Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This study focuses on academic institutional repositories as tools that allow us open access to scientific and academic production. Specifically, we analyze the Top 50 European University repositories differentiating, firstly, those repositories linked to Spanish universities compared to those belonging to universities throughout Europe and, secondly, repositories that only include research content as opposed to those that also include teaching content. Specifically, this work complements previous studies on the consolidation of the repositories, focusing on the analysis of the competitive environment by considering their participation and relative visibility shares. The analysis, using competitive maps and comparative advantage method, allows us to identify European university repositories that lead their segments, in terms of their levels of participation and web visibility in the market. In general, without distinguishing by segments, results show that the leadership at European level in terms of participation is held by the University College of London (UK) and the repository of the University of Umea (Sweden) is the leader in visibility.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

The study of digital repositories is currently very important because since The Budapest Declaration (BOAI, 2002), which established the first formal definition of the open access movement (ratified and expanded in The Bethesda and Berlin Declarations of 2003), the implantation and development of repositories of electronic documents have increased substantially. According to the Ranking Web of World Repositories, there are more than 1,500 digital repositories in 2012. The importance of repositories in the communication of scientific knowledge and their role in strengthening the cooperative spirit in scientific research have led to the need to analyze them.

Coinciding with the rise of the World Wide Web in the 90s, projects linked with the open access movement began to appear. This entailed free Internet access, with no economic or copyright restrictions, to the scientific literature (Suber, 2005). The arXiv repository of pre-publications, founded in 1991 in the field of Physics, is considered to be the pioneer in the development of digital repositories.

If we focus on the strategies that characterize the implantation and development of the open access movement, it is self-archiving or the green route that began and nurtured the digital repositories (Harnad & al., 2004; Sánchez & Melero, 2006). Apart from publication in journals, this strategy means the placing of a copy of a study in a stable repository that allows free on-line access. In this context, the term «repository» entails an expansion of the preservation and conservation characteristics of an archive since, apart from storing information, a repository has other functions such as the supply, management, recovery, visualization and reutilization of digital documents (Pinfield, 2009). In this sense, open access to a repository adds easy availability of content that may come from various sources to the advantages of no cost or unlimited access to information. Independently of their role of provider of data and/or services (Hernández, Rodríguez & Bueno, 2007), repositories can be implemented by institutions, thematic communities, research centers or other groups. This study focuses on the study of institutional repositories which, according to The Budapest Declaration (BOAI, 2002), arose in response to the need for academic institutions to conserve and preserve their intellectual property and make it available to the education and research community.

There is much debate around the content of repositories; some authors (Crow, 2002; Johnson, 2002) defend education-learning as one of the key functions of university, believing that teaching materials should be included along with research results. Taking this point further, repositories specializing in teaching design could be a tool for educational staff to learn different teaching strategies such as a detailed explanation of the steps to be taken in its implementation (Marcelo, Yot & Mayor, 2011). Other authors oppose this position, supporting the premise that the purpose of an institutional repository is the diffusion of research results and hold that the key factor is free access to these results (Harnad, 2005; Sánchez & Melero, 2006).

Notwithstanding this open debate, Lynch (2003) defines the institutional repository in the area of universities as a collection of services that a university offers to the members of its community for the management and diffusion of digital materials created by the institution and its members. Hence, it is an organizational obligation to manage digital material that includes its long-term preservation, its organization and its access or distribution (Lynch & Lippincott, 2005). In line with Crow (2002), institutional repositories comply with 2 of the strategic factors of universities. First, these repositories constitute a critical component of the academic communication system by expanding access to research, increasing competition and reducing the monopolistic power of the journals. Second, they can be quantitative indicators of the quality of a university and they can demonstrate the scientific, social and economic importance of academic activity; thus increasing the visibility, status and public value of the institution. In a broad sense, university repositories collect part of the intellectual production of universities, in that they are where the organization, preservation and diffusion of digital documents derived from academic work take place.

The study of repositories is a current hot topic (Barrueco & García, 2009; Ezema, 2011; Galina, 2011). And within this field there are various lines of research, such as those focused on the analysis of the technical factors around the implementation of repositories (Koopman & Kipnis, 2009; Subirats & al., 2008), on attitudes to self-archiving (Carr & Brody, 2007; Chuk & McDonald, 2007; Xia & Sun, 2007), on free access and the impact of citations (Davis, 2010; Gaulé & Maystre, 2011; Giglia, 2010) and on the evolution of repositories (Keefer, 2007; Krishnamurthy & Kemparaju, 2011; Peset & Ferrer, 2008; Wray, Mathieu & Teets, 2009). This study belongs in the last of these lines and aims to analyze the competitive environment of university repositories through the volume of digital content, participation of a repository in the supply of digital content and the web visibility of a repository. The study also uses a double segmentation to consider the geographical context of the universities that host the repositories and the type of digital content stored in them.

After these initial considerations, the following section describes the methodology and identifies the sources of information and variables used. Next we present the results differentiated by geographical area and by the content type of the repositories and we finish with the conclusions derived from the study.

2. Material and methods

2.1. Methodology

After describing the current situation of university repositories in Europe, we use information visualization (Chen, 2003) to analyze their competitive environment through a comparative map. More precisely, we use a variant of the dispersion diagram that positions Spanish university repositories against those of the rest of Europe in terms of 2 dimensions: their participation and visibility shares compared to the other competitors in their segment; each repository is represented by a circle which is indicative of the volume of digital documents derived from the academic production of the host universities. The analysis by geographical area considers an additional segmentation around the content of the repositories, differentiating those with content derived exclusively from research from those that also include teaching resources (mixed repositories).

The final position occupied by a repository in the diagram described above allows us to identify the leaders in the analyzed dimensions (repositories with relative shares above 1) If there is no single repository that leads in both dimensions, the leader is identified through the relative advantage method. This method implies initially obtaining the advantages, in terms of participation and of visibility, for the 2 repositories that are leaders in each dimension. Next we compare the above advantages, with the dimension that has the greater relative advantage being the identification criteria for the leader repository.

2.2. Data and variables

The university repositories to be analyzed are identified using the Ranking Web of World Repositories (RWWR) of the Spanish National Research Council (Aguillo & al., 2010). Using the latest available edition (April 2012), we select the 50 main repositories linked to European universities, discarding those with incomplete information on the number of entries in the analysis period (see Table 1). This ranking also provides the degree of visibility of the selected repositories. We use the Registry of Open Access Repositories (ROAR) to find the size of the repositories through the accumulated number of entries from the foundation date until 31st December 2011. The evolution of entries during 2011 gives us the participation share for this period for each repository. Finally, the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) allows us to identify universities and their geographical distribution.


Draft Content 700388931-26753-en050.jpg

Using the above information, we construct the following variables that allow us to analyze the competitive environment of the Top50 European university repositories.

1) Relative participation share (CPRijk) of university repository i (i=1…Ij) in geographical area j (j=1 (Spain), 2(Rest de Europe)) and of type k (k=1 (mixed), 2(research), so that:


Draft Content 700388931-26753-en051.jpg

• CPijk: Participation share of repository i in geographical area j and of type k.

• CPC1jk: Highest participation share of the repositories in geographical area j of type k.

• CPRC1jk: Relative participation share of the repository with the highest participation share in geographical area j of type k.

• CPC2jk: Participation share of the 2nd best competitor in geographical area j of type k.

• RTijk: Total entries in repository i in geographical area j of type k in the year 2011.

RTjk:

2) Relative visibility share (CVRijk) of repository i (i=1,… Ij) in geographical area j (j=1(Spain), 2(Rest of Europe)) of type k (k=1(mixed), 2(research)), so that:


• CVijk: Visibility share of repository i in geographical area j of type k.

• CVC1jk: Highest visibility share of repositories in geographical area j of type k.

• CVRC1jk: Relative visibility share of the repository with the highest visibility share in geographical area j of type k.

• CVC2jk: Visibility share of the 2nd highest competitor in geographical area j of type k.

• Vijk: Visibility of repository i in geographical area j of type k.

• Vjk: Visibility of the repositories in geographical area j of type k.

Bearing in mind that the degree of visibility (V) of repository i (i=1…, 50) is:


Draft Content 700388931-26753-en053.jpg

where Elinki represents the position in visibility terms provided by the RWWR, obtained by the number of external links received by repository i (Aguillo et al., 2010).

3) Size (TR) of repository i (i=1… 50) until day T (31 December 2011):


Draft Content 700388931-26753-en054.jpg

where:

• DDit: Number of digital documents of repository i on day t.

• Fi: Foundation date of repository i.

Hence, using Equation (1) we quantify the relative participation shares of the repositories –as a measure of the degree of participation of each repository in the supply of digital content stored in all the repositories considered-, differentiating Spanish repositories from those of the rest of Europe and repositories with only research content from mixed repositories. For the generic case of a given repository in a concrete segment, the relative participation share is the quotient between its participation share and the highest share of its segment; for the repository with the highest participation share, we divide its share by the 2nd highest share. For the calculation of participation shares we consider the number of entries received by the repository in 2011 compared with the number of entries of all the repositories in the segment in the same period. With a similar method, equation (2) finds the relative visibility shares of repositories by segments –as a measure of the level of market penetration-, considering visibility as the inverse of the position in terms of this variable given by the RWWM. Finally, in equation (4) referring to the size of the repository –as a measure of digital academic production- we consider the number of digital documents accumulated in the repository from the foundation date until the 31st December 2011.


Draft Content 700388931-26753-en055.jpg

3. Analysis and results

The Top 50 European repositories analyzed are distributed so that 12% belong to Spanish universities and the remaining 88% to universities from the rest of Europe. In terms of content, 56% only store research results and 44% are mixed repositories. The repositories considered have an average of 33,630 digital documents, ranging from the 234,760 entries of the University College of London (United Kingdom) and the 1,502 of the University of Oulu (Finland).

Looking at the analysis of the competitive environment of European repositories without differentiating by segments, the repository of the University of Umea (Sweden) is leader in visibility and the University College of London (United Kingdom) is leader in participation. In terms of the segmentations by geographical area (Spain versus the rest of Europe) and by content type (research versus mixed), Figure 1 shows only the leading repositories in the 3 dimensions analyzed. Each repository is represented in terms of its relative participation and visibility shares, and its size.

The comparative analysis using the double segmentation, and initially focusing on the Spanish repository market, shows that the repositories of the Autónoma University of Barcelona and the Polytechnic of Madrid have relative participation shares above 1. Therefore, the repositories of these universities are leaders in the supply of digital content, with the Polytechnic of Madrid being leader in the research only segment and the Autónoma University of Barcelona leader in the mixed segment. Turning to visibility, the leading Spanish repositories are the Polytechnic of Cataluña and the Autónoma University of Barcelona for research only and mixed repositories respectively. Given that visibility is related to the number of links received by each repository, these 2 universities are leaders in terms of market penetration.

Moving on to the rest of Europe, we find that the University of Liège (Belgium) and the University College of London (United Kingdom) are leaders in participation in the research only and mixed segments respectively. The leaders in terms of penetration are the University of Umea (Sweden) for research repositories and the University of Utrecht (Netherlands) in the mixed segment.

The size of the bubbles in Figure 1, which shows the supply of digital content, gives us the highest volume repositories for the segments considered. The University Carlos III of Madrid has the largest research repository and the Autónoma University of Barcelona has the largest mixed repository. In the rest of Europe, the repositories of the University of Amsterdam (Netherlands) and the University College of London (United Kingdom) are the largest in the research and mixed segments, respectively.


Draft Content 700388931-26753-en056.jpg

Apart from the Autónoma University of Barcelona, which is the leader in participation and penetration in Spanish mixed repositories, there are no repositories that lead in both dimensions; some lead in participation and others in penetration. Hence, in these cases and for the other segments, we find the leading repository in the 2 segments by applying the relative advantage method described in the previous section. The application of this method shows that the leader in the Spanish research repositories segment is the Polytechnic of Cataluña; the University of Umea (Sweden) is the leader in research repositories in the rest of Europe; and, finally, the leader of the rest of Europe mixed repositories segment is the University of Utrecht (Netherlands).

To go further into the characterization of repositories that do not lead in any of the dimensions considered, figure 2 identifies repositories with content supply and relative participation and visibility shares that are above average for the non-leaders group. We obtain these average values through the maximum and minimum values in each dimension.

Looking at figure 2 and focusing on the Spanish repositories, we find three repositories that stand out for their above average values for relative participation and visibility shares. While the research only repository of the University Carlos III of Madrid and the mixed repository of the University of Alicante stand out in terms of participation, the repositories of the universities of Complutense of Madrid, Alicante and Carlos III of Madrid stand out in terms of market penetration. With regard to repositories from the rest of Europe, the research repositories of the universities of Milan (Italy), Amsterdam (Netherlands) and Glasgow (United Kingdom), and the mixed repositories of the Federal Polytechnic School of Lausanne (Switzerland) and the University of Southampton (United Kingdom) stand out in participation. In terms of penetration, notable repositories are the research repository of the University of Humboldt (Germany) and the mixed repositories of the universities of Oulu (Finland), Stuttgart (Germany), Saint Gallen (Switzerland) and Southampton (United Kingdom).

To synthesize the information in Figures 1 and 2, Table 2 shows the leading repositories and those that are above average in the dimensions of participation, visibility and size for the segments considered. This table shows the absolute leader repositories in their segments after applying the relative advantage method; in other words, those that lead in both participation and penetration.

4. Discussion and conclusions

In response to the cementing of the position of free access as a model of scientific communication in the scientific-academic world and the growing number of institutional repositories, we propose the need to evaluate this type of application. This study analyzes the market of the Top50 European university repositories, differentiating within the same competitive environment repositories linked to Spanish universities from those pertaining to universities from the rest of Europe and further differentiating repositories that only store research results from those that also include teaching resources. Concretely, this study complements previous studies on the consolidation of repositories that focus on the volume of digital content derived from the production of universities. As a new contribution, we go deeper into the analysis of the competitive environment of the repositories through their relative participation and web visibility shares, which identify the leading repositories in a double segmentation by geography and content type.


Draft Content 700388931-26753-en057.jpg

Looking at the Spanish repositories, there are currently 6 Spanish university repositories in the Top 50 European institutional repositories: the universities of Autónoma of Barcelona, Polytechnic of Cataluña, Alicante, Complutense of Madrid, Polytechnic of Madrid and Carlos III of Madrid. Looking further into the national context, the first positions in the dimensions analyzed are held by the research repository of Carlos III University of Madrid and the mixed repository of the Autónoma University of Barcelona. However, the Polytechnic of Madrid holds first place in participation in research repositories and the Autónoma University of Barcelona leads the mixed repositories segment. In terms of market penetration, the Polytechnic of Cataluña and the Autónoma University of Barcelona have the leading research and mixed repositories, respectively.

Turning to the rest of Europe, we find that the University of Amsterdam (Netherlands) and the University College of London (United Kingdom) have the largest repositories, the former in the research segment and the latter in the mixed segment. The universities of Liège (Belgium) and the University College of London (United Kingdom) are leaders in participation in the research and mixed segments, respectively. The leaders in terms of penetration are the research repository of the University of Umea (Sweden) and the mixed repository of the University of Utrecht (Netherlands).

Accordingly, the leading universities in relative participation share give more importance to the basic functions of storage and preservation that characterize institutional repositories. These universities develop their repositories as a complement to the traditionally used options for presenting academic production. In this sense, they are using their repositories to make themselves better known by offering open access to a wide variety of the teaching and/or research output of their academic staff. In the terms of penetration, leading positions in web visibility of academic output strengthen the function of diffusion of own knowledge of the repository as a means of communication. Therefore, leading positions in both participation and penetration allow a university to not only make itself better known than others, with regard to its academic output, but to also increase possible access to this academic output. In this sense, the leading repositories in the dimensions considered gain importance as means of communication of teaching and research knowledge, with emphasis on the functions of storage, preservation and diffusion of knowledge.

Although this study characterizes the main university repositories in terms of volume of digital content, participation in the supply of this content and web visibility, there is scope to continue this line of research with a causal analysis to identify the determining factors of the leading positions in the different dimensions. Among other aspects, factors such as the language of the repository, the diversity of the content, the size of the institution or its funding could be analyzed to see whether they influence the leading positions. Similarly, and taking the premise that a large presence in the market through high content volume is not the only important factor, researchers could also investigate the quality of the content stored in repositories as an additional key factor in the evolution of these instruments that give open access to scientific output; this could be another future research line.

References

Aguillo, I.F., Ortega, J.L., Fernández, M. & Utrilla, A.M. (2010). Indicators for a Webometric Ranking of Open Access Re­po­sitories. Scientometrics, 82 (3), 477-486. (DOI: 10.1007/s­111­92-­010-0183-y).

ARWU (2011). Academic Ranking of World Universities. (www.­arwu.org).

Barrueco, J.M. & García, C. (2009). Repositorios institucionales universitarios: evolución y perspectivas. Zaragoza: Fesabid, XI Jor­na­das Españolas de Documentación.

BOAI (2002). Budapest Open Access Initiative. (www.soros.org/­openacces).

Carr, L. & Brody, T. (2007). Size Isn’t Everything: Sustainable Repositories as Evidenced by Sustainable Deposit Profiles. D-Lib Magazine, 13 (7/8). (www.dlib.org/dlib/july07/carr/07carr.html).

Chen, C. (2003). Mapping Scientific Frontiers: The Quest for Knowledge Visualization. London: Springer-Verlag.

Chuk, T. & McDonald, R.H. (2007). Measuring and Comparing Participation Patterns in Digital Repositories. D-Lib Magazine, 13 (9/10). (http://openaccess.be/media/docs/09mcdonald.pdf).

Crow, R. (2002). The Case for Institutional Repositories: A SPARC Position Paper. Technical Report 223. (www.arl.org/­spa­rc/­IR/ir.­html).

Davis, P.M. (2010). Does Open Access Lead to Increased Readership and Citations? A Randomized Controlled Trial of Articles Published. APS Journals. Physiologist, 53 (6), 197-200.

Ezema, I.J. (2011). Building Open Access Institutional Repositories for Global Visibility of Nigerian Scholarly publication. Library Review, 60 (6), 473-485. (DOI: 10.1108/00242531111147198).

Galina, I. (2011). La visibilidad de los recursos académicos: una revisión crítica del papel de los repositorios institucionales y el acceso abierto. Investigación Bibliotecológica, 25 (53), 159-183.

Gaulé, P.A. & Maystre, N.B. (2011). Getting Cited: Does Open Access Help? Research Policy, 40 (10), 1332-1338. (DOI: 10.­10­16­/j.respol.2011.05.025).

Giglia, E. (2010). The Impact Factor of Open Access Journals: Data and Trends. Helsinki (Finland): ELPUB 2010 International Conference on Electronic Publishing. (http://dhanken.shh.fi/dspace/bitstream/10227/599/72/2giglia.pdf).

Harnad, S. (2005). Fast-forward on the Green Road to Open Access: The Case against Mixing up Green and Gold. Ariadne, 4 (42). (www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue42/harnad).

Harnad, S., Brody, T., Vallières, F. & al. (2004). The Access/­impact Problem and the Green and Gold Roads to Open Access. Serial Review, 30 (4), 310-314. (DOI: 10.1016/j.se­rrev.2004.­09.­013).

Hernández, T., Rodríguez, D. & Bueno, G. (2007). Open Ac­cess: el papel de las bibliotecas en los repositorios institucionales de acceso abierto. Anales de Documentación, 10, 185-204.

Johnson, R.K. (2002). Institutional Repositories: Partnering with Faculty to Enhance Scholarly Communication. D-Lib Magazine, 8 (11). (www.dlib.org/dlib/november02/johnson/11johnson.html).

Keefer, A. (2007). Los repositorios digitales universitarios y los autores. Anales de Documentación, 10, 205-214. (DOI:10.6018/analesdoc.10.0.1151).

Koopman, A. & Kipnis, D. (2009). Feeding the Fledgling Re­po­sitory: Starting an Institutional Repository at an Academic Health Sciences Library. Medical Reference Services Quarterly, 28 (2), 111-122. (DOI:10.1080/02763860902816628).

Krishnamurthy, M. & Kemparaju, T.D. (2011). Institutional Repositories in Indian Universities and Research Institutes: A Study. Program. Electronic Library and Information Systems, 45 (2), 185-198. (DOI: 10.1108/00330331111129723).

Lynch, C.A. & Lippincott, J.K. (2005). Institutional Repository Deployment in the United States as of Early 2005. D-Lib Magazine, 11 (9). (www.dlib.org/dlib/september05/lynch/09lynch.html).

Lynch, C.A. (2003). Institutional Repositories: Essential Infra­structure for Scholarship in the Digital Age. ARL Bimonthly Report, 226, 1-7. (www.arl.org/newsltr/226/ir.htm).

Marcelo, C., Yot, C. & Mayor, C. (2011). «Alacena»: repositorio de diseños de aprendizaje para la enseñanza universitaria. Comu­ni­car, 37 (XIX), 37-44. (DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-2466.2006.­0031­6.x).

Peset, F. & Ferrer, A. (2008). Implementation of the Open Archives Initiative in Spain. Information Research, 13 (4). (http://informationr.net/ir/13-4/paper385.html).

Pinfield, S. (2009). Journals and Repositories: An Evolving Rela­tionship? Learned Publishing, 22 (3), 165-175. (DOI:10.108­7/2009302).

ROAR (2011). Registry of Open Access Repositories. (http://roar.eprints.org).

RWRM (2012). Ranking Web de Repositorios del Mundo. (http://repositories.webometrics.info).

Sánchez, S. & Melero, R. (2006). La denominación y el contenido de los repositorios institucionales en acceso abierto: base teórica para la ruta verde. (http://eprints.rclis.org/6368).

Suber, P. (2005). Open Access Overview: Focusing on Open Access to Peer-reviewed Research Articles and their Preprints. (www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/overview.htm).

Subirats, I., Onyancha, I., Salokhe, G., Kaloyanova, S., Anibaldi, S. & Keizer, J. (2008). Towards an Achitecture for Open Archive Networks in Agricultural Sciences and Technology. Online Information Review, 32 (4), 478-487. (DOI: 10.1108/14684520­810897359).

Wray, B.A., Mathieu, R.G. & Teets, J.M., (2009). Identifying How Determinants Impact Security-based Open Source Software Project Success Using Rule Induction. International Journal of Elec­t­ronic Marketing and Retailing, 2 (4), 352-362. (DOI: 10.­1504­/IJE­MR.2009.025249).

Xia, J. & Sun, L. (2007). Assessment of Self-archiving in Insti­tu­tional Repositories: Depositorship and Full-text Availability. Serials Review, 22 (1), 14-21.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

El presente estudio se centra en los repositorios institucionales universitarios como instrumentos que posibilitan el acceso en abierto a la producción científica y académica. Se analizan los Top50 repositorios universitarios europeos diferenciando, en primer lugar, aquellos repositorios vinculados a universidades españolas frente a los pertenecientes a universidades del resto de Europa y, en segundo lugar, los repositorios que incluyen en sus contenidos exclusivamente resultados de investigación frente a aquéllos que también albergan recursos docentes. En concreto, este trabajo complementa estudios previos sobre la consolidación de los repositorios, profundizando en el análisis del entorno competitivo a partir de sus cuotas relativas de participación y de visibilidad web. El análisis efectuado, a través del diseño de mapas competitivos y la aplicación del método de la ventaja relativa, permite identificar los repositorios universitarios europeos líderes en sus segmentos respecto a sus niveles de participación y visibilidad web en el mercado. A nivel general, sin establecer diferencias por segmentos, los resultados muestran que el liderazgo a nivel europeo, en términos de participación, lo ostenta el University College of London (Reino Unido), mientras que el repositorio de la Universidad de Umea (Suecia) es líder en visibilidad.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

El estudio de los repositorios digitales cobra especial relevancia en el momento actual ya que desde la Declaración de Budapest (BOAI, 2002), en la que se establece la primera definición formal del movimiento open access, ratificada y ampliada en las Declaraciones de Bethesda y Berlín en el año 2003, la implantación y desarrollo de depósitos de documentos electrónicos ha experimentado un notable crecimiento. Según el Ranking Web de Repositorios del Mundo existen más de mil quinientos repositorios digitales en 2012. La importancia adquirida por los repositorios como instrumentos de comunicación del conocimiento científico y potenciador del espíritu cooperativo en la investigación científica, lleva a plantearse la necesidad de analizar este tipo de aplicaciones.

Si bien, es en la década de los 90 coincidiendo con la aparición de la World Wide Web cuando comienzan a surgir proyectos vinculados al movimiento open access, entendido como el acceso libre sin restricciones económicas o de derechos de copyright a la literatura científica a través de Internet (Suber, 2005). De hecho, el depósito de pre-publicaciones arXiv, fundado en 1991 en el ámbito de la Física, es considerado pionero en el desarrollo de los repositorios digitales.

Centrándonos en las estrategias que caracterizan la implantación y el desarrollo del movimiento open access, es el autoarchivo o ruta verde la que origina y nutre a los repositorios digitales (Harnad & al., 2004; Sánchez & Melero, 2006). Dicha estrategia supone, además de la publicación en revistas de suscripción, la disposición de una copia del artículo en un depósito estable que permite su acceso en línea y de forma gratuita. En este contexto, el término repositorio supone la ampliación de las características de preservación y conservación propias de los archivos, ya que además de almacenar la información, el repositorio posee otras funcionalidades como son el suministro, gestión, recuperación, visualización y reutilización de documentos digitales (Pinfield, 2009). En este sentido, el acceso abierto de un repositorio añade a las ventajas de gratuidad o acceso ilimitado a la información, la fácil disponibilidad de contenidos que pueden proceder de diversos proveedores. Con independencia del carácter de proveedor, ya sea de datos y/o de servicios (Hernández, Rodríguez & Bueno, 2007), los repositorios pueden ser implementados por instituciones, comunidades temáticas, centros de investigación u otros grupos. El presente trabajo se centra en el estudio de los repositorios institucionales que, según la Declaración de Budapest (BOAI, 2002), surgen como respuesta de las instituciones, fundamentalmente académicas, a la necesidad de conservar, preservar y poner a disposición de la comunidad docente e investigadora su patrimonio intelectual.

Una cuestión ampliamente debatida se refiere al contenido que debe formar parte del repositorio. Ciertos autores (Crow, 2002; Johnson, 2002) defienden la docencia-aprendizaje como una de las funciones clave de los repositorios institucionales universitarios considerando que, además de los resultados de investigación, los materiales docentes también deben incluirse en los repositorios. Aún más, los repositorios especializados en diseños del aprendizaje pueden constituir una herramienta abierta al profesorado para conocer diferentes estrategias de enseñanza, así como para describir de forma pormenorizada los pasos a seguir en su implementación (Marcelo, Yot & Mayor, 2011). Frente a la postura anterior otros autores, apoyándose en la premisa de que la finalidad de todo repositorio institucional es la difusión de resultados de investigación, defienden que el factor clave de un repositorio institucional es el acceso en abierto de dichos resultados de investigación, dejando al margen los recursos docentes (Harnad, 2005; Sánchez & Melero, 2006).

Al margen del debate abierto, Lynch (2003) define el repositorio institucional en el ámbito universitario, como un conjunto de servicios que la universidad ofrece a los miembros de su comunidad para la gestión y difusión de materiales digitales creados por la institución y por sus miembros. Así, se trata de un compromiso organizativo para la gestión de materiales digitales que incluye su preservación a largo plazo, así como su organización y su acceso o distribución (Lynch & Lippincott, 2005). En línea con Crow (2002), los repositorios institucionales permiten dar respuesta a dos factores estratégicos de las instituciones universitarias. Por un lado, este tipo de repositorios dota de un componente crítico al sistema de comunicación académica al expandir el acceso a la investigación, incrementar la competencia y reducir el poder monopolista de las revistas. Por otro lado, pueden convertirse en indicadores cuantitativos de la calidad de la universidad y demostrar la relevancia científica, social y económica de la actividad académica, incrementando por tanto la visibilidad, el estatus y el valor público de la institución. En sentido amplio, los repositorios institucionales universitarios recogen parte de la producción intelectual de las universidades, al ser entendidos como el «lugar» donde se organiza, preserva y difunde la producción de documentos digitales derivados del trabajo académico de las universidades.

El estudio de los repositorios es un tema candente en el momento actual (Barrueco & García, 2009; Ezema, 2011; Galina, 2011). Dentro de este ámbito de estudio podemos encontrar distintas líneas de investigación, como las centradas en el análisis de los factores técnicos en torno a la implementación de los repositorios (Koopman & Kipnis, 2009; Subirats & al., 2008), en las actitudes frente al auto-archivo (Carr & Brody, 2007; Chuk & McDonald, 2007; Xia & Sun, 2007), en el acceso libre y el impacto de citas (Davis, 2010; Gaulé & Maystre, 2011; Giglia, 2010) y en la evolución de los repositorios (Keefer, 2007; Krishnamurthy & Kemparaju, 2011; Peset & Ferrer, 2008; Wray, Mathieu & Teets, 2009). El presente trabajo se enmarca en esta última corriente de investigación con objeto de analizar el entorno competitivo en que se desarrollan los repositorios institucionales universitarios a partir del volumen de contenidos digitales albergados, la participación del repositorio en la oferta de contenidos digitales y la visibilidad web del repositorio. Además, el estudio se amplía considerando una doble segmentación que contempla tanto el ámbito geográfico de las universidades que desarrollan los repositorios como el tipo de contenido digital recogido en los mismos.

Bajo estas consideraciones iniciales, en el siguiente epígrafe se describe la metodología y se identifican las fuentes de información y variables utilizadas. A continuación, se presentan los resultados de forma diferenciada por zonas geográficas y por tipo de contenidos de los repositorios universitarios, finalizando con la exposición de las conclusiones derivadas del estudio realizado.

2. Material y métodos

2.1. Metodología

Tras describir el panorama actual de los repositorios vinculados a las instituciones universitarias en el contexto europeo, se emplea la visualización de la información (Chen, 2003) para analizar el entorno competitivo en que se desarrollan los repositorios mediante un mapa comparativo. En concreto, se emplea una variante del diagrama de dispersión donde se posicionan los repositorios universitarios españoles frente a los del resto de Europa en términos de dos dimensiones, como son sus cuotas de participación y visibilidad respecto al resto de competidores en su segmento; cada repositorio se representa por un círculo, indicativo del volumen de documentos digitales derivados de la producción académica de las universidades que se alberga en el mismo. El análisis por áreas geográficas se extiende considerando una segmentación adicional en función del contenido de los repositorios, diferenciando aquellos con contenidos derivados exclusivamente de resultados de investigación de aquellos otros que incluyen, además, recursos destinados a la docencia (denominados estos últimos como repositorios mixtos).

La posición que ocupan finalmente los repositorios en el diagrama descrito en el párrafo anterior permite identificar los líderes en cada una de las dimensiones analizadas (aquellos repositorios que presenten cuotas relativas superiores a la unidad). En el caso de que un mismo repositorio no lidere en ambas dimensiones, la identificación del líder se realiza por medio del método de la ventaja relativa. Este método implica obtener inicialmente las ventajas, tanto en términos de participación como en términos de visibilidad, para aquel par de repositorios que resulte líder en cada una de las dimensiones. Seguidamente se comparan las anteriores ventajas, actuando como criterio de identificación del repositorio líder aquella dimensión que obtenga una mayor ventaja relativa.

2.2. Datos y variables

La identificación de los repositorios universitarios objeto de análisis se realiza siguiendo el Ranking Web de Repositorios del Mundo (RWRM) desarrollado por el Centro Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (Aguillo & al., 2010). A partir de la última edición disponible (abril de 2012), se seleccionan los cincuenta principales repositorios vinculados a instituciones universitarias europeas, desestimando aquellos repositorios con información incompleta sobre el número de registros en el periodo objeto de análisis (ver tabla 1). Asimismo, dicho ranking proporciona el grado de visibilidad de los repositorios previamente seleccionados. El Registry of Open Access Repositories (ROAR) se utiliza para cuantificar el tamaño del repositorio a partir del número acumulado de registros desde la fecha de fundación del repositorio hasta el 31 de diciembre de 2011. La evolución de sus registros a lo largo del año 2011 permite cuantificar las cuotas de participación en dicho periodo para cada repositorio. Finalmente, el Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) posibilita identificar la institución universitaria y la distribución por zonas geográficas.


Draft Content 700388931-26753 ov-es050.jpg

A partir de la información anterior, se construyen las siguientes variables que permitirán analizar el entorno competitivo en el que se desarrollan los Top50 repositorios universitarios europeos.

1) Cuota de participación relativa (CPRijk) del repositorio institucional universitario i (i=1,…, Ij) en la zona geográfica j (j=1(España), 2(Resto de Europa)) y de tipo k (k=1(mixto), 2(de investigación), tal que:


Draft Content 700388931-26753 ov-es051.jpg

• CPijk: Cuota de participación del repositorio institucional universitario i en la zona geográfica j y de tipo k.

• CPC1jk: Mayor cuota de participación de los repositorios institucionales universitarios en la zona geográfica j y de tipo k.

• CPRC1jk: Cuota de participación relativa del repositorio con mayor cuota de participación en la zona geográfica j y de tipo k.

• CPC2jk: Cuota de participación del segundo mayor competidor en la zona geográfica j de tipo k.

• RTijk: Registros totales del repositorio institucional universitario i en la zona geográfica j de tipo k en el año 2011.

• RTjk: Registros totales de los repositorios institucionales universitarios en la zona geográfica j de tipo k en el año 2011.

2) Cuota de visibilidad relativa (CVRijk) del repositorio institucional universitario i (i=1,…, Ij) en la zona geográfica j (j=1(España), 2(Resto de Europa)) y de tipo k (k=1 (mixto), 2(de investigación), tal que:


Draft Content 700388931-26753 ov-es052.jpg

• CVijk: Cuota de visibilidad del repositorio institucional universitario i en la zona geográfica j y de tipo k.

• CVC1jk: Mayor cuota de visibilidad de los repositorios institucionales universitarios en la zona geográfica j y de tipo k.

• CVRC1jk: Cuota de visibilidad relativa del repositorio con mayor cuota de visibilidad en la zona geográfica j y de tipo k,

• CVC2jk: Cuota de visibilidad del segundo mayor competidor en la zona geográfica j de tipo k.

• Vijk: Visibilidad del repositorio institucional universitario i en la zona geográfica j de tipo k.

• Vjk: Visibilidad de los repositorios institucionales universitarios en la zona geográfica j de tipo k.

Teniendo en cuenta que el grado de visibilidad (V) del repositorio institucional universitario i (i=1,…, 50) es:


Draft Content 700388931-26753 ov-es053.jpg

donde Elinki representa la posición en términos de visibilidad proporcionada por el RWRM, obtenida a través del número de links externos que recibe el repositorio institucional universitario i (Aguillo & al., 2010).

3) Tamaño del repositorio (TR) del repositorio institucional universitario i (i=1… 50) hasta el día T (31 diciembre 2011):


Draft Content 700388931-26753 ov-es054.jpg

donde:

• DDit: Número de documentos digitales del repositorio institucional universitario i en el día t.

• Fi: Día de fundación del repositorio institucional universitario i.

Así, a partir de ecuación 1 se cuantifican las cuotas de participación relativas de los repositorios –como medida del grado de participación que cada repositorio tiene en la oferta de contenidos digitales albergados en el conjunto de repositorios universitarios considerados–, diferenciando por un lado los repositorios españoles frente a los del resto de Europa y, por otro, los repositorios con contenidos exclusivos de investigación frente a los repositorios mixtos. Para el caso genérico de un determinado repositorio perteneciente a un segmento concreto, la cuota de participación relativa se obtiene como el cociente entre su cuota de participación y la mayor de su segmento; para aquel repositorio con mayor cuota de participación, se divide su cuota entre la segunda mayor. En el cálculo de las cuotas de participación se considera el número de registros que el repositorio alberga durante el año 2011, frente al número de registros de la totalidad de los repositorios incluidos en su segmento en el mismo periodo temporal. Siguiendo una operativa similar, la ecuación 2 permite obtener las cuotas de visibilidad relativas de los repositorios por segmentos –como medida del nivel de penetración en el mercado–, considerando la visibilidad como la inversa de la posición en términos de esta variable proporcionada por el RWRM. Por último, en la ecuación 4 referida al tamaño del repositorio –como medida de la producción académica digital– se considera el número total de documentos digitales acumulados en el repositorio desde el día de su fundación hasta el 31 de diciembre de 2011.


Draft Content 700388931-26753 ov-es055.jpg

3. Análisis y resultados

Los Top 50 repositorios europeos analizados se distribuyen de forma que un 12% pertenece a instituciones universitarias españolas y el restante 88% a universidades del resto de Europa. En cuanto al contenido de dichos repositorios, mientras que el 56% alberga exclusivamente resultados de investigación, el 44% restante son repositorios mixtos. Los repositorios considerados poseen por término medio 33.630 documentos digitales, si bien el rango varía entre los 234.760 registros del University College of London (Reino Unido) y los 1.502 de la Universidad de Oulu (Finlandia).

Centrándonos en el análisis del entorno competitivo de los repositorios universitarios europeos sin establecer diferencias por segmentos, mientras el repositorio de la Universidad de Umea (Suecia) es líder en visibilidad, el liderazgo en términos de cuota de participación lo detenta el University College of London (Reino Unido). No obstante, atendiendo a la doble segmentación considerada y que diferencia, por un lado, la zona geográfica a la que pertenece el repositorio (España frente al resto de Europa) y, por otro, el tipo de contenidos que alberga (investigación frente a mixto), en la figura 1 se representan exclusivamente aquellos repositorios que lideran en alguna de las tres dimensiones analizadas. Cada repositorio viene representado en términos de sus cuotas relativas de participación y de visibilidad, así como en función de su tamaño.

El análisis comparativo efectuado, atendiendo a la doble segmentación expuesta y centrándonos inicialmente en el mercado de los repositorios españoles, revela que son los repositorios de las universidades Autónoma de Barcelona y Politécnica de Madrid los que presentan cuotas de participación relativas superiores a la unidad. En este sentido, los repositorios de dichas universidades son líderes en cuanto a la oferta de contenidos digitales, siendo la universidad Politécnica de Madrid líder en el segmento de los repositorios de investigación y la Autónoma de Barcelona en el segmento de los repositorios mixtos. Si bien, atendiendo a la visibilidad de los repositorios, el liderazgo en el mercado español lo detentan las universidades Politécnica de Cataluña y, de nuevo, Autónoma de Barcelona para el caso de los repositorios de investigación y mixtos, respectivamente. Dado que la visibilidad se relaciona con el número de enlaces que recibe cada repositorio, estas dos últimas universidades son las que lideran en términos de penetración del mercado.

Trasladando el análisis al resto de Europa, las universidades de Liège (Bélgica) y el University College of London (Reino Unido) son líderes en participación en los segmentos de los repositorios de investigación y repositorios mixtos, respectivamente. Por otra parte, el liderazgo en términos de penetración corresponde a las Universidades de Umea (Suecia) en el caso de los repositorios de investigación y Utrecht (Holanda) en los mixtos.

Adicionalmente, el tamaño de las burbujas de la figura 1, indicador de la oferta de contenidos digitales, permite identificar los repositorios de mayor volumen por los segmentos considerados. Así, mientras que la Universidad Carlos III de Madrid posee el mayor repositorio de investigación, la Autónoma de Barcelona posee el mayor repositorio mixto. En el resto de Europa, los repositorios de la Universidad de Ámsterdam (Holanda) y del University College of London (Reino Unido) son los mayores en la tipología de investigación y mixto, respectivamente.


Draft Content 700388931-26753 ov-es056.jpg

Se constata que, a excepción del liderazgo absoluto detentado por el repositorio de la Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona en el segmento de los repositorios españoles mixtos (aquellos que también incluyen en sus contenidos recursos destinados a la docencia), no existen otros repositorios que lideren de forma conjunta en ambas dimensiones; mientras unos lideran en términos de participación otros lo hacen en términos de penetración. Así, en estos casos y para el resto de segmentos, la identificación del repositorio líder en ambas dimensiones se lleva a cabo aplicando el método de la ventaja relativa descrito en el epígrafe anterior. La aplicación de dicho método evidencia que el segmento de los repositorios españoles de investigación lo lidera la Universidad Politécnica de Cataluña; la Universidad de Umea (Suecia) es líder en el segmento de repositorios de investigación del resto de Europa; y, por último, el segmento de los repositorios mixtos del resto de Europa es liderado por la Universidad de Utrecht (Holanda).

Seguidamente, con objeto de profundizar en la caracterización de los repositorios que no detentan posiciones de liderazgo en ninguna de las dimensiones consideradas, la figura 2 identifica aquellos repositorios con oferta de contenidos, cuotas relativas de participación y de visibilidad superiores a los respectivos valores medios del conjunto de repositorios no líderes. Estos valores medios se obtienen a partir de los valores máximo y mínimo en cada dimensión.

A partir de la figura 2 y centrándonos en el contexto de los repositorios españoles, se evidencia la existencia de tres repositorios que destacan por poseer valores superiores al valor medio en cuanto a cuotas relativas de participación y de visibilidad. En concreto, mientras que el repositorio de investigación de la Universidad Carlos III de Madrid y el repositorio mixto de la Universidad de Alicante destacan en términos de participación, los repositorios de las universidades Complutense de Madrid y, de nuevo, Alicante y Carlos III de Madrid lo hacen en términos de penetración de mercado. Respecto al resto de repositorios europeos, los repositorios de investigación de las Universidades de Milán (Italia), Ámsterdam (Holanda) y Glasgow (Reino Unido), así como los repositorios mixtos de la Escuela Politécnica Federal de Lausanne (Suiza) y de la Universidad de Southampton (Reino Unido) destacan en participación. Asimismo, en términos de penetración destaca el repositorio de investigación de la Universidad de Humboldt (Alemania), así como los repositorios mixtos de las universidades de Oulu (Finlandia), Stuttgart (Alemania), Saint Gallen (Suiza) y Southampton (Reino Unido).

Con objeto de sintetizar la información presentada en las figuras 1 y 2, la tabla 2 recoge tanto los repositorios institucionales universitarios líderes como aquellos caracterizados por superar los valores medios en las dimensiones participación, visibilidad y tamaño del repositorio para los diferentes segmentos considerados. En dicha tabla aparecen los repositorios que detentan el liderazgo absoluto en su segmento tras aplicar el método de la ventaja relativa; es decir, aquellos que resultan líderes en participación y penetración de forma conjunta.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

A medida que el acceso abierto, como modelo de comunicación científica, va arraigando en el mundo científico-académico y surgen cada vez más repositorios institucionales, se plantea la necesidad de evaluar este tipo de aplicaciones. El presente trabajo analiza el mercado de los Top50 repositorios universitarios europeos diferenciando en un mismo entorno competitivo, aquellos repositorios vinculados a instituciones universitarias españolas frente a los pertenecientes a universidades del resto de Europa y, a su vez, los repositorios que incluyen en sus contenidos exclusivamente resultados de investigación frente a aquellos que también albergan recursos docentes. En concreto, este trabajo complementa estudios previos sobre la consolidación de los repositorios que se centran en el volumen de contenidos digitales derivados de la producción de las instituciones universitarias. Como novedad, se profundiza en el análisis del entorno competitivo de los repositorios a partir de sus cuotas relativas de participación y de visibilidad web, permitiendo identificar los repositorios líderes atendiendo a una doble segmentación, geográfica y por tipo de contenidos.


Draft Content 700388931-26753 ov-es057.jpg

Centrándonos en el mercado español de los repositorios, cabe destacar que en el momento actual ya son seis las universidades españolas que han conseguido posicionar sus repositorios entre los Top50 repositorios institucionales a nivel europeo. Tal es el caso de los repositorios desarrollados por las Universidades Autónoma de Barcelona, Politécnica de Cataluña, Alicante, Complutense de Madrid, Politécnica de Madrid y Carlos III de Madrid. Profundizando en el estudio del contexto nacional y destacando las primeras posiciones en las dimensiones analizadas, los resultados del estudio permiten concluir que son las Universidades Carlos III de Madrid y la Autónoma de Barcelona aquellas que poseen el repositorio más consolidado de investigación y mixto, respectivamente. Si bien, el liderazgo por cuota de participación en el segmento de los repositorios de investigación lo detenta la Politécnica de Madrid, la Autónoma de Barcelona lidera el segmento de los repositorios mixtos. Por su parte, en cuanto a penetración de mercado, el liderazgo corresponde a los repositorios de las Universidades Politécnica de Cataluña y, de nuevo, al de la Autónoma de Barcelona en los segmentos de investigación y mixtos, respectivamente.

Trasladando el análisis al resto de Europa, la Universidad de Amsterdan (Holanda) y el University College of London (Reino Unido) poseen los mayores repositorios, la primera en contenidos de investigación y la segunda en mixtos. Además, son las Universidades de Liège (Bélgica) y el University College of London (Reino Unido) quienes lideran en participación en los segmentos de los repositorios de investigación y repositorios mixtos, respectivamente. Por otra parte, el liderazgo en términos de penetración lo detentan el repositorio de investigación de la Universidad de Umea (Suecia) y el repositorio mixto de la Universidad de Utrecht (Holanda).

En este sentido cabe señalar que las universidades que detentan posiciones destacadas en sus cuotas de participación relativa otorgan mayor importancia a las funciones básicas de almacenamiento y preservación que caracterizan a los repositorios institucionales. De este modo, estas universidades apuestan por desarrollar repositorios como un complemento a las alternativas utilizadas tradicionalmente para mostrar su producción académica. En esta línea, los repositorios se estarían empleando para dar a conocer mejor a la propia universidad al ofrecer el acceso en abierto a una gran variedad de producción docente y/o investigadora desarrollada por su personal académico. En términos de penetración, posiciones destacadas en el nivel de visibilidad web de la producción académica de la universidad potencian la función de difusión de conocimiento propia del repositorio institucional como medio de comunicación. Por tanto, posiciones destacadas tanto en participación como en penetración permitirán a una universidad no solo darse a conocer mejor que otras, respecto a su producción académica, sino que además incrementarán la posibilidad de acceso a dicha producción académica. En este sentido, los repositorios institucionales de las universidades líderes en las dimensiones contempladas cobran importancia como medio de comunicación del conocimiento docente e investigador, destacando las funcionalidades de almacenamiento, preservación y difusión del conocimiento.

Si bien el presente trabajo ha permitido caracterizar los principales repositorios universitarios en términos de volumen de contenidos digitales, participación en la oferta de este tipo de contenidos, así como en visibilidad web, cabría proseguir en esta línea de investigación con objeto de identificar, a través de un análisis causal, los factores determinantes de las posiciones de liderazgo detentadas en las diferentes dimensiones. Entre otros aspectos, cabría analizar si factores tales como el idioma del repositorio, la diversidad de contenidos, el tamaño de la institución o la financiación de las mismas constituyen factores que influyen en las posiciones de liderazgo. Asimismo, y partiendo de la premisa de que no solo es relevante tener una gran presencia en el mercado a través de un elevado volumen de contenidos, también cabría investigar la calidad de los contenidos albergados en los repositorios como un factor adicional clave en la evolución de estos instrumentos que posibilitan el acceso abierto a la producción científica; constituyendo esta otra línea de investigación futura.

Referencias

Aguillo, I.F., Ortega, J.L., Fernández, M. & Utrilla, A.M. (2010). Indicators for a Webometric Ranking of Open Access Re­po­sitories. Scientometrics, 82 (3), 477-486. (DOI: 10.1007/s­111­92-­010-0183-y).

ARWU (2011). Academic Ranking of World Universities. (www.­arwu.org).

Barrueco, J.M. & García, C. (2009). Repositorios institucionales universitarios: evolución y perspectivas. Zaragoza: Fesabid, XI Jor­na­das Españolas de Documentación.

BOAI (2002). Budapest Open Access Initiative. (www.soros.org/­openacces).

Carr, L. & Brody, T. (2007). Size Isn’t Everything: Sustainable Repositories as Evidenced by Sustainable Deposit Profiles. D-Lib Magazine, 13 (7/8). (www.dlib.org/dlib/july07/carr/07carr.html).

Chen, C. (2003). Mapping Scientific Frontiers: The Quest for Knowledge Visualization. London: Springer-Verlag.

Chuk, T. & McDonald, R.H. (2007). Measuring and Comparing Participation Patterns in Digital Repositories. D-Lib Magazine, 13 (9/10). (http://openaccess.be/media/docs/09mcdonald.pdf).

Crow, R. (2002). The Case for Institutional Repositories: A SPARC Position Paper. Technical Report 223. (www.arl.org/­spa­rc/­IR/ir.­html).

Davis, P.M. (2010). Does Open Access Lead to Increased Readership and Citations? A Randomized Controlled Trial of Articles Published. APS Journals. Physiologist, 53 (6), 197-200.

Ezema, I.J. (2011). Building Open Access Institutional Repositories for Global Visibility of Nigerian Scholarly publication. Library Review, 60 (6), 473-485. (DOI: 10.1108/00242531111147198).

Galina, I. (2011). La visibilidad de los recursos académicos: una revisión crítica del papel de los repositorios institucionales y el acceso abierto. Investigación Bibliotecológica, 25 (53), 159-183.

Gaulé, P.A. & Maystre, N.B. (2011). Getting Cited: Does Open Access Help? Research Policy, 40 (10), 1332-1338. (DOI: 10.­10­16­/j.respol.2011.05.025).

Giglia, E. (2010). The Impact Factor of Open Access Journals: Data and Trends. Helsinki (Finland): ELPUB 2010 International Conference on Electronic Publishing. (http://dhanken.shh.fi/dspace/bitstream/10227/599/72/2giglia.pdf).

Harnad, S. (2005). Fast-forward on the Green Road to Open Access: The Case against Mixing up Green and Gold. Ariadne, 4 (42). (www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue42/harnad).

Harnad, S., Brody, T., Vallières, F. & al. (2004). The Access/­impact Problem and the Green and Gold Roads to Open Access. Serial Review, 30 (4), 310-314. (DOI: 10.1016/j.se­rrev.2004.­09.­013).

Hernández, T., Rodríguez, D. & Bueno, G. (2007). Open Ac­cess: el papel de las bibliotecas en los repositorios institucionales de acceso abierto. Anales de Documentación, 10, 185-204.

Johnson, R.K. (2002). Institutional Repositories: Partnering with Faculty to Enhance Scholarly Communication. D-Lib Magazine, 8 (11). (www.dlib.org/dlib/november02/johnson/11johnson.html).

Keefer, A. (2007). Los repositorios digitales universitarios y los autores. Anales de Documentación, 10, 205-214. (DOI:10.6018/analesdoc.10.0.1151).

Koopman, A. & Kipnis, D. (2009). Feeding the Fledgling Re­po­sitory: Starting an Institutional Repository at an Academic Health Sciences Library. Medical Reference Services Quarterly, 28 (2), 111-122. (DOI:10.1080/02763860902816628).

Krishnamurthy, M. & Kemparaju, T.D. (2011). Institutional Repositories in Indian Universities and Research Institutes: A Study. Program. Electronic Library and Information Systems, 45 (2), 185-198. (DOI: 10.1108/00330331111129723).

Lynch, C.A. & Lippincott, J.K. (2005). Institutional Repository Deployment in the United States as of Early 2005. D-Lib Magazine, 11 (9). (www.dlib.org/dlib/september05/lynch/09lynch.html).

Lynch, C.A. (2003). Institutional Repositories: Essential Infra­structure for Scholarship in the Digital Age. ARL Bimonthly Report, 226, 1-7. (www.arl.org/newsltr/226/ir.htm).

Marcelo, C., Yot, C. & Mayor, C. (2011). «Alacena»: repositorio de diseños de aprendizaje para la enseñanza universitaria. Comu­ni­car, 37 (XIX), 37-44. (DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-2466.2006.­0031­6.x).

Peset, F. & Ferrer, A. (2008). Implementation of the Open Archives Initiative in Spain. Information Research, 13 (4). (http://informationr.net/ir/13-4/paper385.html).

Pinfield, S. (2009). Journals and Repositories: An Evolving Rela­tionship? Learned Publishing, 22 (3), 165-175. (DOI:10.108­7/2009302).

ROAR (2011). Registry of Open Access Repositories. (http://roar.eprints.org).

RWRM (2012). Ranking Web de Repositorios del Mundo. (http://repositories.webometrics.info).

Sánchez, S. & Melero, R. (2006). La denominación y el contenido de los repositorios institucionales en acceso abierto: base teórica para la ruta verde. (http://eprints.rclis.org/6368).

Suber, P. (2005). Open Access Overview: Focusing on Open Access to Peer-reviewed Research Articles and their Preprints. (www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/overview.htm).

Subirats, I., Onyancha, I., Salokhe, G., Kaloyanova, S., Anibaldi, S. & Keizer, J. (2008). Towards an Achitecture for Open Archive Networks in Agricultural Sciences and Technology. Online Information Review, 32 (4), 478-487. (DOI: 10.1108/14684520­810897359).

Wray, B.A., Mathieu, R.G. & Teets, J.M., (2009). Identifying How Determinants Impact Security-based Open Source Software Project Success Using Rule Induction. International Journal of Elec­t­ronic Marketing and Retailing, 2 (4), 352-362. (DOI: 10.­1504­/IJE­MR.2009.025249).

Xia, J. & Sun, L. (2007). Assessment of Self-archiving in Insti­tu­tional Repositories: Depositorship and Full-text Availability. Serials Review, 22 (1), 14-21.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 28/02/13
Accepted on 28/02/13
Submitted on 28/02/13

Volume 21, Issue 1, 2013
DOI: 10.3916/C40-2013-03-10
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 5
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?