Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

In Peru, young college students have leading roles in social protest mobilizations even when they seldom belong to political organizations. This study aims to analyze the perception of current politics and its institu-tions among young college students, and to inquire into their interest on relevant events at their surround-ings and into the importance gained by the media and the social networks concerning their information. The purpose of this project is also to examine the role assigned by college students to the university as a space of personal development and reflection. This project was carried out in Lima, Peru, directed to youngsters aged 17 to 25 from public and private universities. Opinions have been collected through six focus-groups and a survey applied to more than 400 students. The analysis concludes that college students distrust pro-foundly political parties and formal political organizations; likewise it shows they have a broad access to information sources, so as their willingness to solve Peru’s problematic issues. It also uncovers clear differ-ences between students of private and public universities regarding attitudes for participating in political action, inside and outside the campus. From the study stems a proposal to provide young students at their campuses with opportunities to debate public issues of national and global interest as a part of their overall academic training.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Influenced by the Córdoba Manifesto, Peruvian universities opened their doors to student participation and academic freedom and acquired greater autonomy in their management in the early decades of the twentieth century (Carrion, 2002). Subsequently, during the decades of 1960 and 1970, population growth, massive dislocation of rural population to the cities, and the emerging industrial development helped create a greater demand for education (Lynch, 1990). The legislature enacted Law No. 882 in 1996 that allowed the establishment of private universities as profit organizations. Thus, new private universities have been consolidated, now numbering 91 (INEI, n.d), and that these organizations overlook the role of research pertaining to the intellectual endeavor by prioritizing the training of professionals for their role in field work, (Benavides, León, Haag, & Cave, 2015). In contrast, only 51 universities belong to the public sector. Topics of discussion are massification, lack of research, and problems with management (Lynch, 2006). In light of this situation, it seems only reasonable that the concerns of the students focus on establishing a better administration for the services they receive in order to secure their professional future.

We began our study in the year 2015, which was a time of political effervescence. Protests led by young people of various groups and the opposition of the university student organizations against Law 30288 of 2014, which introduced a new regime detrimental to18–24-year-old freshmen workers stand out as antecedents (Fernández-Maldonado, 2015). Another factor defining the political environment was the announcement of general elections (presidential and congressional) in April 2016. In Peru, voting is mandatory, and one can join the Congress at age 25. According to the First National Survey of the Peruvian Youth, 1665 people have been elected as local and regional authorities at a national level. A significant fact about the connection between university and politics is that out of the 130 recently elected members of Congress, only 104 hold a university degree (National Elections, 2016).

1.1. Conceptual assumptions

The concept of citizenship refers to a set of institutions, obligations, and social practices (Soysal, 2010). Therefore, in the framework of corporate social responsibility, universities must encourage students to gain knowledge and pursue research on issues relevant to national and international arenas, such as world poverty and climate change, and should encourage the participation of young people in the matters of public interest (Gasca-Pliego & Olvera-Garcia, 2011).

Various studies suggest the role of the Internet and social networks in the protests involving young people, attributing a determining role to social networks because they would be “the only way in which these generations can control governments and institutions. Through them, they can discuss, organize and mobilize” (Yuste, 2015: 186). A “digital citizenship” can “provide political, social, and cultural experiences of action, communication, reflection, and creation, unpublished…” (Natal, Benítez, & Ortiz, 2014: 9-10). However, others belittle the civic engagement of young citizens by saying that “there is a need for other preconditions of awareness and triggers to engage in committed public practices” (Padilla-de-la-Torre, 2014: 9). An intensive use of social networks, especially Facebook, does not necessarily correspond to a greater exposure to political information; nevertheless, more in-depth studies need to be conducted on the search for political information using digital platforms (Ohme, Albaek, & de-Vreese, 2016).

Regarding the problems that concern youth today, young people transcend their class status and connect with various, wider interests related to both personal experiences as well as worldviews and their broad access to mass media: “When groups of young people employ alternative concepts of race, youth, women, nature, democracy, citizenship, justice, which question and confront dominant cultural meanings, they are pursuing cultural policy” (Delgado-Salazar & Arias-Herrera, 2011: 293).

Youth organization or mobilizations’ power of transformation is “not in creating a change in society through the modification of the law but in generating new dynamics of coexistence and relationships through the intervention at a micro level. It is precisely here, for us, that lies their renewed citizen dimension” (Delgado-Salazar & Arias-Herrera, 2011: 294). Politics include every day as well as cultural interests.

2. Material and methods

This article has its origin in the project “Young People and Politics: A Case Study on the University Students from Lima” that, sponsored by the Institute of Scientific Research of the University of Lima, was carried out between April 2015 and March 2016. It was a non-experimental joint research under exploratory and descriptive approaches.

The perception of young university students on the policies and institutions as well as the use of media and digital networks for obtaining information on the subject is determined objectively as well as subjectively. Their study requires a descriptive and an exploratory approach. The qualitative methodology allows in-depth investigations on perceptions, motivations, impediments, conceptualizations, fears, profound reasons, and ratings, while the quantitative concerns knowledge, preferences, habits, and customs. Complementing one approach with the other allows an integral vision of the relevant phenomenon.

Initially, a qualitative study was conducted with the group dynamics technique to confirm the variables of the survey. A pilot focus group was formed by three universities with two categories of university students (independent and uninterested), belonging to humanities and sciences, and with, at least, two years of study. This stage of the investigation allowed the determination of those variables that have a decisive influence on the relation between politics, academics, media, and networks. Subsequently, six mixed group dynamics (men and women) were conducted, three with students from public universities and three with students from private universities by employing a manual of flexible guidelines; all students were between the ages of 17 and 25 years. Next, the dimensions considering the variables were determined, and the indicators that would allow measuring these dimensions were defined. As stated, these indicators were assembled in a structured questionnaire that was administered to 20 young people with similar characteristics to the study’s objective.

The survey was conducted between November 23rd and December 3rd of 2015, to a statistical sample of 403 university students in Metropolitan Lima who met the characteristics of the target group of the study. The non-probability for convenience procedure was applied, intercepting students at the university entrances on different days and times. We verified the collected information and ensured the correct application of the questionnaires with the help of a team of supervisors, who satisfactorily fulfilled their role.

Afterward, 100% of applied questionnaires were reviewed to detect systematic errors and omissions that are inevitable in this type of application.

After the lifting of codes of the open questions, the code book was elaborated, and we proceeded with the encoding. All the information was digitized for processing and organization in statistical tables using SPSS, version 23.0.

3. Analysis and results

The results were obtained by analyzing the focus groups and the survey. Three main topics were considered: (a) University and politics; (b) mass media, and (c) participation. A fourth topic concepts and discourses will be reported in a future article.

Of the respondents, 68% belong to private universities and 32% to public universities, which represents the universe of universities according to official data (INEI, s.f./ b & c); Benavides, León, Haag, & Cave, 2015). Of the total number of university students surveyed, 65% corresponds to those interested in politics, although they are independent; 20% are disinterested in politics, and 15% are affiliated with a political party or group.

3.1. University students: Interested in politics and the future of the country?

Despite the estrangement from politics displayed by the university students, they consider that studying provides them with knowledge of reality and that every student must commit to being a good citizen (97.1%) and must be concerned with the nation’s problems (95.8%).

The students from the public universities are aware of their privilege because they have access to free university studies provided by the State. They have an advantage over those who do not enjoy this benefit, and this obliges them to remunerate the country with the fruits of their knowledge: “The student from a national university has a greater responsibility, such as giving back to the country what has been invested in their education because practically, Peru is educating us” (disinterested, public university [hereinafter public U]). Nevertheless, there is no clarity regarding the opportunities or the ways to give back: “We belong to public universities, our role in society is to contribute to the improvement of the country with what we can do in our different areas” (organized, public U.); “Not only have I entered the university to study but to contribute to my university and fight for my rights and those of others” (independent, public U.). While the independent and organized students express a more direct will to immediately contribute to the national policy and toward a more developed country through controls and social and personal responsibility, the uninterested are more skeptical about the effectiveness of their participation.

The students from private universities manifest their concerns about the relevant issues of the country, but they prioritize their professional training: “University teaches us to be more educated, to learn more about life, also about the country. It will make us professionals who can assist the country” (independent, private university [hereinafter private U]); “We are upcoming professionals who will generate profits for Peru in the future” (uninterested, private U.).

3.2. Should universities promote political debate?

For young people, the university should be a place for studying and learning to express their views freely, organizing debates (92.1%), and participating in political activities (84.9%). A smaller percentage states that universities should authorize political activities inside their campuses (52.4%). The organized and independent students from public and private universities approved the various forms of political activity if they related to the vindication of their rights as students, the defense of academic interests, and the control of the behavior of their authorities. Furthermore, they considered debates and talks appropriate but did not feel organizations regarding political parties to be intrinsic to the university life. The uninterested wanted peace and tranquility at the university because politics could distract them from their academic goals; they did not agree with the promotion of debates at the university, despite admitting that the problems of the country were not unrelated to the student life.

Most agreed that political participation within the university occurred through the student representatives as intermediaries to the authorities: “If one wants to make a claim, the entire student body cannot go and complain; there must be representatives of the faculty, in a way that is politics” (uninterested, public U). It is a topic of greater concerns to those of public universities. In some for-profit private universities, there is no student participation at all in the governing body.

3.3. Is mass media a platform for university students to learn about public affairs?

The media occupy a menacing place in the life of the university students. They argue that these media exert much influence on public opinion (97.2%), although they may not provide a clear picture of what is important for the country (only 68.1%). The independent students and students uninterested in politics exhibit greater doubts about the quality of information than organized students. All students agree that the information the media provide contributes directly to their perception of the country but criticize the performance of these platforms. The organized students from public and private universities are incisive: they research more about politics and identify the business nature of the media and their connection with power and corruption. “Most media are linked to a political party because the media has enormous power over public opinion, and it can be considered that media themselves constitute a power” (organized, public U.). They display a disposition not only to learn but also to understand politics.

While these students also constantly and sustainedly use media, they express their distrust too; they do not immediately identify with a particular opinion. They review various sources: “I do not rely on a single source, I learn from different ones, and from there, I make my opinion” (uninterested, public U.). “To know what’s going on, one cannot rely on one article or two; different media must be used” (organized, public U.).

3.4. Which media is preferred by students for learning about political affairs?

Television is the medium most widely used, followed by the Internet, the newspapers, and the radio. The students from public universities read newspapers and listen to the radio more than those from private universities (Table 1). Additionally, the former exhibits greater interest and are more active browsing for information than the latter; they also consult more sources.

The consumption of all media by organized students from public and private universities is above the average level, and this comparison of sources empowers them to build their informative ideas on public affairs. For their part, the students from public universities seek more information, denoting higher interest in general matters. The uninterested students from private universities pay attention to news that affects their daily lives: “While I do my things, I turn on the news, and they talk about politics, accidents; what catches my attention is the lack of security in the country; I listen to be forewarned lest something happens to me. One must be updated on the modalities of theft to foresee potential danger” (uninterested, private U.).

The accessibility, timeliness, and immediacy associated with the Internet express a pragmatic assessment of that technological environment, but it is powered with the scarce seriousness attached to it.


Cano-Correa et al 2017a-62669-en025.jpg

University students, in general, appreciate more the opportunity to have access to the information promptly than the possibility of issuing information. The organized appreciate the opportunity to comment, while the uninterested enjoy the variety and entertainment.

The extreme dynamism of the networks facilitates the consumption of media on the various platforms. Thus, for example, students access journals through their mobile phones. “I visit the websites of newspapers and television channels; thanks to technology, it is not necessary to wait for the following day. The Internet is everything now, and social networks give you the option to comment” (independent, public U.). They can access these media at any place: “In your phone, you have it so fast, you can browse the information while in your car; it is more portable. On the contrary, to view the information on the television you must be in your home or at a restaurant” (independent, private U.).

Young people use networks to communicate, learn, and participate. They value the possibility of expressing their opinions and recognize other qualities such as the absence of censorship and the option of considering different viewpoints. While the organized students think networks can convoke, allow you to have a say, be democratic, and contribute to politics, the independent find the networks’ immediacy in news availability helpful for political participation. For the uninterested students, networks matter less in relation to politics. It should be noted that they all have knowledge of the networks and a vast experience in their everyday life, but they manifest distrust about the veracity of the available information.

Although there is no absolute credibility assigned to the networks, students appreciate their open nature: “Everyone can make their voices heard. If social networks did not exist, only the people with power in the media would be heard. Due to the networks, us or less-renowned people, with few resources to participate in the media, can also express their opinion” (uninterested, private U.); “I don’t trust much in the Internet media; they can share news that can be deleted instantly, because on the Internet anyone can upload information which he or she believes or thinks and that is not necessarily correct in terms of the truthfulness or facts” (independent, private U.); “Many debates are generated on Twitter, on Facebook; you realize that your opinion may be valid, but you see that the view of another person is also valid, and from there, you can discern more clearly” (organized, public U.).

When asked, more than 50% of the students pointed out that social networks were useful for organizing and convening people and learning to express oneself freely. However, they resort to the face-to-face interaction to discuss politics with their parents and relatives (74.8%), with friends and colleagues (66.9%) and with professors (33%). The political debates on social networks garner fewer results (17.7%). Moreover, the students from public universities (23.8%) interact much more than those of private universities (14.9%).


Cano-Correa et al 2017a-62669-en026.jpg

It is surprising that while university students unanimously recognized that social networks enabled the horizontal communication and the democratization of opinion, they did not see themselves as protagonists, and rather, their practices are fundamentally linked to consumption of social networks.

3.5. Mobilization and participation of university students in public affairs

Students agree that protests are a legitimate right of expression (94%) if they occur without violence or generate disturbances affecting the city and citizens. They point out that the protests are an expression of dissatisfaction with the ineffectiveness of the Government: “It is a right of every citizen to protest, but the State should not expect that the population reaches to that point; it is because you are not being heard” (independent, private U.). Moreover, they state that they would protest for the unresolved issues of the country, such as the defense of human rights, abortion, and the need for greater investment in education and sport.

They argue that the protests of the youth are always against any injustice (84.1%) and that it is a civil right to take it to the streets to protest (88.9%). They disagree with the idea that protests are a waste of time (85.3%) and assert that the function of protests is to make known to all the country what is happening (87%) as well as be acts of freedom of expression (94%).

There are gross differences between the students from private and public universities about the direction of the protests. The topic is sensitive among the students from private universities who are resistant to direct political intervention: “they create much disturbance, and the truth is that sometimes they make noise and cause problems on the streets, they even fight” (disinterested, private U.). They also point out that protests are meritorious although they do not completely agree about their necessity. “They use force to be heard, and I do not believe that this is the way, but ultimately, it is a form of expression” (organized, U. private).

Everybody would protest about issues related to student and labor benefits or that affect them personally: “Protests create a current of opinion because people are being informed when watching; they raise awareness for participation and about the need to defend your rights” (independent, public U.). In the face of this comprehensive position, it is surprising why the surveyed students declared such scarce active participation: the majority has not participated in protests (87%), while only 10.1% participates sometimes. The organized students from public universities are the ones who participate the most.


Cano-Correa et al 2017a-62669-en027.jpg

3.6. About what do the university students worry?

The topics of interest identified in the focus groups, some of which resulted in street protests, are displayed in Table 3.

More or less, these are the issues that attract the attention of the students. The public university and the organized students display higher interest in the lack of civil security, university laws, TV trash, and discrimination. The defense of the environment is of more interest to the students from public universities and less to those from the private. Corruption, labor law, law of universities, abortion and death penalty are of most interest to the organized and public university students.

The independents express and comment, with interest and expectation, on more prominent topics. The majority states having protested for the defense of animals (57.1%), followed by for the defense of human rights and the environment and against racial discrimination and the death penalty. The public university and organized students mention having participated in actions against corruption as well as against TV trash, lack of public security, university laws, and civil union. The organized students have protested more for the abovementioned topics. They also agree on theater, dance, and collective actions on the street being effective forms of political expression (71.6%); the uninterested join these activities in a significantly lower percentage.

4. Discussion and conclusions

The widespread discredit of political institutions in Peru, the proximity of the national elections, and some successful protests promoted by the youth with the support of the media and social networks (Fernández-Maldonado, 2015) form the context that helps in understanding the findings of this study.

In Lima, the university students express interest in politics though the number of those who decide to organize themselves into political parties or groups is small; this is a time of great disrepute of politics, not only in Peru but also in the world. There is a detachment from the traditional parties, although that does not mean distance from public affairs and new political ideas (Aguilar, 2011; Padilla-de-la-Torre, 2015; Reguillo, 2000; Krauskopf, 1998). While all students are interested in the problems of the country, for the private university and uninterested students, it is a future commitment, postponed for when they belong to the working class. Public university, organized, and independent students observe the current situation with more attention than their private university and uninterested counterparts, and they feel more immediately and directly committed because they acknowledge their indebtedness to the country for the free education they receive. It is worth highlighting that both public and private university students recognize their privileged status because they possess knowledge and information, which leads them to affirm their commitment to be good students.

All students express a fear of the violence that political protests can generate in public spaces. The students from private universities are more concerned than others because they fear the disorder would disrupt their academics. The years of political violence in the country and the constant emphasis on the media and politicians on their effects on economic growth are possible causes of these fears.

There are no unanimous views on the scope that political activities should have in the university. This is adopted by the organized students and occurs in public universities, wherein internal corruption is dealt with daily, and many shortages and the lack of security explain the students’ interest in addressing these issues. On the contrary, private university and uninterested students are skeptical. This attitude can be explained in the case of private universities through the existence of organizational and business models that do not demand the involvement of students in their management. Thus, the lack of political activity in the private universities has its roots not in the indifference of the youth but in institutional policies because the universities themselves are restricting the participation of the students, slowing down their deliberative and propositional capacity (Sota, 2002).

The university students of Lima have an ongoing relationship with the media. They are the students’ primary source of information, but the students have critical opinions that lead them to distrust and find supplementary sources. This search drives them to confront sources and endorses the information in other media, enlarge it, and to seek other opinions (Catalina-García, García-Jiménez, & Montes-Vozmediano, 2015: 601-619; Yuste, 2015). They also use their relationships and familiar and fraternal interactions (Castells 2007: 381). They recognize the power of the media in daily information, though they question the quality because of their personal interests, an aspect particularly highlighted by the organized students. Television is the medium most used for collecting information, while the other media are consumed through various screens and platforms. In this regard, agreeing with García-Avilés and others (2014), it was noted that the journalistic enterprises are still reliable because in all cases, diaries were mentioned. The amount of consumption and the critical attitude of the organized students is notorious.

Although there is much access to digital media, there is an underutilization of social networks, which reflects on the low percentage of students who begin to build autonomy through these (Castells, 2007). In general, the majority reproduces, against digital media, the attitude they have towards traditional media; however, they do not interact and limit themselves to follow, comment, or exchange information with their immediate peers, even though they recognize these media for their interactive potential. This is in contrast to what is discovered in other contexts, such as in Madrid, Tunisia or Egypt, where the questioning of the traditional vertical sources leads to searching for alternative sources, horizontal and interactive construction of community, and participation with greater autonomy, oriented towards political change (Castells, 2007; Almansa-Martínez, 2016). In the case of this study, the mere use of social networks does not produce nor manage protests. Only the organized students prove to be effective in this regard, noticeable in the organization of some protests through these networks.

There is a disposition and sensitivity to new global issues such as the environment, discrimination, gender debates, and civil union, though they do not necessarily express a reflexive attitude. Among the organized students, corruption and the lack of security for citizens mobilize their interests with a political emphasis; this is why it is possible to affirm that their participation in some protests allow them to activate their emotions and connect with other individuals, i.e., to move to a collective and effective experience (Castells, 2015; Quiroz, 2011).

The independent students form the most extensive group in the investigation. This is an interested section that fluctuates between confusion, interest, and fear but has a great potential that can be channeled not only by political institutions but also by the universities themselves. The concern for the problems of the country constitutes an opportunity for the university to capitalize the potential of its students, generating spaces for debate, a teaching pedagogy, and “a methodology that encourages curiosity, inquiry, cooperation” (Agudelo, 2015; Martínez, Silva, & Hernández, 2010), and also enables the formation of autonomous political proposals.

It was noted that issues encompassing the society, culture, and fields closest to their everyday concerns that interest the students, although they are not expressly political or permanently committed to political causes (Montoya, 2003; Alvarado, Ospina, Botero, & Muñoz, 2008). A small section mobilizes, but due to the actions’ sporadic nature, they do not necessarily imply a commitment on the students’ part.

The results set the ground for future research that can help establish a more accurate picture about the disposition of the university students toward political affairs. However, it is essential to discern between the position of men and that of women, now that the representation of women in international politics is increasing, such as Angela Merkel, Dilma Rousseff, Cristina Kirschner; in Peru, the Congress President, Luz Salgado; the vice president of the Republic, Mercedes Araoz, and other leaders are pointing out that there is a growing interest of women in exercising political leadership.

From another study perspective, with qualitative techniques, we could inquire about the relationship between the specialty (science or humanities) and the university students’ perception of political affairs.

The present study was limited to the city of Lima, Peru’s capital, a city in which the greatest amount of national resources are concentrated, both regarding infrastructure as well as services. This centralism is particularly in the field of education (López, 2005; Cuenca, 2015), engendering the necessity to clarify whether this situation of inequality has a correlation with the political practices of the university students in the other regions of Peru.

Authors such as López (2005) emphasize the role of the family in education, which sometimes conflicts with the school. One aspect that we have considered in this study is the role played by the family in the political convictions of young people, and how the university is configured as a catalyst for the previously acquired ideologies.

About the methods of inquiry, the stories of life constitute a convenient resource for exploring in depth the beliefs and motivations of the subjects.

The interest in conducting this research aligns with other studies in Latin America, and the similarity found among the results allows us to conclude that the need for the university, in response to the criticism of the students concerning politics, is to create a space for deliberation and public action, as part of the integral formation of the student body.

Funding Agency

The research project “Young people and politics: Study on the university students of Lima” was funded by the University of Lima (PI. 55,008.2015).

References

Agudelo, Z. (2015). Formación política en la universidad de Antioquia y su incidencia en las percepciones de los estudiantes de pregrado sobre la negociación del conflicto armado colombiano. Revista CES Derecho, 6(1), 58-78.

Aguilar, J. (2011). Revisión del concepto de juventud y su relación con el mundo de la política. Estudios Políticos, Documento de trabajo, nº 3. Universidad de Guanajuato. (https://goo.gl/bm1N6R) (2015-05-05).

Almansa-Martínez, A. (2016). Estudio sobre la participación de estudiantes universitarios en la vida política. Opción, 32(7). Número especial, 39-54.

Alvarado, S.V., Ospina, H.F., Botero, P., & Muñoz, G. (2008). Las tramas de la subjetividad política y los desafíos a la formación ciudadana en jóvenes. Revista Argentina de Sociología, 6(11), 19-43. (https://goo.gl/Erie2X) (2015-05-05).

Benavides, M., León, J., Haag, F., & Cueva, S. (2015). Expansión y diversificación de la educación superior universitaria y su relación con la desigualdad y la segregación. Lima: Grupo de Análisis para el Desarrollo. (https://goo.gl/9vfQu8) (2015-04-20).

Carrión, R. (2002). Universidad, conocimiento y autonomía. In C. Aljovín-de-Losada y C. Germaná-Cavero (Eds.). La Universidad en el Perú (versión PDF) (pp. 35-47). Lima: Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. (https://goo.gl/xBnbos) (2015-04-27).

Castells, M. (2007). Comunicación móvil y sociedad. Barcelona: Ariel. Fundación Telefónica.

Castells, M. (2015). Redes de indignación y esperanza (2015). Madrid: Alianza.

Catalina-García, B., García-Jiménez, A., & Montes-Vozmediano, M. (2015). Jóvenes y consumo de noticias a través de Internet y los medios sociales. Historia y Comunicación Social, 20(2), 601-619. (https://goo.gl/iEWKSY) (2015-07-19). Cuenca, R. (Ed.). (2015). La educación universitaria en el Perú: Democracia, expansión y desigualdades (1ª edición). Lima: IEP. (https://goo.gl/Tvvlss) (2015-04-20).

Decreto Legislativo, nº 882. Ley de Promoción de la Inversión en la Educación (8 de noviembre de 1996). Suplemento de Normas Legales del diario oficial El Peruano. (https://goo.gl/l6nCVU) (2015-03-19).

Delgado-Salazar, R., & Arias-Herrera, J. C. (2008). La acción colectiva de los jóvenes y la construcción de ciudadanía. Revista Argentina de Sociología, 6(11). (https://goo.gl/aG3RL0) (2015-05-20).

Fernández-Maldonado, E. (2015). La rebelión de los pulpines. Jóvenes, trabajo y política. Lima: Otra Mirada.

García-Avilés, J.A., Navarro-Maillo, F., & Arias-Robles, F. (2014). La credibilidad de los contenidos informa-tivos en Internet para los ‘nativos digitales’: estudio de caso. Palabra Clave, 17(3), 875-894. (https://goo.gl/zMxQQq) (2015-07-19).

Gasca-Pliego, E., & Olvera-García, J.C. (2011). Construir ciudadanía desde las universidades, responsabi-lidad social universitaria y desafíos ante el siglo XXI. Convergencia, (56), 37-58. (https://goo.gl/sb7rnu) (2015-07-19).

INEI (s.f./a). Número de universidades públicas y privadas 1980-2014. (https://goo.gl/Jud4Bo) (2015-03-12).

INEI (s.f./b). Número de alumnos matriculados en universidades privadas 2004-2013. (https://goo.gl/Jud4Bo) (2015-03-12).

INEI (s.f./c). Número de alumnos matriculados en universidades públicas 2004-2013. (https://goo.gl/Jud4Bo) (2015-03-12).

Jurado Nacional de Elecciones (2016). Consulta de autoridades nacionales, regionales y municipales. (https://goo.gl/f8yJOd) (2015-03-12).

Krauskopf, D. (1998). Dimensiones críticas en la participación social de las juventudes. En Participación y desarrollo social en la adolescencia (pp. 119-134). San José: Fondo de Población de Naciones Unidas. (https://goo.gl/Skkf2G) (2015-05-20).

Lobos, M. (2014). La influencia de las organizaciones políticas universitarias en la formación de élites polí-ticas en Chile: el caso de las federaciones de estudiantes de la Universidad de Chile y Universidad Católica 1984- 2005. Política, 52(2), 157-183 (https://goo.gl/vAB0jJ) (2015-06-06).

López, N. (2005). Equidad educativa y desigualdad social. Desafíos de la educación en el nuevo escenario latinoamericano. (https://goo.gl/M3d8rT) (2015-06-06).

Lynch, N. (1990). Los jóvenes rojos de San Marcos. El radicalismo universitario de los años setenta. Lima: El Zorro de Abajo Ediciones.

Lynch, N. (2006). La universidad en el Perú. Razones para una reforma universitaria. Informe 2006. Lima: Ministerio de Educación. (https://goo.gl/lwUfZu) (2015-06-06).

Martínez, M.L., Silva, C., & Hernández, A. (2010). ¿En qué ciudadanía creen los jóvenes? Creencias, aspira-ciones de ciudadanía y motivaciones para la participación sociopolítica. Psykhe, 19(2), 25-37.

Ministerio de Educación, Secretaría Nacional de la Juventud. (2012). Perú: resultados finales de la Primera Encuesta Nacional de la Juventud 2011 (versión PDF). Lima: Senaju. (https://goo.gl/hHjTms) (2015-03-12).

Montoya, L.W. (2003). Poder, jóvenes y ciencias sociales en el Perú. Última década, 11(18), 21-68. (https://goo.gl/EykiYR) (2015-03-19).

Natal, A., Benítez, M., & Ortiz, G. (Coords.) (2014). Ciudadanía digital. México: UAM.

Ohme, J., Albaek, E., & de-Vreese, C. H. (2016). Exposure Research Going Mobile: A Smartphone-Based Measurement of Media Exposure to Political Information in a Convergent Media Environment, Communica-tion Methods and Measures, 10(2-3), 135-148, https://org.doi: 10.1080/19312458.2016.1150972

Padilla-de-la-Torre, M.R. (2014). Ciudadanía política en la red. Análisis de las prácticas políticas entre jóvenes universitarios. Comunicación y Sociedad, 21, 71-100. (https://goo.gl/hmgzoG) (2015-05-20).

Quiroz, M.T. (2011). La televisión: vista, oída y leída por adolescentes peruanos. [Television: Seen, Heard and Read by Peruvian Adolescents]. Comunicar, 36, 35-41. https://doi.org/10.3916/C36-2011-02-03

Reguillo R. (2000). Emergencia de culturas juveniles: estrategias del desencanto. Bogotá: Norma. (https://goo.gl/pFwWsY) (2015-10-10).

Sota, J. (2002). Diagnóstico de la universidad peruana: razones para una nueva reforma universitaria. Lima: Comisión Nacional por la Segunda Reforma Universitaria. (https://goo.gl/JW0kX4) (2015-04-27).

Soysal, Y., Baubock, R., & Bosniak, L. (2010). Ciudadanía sin nación. Bogotá: Siglo del Hombre Editores/Universidad de los Andes/Pontificia Universidad Javeriana.

Yuste, B. (2015). Las nuevas formas de consumir información de los jóvenes. Revista de estudios de juventud, (108), 179-191. (https://goo.gl/IO5Gjo) (2015-10-10).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

En el Perú, los jóvenes universitarios son protagonistas de movilizaciones de protesta social aun cuando es escasa su pertenencia a organizaciones políticas. Esta investigación tiene como objetivos analizar la per-cepción que tienen los jóvenes universitarios limeños sobre la política y sus instituciones e indagar acerca de su interés por los sucesos relevantes de su entorno y la importancia que adquieren los medios de co-municación y las redes digitales para su información. El trabajo también se propuso examinar el rol que los universitarios le asignan a la universidad como espacio de formación y reflexión. El estudio se realiza en Lima, Perú, con jóvenes de 17 a 25 años, de universidades públicas y privadas. Las opiniones se recogen en seis grupos focales y una encuesta aplicada a más de 400 estudiantes. El análisis concluye que los universitarios desconfían profundamente de los partidos políticos y las organizaciones políticas formales; asimismo, se evidencia que gozan de amplio acceso a fuentes de información y están dispuestos a contri-buir a la solución de los problemas que aquejan a su país. El estudio desvela diferencias marcadas entre estudiantes de universidades públicas y privadas en su disposición para participar en actividades políticas, dentro y fuera del ámbito universitario. La investigación propone que la universidad ofrezca a los jóvenes oportunidades para el debate de los asuntos públicos de interés nacional y global en su formación integral.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

En las primeras décadas del siglo XX, y por influencia del Manifiesto de Córdoba, la universidad peruana se abre a la participación de los alumnos y a la libertad de cátedra, y adquiere mayor autonomía en su gestión (Carrión, 2002). Posteriormente, en las décadas de 1960 y 1970, el crecimiento demográfico, el desplazamiento masivo de la población rural hacia las ciudades y el incipiente desarrollo industrial, crean las condiciones para una mayor demanda educativa (Lynch, 1990). En 1996 se promulga el Decreto Legislativo N.° 882 (1996), que permite la constitución de universidades privadas con fines de lucro. Así, aparecen nuevas universidades privadas, que actualmente suman 91 (INEI, s.f./a) y que, al priorizar la formación de profesionales para su inserción en el campo laboral, descuidan el rol investigativo propio del quehacer intelectual (Benavides, León, Haag, & Cueva, 2015). Frente a estas se ubican únicamente 51 universidades públicas. Se menciona la masificación, la escasez de investigación y los problemas de gestión, entre otros (Lynch, 2006). Ante este panorama, parece razonable que las preocupaciones de los estudiantes se enfoquen en conseguir una mejor administración de los servicios que reciben, en la perspectiva de su futuro profesional.

La investigación, que emprendimos en el año 2015, se situó en una época de efervescencia política. Como antecedente inmediato destacan las marchas protagonizadas por jóvenes de diversos colectivos, así como el nivel organizativo de los universitarios en el rechazo a la Ley 30288 del 2014, que establecía un régimen perjudicial para los trabajadores de 18 a 24 años ingresantes al campo laboral (Fernández-Maldonado, 2015).

Otro factor que definió el ambiente político fue la convocatoria a elecciones generales (presidenciales y congresales) para abril del 2016. En el Perú, el voto es obligatorio y se puede acceder al Congreso a los 25 años. Según la Primera Encuesta Nacional de la Juventud Peruana, 1.665 jóvenes han sido elegidos como autoridades regionales y locales en el ámbito nacional. En cuanto a la vinculación entre universidad y política, un dato significativo es que de los 130 congresistas recientemente elegidos, 104 tienen título universitario y 26 no (Jurado Nacional de Elecciones, 2016).

1.1. Presupuestos conceptuales

El concepto de ciudadanía remite a un conjunto de instituciones, obligaciones y prácticas sociales (Soysal, 2010). Por lo tanto, en el marco de la responsabilidad social, las universidades deben promover el interés de los estudiantes en el conocimiento e investigación de temas relevantes del ámbito nacional e internacional, como la pobreza en el mundo y el cambio climático, y deben motivar la participación de los jóvenes en los asuntos de interés público (Gasca-Pliego & Olvera-García, 2011).

Diversos estudios plantean la incidencia de Internet y las redes sociales en las movilizaciones que tienen como protagonistas a los jóvenes, atribuyendo a las redes sociales un rol determinante, pues serían «la única vía para que estas generaciones puedan controlar a gobiernos e instituciones. Por medio de ellas pueden debatir, organizarse en red y movilizarse» (Yuste, 2015: 186). Una «ciudadanía digital» puede «brindar experiencias políticas, sociales y culturales de acción, comunicación, reflexión y creación, inéditas…» (Natal, Benítez, & Ortiz, 2014: 9-10).

Sin embargo, otros relativizan la participación ciudadana de los jóvenes señalando que «se requieren otras condiciones previas de concientización y detonantes para que se integren a prácticas públicas comprometidas» (Padilla-de-la-Torre, 2014: 9). El uso intensivo de las redes sociales, particularmente de Facebook, no se corresponde necesariamente con una mayor exposición a información política; no obstante, se requieren estudios más exhaustivos sobre el uso de las plataformas digitales para la búsqueda de información política (Ohme, Albaek, & de-Vreese, 2016).

En cuanto a los problemas que les preocupan actualmente, los jóvenes trascienden su condición de clase y adscriben diversos intereses de naturaleza más amplia, que pueden estar relacionados con vivencias personales, pero también con visiones del mundo y con su amplio acceso a los medios de comunicación: «cuando los colectivos de jóvenes despliegan conceptos alternativos de: raza, juventud, mujer, naturaleza, democracia, ciudadanía, justicia, que interpelan y confrontan significados culturales dominantes están poniendo en curso una política cultural» (Delgado-Salazar & Arias-Herrera, 2011: 293).

La potencia de transformación de las organizaciones o movilizaciones juveniles está «no en la generación de un cambio de la sociedad en general por medio de la modificación de la ley, sino en la generación de nuevas dinámicas de convivencia y relación a través de la intervención de lo micro. Precisamente aquí radica, para nosotros, su renovada dimensión ciudadana» (Delgado-Salazar & Arias-Herrera, 2011: 294). La política se abre a intereses cotidianos y culturales.

2. Material y métodos

Este artículo tiene su origen en el proyecto «Jóvenes y política. Estudio sobre los universitarios limeños» que, auspiciado por el Instituto de Investigación Científica de la Universidad de Lima, se ejecutó entre abril de 2015 y marzo de 2016. Se trató de una investigación mixta, de tipo no experimental bajo los enfoques exploratorio y descriptivo.

La percepción que tienen los jóvenes universitarios sobre la política y sus instituciones, así como el uso que realizan de medios de comunicación y redes digitales para informarse sobre el tema se determina a partir de aspectos objetivos y subjetivos. Su estudio requiere un enfoque exploratorio y uno descriptivo. La metodología cualitativa permite indagar en profundidad acerca de percepciones, motivaciones, frenos, conceptualizaciones, temores, razones profundas y valoraciones; mientras que la cuantitativa acerca de conocimientos, preferencias, hábitos y costumbres. La complementación de ambas permite una visión integral del fenómeno.

Inicialmente se hizo un estudio cualitativo con la técnica de dinámica de grupos para confirmar las variables. Se realizó un grupo focal piloto, con dos categorías de universitarios (independientes y desinteresados), de humanidades y ciencias, con al menos dos años de carrera, de tres universidades. Esta etapa de la investigación permitió determinar aquellas variables que influyen de manera decisiva en la relación entre política, universitarios, medios y redes. Posteriormente se realizaron las seis dinámicas grupales mixtas (hombres y mujeres), tres con estudiantes de universidades públicas y tres con estudiantes de universidades privadas, de 17 a 25 años, mediante el empleo de una guía de pautas flexible. Seguidamente se determinaron las dimensiones que considerarían las variables y se definieron los indicadores que permitirían medir estas dimensiones que, como enunciados, dieron lugar a un cuestionario estructurado y sometido a validación con veinte jóvenes de similares características al universo de estudio.

La encuesta se realizó entre el 23 de noviembre y el 3 de diciembre de 2015, a una muestra estadística constituida por 403 jóvenes universitarios de Lima Metropolitana, que cumplieron las características del grupo objetivo del estudio. Se aplicó el procedimiento de muestreo no probabilístico por conveniencia, mediante la modalidad de intercepción, a la salida de las universidades, en diferentes días y horarios. Para la verificación de la información recolectada y la correcta aplicación de los cuestionarios se contó con la participación de un equipo de supervisores que de forma coincidente realizaron su labor.

Posteriormente, se procedió a la revisión del 100% de cuestionarios aplicados con la finalidad de detectar omisiones y errores sistemáticos que, eventualmente, se presentan en este tipo de aplicación.

Luego del levantamiento de códigos de las preguntas abiertas se elaboró el libro de códigos y se procedió a la codificación. Toda la información fue digitalizada para su procesamiento y organización en cuadros estadísticos con el SPSS, versión 23.0.

3. Análisis y resultados

Los resultados provienen del análisis de los grupos focales y de la encuesta. Se trabajaron tres ejes: a) Universidad y política; b) Medios de comunicación; c) Participación. Un cuarto eje: Conceptos y discursos, será reportado en un artículo posterior.

El 68% de los encuestados pertenece a universidades privadas y el 32% a universidades públicas, relación que representa el universo de universidades según datos oficiales (INEI, s.f.; Benavides, León, Haag, & Cueva, 2015). De la totalidad de jóvenes universitarios encuestados, un 65% corresponde a los interesados en política, aunque son independientes, un 20% está constituido por aquellos desinteresados en la política y un 15% resulta de los organizados en un partido político o colectivo.

3.1. Los universitarios: ¿interesados por la política y los destinos del país?

A pesar del distanciamiento que muestran los jóvenes universitarios frente a la política, consideran que los estudios les permiten un conocimiento de la realidad y que todo universitario debe comprometerse a ser un buen estudiante (97,1%) y debe preocuparse por los problemas del país (95,8%).

Los jóvenes de las universidades públicas saben que viven una situación de privilegio por tener acceso a los estudios universitarios gratuitos que el Estado les brinda. Están en ventaja frente a los que no gozan de este beneficio y esto les obliga a retribuir al país con el fruto de sus conocimientos: «El estudiante de universidad nacional tiene una mayor responsabilidad, como retribuirle al país lo que se ha invertido en su educación, porque el Perú prácticamente nos está educando a nosotros» (desinteresado, universidad pública, en adelante U. pública). Empero, no hay claridad respecto de la oportunidad o la manera de hacerlo: «Somos de universidades públicas, nuestro rol en la sociedad es contribuir a mejorar el país en lo que podamos hacer, en nuestras diferentes áreas» (organizado, U. pública); «No solamente he entrado en la universidad para estudiar sino para contribuir con mi universidad y luchar por mis derechos y por los de los demás» (independiente, U. pública). Mientras que los independientes y organizados expresan una voluntad más directa de contribuir desde ya con la política nacional y por un país más desarrollado, mediante una fiscalización y responsabilidad social y personal, los desinteresados se muestran más escépticos en cuanto a la eficacia de su participación.

Los alumnos de universidades privadas manifiestan preocupación por los asuntos relevantes del país, pero dando prioridad a su formación profesional: «La universidad nos enseña a ser más educados, a ver más sobre la vida, también sobre el país. Nos va a volver profesionales, para ayudar al país» (independiente, universidad privada, en adelante U. privada); «Somos proyectos de profesionales que vamos a generar en el futuro ganancias para el Perú» (desinteresado, U. privada).

3.2. ¿Debe la universidad propiciar el debate político?

Para los jóvenes, la universidad debería ser un espacio de estudio y aprendizaje para expresar libremente sus opiniones, organizar debates (92,1%) y para la realización de actividades políticas (84,9%). Un número menor afirma que las universidades deberían autorizar actividades políticas en sus instalaciones (52,4%). Los organizados e independientes de universidades públicas y privadas aprueban las diversas formas de actividad política en tanto se relacionen con la reivindicación de sus derechos como estudiantes, la defensa de intereses académicos y la fiscalización del comportamiento de sus autoridades. Consideran oportunos los debates y las charlas pero no que organizarse en partidos políticos sea algo intrínseco a la vida universitaria. Los desinteresados quieren tranquilidad en la universidad porque la política los puede distraer de su objetivo de estudiar; no están de acuerdo en que se promuevan debates en la universidad, pese a que coinciden en que los problemas del país no son ajenos a la vida universitaria.

La mayor parte coincide en que la participación política dentro de la universidad se produce a través de los representantes estudiantiles como intermediarios ante las autoridades: «Si uno quiere hacer un reclamo, no puede ir toda una facultad a reclamar, tiene que haber representantes de facultad, en cierta forma eso es política» (desinteresado, U. pública). Es un tema que preocupa bastante más a los jóvenes de universidades públicas. En algunas universidades privadas con fines de lucro no hay participación estudiantil en los órganos de gobierno.

3.3. ¿Son los medios de comunicación los referentes de los universitarios para informarse sobre los asuntos públicos?

Los medios de comunicación ocupan un lugar gravitante en la vida de los jóvenes universitarios. Sostienen que estos medios ejercen mucha influencia en la opinión pública (97,2%); aunque no ofrezcan un panorama claro de lo que es importante para el país (solo 68,1%). Los independientes y desinteresados en política manifiestan mayores dudas acerca de la calidad de la información. Todos coinciden en que la información que ofrecen contribuye directamente a la percepción que tienen del país, pero critican su desempeño. Los organizados de universidades públicas y privadas son más incisivos, se informan más sobre política e identifican el carácter empresarial de los medios y sus relaciones con el poder y la corrupción: «La mayoría de medios está ligada a un partido político porque el poder que tienen los medios es muy grande en la opinión pública y se puede considerar que los medios son un poder» (organizado, U. pública). Denotan disposición no solamente a informarse, sino también a comprender la política.

Si bien hay un consumo constante y sostenido de los medios, también expresan su desconfianza, no se identifican con ninguno en particular y revisan diversas fuentes: «Yo no le doy a un solo medio la confiabilidad, sino que me informo de distintas fuentes y voy formando mi propia opinión» (desinteresado, U. pública); «Para saber lo que realmente pasa, no puede fiarse de un artículo o dos, tiene que haber distintos medios» (organizado, U. pública).

3.4. ¿A través de qué medios se informan preferentemente sobre asuntos políticos?

La televisión es el medio más utilizado, seguido de Internet, los diarios y la radio. Los jóvenes de universidades públicas leen más diarios y escuchan más la radio que los de las privadas (Tabla 1). Asimismo, los primeros manifiestan mayor interés y son más activos buscando información; consultan más fuentes.


Cano-Correa et al 2017a-62669 ov-es025.jpg

Los jóvenes organizados de universidades públicas y privadas consumen todos los medios por encima del promedio y esta confrontación de fuentes los faculta para construir su propia agenda informativa sobre asuntos públicos. Por su parte, los de universidades públicas buscan más información, denotando una vinculación estrecha con asuntos de interés general. Los desinteresados de universidades privadas prestan atención a noticias que afectan su cotidianidad: «Mientras hago las cosas pongo las noticias y pasan sobre política, accidentes, lo que llama mi atención es la inseguridad del país, estar prevenido si es que me llega a suceder algo. Uno debe estar actualizado en las modalidades de robo, para prevenir» (desinteresado, U. privada).

La facilidad de acceso y la actualidad e inmediatez asociadas a Internet expresan una valoración pragmática de ese entorno tecnológico. Esta se potencia con la escasa seriedad que se le atribuye.

Los universitarios, en general, aprecian más la oportunidad de acceder a información con prontitud que la posibilidad de emitir información. Los organizados aprecian de Internet la posibilidad de opinar, mientras que los desinteresados la variedad y el entretenimiento.

El intenso dinamismo de las redes facilita el consumo de medios en las diversas plataformas. Así, por ejemplo, acceden a los diarios a través del celular, «entro a las webs de los periódicos y de los canales de televisión, gracias a la tecnología no es necesario esperar al día siguiente. Internet lo es todo ahora y las redes sociales te dan opción de comentar» (independiente, U. pública); incluso en cualquier lugar: «en tu celular, lo tienes así de rápido, puedes ver la información en el carro, es más portátil, en cambio, para ver la información por la televisión tienes que estar en tu casa o en un restaurante» (independiente, U. privada).

Los jóvenes usan las redes para comunicarse, informarse y participar. Valoran la posibilidad de opinar y reconocen otras cualidades como la ausencia de censura y la opción de escuchar opiniones diversas. Mientras los organizados piensan que las redes convocan, permiten opinar, son democráticas y contribuyen con la política, los independientes encuentran en las redes noticias inmediatas, que ayudan a la participación política. Para los desinteresados, las redes importan menos en relación con la política. Hay que anotar que todos tienen conocimiento de las redes y una vasta experiencia cotidiana, pero manifiestan desconfianza sobre la veracidad de la información que ofrecen.


Cano-Correa et al 2017a-62669 ov-es026.jpg

Aunque no se les asigna absoluta credibilidad aprecian el carácter abierto de las redes: «Todos pueden hacer escuchar su voz. Si no hubiera tales redes sociales, solo la gente que tiene más poder en los medios sería escuchada. Con las redes nosotros o gente menos conocida, con menos recursos para salir en los medios, puede también dar su opinión» (desinteresado, U. privada); «no confío mucho en los medios de Internet, pueden dar noticias, luego las pueden borrar al instante porque en Internet cualquier persona puede subir información que crea o que piense y que no necesariamente está en lo correcto de lo que es la veracidad de los hechos» (independiente, U. privada); «se generan en Twitter, en Facebook muchos debates, te das cuenta que tu opinión puede ser valedera pero ves que también es válida la opinión de otra persona; y por ahí te puede permitir discernir, de forma más clara» (organizado, U. pública).

Cuando se les interroga, más del 50% señala que las redes sociales son útiles para organizar y convocar personas, informarse y expresarse con libertad. No obstante, recurren a la interacción presencial para conversar sobre política con sus padres y familiares (74,8%), con amigos y compañeros (66,9%) y con los profesores (33%). El intercambio sobre política a través de las redes sociales acusa menores resultados (17,7%). Y los jóvenes de universidades públicas (23,8%) interactúan bastante más que los de universidades privadas (14,9%).

Sorprende que, si bien los jóvenes universitarios reconocen de manera unánime que las redes sociales posibilitan la comunicación horizontal y la democratización de la opinión, no se constituyen ellos mismos en protagonistas y, más bien, sus prácticas están vinculadas fundamentalmente al consumo.

3.5. Movilización y participación de los universitarios en asuntos públicos

Hay coincidencia en calificar las movilizaciones como un derecho legítimo de expresión (94%), siempre que se produzcan sin violencia o generen disturbios que afecten la ciudad y a los ciudadanos. Precisan que las movilizaciones son expresión del descontento ante la inoperancia del Estado: «Es un derecho de todo ciudadano movilizarse, pero el Estado no debería esperar que la población llegue a ese punto, es porque no te hacen caso» (independiente, U. privada). Señalan que se movilizarían por temas no resueltos en el país, como la defensa de los derechos humanos, el aborto, la necesidad de una mayor inversión en educación y deporte. Sostienen que las movilizaciones juveniles son siempre reclamos frente a alguna injusticia (84,1%) y que es un derecho ciudadano salir a las calles a protestar (88,9%). Discrepan con la idea de que son una pérdida de tiempo (85,3%) y afirman que las movilizaciones sirven para dar a conocer a todo el país lo que ocurre (87%), siendo además actos de libertad de expresión (94%).

Hay manifiestas diferencias entre los jóvenes de universidades privadas y públicas en relación con el sentido de las movilizaciones. El tema es sensible entre los de universidades privadas, resistentes a la intervención política directa. Opinan que «hacen muchos disturbios, y la verdad es que a veces hacen bulla y ocasionan problemas en la calle, hasta pelea» (desinteresados, U. privada). También señalan que las movilizaciones son atendibles aunque «utilizan la fuerza para ser escuchados, y yo no creo que sea la forma pero finalmente es una forma de expresión» (organizado, U. privada).


Cano-Correa et al 2017a-62669 ov-es027.jpg

Todos se movilizarían por temas relacionados con beneficios estudiantiles y laborales o que les afectan personalmente: «Las movilizaciones forman corriente de opinión porque las personas que ven eso se informan. Concientizan a participar acerca de la necesidad de defender tus derechos» (independiente, U. pública). Frente a esta posición tan comprensiva, sorprende la escasa participación activa que declaran los universitarios encuestados: la mayor parte no ha participado en movilizaciones (87%), frente a un 10,1% que lo hace algunas veces. Son los organizados de universidades públicas los que más participan.

3.6. ¿Qué les preocupa a los universitarios?

Los temas de interés identificados en los grupos focales (Tabla 3), algunos de los cuales dieron lugar a movilizaciones callejeras.

En mayor o menor medida estos son los asuntos que concitan la atención de los universitarios. Son los de universidades públicas y los organizados quienes manifiestan en un porcentaje mayor su interés por la inseguridad ciudadana, la ley universitaria, la televisión basura y la discriminación. La defensa del medio ambiente interesa más a los universitarios de las públicas y menos a los de privadas. La corrupción, la ley laboral, la ley universitaria, el aborto y la pena de muerte interesan más a los organizados y a los de universidades públicas.

Los independientes se expresan y comentan con interés y expectativa sobre los temas más mencionados. La mayoría afirma haberse movilizado en defensa de los animales (57,1%). También por los derechos humanos, el medio ambiente, la discriminación racial y la pena de muerte. Los organizados y los de universidades públicas mencionan haber participado en acciones contra la corrupción, así como contra la televisión basura, la inseguridad ciudadana, la ley universitaria y la unión civil. Es decir, que los universitarios organizados se han movilizado más por los temas mencionados. También coinciden en que el teatro, la danza o las acciones colectivas callejeras son formas eficaces de expresión política (71,6%), aunque los desinteresados lo hacen en un porcentaje significativamente menor.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

El extendido descrédito de las instituciones políticas en el Perú, la proximidad de las elecciones nacionales y algunas movilizaciones exitosas promovidas por sectores juveniles con el apoyo de los medios y las redes sociales (Fernández-Maldonado, 2015), forman parte del contexto que contribuye a entender los hallazgos alcanzados en esta investigación.

En Lima, los jóvenes universitarios manifiestan interés por la política, aunque el número de aquellos que deciden organizarse en partidos o colectivos es muy reducido, en un tiempo de gran desprestigio de la política no solamente en el Perú sino también en el mundo. Se produce un distanciamiento de las organizaciones partidarias tradicionales, aunque ello no signifique un distanciamiento de lo público y de nuevos sentidos de lo político (Aguilar, 2011; Padilla-de-la-Torre, 2015; Reguillo, 2000; Krauskopf, 1998). Si bien todos ellos manifiestan interés por los problemas del país, para los estudiantes de universidades privadas y los desinteresados de ambas, se trata de un compromiso futuro, cuando se inserten en el trabajo. Los de universidades públicas, organizados e independientes, viven con más atención la situación actual y se sienten comprometidos, de forma más directa e inmediata, en particular porque admiten su deuda con la sociedad por la educación gratuita que reciben. Cabe señalar que tanto los de universidades públicas como de privadas reconocen su condición privilegiada, porque poseen conocimientos e información, lo que los lleva a afirmar su compromiso de ser buenos estudiantes.

Todos los estudiantes manifiestan temor frente a la violencia que pueden generar las movilizaciones políticas en los espacios públicos. Los de universidades privadas tienen una mayor preocupación al respecto porque temen que el desorden retrase sus estudios. Probablemente los años de violencia política en el país y el insistente discurso de los medios y de los políticos sobre sus efectos en el crecimiento económico, sean la causa de estos temores.

No hay opiniones unánimes sobre el alcance que debe tener la actividad política en la universidad. Esta es aprobada por los jóvenes organizados y se produce en mayor medida en las universidades públicas. En estas se vive cotidianamente la corrupción interna, las condiciones de inseguridad y un sinnúmero de carencias que explican su interés por enfrentar estos problemas. Por otro lado, los de universidades privadas y los desinteresados de ambas se muestran escépticos.

Esta actitud se explica, en el caso de las privadas, porque tienen modelos organizativos y de negocios que no demandan la participación de los estudiantes en su gestión. Así, el desinterés por la actividad política en las universidades privadas tiene sus raíces no en la indiferencia de los jóvenes sino en las políticas institucionales, porque son las propias universidades las que restringen la participación de los estudiantes, frenando su capacidad deliberativa y propositiva (Sota, 2002).

Los universitarios limeños tienen una relación sostenida con los medios de comunicación. Son su principal fuente informativa, pero tienen opiniones críticas que los llevan a desconfiar y buscar formas complementarias de información. Esta búsqueda los conduce a confrontar fuentes y refrendar la información en otros medios, ampliarla y buscar otras opiniones (Catalina-García, García-Jiménez, & Montes-Vozmediano, 2015; Yuste, 2015). También se valen de sus relaciones e interacciones familiares y de amistad (Castells 2007). Reconocen el poder de los medios en la información cotidiana, aunque su calidad esté en entredicho por los intereses privados que defienden, aspecto especialmente destacado por los organizados. La televisión es el medio más utilizado para informarse, mientras que los otros medios son consumidos en diversas pantallas y plataformas. Al respecto, coincidiendo con García-Avilés y otros (2014), se observa que las empresas periodísticas todavía son un referente fiable, pues en todos los casos se mencionan los diarios. Es notoria la amplitud en el consumo y la actitud crítica de los organizados.

Si bien hay un amplio acceso a los medios digitales, hay una subutilización de las redes sociales, lo cual se refleja en el bajo porcentaje de estudiantes que empieza a construir autonomía a través de estas (Castells, 2007). En general, la mayoría reproduce, frente a los medios digitales, la actitud que tiene frente a los tradicionales, es decir que se informan pero no interactúan, y se limitan a seguir, comentar o intercambiar información con sus pares inmediatos, pese a que reconocen estos medios por su potencial interactivo. Todo ello en contraposición de lo que se descubre en otros contextos, como en Madrid, Túnez o Egipto, donde el cuestionamiento a las fuentes tradicionales verticales conduce a la búsqueda de fuentes alternativas, horizontales, interactivas, construcción de comunidades y participación con mayor autonomía, orientada al cambio político (Castells, 2007; Almansa-Martínez, 2016). En el caso de esta investigación, el uso de redes sociales no produce ni gestiona propuestas. Solo los organizados demuestran ser más eficaces en este propósito, lo cual fue notorio en la organización de algunas movilizaciones a través de estas redes.

Se constata una disposición y sensibilidad a nuevos temas globales, como el medio ambiente, la discriminación, los debates sobre género y la unión civil, aunque no expresan necesariamente una actitud reflexiva. Entre los organizados, la corrupción y la inseguridad ciudadana movilizan sus intereses con un énfasis político, motivo por el cual es posible afirmar que su participación en algunos movimientos permite activar sus emociones y conectar con otros individuos, es decir transitar a una experiencia colectiva y eficaz (Castells, 2015; Quiroz, 2011).

Los universitarios independientes constituyen el grupo más extenso en la investigación. Se trata de un sector interesado, que fluctúa entre el desconcierto, el interés y los temores, pero con un gran potencial que puede ser canalizado no solo por las instituciones políticas sino también por las propias universidades. La preocupación por los problemas del país constituye una oportunidad para que la institución universitaria capitalice ese potencial de sus estudiantes, generando espacios de debate, una pedagogía docente, «una metodología que propicie la curiosidad, la indagación, la cooperación» (Agudelo, 2015; Martínez, Silva, & Hernández, 2010), y que, además, les permita la formulación de propuestas políticas autónomas.

Se advierte que hay asuntos que se extienden a lo social, incluso a lo cultural, como campos más cercanos a sus preocupaciones cotidianas, y que les interesan, aunque no son expresamente políticos ni conducen a compromisos permanentes (Montoya, 2003; Alvarado, Ospina, Botero, & Muñoz, 2008). Un reducido sector se moviliza, pero estas acciones no implican necesariamente un compromiso, por su carácter esporádico.

Los resultados alcanzados nos inducen a vislumbrar futuras investigaciones que pueden ayudar a configurar un panorama más preciso acerca de la disposición de los jóvenes universitarios hacia la política. Por un lado, es indispensable discernir entre la posición de los hombres y las mujeres, ya que la presencia cada vez más relevante de mujeres en la vida política internacional, como Angela Merkel, Dilma Rousseff, Cristina Kirschner; y en el Perú, la presidenta del Congreso, Luz Salgado; la vicepresidenta de la República, Mercedes Araoz; y otras líderes estarían señalando que hay un creciente interés de las mujeres por ejercer liderazgo político.

Desde otro ámbito de estudio, con técnicas cualitativas, se podría indagar acerca de la relación existente entre la especialidad (ciencias o humanidades) y la percepción que tienen los universitarios sobre la política.

Por otro lado, el estudio realizado se restringe a la ciudad de Lima, capital del Perú, ciudad que concentra la mayor cantidad de recursos del Estado, tanto en infraestructura como en servicios. Este centralismo se da particularmente en el campo educativo (López, 2005; Cuenca, 2015), por lo que habría que establecer si esta situación de inequidad tiene correlato en las prácticas políticas de los universitarios de las demás regiones del Perú.

Autores como López (2005) enfatizan en el rol de la familia en la educación, que en ocasiones colisiona con la escuela. Un aspecto que no hemos considerado en este estudio es el papel que juega la familia en las convicciones políticas de los jóvenes y cómo la universidad se configura como un elemento catalizador de ese bagaje ideológico previo.

En cuanto a los métodos de indagación, las historias de vida constituyen un recurso conveniente para explorar en profundidad las creencias y motivaciones que tienen los sujetos. El interés por desarrollar esta investigación coincide con otros estudios en Iberoamérica, y la semejanza en los resultados encontrados permite concluir en la necesidad de que la Universidad, atendiendo a las críticas de los jóvenes respecto de la política, se constituya en espacio de deliberación y acción pública, como parte de la formación integral de los jóvenes.

Apoyos

Proyecto de investigación «Jóvenes y política. Estudio sobre los universitarios limeños», fue financiado por el fondo de apoyo de la Universidad de Lima (PI.55.008.2015).

Referencias

Agudelo, Z. (2015). Formación política en la universidad de Antioquia y su incidencia en las percepciones de los estudiantes de pregrado sobre la negociación del conflicto armado colombiano. Revista CES Derecho, 6(1), 58-78.

Aguilar, J. (2011). Revisión del concepto de juventud y su relación con el mundo de la política. Estudios Políticos, Documento de trabajo, nº 3. Universidad de Guanajuato. (https://goo.gl/bm1N6R) (2015-05-05).

Almansa-Martínez, A. (2016). Estudio sobre la participación de estudiantes universitarios en la vida política. Opción, 32(7). Número especial, 39-54.

Alvarado, S.V., Ospina, H.F., Botero, P., & Muñoz, G. (2008). Las tramas de la subjetividad política y los desafíos a la formación ciudadana en jóvenes. Revista Argentina de Sociología, 6(11), 19-43. (https://goo.gl/Erie2X) (2015-05-05).

Benavides, M., León, J., Haag, F., & Cueva, S. (2015). Expansión y diversificación de la educación superior universitaria y su relación con la desigualdad y la segregación. Lima: Grupo de Análisis para el Desarrollo. (https://goo.gl/9vfQu8) (2015-04-20).

Carrión, R. (2002). Universidad, conocimiento y autonomía. In C. Aljovín-de-Losada y C. Germaná-Cavero (Eds.). La Universidad en el Perú (versión PDF) (pp. 35-47). Lima: Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. (https://goo.gl/xBnbos) (2015-04-27).

Castells, M. (2007). Comunicación móvil y sociedad. Barcelona: Ariel. Fundación Telefónica.

Castells, M. (2015). Redes de indignación y esperanza (2015). Madrid: Alianza.

Catalina-García, B., García-Jiménez, A., & Montes-Vozmediano, M. (2015). Jóvenes y consumo de noticias a través de Internet y los medios sociales. Historia y Comunicación Social, 20(2), 601-619. (https://goo.gl/iEWKSY) (2015-07-19). Cuenca, R. (Ed.). (2015). La educación universitaria en el Perú: Democracia, expansión y desigualdades (1ª edición). Lima: IEP. (https://goo.gl/Tvvlss) (2015-04-20).

Decreto Legislativo, nº 882. Ley de Promoción de la Inversión en la Educación (8 de noviembre de 1996). Suplemento de Normas Legales del diario oficial El Peruano. (https://goo.gl/l6nCVU) (2015-03-19).

Delgado-Salazar, R., & Arias-Herrera, J. C. (2008). La acción colectiva de los jóvenes y la construcción de ciudadanía. Revista Argentina de Sociología, 6(11). (https://goo.gl/aG3RL0) (2015-05-20).

Fernández-Maldonado, E. (2015). La rebelión de los pulpines. Jóvenes, trabajo y política. Lima: Otra Mirada.

García-Avilés, J.A., Navarro-Maillo, F., & Arias-Robles, F. (2014). La credibilidad de los contenidos informa-tivos en Internet para los ‘nativos digitales’: estudio de caso. Palabra Clave, 17(3), 875-894. (https://goo.gl/zMxQQq) (2015-07-19).

Gasca-Pliego, E., & Olvera-García, J.C. (2011). Construir ciudadanía desde las universidades, responsabi-lidad social universitaria y desafíos ante el siglo XXI. Convergencia, (56), 37-58. (https://goo.gl/sb7rnu) (2015-07-19).

INEI (s.f./a). Número de universidades públicas y privadas 1980-2014. (https://goo.gl/Jud4Bo) (2015-03-12).

INEI (s.f./b). Número de alumnos matriculados en universidades privadas 2004-2013. (https://goo.gl/Jud4Bo) (2015-03-12).

INEI (s.f./c). Número de alumnos matriculados en universidades públicas 2004-2013. (https://goo.gl/Jud4Bo) (2015-03-12).

Jurado Nacional de Elecciones (2016). Consulta de autoridades nacionales, regionales y municipales. (https://goo.gl/f8yJOd) (2015-03-12).

Krauskopf, D. (1998). Dimensiones críticas en la participación social de las juventudes. En Participación y desarrollo social en la adolescencia (pp. 119-134). San José: Fondo de Población de Naciones Unidas. (https://goo.gl/Skkf2G) (2015-05-20).

Lobos, M. (2014). La influencia de las organizaciones políticas universitarias en la formación de élites polí-ticas en Chile: el caso de las federaciones de estudiantes de la Universidad de Chile y Universidad Católica 1984- 2005. Política, 52(2), 157-183 (https://goo.gl/vAB0jJ) (2015-06-06).

López, N. (2005). Equidad educativa y desigualdad social. Desafíos de la educación en el nuevo escenario latinoamericano. (https://goo.gl/M3d8rT) (2015-06-06).

Lynch, N. (1990). Los jóvenes rojos de San Marcos. El radicalismo universitario de los años setenta. Lima: El Zorro de Abajo Ediciones.

Lynch, N. (2006). La universidad en el Perú. Razones para una reforma universitaria. Informe 2006. Lima: Ministerio de Educación. (https://goo.gl/lwUfZu) (2015-06-06).

Martínez, M.L., Silva, C., & Hernández, A. (2010). ¿En qué ciudadanía creen los jóvenes? Creencias, aspira-ciones de ciudadanía y motivaciones para la participación sociopolítica. Psykhe, 19(2), 25-37.

Ministerio de Educación, Secretaría Nacional de la Juventud. (2012). Perú: resultados finales de la Primera Encuesta Nacional de la Juventud 2011 (versión PDF). Lima: Senaju. (https://goo.gl/hHjTms) (2015-03-12).

Montoya, L.W. (2003). Poder, jóvenes y ciencias sociales en el Perú. Última década, 11(18), 21-68. (https://goo.gl/EykiYR) (2015-03-19).

Natal, A., Benítez, M., & Ortiz, G. (Coords.) (2014). Ciudadanía digital. México: UAM.

Ohme, J., Albaek, E., & de-Vreese, C. H. (2016). Exposure Research Going Mobile: A Smartphone-Based Measurement of Media Exposure to Political Information in a Convergent Media Environment, Communica-tion Methods and Measures, 10(2-3), 135-148, https://org.doi: 10.1080/19312458.2016.1150972

Padilla-de-la-Torre, M.R. (2014). Ciudadanía política en la red. Análisis de las prácticas políticas entre jóvenes universitarios. Comunicación y Sociedad, 21, 71-100. (https://goo.gl/hmgzoG) (2015-05-20).

Quiroz, M.T. (2011). La televisión: vista, oída y leída por adolescentes peruanos. [Television: Seen, Heard and Read by Peruvian Adolescents]. Comunicar, 36, 35-41. https://doi.org/10.3916/C36-2011-02-03

Reguillo R. (2000). Emergencia de culturas juveniles: estrategias del desencanto. Bogotá: Norma. (https://goo.gl/pFwWsY) (2015-10-10).

Sota, J. (2002). Diagnóstico de la universidad peruana: razones para una nueva reforma universitaria. Lima: Comisión Nacional por la Segunda Reforma Universitaria. (https://goo.gl/JW0kX4) (2015-04-27).

Soysal, Y., Baubock, R., & Bosniak, L. (2010). Ciudadanía sin nación. Bogotá: Siglo del Hombre Editores/Universidad de los Andes/Pontificia Universidad Javeriana.

Yuste, B. (2015). Las nuevas formas de consumir información de los jóvenes. Revista de estudios de juventud, (108), 179-191. (https://goo.gl/IO5Gjo) (2015-10-10).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/09/17
Accepted on 30/09/17
Submitted on 30/09/17

Volume 25, Issue 2, 2017
DOI: 10.3916/C53-2017-07
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Views 2
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?