Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Considering the relationship between new social media and youth political actions, the purpose of this article is to describe the use of Facebook during the 2011 Chilean student movement, through a content and textual analysis of Facebook’s page of the Student Federation of the University of Chile (FECH). In 2011, Chile experienced massive mobilizations for seven months. These were perhaps the most important social protests in Chile's recent history, where young people played a leading role in the discussion over education. During these events, Facebook was one of the digital social networks most widely used by the mobilized organizations. In FECH’s case, it utilized Facebook mainly to call for protest actions, to highlight the achievements of the movement, and to indicate their opponents. However, most of the content published on this Facebook page was produced by traditional media, demonstrating that conventional communication strategies of social movements are interrelated with new innovative practices. Therefore, this article rejects technological determinism, because it does not recognize the complex characteristics of student and youth movements.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

«With rain, with snow, the people still move», sang almost 100,000 students on August 18, 2011 in the streets of Santiago. That day, the temperature was 4 degrees below zero and snow fell on the capital of Chile (Cabalin, 2011). This event was called the «March of Umbrellas» because participants used them to protect themselves from the elements. This was just one of the multiple protests of the «Chilean Winter», as it became internationally known, in reference to the «Arab Spring» that year. Only a few hours after the march, the Student Federation of the University of Chile (FECH) used Facebook to call for a new protest action, stating: «after the beautiful march today, cacerolazo1 at 21:00!». This post received 443 «likes» and 31 people posted comments in support of the cause. This is an example of the combination of traditional and new resources that are currently used by social movements, where digital networks have played a key role in their communication strategies (Castells, 2012).

During 2011, various protest movements developed in different countries («Los Indignados» (The Indignants) in Spain and the «Arab Spring» in Tunisia and Egypt, among others). In fact, for some authors, this was a historic moment that should be remembered as the «year of revolutions» (Fuchs, 2012: 775). One of the characteristics of these citizen mobilizations was the intensive use of social networks. As such, different media began using expressions such as «Facebook or Twitter» revolutions to refer to these events, depending on the importance assigned to a specific social network. However, a number of academic papers on the subject, published in a special issue of the Journal of Communication, qualified this categorization as simplified and popular, demonstrating that the impact of online social networks is complex and contingent on the context where protests develop (Howard & Parks, 2012; Valenzuela, Arriagada & Scherman, 2012). This view allows for the problematization of the notion that contemporary social movements are a consequence of new media on the internet. This causal relationship is associated with technological determinism, which does not recognize the complexity of social movements and their political, social, cultural and economic components (Fuchs, 2012).

However, it is impossible to deny that the internet has provided effective and innovative tools that allow social movements to mobilize supporters and to counteract hegemonic media trends. In fact, one the leaders of the 2011 Chilean student movement, Giorgio Jackson, states that «new technologies served to put a limit to the mainstream media, to show that they no longer have a monopoly on the represented reality» (Jackson, 2013: 85). Considering this point, this article analyzes the Facebook page of FECH, the most influential federation of students in Chile, to describe how this organization used this digital social network during the student movement.

In order to do this, this paper first presents the relationship between the youth and the internet and then situates this discussion in the Chilean student movement to further describe the use of FECH’s Facebook page. It concludes with final remarks.

2. Globally connected youth

The effects of the internet on social capital formation, political participation, cultural diversity and the identity construction of individuals, among other themes, have been studied since the ‘90s. Young people have received special attention in academic work around new technologies because of the close relationship between youth and the Internet (Tapscott, 2009).

Young people interact with digital social networks more than any other social group. This is a global phenomenon. For example, the youth in Asia share similar experiences via the internet with their peers in the United States or in other parts of the world (Farrer, 2007). However, it would be naive to think that young people are experiencing a full development due to new technologies. In fact, global inequalities are affecting many of them. Unemployment is highest amongst the young, they suffer from vulnerability and many are experiencing «waiting times», a term coined by Jeffrey (2010), which describes the situation of young people in developing countries that bet on education as an instrument of social mobility, but have instead seen those expectations crushed. Furthermore, the representation and social visibility of young people have been dominated by «moral panic» (Valdivia, 2010; Thompson, 1998). The youth are seen as the hope for the future, but at the same time they are the risk in the present (Comaroff & Comaroff, 2005). Against this backdrop, new technologies have allowed them other avenues of expression and participation in society.

New information technologies not only have a high economic component, but also cultural and political ones (Xenos & Moy, 2007). Due to their interactive nature, social networking sites on the internet have been viewed as a collaborative space with immense consequences for the development of young people Some authors have spoken of this as a «historic moment» for youth (Tapscott, 2009), but others are more skeptical about the positive impact of these new technologies (Gladwell, 2010). In the case of the 2006 and 2011 student movements in Chile, social networks and new media played a key role in the development of the protests. During the «Penguin Revolution», the 2006 secondary school movement, the students used Fotologs, blogs and YouTube to communicate their demands (Condeza, 2009) and in 2011, mobilized students utilized Twitter, YouTube and Facebook as their communication strategies.

Herrera (2012) has characterized this close relationship between young people and digital social networks as the «wired generation». In the case of the Chilean student movement, we can assume that its protagonists are part of this new generation. Mobilized youths were able to use the internet as a space for the construction of meaning while on the movement. For Castells (2012: 5), this process of production of meanings and concepts is fundamental to the success of social movements, since power is exercised by «the construction of meaning in people’s minds, through mechanisms of symbolic manipulation». Online social networks, as such, help to counteract hegemonic power relations. However, Buckingham and Rodriguez (2013) state that new information technologies are far from being an absolute free and democratic space, because traditional patterns of domination and control often play out on the internet.

At any rate, the internet does allow for the observation of the development of political participation by young people. In 2011, the mobilized Chilean students showed that their protest actions offline and online were complementary (Valenzuela, 2013), allowing them to overcome the division between «traditional» and «new» movements. In fact, they were able to incorporate both strategies, making them more diverse and difficult to define linearly. However, the «message» of social movements continues to be determined by how the movement operates, which is more important than which media platform was chosen to communicate the movement’s operations (Castells, 2012).

3. The communication of the movement

The students were in the streets for 7 months and received support from 80% of the public, according to various surveys. One of the elements that helped to explain this massive popular support was the ability of the students to frame their message of transformation and to control the media agenda during movement. Students were aware of the need to convert their political objectives into a massive message, as Jackson (2013: 63) points out: «Our initial language was not ideological; it was technical and pragmatic, in the sense that if we wanted to reach more people, we had to start by deleting certain words». The students conveyed a message that condensed the main problems of the Chilean education system: inequality, low quality, segregation, and indebtedness (Bellei & Cabalin, 2013).

In Chile, the neoliberal model in education was imposed in the ‘80s during the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet, implementing the privatization of the educational system, increasing competition, the pauperization of teaching jobs, the weakening of public education, among other specific aspects of the neoliberalization of education on a global scale (McCarthy, 2011). Thus, in 2011, the supposed neoliberal progress faced a critical review by the majority of the population for the first time in 30 years, surprising the administrators of the economic and political systems. As noted by one of the 2011 student leaders, Francisco Figueroa: «few imagined that the model’s own children, the youth allegedly lulled by individualism, would rebel against the current state of affairs» (Figueroa, 2013: 72). The student revolts showed precisely how the passivity that the youth were charged with reduced their political participation to only the classical dimension that was established by the routines of the political system. However, young people do participate through other methods.

The 2011 student demonstrations, marches, strikes and takeovers of educational establishments were accompanied by flashmobs, kiss-a-thons, viral campaigns, and other artistic activities, where students used both the physical and digital public space actively. It was a mixture of «Facebook and street», to paraphrase the book Tweets and the Streets: Social Media and Contemporary Activism (Gerbaudo, 2012), which questions the overemphasis on digital social networks as catalysts for protest actions. The students displayed their demands through a combination of both strategies, demonstrating that «even a new medium, as powerful and participatory as the internet’s social networks, is not the message. The message constructs the medium» (Castells, 2012: 122). This means that for a social movement to be successful it requires, among other things, the construction of a persuasive message (Stewart, Smith & Denton, 1994), which connects with the experiences of people. Digital social networks allow for that message to go viral, thus leading to mass impact, especially among the youth sectors. This was understood by the Student Federation of the University of Chile through the use of its Facebook page as the means to distribute their message.

4. Methods and material

86% of young Chileans have a Facebook account and 52% of those young people connect to Facebook every day (Scherman, Arriagada & Valenzuela, 2013). Facebook was the digital social network most used by the students during the 2011 movement. In fact, 68% of those who mobilized used the internet as an information platform to find out about the movement (Arriagada & al., 2011). Consequently, it is important to analyze how this generation of students displayed their actions through online social networks during the student movement. With this objective in mind and without generalizing the results to all mobilized organizations, the Facebook page of the Student Federation of the University of Chile was utilized as a reference, as it represents one of the most influential institutions in the educational debate in Chile and its president in 2011, Camila Vallejo, was one of the leaders with greatest public visibility in the media. This Facebook page had more than 62,000 «friends» during the movement, surpassing the number of students at the university itself, which shows the extent of its influence beyond the University of Chile.

The new information technologies involve diverse epistemological and methodological approaches. Social networks can be useful for studying social interactions, relationships of belonging, identity formation and types of discussion, among other themes (Murthy, 2008). According to Coleman (2010: 488), there are at least three categories to study digital media : a) «the cultural politics of media; b) the vernacular cultures of digital media; and c) the prosaics of digital media». The first relates to the interest in the study of the circulation and construction of cultural identities, representations, meanings and collective commitments in digital media. The second approach deals with the analysis of different groups or social phenomena in digital media (for example, blogs, hackers, and memes). Finally, the third approach focuses on the social practices that occur in digital media, which involve economic, financial, cultural or religious aspects. This study uses the first approach.

As the student movement lasted seven months, this sample is restricted to only one month, considering two milestones: a political one (the first change of the Education Minister during the movement) and the other, a symbolic one (the «March of Umbrellas»). These two events represent in some ways, what the student movement meant in the recent history of Chile. On the one hand, the political system was overcome by the force of the mobilized students who questioned the legitimacy of the means of political representation in the country; on the other hand, the persistence of the protests and their size transformed the movement into an expression of the collective commitment of students beyond the particular circumstances of each individual student.

All public posts on FECH’s Facebook page that were made over these 33 days were intentionally selected, beginning on July 18th -when the president, Sebastián Piñera, made a change in the cabinet, which included the departure of then Education Minister, Joaquín Lavín, and the appointment of his replacement, Felipe Bulnes- and ending on August 19th, one day after the «March of the Umbrellas». This last event was included to observe how the students addressed the success of the march the day after it occurred. These entries were analyzed into a content analysis matrix (Krippendorff, 2013), deductively constructed from previous literature on social movements and new communication (Stewart, Smith & Denton, 1994; Benford & Snow, 2000; Castells, 2012; Valenzuela, 2013). This methodological design relates to the research question: What were the uses of FECH’s Facebook page in terms of content during one of the seven months of student mobilization?

To answer this question and describe the uses of Facebook, eight general categories were used. The first two categories recognized the architecture of the analyzed medium, which regulates and limits its use (Lafi Youmans & York, 2012). These basic categories are:

1) Likes: The number of «likes» on each post was quantified to account for the popularity or acceptance of each entry.

2) Comments: The number of comments for each entry was considered to observe the interaction generated from the initial entry.

The following three categories attempted to describe the communication strategy used by the Student Federation of the University of Chile. In order to do this, the presence (1) or the absence (0) of these functions were considered.

3) Own posts: The posts made by FECH were used to quantify whether FECH generated some kind of commentary on their page as a way to frame the content posted.

4) Photos and videos: The presence of images was measured with the understanding that their addition can make an entry more powerful.

5) Organization’s Leadership: Considering that their president was Camila Vallejo, a figure widely known by the public, the use or lack of Camila Vallejo’s name was also measured in FECH’s posts.

The remaining two general categories attempt to describe content characteristics present in each of the analyzed entries. These categories were:

6) Source of content: It is important to note where the content originated. Therefore, I measured if the content was generated from FECH’s own website, if it was content from the University of Chile, if it was from another organization related to the movement or if it was content from the government. Also, I quantified if the content posted was produced by an organization not associated with the movement or by a traditional medium.

7) Media quote: To measure the interaction with other communication platforms, I quantified if the content posted was referring to a form of national, international, student or other digital social media (for example, YouTube) communication.

The final category attempted to describe the purpose of the entry, since the objectives of social movements are also associated with different communication strategies (Stewart, Smith & Denton, 1994). Thus, this category corresponds to:

8) Purpose of Entry: I measured whether the content published summoned participation in protest actions (marches, strikes, etc.) or movement activities (lectures, conferences, etc.). Also, I measured if the entry highlighted achievements or support of the movement (balance of participation, emblematic backups, etc.). Finally, other objectives that could reaffirm the definition of movement (mobilization reasons) or replies to or mentioning opponents (government, police, etc.) were also measured.

This descriptive content analysis was complemented with textual analysis of the posts made by FECH to describe and understand how public content on their Facebook page was framed. The textual analysis followed the approach proposed by Norman Fairclough (2003), who understands discourses as a facet of social life in interaction with other social dimensions. Discourse is, ultimately, a social practice (Fairclough, 2003). This textual analysis was done to account for the broader use of Facebook, considering the importance of generating messages and meanings in the development of social movements (Castells, 2012).

5. Results

Considering the eight general categories mentioned, 552 posts were identified during the month of analysis (an average of 16.7 posts per day), which shows the intensive use of this digital platform by FECH. There were 47,314 approvals (likes) on the content posted and 8,686 comments. In other words, each post generated on average 15.7 reactions from fans of the page.

5.1. Content

The analysis shows that FECH used its Facebook page primarily as a source of information for the student movement. The vast majority of posts were accompanied by a comment made by FECH itself, which tried to explain, elaborate on or summarize the content posted. In 85.7% of the 552 posts, FECH made ??its own introduction to frame the discussion. However, the presence of visual «hooks» (photos or videos) was lower than expected, considering how frequently the use of Facebook is associated with the publication of images. Only 58.5% of the posts analyzed used photos or videos. References to the leadership of the organization had even lower numbers. Camila Vallejo was practically never mentioned in the entries. Just 43 of the 552 posts included some mention of the president of FECH. This result is striking because of the high public visibility of the leader, but it could be explained by the very nature of FECH, whose leadership is made up of a list of representatives who are voted in each year. Thus, the organization is not serving a particular leader, but rather all student groups that make up its board.

Another result highlighted is the use of content produced by some type of traditional media. The majority of posts incorporated content generated by an organization not related to FECH. In fact, 40% of the posts corresponded to traditional media content and only 22.6 % is content generated by FECH itself. This illustrates that the Facebook page was mostly used to respond to the content published on other media platforms. References to content generated by the University of Chile (4), by another organization of the movement (7), by the government (3), or by an organization not directly linked to the movement (10) were scarce.

In summary, the major source of content for FECH’s Facebook page was traditional media (radio, print and online newspapers, television). Specifically, national media are the main sources of content (37% of the 552 posts). International media only appear 14 times, despite the wide coverage of the movement in various countries. In addition, consistent with the low number of images in the analyzed posts, there were only 28 occasions when YouTube was referenced.

With regard to the purposes of each post, the use of Facebook by FECH responded to the usual characteristics of the communication strategies of social movements. Its main uses are: to mobilize supporters through the call for protest actions or movement activities (29.2%), to highlight achievements, outstanding support and mass demonstrations of the movement (27.5%) and to remind readers who were the opponents of movement (24.3%). The remaining 47 posts were intended to explain the main reasons for the student conflict. Through these communication uses, FECH contributed to the construction of interpretive frameworks for collective action, defined as «action-oriented sets of beliefs and meanings that inspire and legitimate the activities and campaigns of a social movement organization» (Benford & Snow, 2000: 614). The constant references to the popularity of the protests and the support that the students gained showed the «success» of the movement and the need to keep going, without forgetting who the opponents were. This was the framework for action that was communicated via FECH’s Facebook.

5.2. Textual analysis

For textual analysis, 473 posts were examined, which included a header generated by FECH. The vast majority of these texts were direct references to content posted, in an attempt to introduce and contextualize the information. Also, in these posts, additional data were added to those mentioned in the posted content or information spread by traditional media was rejected. Some examples are: «Meet the new Minister of Education. Complete information on Felipe Bulnes» (19-07-2011), «Dear all, at this time have a double eye [be careful] when reading certain media» (19-07-2011), «They have invented many things to discredit us, pay attention to the info [sic] circulating» (19-08-2011). These types of messages were accompanied by explanatory notes. Through these means, the information available to participants of the movement spread and a counter-framing of news events published by traditional media (Squires, 2011) was realized.

The vast majority of FECH’s own comments are short, accurate and informative texts. This can be explained because the Facebook page was administered by the young professionals of the organization, who have knowledge about communication. For example, commenting on the change of minister by President Piñera, FECH wrote: «A change in Minister is not enough, we demand a change in state policies!» (19-07-2011). Or to call a protest activity during the Chilean winter: «The rain isn’t going to stop us either!» (28-07-2011). As expected, all references to the movement’s actions were positive and the references to the adversaries were negative, confirming the polarization communication strategy employed by social movements (Stewart, Smith & Denton, 1994).

The positive approach of the texts intended to show the support and achievements of the movement, counteracting the official conservative voices criticizing students (Cabalin, 2014). This discursive strategy was also intended to motivate and add supporters to the demonstrations organized. Thus, when there was an unauthorized march, which was violently repressed by the police on August 4, 2011, FECH posted on its Facebook: «The March Continues!! No repressive media that the government unleashes will achieve [or] undermine the strength of our movement. We respond with more unity and more fight!». During that day, there was a greater degree of violence against the student movement and Facebook was used as a platform to denounce such actions: «Throughout Chile We Are Being Repressed»; «What has happened in our country today Cannot Go Unpunished!». Messages written in capitalized words by the administrators of the Facebook page show that the emphasis of the students’ complaints was affirmed by the leaders of the movement in its subsequent statements to traditional media.

Other common uses of the messages were to broadcast the activities of the movement, to gather information for the development of demonstrations across the country or to reaffirm the protest actions. For example: «Let everyone in the world know that today in Chile we could not protest and congregate publically» (04-08-2011); «How is the cacerolazo going at home?» (09-08-2011); «Yesterday we were 100,000 in the rain in Santiago, peacefully beautiful. This Sunday everyone is invited to Family Sunday for Education, with everyone for everyone» (19-08-2011). These types of messages explicitly called for the interaction with fans of the page, asking on the one hand for «help» in denouncing unjust acts and, on the other hand, seeking feedback on the protest actions. It was also a way to promote participation and turn readers into activists in these actions.

In short, the messages published by FECH demonstrated that the following communication functions were used on Facebook: disseminating and framing information, responding to opponents and traditional media, counteracting official information, calling for public demonstrations and events, highlighting the positive results of the protest actions and support obtained, calling for adhesion, and finally, acknowledging and identifying the main detractors of the movement.

6. Conclusion

As noted, one of the most important organizations of the 2011 Chilean student movement used Facebook intensively, but this use replied to classic schemes of social movements. This indicates that current protest actions synthesize traditional actions in new innovative ways, which dismisses any hint of technological determinism in the analysis of protest actions of these movements. According to Valenzuela (2013), in the case of young Chileans, the use of social media networks to express opinions and join social causes, predicts a higher probability of young people participating in public demonstrations, but cannot be considered a trigger for political actions. Social movements use digital social networks as a tool in a wide variety of actions, ranging from street marches to viral internet campaigns, as a case study of the 15M movement in Spain illustrated (Hernández-Merayo, Robles-Vilchez & Martínez- Rodríguez, 2013).

In the case of FECH, the increased use that this organization gave to its Facebook page was made ??on the basis of specific mobilization strategies, such as the call for marches, debates and conferences, in addition to permanently highlighting its opponents as responsible the conflict. Aware of the importance of communication for the success of the movement, the students also resorted to traditional media, whose reports were the main content on FECH’s Facebook page. This content, which often criticized the students, was recontextualized in the analyzed posts through explicit comments or direct calls to not believe the information published by traditional media sources. Along this line, the wisdom of one of the student leaders frames this idea saying: «We were on the radio, television news, and in the morning newspaper. This happened despite the lines of editors and the interests of some media sources, which responded against our rebellious and transgressive message, focusing its efforts in distorting our opinions and focused on showing the movement with a violent and uncompromising character, almost criminal character» (Jackson, 2013: 21-22).

Social networking sites were not used only for this counter-framing, but also for communicating the message of the mobilized students. Social movements see communication as «the lifeblood» (Stewart, Smith & Denton, 1994: 159) and Chilean students understood this well.

Obviously, new information technologies are fundamental to the development of the current youth movements, but cannot be considered exclusively as the factors that enable the success and scope of these movements. In the case of the Chilean student movement, its prolonged development is explained by structural reasons associated with the reproduction of inequalities in the educational system and the political and cultural reconfigurations of the country. Nonetheless, Facebook and other digital platforms were key to the success of the mobilizations, facilitating the transformation of many of the bystanders into activists of the movement.

Considering the above, it would be interesting to investigate other aspects of the relationship between new digital media and the actions of protesting youths. For example, the processes of appropriation of these new technologies by young people and their impact on citizen mobilizations or generational identity could be examined. This approach was beyond the scope and objective of this article, but in the same way, the study presented allowed for the analysis of the uses of Facebook communication developed by an influential organization in the 2011 Chilean student movement.

Notes

1 A special type of protest where pots, pans and other kitchen utensils are banged together noisily to call attention to a specific cause.

References

Arriagada, A., Scherman, A., Barrera, A. & Pardo, J. (2011). La generación movilizada. Qué Pasa (http://goo.gl/ncBaCy) (13-11-2013).

Bellei, C. & Cabalin, C. (2013). Chilean Student Movements: Sustained Struggle to Transform a Market-oriented Educational System. Current Issues in Comparative Education, 15(2), 108-123.

Benford, R.D. & Snow, D.A. (2000). Framing Processes and Social Movements. An Overview and Assessment. Annual Review of Sociology, 26, 611-639. (DOI: 10.1146/annurev.soc.26.1.611).

Buckingham, D. & Rodríguez, C. (2013). Aprendiendo sobre el poder y la ciudadanía en un mundo virtual. Comunicar, 40, 49-58. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-05).

Cabalin, C. (2011). La democracia de los estudiantes. Perfil. (http://goo.gl/twtvxB) (15-02-2014).

Cabalin, C. (2014). The Conservative Response to the 2011 Chilean Student Movement: Neoliberal Education and Media. Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01596306.2013.871233).

Castells, M. (2012). Networks of Outrage and Hope. Social Movements in the Internet Age. Cambridge, MA: Polity Press.

Coleman, E.G. (2010). Ethnographic Approaches to Digital Media. Annual Review of Anthropology, 39, 487-498. (DOI: 10.1146/annurev.anthro.012809.10494).

Comaroff, J. & Comaroff, J. (2005). Children and Youth in a Global Era: Reflections on Youth. From the Past to the Postcolony. In A. Honwana & F. De Boeck (Eds.), Makers & Breakers: Children and Youth in Postcolonial Africa. (pp. 19-30). Trenton, NJ & Asmara, Eritrea: Africa World Press.

Condeza, A.R. (2009). Las estrategias de comunicación utilizadas por los adolescentes. Cuadernos de Información, 24, 67-78. (DOI: 10.7764/cdi.0.35).

Fairclough, N. (2003). Analysing Discourse. Textual Analysis for Social Research. New York: Routledge.

Farrer, J. (2007). Networked and not Inhibited: Asian Youth Culture in a Globalizing World. Global Asia, 2 (1), 102-110.

Figueroa, F. (2013). Llegamos para quedarnos. Crónicas de la revuelta estudiantil. Santiago: LOM Ediciones.

Fuchs, C. (2012). Some reflections on Manuel Castells’ book networks of outrage and hope. Social movements in the internet age. Triple C, 10 (2), 775-797.

Gerbaudo, P. (2012). Tweets and the Streets. Social Media and Contemporary Activism. London: Pluto Press.

Gladwell, M. (2010). Small Change: Why the Revolution will not be Tweeted. New Yorker. (http://goo.gl/ikIFec) (13-11-2013).

Hernández-Merayo, E., Robles-Vílchez, M.C. & Martínez-Rodríguez, J.B. (2013). Jóvenes interactivos y culturas cívicas: Sentido educativo, mediático y político del 15M. Comunicar, 40, 59-67. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-06).

Herrera, L. (2012). Youth and Citizenship in the Digital Age: A View from Egypt. Harvard Educational Review, 82(3), 333-352.

Howard, P.N. & Parks, M.R. (2012). Social Media and Political Change: Capacity, Constraint, and Consequence. Journal of Communication, 62 (2), 359-362. (DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-2466.2012.01626.x).

Jackson, G. (2013). El país que soñamos. Santiago: Debate.

Jeffrey, C. (2010). Timepass: Youth, Class, and the Politics of Waiting in India. Palo Alto: Stanford Uinversity Press.

Krippendorff, K.H. (2013). Content Analysis: An introduction to its Methodology. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Lafi Youmans, W. & York, J.C. (2012). Social Media and the Activist Toolkit: User Agreements, Corporate Interests, and the Information Infrastructure of Modern Social Movements. Journal of Communication, 62 (2), 315-329. (DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-2466.2012.01636.x).

McCarthy, C. (2011). Afterword. The Unmaking of Education in the Age of Globalization, Neoliberalism, and Information. In M.A. Peters & E. Bulut (Eds.), Cognitive Capitalism, Education and Digital Labor. (pp. 301-321). New York: Peter Lang.

Murthy, D. (2008). Digital Ethnography: An Examination of the Use of New Technologies for Social Research. Sociology, 42 (5), 837-855. (DOI: 10.1177/0038038508094565).

Scherman, A., Arriagada, A. & Valenzuela, S. (2013). La protesta en la era de las redes sociales: El caso chileno. En A. Arriagada & P. Navia (Eds.), Intermedios. Medios de comunicación y democracia en Chile. (pp. 179-197). Santiago: Ediciones Universidad Diego Portales.

Squires, C.R. (2011). Bursting the Bubble: A Case Study of Counter-framing in the Editorial Pages. Critical Studies in Media Communication, 28 (1), 30-49. (DOI:10.1080/15295036.2010.544613).

Stewart, C.J., Smith, C.A. & Denton, R.E. (1994). Persuasion and Social Movements (3rd ed.). Prospect Heights, IL: Waveland Press.

Tapscott, D. (2009). Grown Up Digital. How the Net Generation is Changing your World. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Thompson, K. (1998). Moral Panics. New York: Routledge.

Valdivia, A.N. (2010). Latina/os in the Media. Malden, MA: Polity Press.

Valenzuela, S. (2013). Unpacking the Use of Social Media for Protest Behavior: The Roles of Information, Opinion Expression, and Activism. American Behavioral Scientist, 57 (7), 920-942. (DOI: 10.1177/0002764213479375).

Valenzuela, S., Arriagada, A. & Scherman, A. (2012). The Social Media Basis of Youth Protest Behavior: The Case of Chile. Journal of Communication, 62 (2), 299-314. (DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-2466.2012.01635.x).

Xenos, M. & Moy, P. (2007). Direct and Differential Effects of the Internet on Political and Civic Engagement. Journal of Communication, 57 (4), 704-718. (DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-2466.2007.00364.x).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Considerando la relación entre los nuevos medios digitales y la acción política de los jóvenes, el objetivo de este artículo es describir el uso de Facebook durante el movimiento estudiantil chileno de 2011, a través de un análisis de contenido y textual de la página de Facebook de la Federación de Estudiantes de la Universidad de Chile (FECH). En 2011, Chile experimentó una serie de movilizaciones, quizás las más importantes de su historia reciente, donde los jóvenes fueron los protagonistas de la discusión sobre la educación. Durante estas manifestaciones, Facebook fue una de las redes sociales en Internet más utilizadas por las organizaciones participantes. En el caso de la FECH, esta agrupación estudiantil usó Facebook principalmente para convocar a las acciones de protestas, para resaltar los logros del movimiento y para señalar quiénes eran sus adversarios. Sin embargo, la mayor parte del contenido publicado fue generado por los medios de comunicación tradicionales, demostrando que en el nivel comunicacional también se entrelazan las estrategias usuales de los movimientos sociales con las nuevas prácticas más innovadoras. Por lo tanto, se rechaza la visión del determinismo tecnológico, porque no da cuenta de los fenómenos complejos que caracterizan el desarrollo de los movimientos estudiantiles y juveniles.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

«Con lluvia, con nieve, el pueblo igual se mueve», cantaban casi 100.000 estudiantes el 18 de agosto de 2011 por las calles de Santiago. Ese día, los termómetros marcaron cuatro grados bajo cero y caía algo de nieve en la capital de Chile (Cabalin, 2011). Esta manifestación fue llamada la «marcha de los paraguas», porque los participantes llevaban esos implementos para capear el agua que caía. Fue una protesta más de las múltiples acciones del «invierno chileno», como fue conocido internacionalmente el movimiento estudiantil en alusión a la «primavera árabe» de ese año. Unas horas después de la marcha, en la página de Facebook de la Federación de Estudiantes de la Universidad de Chile (FECH) se convocaba a una nueva acción de protesta: «tras la hermosa marcha de hoy, ¡cacerolazo a las 21 hrs.!». A 443 personas les gustó esta entrada y 31 emitieron sus comentarios de apoyo. Este es un ejemplo de la combinación de recursos tradicionales y nuevos que utilizan actualmente los movimientos sociales, donde las redes digitales juegan un papel fundamental en sus estrategias comunicacionales (Castells, 2012).

Durante 2011, diferentes movimientos de protesta se desarrollaron en diversos países («Los indignados» en España, «La primavera árabe» en Túnez y Egipto, entre otros). De hecho, para algunos autores fue un momento histórico que debe ser recordado como el «año de las revoluciones» (Fuchs, 2012: 775). Una de las características de estas movilizaciones ciudadanas fue el uso intensivo de las redes sociales en Internet. Muchos medios de comunicación calificaron a estos eventos como expresiones de las revoluciones «Facebook o Twitter», dependiendo de la importancia asignada a cada red social. Sin embargo, una serie de trabajos académicos sobre el tema, publicados en un número especial de «Journal of Communication», matizó esta popular categorización, mostrando que el impacto de las redes sociales digitales es complejo y contingente a cada contexto donde se desarrollan las protestas (Howard & Parks, 2012; Valenzuela, Arriagada & Scherman, 2012). Esta visión permite problematizar la noción de que los actuales movimientos sociales serían una consecuencia de los nuevos medios en Internet. Esta relación de causalidad es asociada al determinismo tecnológico, que no reconoce la complejidad de los movimientos sociales y sus componentes políticos, sociales, culturales y económicos (Fuchs, 2012).

Sin embargo, no es posible desconocer que Internet ha provisto de herramientas eficaces y novedosas a los movimientos sociales para movilizar adherentes y contrarrestar las tendencias mediáticas hegemónicas. De hecho, uno de los líderes del movimiento estudiantil chileno de 2011, Giorgio Jackson, indica que «las nuevas tecnologías sirvieron para ponerle un límite a los medios convencionales, para mostrarle que ya no tienen el monopolio de la realidad representada» (Jackson, 2013: 85). Considerando este punto, en este artículo se propone un análisis de la página de Facebook de la FECH, la federación de estudiantes más influyente de Chile, para describir cómo esta organización utilizó esta red social durante el movimiento.

Para dar cuenta de lo anterior, este artículo presenta primero la relación entre juventud e Internet, luego sitúa esta discusión en el movimiento estudiantil chileno para posteriormente describir el uso de la página de Facebook de la FECH, y se concluye con observaciones finales.

2. Jóvenes globalmente conectados

Los efectos de Internet en la formación de capital social, participación política, diversidad cultural y en la construcción identitaria de las personas, entre otros temas, han sido estudiados desde los años noventa. La juventud ha recibido una atención especial en la producción académica en torno a las nuevas tecnologías debido a la estrecha relación entre jóvenes e Internet (Tapscott, 2009).

Los jóvenes interactúan con las redes sociales digitales más que cualquier otro grupo social. Este es un fenómeno global. Por ejemplo, la juventud en Asia comparte experiencias similares a través de Internet con sus pares en Estados Unidos o en otras partes del mundo (Farrer, 2007). Sin embargo, sería ingenuo pensar que los jóvenes están viviendo un momento de pleno desarrollo gracias a las nuevas tecnologías. De hecho, las desigualdades globales les afectan en mayor medida. Tienen los niveles más altos de desempleo, sufren de vulnerabilidad y muchos están experimentando «los tiempos de espera» (waiting times), como Jeffrey (2010) llama a la situación de los jóvenes en los países en desarrollo que apostaron por la educación como instrumento de movilidad social, pero que han visto frustradas sus expectativas. Además, la representación y visibilidad social de los jóvenes ha sido dominada por el «pánico moral» (Valdivia, 2010; Thompson, 1998). Ellos son vistos como la esperanza del futuro, pero al mismo tiempo como el riesgo del presente (Comaroff & Comaroff, 2005). Frente a este escenario, las tecnologías han permitido otras vías de expresión y participación de los jóvenes.

Las tecnologías de la información tienen un alto componente económico, pero también cultural y político (Xenos & Moy, 2007). Debido a su carácter interactivo, las redes sociales en Internet han sido vistas como un espacio colaborativo de inmensas consecuencias para el desarrollo de la juventud. Algunos autores han hablado de un «momento histórico» para los jóvenes (Tapscott, 2009), pero otros son más escépticos sobre los impactos positivos de las nuevas tecnologías (Gladwell, 2010). En el caso de los movimientos estudiantiles en Chile de 2006 y 2011, las redes sociales y los nuevos medios digitales jugaron un papel clave en el desarrollo de las protestas. En la «Revolución de los Pingüinos», el movimiento secundario de 2006, los estudiantes utilizaron fotologs, blogs y YouTube para comunicar sus demandas (Condeza, 2009), y en 2011 los estudiantes movilizados ocuparon Twitter, YouTube y Facebook en sus estrategias comunicacionales.

Herrera (2012) ha caracterizado esta estrecha relación entre los jóvenes y las redes sociales digitales como la «generación conectada». En el caso del movimiento estudiantil chileno, podríamos presumir que sus protagonistas son parte de esta nueva generación. Los jóvenes movilizados encontraron en Internet un espacio para la construcción de sentidos durante el movimiento. Para Castells (2012: 5), este proceso de producción de sentidos es fundamental para el éxito de los movimientos sociales, ya que el poder es ejercido a través de la coerción generada por «mecanismos de manipulación simbólica». Las redes sociales digitales, entonces, ayudarían a contrarrestar relaciones de poder hegemónicas. Sin embargo, Buckingham y Rodríguez (2013) establecen que las nuevas tecnologías de la información están lejos de ser un espacio libre y democrático absoluto, porque muchas veces se reproducen esquemas tradicionales de dominación y control en las aplicaciones de Internet.

De todos modos, Internet sí permite observar cómo las prácticas políticas de los jóvenes se están desarrollando. Los estudiantes chilenos movilizados en 2011 mostraron que las acciones de protestas offline y on-line se complementan (Valenzuela, 2013), permitiendo superar la división entre movimiento «tradicional» y «nuevo», pues actualmente las formas de movilización incorporan ambas estrategias, haciéndolas más diversas y difíciles de definir linealmente. Sin embargo, el «mensaje» de los movimientos sociales sigue siendo determinante para sus operaciones, más allá del medio por el cual se comunique (Castells, 2012).

3. La comunicación del movimiento

Los estudiantes estuvieron en la calle durante siete meses y consiguieron un respaldo ciudadano del 80%, según diversas encuestas. Uno de los elementos que ayudan a explicar este amplio apoyo popular fue la capacidad de los estudiantes para encuadrar exitosamente su mensaje de transformación y copar la agenda mediática durante el movimiento. Los estudiantes fueron conscientes de la necesidad de convertir sus objetivos políticos en un mensaje masivo, tal como Jackson (2013: 63) lo señala: «nuestro lenguaje inicial fue muy poco ideologizado, era técnico y pragmático, en el sentido de que si queríamos llegar a más gente teníamos que empezar por borrar ciertas palabras». Los estudiantes transmitieron un mensaje que condensaba los principales problemas del sistema educacional chileno: desigualdad, mala calidad, segregación y endeudamiento (Bellei & Cabalin, 2013).

En Chile, el modelo neoliberal en educación fue implementado en los años 80 durante la dictadura de Augusto Pinochet, implicando la privatización del sistema educacional, la exacerbación de la competencia, la precarización del empleo docente y el debilitamiento de la educación pública, entre otros aspectos propios de la neoliberalización de la educación a escala global (McCarthy, 2011). En 2011, el supuesto progreso neoliberal se enfrentó por primera vez en 30 años a un crítico examen por una parte mayoritaria de la población, sorprendiendo a los administradores del sistema económico y político. Tal como recuerda otro de los líderes estudiantiles del año 2011, Francisco Figueroa: «pocos imaginaban que los propios hijos del modelo, jóvenes supuestamente adormecidos por el individualismo, se rebelarían contra el actual estado de cosas» (Figueroa, 2013: 72). Las revueltas estudiantiles, justamente, demostraron que la pasividad que se les asignaba a los jóvenes reducía su participación política solo a la dimensión clásica establecida en las rutinas del sistema político. Sin embargo, los jóvenes sí participaron a través de otros métodos.

En las movilizaciones estudiantiles de 2011, las marchas, paros y tomas de establecimientos educacionales fueron acompañadas por «flashmobs», «besatones» y campañas virales, entre otras acciones artísticas, donde los estudiantes usaron el espacio público físico y digital activamente. Fue una mezcla de «Facebook y calle», parafraseando el libro «Tweets and the Streets: Social Media and Contemporary Activism» (Gerbaudo, 2012), que cuestiona el excesivo énfasis en las redes sociales digitales como catalizadores de las acciones de protesta. A través de la combinación de ambas estrategias, los estudiantes desplegaron sus demandas, demostrando que «incluso un nuevo medio tan poderoso y participativo, como las redes sociales en Internet, no es el mensaje. El mensaje construye el medio» (Castells, 2012: 122). Esto significa que un movimiento social para ser exitoso necesita, entre otros aspectos, producir un mensaje persuasivo (Stewart, Smith & Denton, 1994), que conecte con las experiencias de las personas. Las redes sociales digitales permiten que ese mensaje sea viral, masificando su penetración, sobre todo, entre los sectores juveniles. Así lo entendió la Federación de Estudiantes de la Universidad de Chile a través de su página de Facebook.

4. Métodos y material

El 86% de los jóvenes chilenos tiene una cuenta de Facebook y el 52% se conecta al menos una vez al día (Scherman, Arriagada & Valenzuela, 2013). Facebook fue la red social digital más utilizada por los estudiantes durante el movimiento de 2011. De hecho, el 68% de quienes se movilizaron usó Internet como una plataforma de información sobre el movimiento (Arriagada & al., 2011). Por eso, resulta interesante analizar cómo esta generación de estudiantes desplegó sus acciones a través de las redes sociales digitales durante las protestas. Para ilustrar este punto y sin pretensiones de generalizar los resultados a todas las organizaciones movilizadas, se utilizó como referencia la página de Facebook de la Federación de Estudiantes de la Universidad de Chile, ya que es una de las instituciones más influyentes en el debate educacional chileno y su presidenta durante 2011, Camila Vallejo, fue una de las líderes con mayor notoriedad pública en los medios de comunicación. Esta página de Facebook tuvo más de 62.000 «amigos» durante el movimiento, superando la cantidad de estudiantes de la propia universidad, lo que demuestra la extensión de su influencia más allá de la Universidad de Chile.

Las nuevas tecnologías de la información implican diversos enfoques epistemológicos y metodológicos. Las redes sociales digitales pueden ser útiles para estudiar las interacciones sociales, las relaciones de pertenencia, la formación de la identidad y los tipos de discusión, entre otros temas (Murthy, 2008). Según Coleman (2010: 488), existen al menos tres enfoques para el estudio de los medios de comunicación digitales: a) las políticas culturales de los medios de comunicación digitales; b) las culturas de los medios digitales; y c) la prosa de los medios digitales. El primero se refiere al interés en el estudio de la circulación y construcción de las identidades culturales, representaciones, significados y compromisos colectivos en los medios digitales. El segundo enfoque aborda el análisis de los diferentes grupos o fenómenos sociales en los medios digitales (blogs, hackers, «memes», por ejemplo). Por último, el tercer enfoque se centra en las prácticas sociales en los medios digitales que implican aspectos económicos, financieros, culturales o religiosos. El estudio aquí presentado se acerca al primer enfoque.

El movimiento estudiantil se prolongó a lo largo de siete meses, pero la muestra del material se restringió solo a un mes, considerando dos hitos: uno político (el primer cambio de ministro de Educación durante el movimiento) y otro simbólico (la «marcha de los paraguas»). Estos dos eventos representan, en cierta medida, lo que significó el movimiento estudiantil en la historia reciente de Chile. Por una parte, el sistema político fue superado por la fuerza de los estudiantes movilizados, quienes cuestionaron la legitimidad de las vías de representación política en el país. Por otra parte, la persistencia de las acciones de protesta y su masividad transformaron al movimiento en una expresión de compromiso colectivo de los estudiantes más allá de las condiciones particulares de cada uno.

Para describir cómo la FECH utilizó Facebook durante estos 33 días intencionalmente seleccionados, fueron analizadas todas las entradas publicadas desde el 18 de julio –cuando el presidente de la República, Sebastián Piñera, realizó el cambio de gabinete, que incluyó la salida del entonces ministro de Educación, Joaquín Lavín, y la incorporación en su reemplazo de Felipe Bulnes– hasta el 19 de agosto de 2011, un día después de la «marcha de los paraguas». Se incluyó este último evento, para observar cómo los propios estudiantes abordaron el éxito de su marcha el día posterior a su realización. Estas entradas fueron «vaciadas» en una matriz de análisis de contenido (Krippendorff, 2013), construida deductivamente a partir de literatura previa sobre movimientos sociales y comunicación (Stewart, Smith & Denton, 1994; Benford & Snow, 2000; Castells, 2012; Valenzuela, 2013). Este diseño metodológico se relaciona con la pregunta de investigación: ¿Cuáles fueron los usos de la página de Facebook de la FECH en términos de contenido durante uno de los siete meses de movilización estudiantil? Para responder a esta pregunta, se utilizaron ocho categorías generales. Las dos primeras categorías reconocieron la propia arquitectura del medio analizado, que regula y limita su uso (Lafi Youmans & York, 2012). Estas categorías básicas son:

1) Me gusta: Se cuantificó la cantidad de «me gusta» señalados en cada entrada, para dar cuenta de su popularidad o aceptación.

2) Comentarios: Se consideró el número de comentarios en cada entrada, para observar la interacción generada a partir de dicho contenido.

Las siguientes tres categorías intentaron describir la estrategia comunicacional utilizada por la Federación de Estudiantes de la Universidad de Chile. Para ello se consideró la presencia (1) o ausencia (0) de estos constructos analíticos:

3) Comentario propio: Para cuantificar si generaba la FECH algún tipo de comentario en la entrada, como una manera de encuadrar el contenido publicado.

4) Fotos o videos: Se midió la presencia de imágenes entendiéndose que su incorporación puede generar una entrada más llamativa.

5) Liderazgo de la organización: Considerando que su presidenta era Camila Vallejo, una figura ampliamente conocida por la opinión pública, se midió si la FECH la mencionaba o no en sus entradas.

Las dos restantes categorías generales buscaron describir las características del contenido en cada una de las entradas analizadas. Estas categorías fueron:

6) Origen del contenido: Se midió si el contenido era generado por la página web de la propia FECH, si era contenido de la Universidad de Chile, de otro organismo relacionado con el movimiento o un contenido del gobierno. También se cuantificó si el contenido posteado fue producido por una organización no asociada al movimiento o por un medio de comunicación tradicional.

7) Cita de medios: Para medir la interacción con otras plataformas de comunicación, se cuantificó si el contenido posteado hacía referencia a un medio de comunicación nacional, internacional, estudiantil u otro medio social digital (YouTube, por ejemplo).

La categoría final buscó describir el propósito de la entrada, ya que los objetivos de los movimientos sociales están asociados también a diferentes estrategias comunicacionales. Por ejemplo, «los movimientos sociales transforman las percepciones de la sociedad a través de una retórica de polarización que crea una clara distinción entre el dañino oponente y el virtuoso movimiento» (Stewart, Smith & Denton, 1994: 51). Entonces, esta categoría correspondió a:

8) Propósito de la entrada: Se midió si el contenido publicado convocaba a participar en acciones de protestas (marchas, paros, «funas», etc.) o en actividades del movimiento (charlas, conferencias, etc.). También si en la entrada se destacaban los logros o apoyos al movimiento (balance de participación, respaldos emblemáticos, etc.).

Finalmente, otros objetivos podían ser reafirmar la definición del movimiento (razones de la movilización) o responder a los adversarios (gobierno, policía, etc.).

Este análisis de contenido descriptivo fue complementado con el análisis textual de las entradas realizadas por la FECH, para describir y entender cómo fueron encuadrados los contenidos publicados en la página de Facebook. El análisis textual siguió la propuesta de Norman Fairclough (2003), que entiende a los discursos como una faceta de la vida social en interacción con otras dimensiones sociales. El discurso es, en definitiva, una práctica social (Fairclough, 2003). Se realizó este análisis textual para dar cuenta con una mayor amplitud del uso de Facebook, considerando la importancia de la generación de mensajes y sentidos en el desarrollo de los movimientos sociales (Castells, 2012).

5. Resultados

Considerando las ocho categorías generales mencionadas, se identificaron 552 entradas durante el mes de análisis (un promedio de 16,7 entradas al día), lo que muestra el uso intensivo de esta plataforma digital por parte de la FECH. Se contabilizaron 47.314 aprobaciones (me gusta) a los contenidos publicados y 8.686 comentarios. Es decir, cada entrada generó en promedio 15,7 comentarios por parte de los seguidores de la página.

5.1. Contenidos

Del análisis se desprende que la FECH utilizó su página de Facebook principalmente como una fuente de información sobre el movimiento estudiantil. La gran mayoría de las entradas estaba acompañada por un comentario propio de la federación, que intentaba explicar, detallar o resumir el contenido publicado. En el 85,7% de las 552 entradas contabilizadas, la FECH realizó una introducción propia para encuadrar la discusión. Sin embargo, la presencia de «ganchos» visuales (fotos o videos) no fue masiva, considerando el común uso de Facebook asociado a la publicación de imágenes. Solo en el 58,5% de las entradas se observó este uso. Más escasas aún fueron las referencias al liderazgo de la organización. Prácticamente, Camila Vallejo no fue mencionada en las entradas. Apenas 43 de las 552 entradas incluyeron alguna mención a la presidenta de la FECH. Este resultado llama la atención, debido a la alta notoriedad pública de la dirigente y podría ser explicado por el carácter mismo de la FECH, cuya dirigencia está constituida por representantes de las listas más votadas en las elecciones de cada año. Así, la organización no está al servicio de un líder particular, sino de todos los grupos de estudiantes que componen su mesa directiva.

Otro resultado destacado fue la utilización de contenidos producidos por algún medio de comunicación tradicional. La mayoría de las entradas incorporó un contenido generado por una organización distinta a la FECH. De hecho, el 40% de las entradas correspondió a contenidos de los medios tradicionales y solo el 22,6% fue un contenido generado por la propia FECH. Esto ilustra que la página de Facebook fue empleada mayormente para responder a los contenidos publicados en otras plataformas mediáticas. Las referencias a contenidos generados por la Universidad de Chile (4), por otro organismo del movimiento (7), por el gobierno (3) o por una organización no directamente vinculada al movimiento (10) fueron escasas.

En resumen, el gran generador de contenidos para la página de Facebook de la FECH fueron los medios de comunicación tradicionales (radios, diarios impresos y digitales, televisión). Específicamente, los medios de comunicación nacionales fueron la principal fuente de contenidos (37% de las 552 entradas). Los medios internacionales apenas aparecieron citados en 14 oportunidades, pese a la amplia cobertura sobre el movimiento en medios de diversos países. Además, consistente con la poca incorporación de imágenes en las entradas analizadas, solo en 28 ocasiones se contabilizó alguna referencia a YouTube.

En cuanto a los propósitos de cada entrada, el uso de Facebook por parte de la FECH respondió a las características habituales de las estrategias comunicacionales de los movimientos sociales. Sus principales usos fueron: movilizar adherentes a través de la convocatoria a acciones de protestas o actividades del movimiento (29,2%), resaltar los logros, apoyos destacados y las masivas manifestaciones (27,5%) y recordar quiénes eran los adversarios del movimiento (24,3%). Las restantes 47 entradas tuvieron como objetivo informar de las principales razones del conflicto estudiantil. A través de estos usos comunicacionales, la FECH contribuyó a la construcción de los marcos interpretativos para la acción colectiva, entendidos como «un set de creencias y significados que orientan las acciones y aspiran a legitimar las actividades y campañas de una organización movilizada» (Benford & Snow, 2000: 614). Las constantes referencias a la masividad de las protestas y al apoyo que sumaban los estudiantes mostraban el «éxito» del movimiento y la necesidad de seguir marchando, sin olvidar quiénes eran los adversarios. Ese era el marco para la acción que se comunicaba a través de la página de Facebook de la FECH.

5.2. Análisis textual

Para el análisis textual, se examinaron las 473 entradas que incluyeron un encabezado generado por la propia FECH. La gran mayoría de estos textos hacía mención directa al contenido posteado, en un intento por introducir la información o contextualizarla. También en estas entradas se agregaban datos adicionales a los mencionados en el contenido publicado o se rechazaban las informaciones difundidas por los medios de comunicación tradicionales. Algunos ejemplos son: «Conozca al nuevo ministro de Educación. Información completa sobre Felipe Bulnes» (19-07-2011); «Estimados, en estos momentos tengan doble ojo [cuidado] al momento de leer algunos medios de comunicación» (19-07-2011); «Se han inventado tantas cosas para desprestigiarnos, atentos con la info [sic] que circula» (19-08-2011). Este tipo de mensajes iba acompañado de notas explicativas. A través de estos usos, se amplió la información disponible para los participantes del movimiento y se realizó un «contra-framing» de los eventos noticiosos publicados por los medios tradicionales (Squires, 2011).

Los comentarios propios de la FECH eran, en su gran mayoría, textos cortos, precisos e informativos. Esto se puede explicar, porque la página de Facebook fue administrada por los profesionales jóvenes de la organización, quienes tienen conocimiento en comunicación. Por ejemplo, al comentar la modificación ministerial del presidente Piñera, la FECH escribió: «No basta un cambio de Ministro, demandamos un cambio en las políticas del Estado» (19-07-2011); o para convocar a una actividad de protesta durante el invierno chileno: «¡Ni la lluvia nos va a detener!» (28-07-2011). Como era de esperar, todas las referencias a las acciones del movimiento fueron positivas y las menciones a los adversarios negativas, confirmando la estrategia comunicacional de polarización que emplean los movimientos sociales (Stewart, Smith & Denton, 1994).

El enfoque positivo de los textos intentaba mostrar los apoyos y logros del movimiento, contrarrestando las voces oficiales conservadoras que criticaban a los estudiantes (Cabalin, 2014). También esta estrategia discursiva pretendía motivar y sumar adherentes a las manifestaciones. Así, cuando se produjo una marcha no autorizada, que fue violentamente reprimida por la policía, el 4 de agosto de 2011, la FECH publicó en su Facebook: «¡La marcha va! Ninguna medida represiva que desate el gobierno logrará socavar la fuerza de nuestro movimiento. ¡Respondemos con más unidad y con más lucha!». Durante ese día se produjo el mayor grado de violencia contra el movimiento estudiantil y Facebook fue utilizada como una plataforma de denuncia: «En todo Chile se está reprimiendo»; «Lo que hoy ha sucedido en nuestro país: ¡No puede quedar impune!». Los mensajes escritos en mayúsculas por los propios administradores de la página de Facebook muestran los énfasis de la queja estudiantil que fue reafirmada por los líderes del movimiento en sus declaraciones posteriores a los medios de comunicación tradicionales.

Otros usos comunes de los mensajes fueron la solicitud de difusión de las actividades del movimiento, la recopilación de información del desarrollo de las manifestaciones a lo largo del país o la reafirmación de las acciones de protesta. Por ejemplo: «Que todo el mundo sepa que en Chile hoy no pudimos manifestarnos y congregarnos públicamente» (04-08-2011); «¿Cómo va el cacerolazo [protesta golpeando ollas] en sus casas?» (09-08-2011); «Ayer en Santiago fuimos 100.000 bajo la lluvia, pacíficamente hermoso. Este Domingo todos invitados al Domingo Familiar por la Educación, con todos para todos» (19-08-2011). Este tipo de mensajes llamaban explícitamente a la interacción con los seguidores de la página, pidiendo por una parte «ayuda» en las denuncias y, por otra parte, buscando retroalimentación sobre las acciones de protesta. Fue también una forma de promover la participación y de convertir a los espectadores en activistas de estas acciones.

En definitiva, los mensajes publicados por la propia FECH dan cuenta del uso de Facebook considerando los siguientes objetivos comunicacionales: difundir y encuadrar información, responder a los medios de comunicación tradicionales, contrarrestar información oficial, convocar manifestaciones públicas, resaltar los resultados positivos de las protestas y los apoyos obtenidos, llamar a la adhesión y, finalmente, identificar y acusar a los principales detractores del movimiento.

6. Conclusión

Como hemos observado, una de las organizaciones más importantes del movimiento estudiantil chileno de 2011 utilizó intensivamente Facebook, pero su uso replicó esquemas clásicos de los movimientos sociales. Esto indica que las actuales acciones de protesta sintetizan actos tradicionales con nuevas formas más innovadoras, lo que permite descartar algún atisbo de determinismo tecnológico en el análisis de las acciones de estos movimientos. De acuerdo con la investigación de Valenzuela (2013) sobre el comportamiento de protesta de los jóvenes chilenos, el uso de los medios sociales en Internet –para expresar opiniones y unirse a causas sociales– predice una mayor probabilidad de participar en movilizaciones públicas, pero no se puede considerar como un detonante de estas acciones. Además, es importante considerar que «las consecuencias de los medios on-line en la participación política de los individuos son contingentes a los distintos contextos y usos que las personas hacen de esas tecnologías» (Scherman, Arriagada & Valenzuela, 2013: 181). Los movimientos sociales utilizan las redes digitales como una herramienta más en un amplio conjunto de repertorios, que van desde las manifestaciones públicas hasta las campañas virales por Internet, como lo mostró un estudio de caso sobre el movimiento 15M en España (Hernández-Merayo, Robles-Vílchez & Martínez-Rodríguez, 2013).

En el caso de la FECH, el mayor uso que esta organización le dio a su página de Facebook fue realizado en función de estrategias puntuales de movilización, como la convocatoria a marchas, debates y conferencias, además de destacar permanentemente a sus adversarios como los responsables del conflicto. Conscientes de la importancia de la comunicación para el éxito del movimiento, los estudiantes recurrieron también a los medios tradicionales, cuyas informaciones fueron el principal contenido en la página de Facebook de la FECH. Estos contenidos, muchas veces críticos hacia los estudiantes, eran re-contexualizados en las entradas analizadas a través de comentarios explicativos o que derechamente llamaban a no creer en la información publicada por los medios tradicionales. En esta línea se enmarca el juicio de uno de los líderes estudiantiles: «Estuvimos en las radios, los noticiarios de televisión, los matinales y los periódicos. Esto fue así a pesar de las líneas editoriales e intereses de algunos de los medios, que reaccionaron ante nuestro mensaje rebelde y transgresor volcando sus esfuerzos en tergiversar nuestras opiniones y concentrándose en mostrar al movimiento con un carácter violentista e intransigente, casi delictual» (Jackson, 2013: 21-22).

Las redes sociales en Internet no solo sirvieron para este «contra-framing», sino también para desplegar el mensaje de los estudiantes movilizados. Los movimientos sociales tienen a la comunicación como «su sangre vital» (Stewart, Smith & Denton, 1994: 159) y los estudiantes chilenos así también lo entendieron.

Evidentemente, las nuevas tecnologías de la información son herramientas fundamentales para el desarrollo de los movimientos juveniles actuales, pero no se pueden considerar exclusivamente como los factores que posibilitan el éxito y alcance de estos movimientos. En el caso del movimiento estudiantil chileno, su prolongado desarrollo se explica por razones estructurales asociadas a la reproducción de las desigualdades en el sistema educacional y a las reconfiguraciones políticas y culturales del país. De todos modos, Facebook y otras plataformas digitales fueron clave para el despliegue comunicacional de las movilizaciones, facilitando la transformación de muchos espectadores en adherentes del movimiento.

Considerando lo anterior, resultaría interesante profundizar en otros aspectos de la relación entre los nuevos medios digitales y las acciones de protesta juvenil. Por ejemplo, se podrían examinar los procesos de apropiación de estas nuevas tecnologías por parte de los jóvenes y su impacto en las movilizaciones ciudadanas o en la identidad generacional. Este enfoque estuvo fuera del alcance y objetivo de este artículo, pero de igual modo el estudio presentado permite conocer descriptivamente los usos comunicacionales de Facebook desarrollados por una organización influyente en el movimiento estudiantil chileno de 2011.

==

Referencias

Arriagada, A., Scherman, A., Barrera, A. & Pardo, J. (2011). La generación movilizada. Qué Pasa (http://goo.gl/ncBaCy) (13-11-2013).

Bellei, C. & Cabalin, C. (2013). Chilean Student Movements: Sustained Struggle to Transform a Market-oriented Educational System. Current Issues in Comparative Education, 15(2), 108-123.

Benford, R.D. & Snow, D.A. (2000). Framing Processes and Social Movements. An Overview and Assessment. Annual Review of Sociology, 26, 611-639. (DOI: 10.1146/annurev.soc.26.1.611).

Buckingham, D. & Rodríguez, C. (2013). Aprendiendo sobre el poder y la ciudadanía en un mundo virtual. Comunicar, 40, 49-58. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-05).

Cabalin, C. (2011). La democracia de los estudiantes. Perfil. (http://goo.gl/twtvxB) (15-02-2014).

Cabalin, C. (2014). The Conservative Response to the 2011 Chilean Student Movement: Neoliberal Education and Media. Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01596306.2013.871233).

Castells, M. (2012). Networks of Outrage and Hope. Social Movements in the Internet Age. Cambridge, MA: Polity Press.

Coleman, E.G. (2010). Ethnographic Approaches to Digital Media. Annual Review of Anthropology, 39, 487-498. (DOI: 10.1146/annurev.anthro.012809.10494).

Comaroff, J. & Comaroff, J. (2005). Children and Youth in a Global Era: Reflections on Youth. From the Past to the Postcolony. In A. Honwana & F. De Boeck (Eds.), Makers & Breakers: Children and Youth in Postcolonial Africa. (pp. 19-30). Trenton, NJ & Asmara, Eritrea: Africa World Press.

Condeza, A.R. (2009). Las estrategias de comunicación utilizadas por los adolescentes. Cuadernos de Información, 24, 67-78. (DOI: 10.7764/cdi.0.35).

Fairclough, N. (2003). Analysing Discourse. Textual Analysis for Social Research. New York: Routledge.

Farrer, J. (2007). Networked and not Inhibited: Asian Youth Culture in a Globalizing World. Global Asia, 2 (1), 102-110.

Figueroa, F. (2013). Llegamos para quedarnos. Crónicas de la revuelta estudiantil. Santiago: LOM Ediciones.

Fuchs, C. (2012). Some reflections on Manuel Castells’ book networks of outrage and hope. Social movements in the internet age. Triple C, 10 (2), 775-797.

Gerbaudo, P. (2012). Tweets and the Streets. Social Media and Contemporary Activism. London: Pluto Press.

Gladwell, M. (2010). Small Change: Why the Revolution will not be Tweeted. New Yorker. (http://goo.gl/ikIFec) (13-11-2013).

Hernández-Merayo, E., Robles-Vílchez, M.C. & Martínez-Rodríguez, J.B. (2013). Jóvenes interactivos y culturas cívicas: Sentido educativo, mediático y político del 15M. Comunicar, 40, 59-67. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-06).

Herrera, L. (2012). Youth and Citizenship in the Digital Age: A View from Egypt. Harvard Educational Review, 82(3), 333-352.

Howard, P.N. & Parks, M.R. (2012). Social Media and Political Change: Capacity, Constraint, and Consequence. Journal of Communication, 62 (2), 359-362. (DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-2466.2012.01626.x).

Jackson, G. (2013). El país que soñamos. Santiago: Debate.

Jeffrey, C. (2010). Timepass: Youth, Class, and the Politics of Waiting in India. Palo Alto: Stanford Uinversity Press.

Krippendorff, K.H. (2013). Content Analysis: An introduction to its Methodology. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Lafi Youmans, W. & York, J.C. (2012). Social Media and the Activist Toolkit: User Agreements, Corporate Interests, and the Information Infrastructure of Modern Social Movements. Journal of Communication, 62 (2), 315-329. (DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-2466.2012.01636.x).

McCarthy, C. (2011). Afterword. The Unmaking of Education in the Age of Globalization, Neoliberalism, and Information. In M.A. Peters & E. Bulut (Eds.), Cognitive Capitalism, Education and Digital Labor. (pp. 301-321). New York: Peter Lang.

Murthy, D. (2008). Digital Ethnography: An Examination of the Use of New Technologies for Social Research. Sociology, 42 (5), 837-855. (DOI: 10.1177/0038038508094565).

Scherman, A., Arriagada, A. & Valenzuela, S. (2013). La protesta en la era de las redes sociales: El caso chileno. En A. Arriagada & P. Navia (Eds.), Intermedios. Medios de comunicación y democracia en Chile. (pp. 179-197). Santiago: Ediciones Universidad Diego Portales.

Squires, C.R. (2011). Bursting the Bubble: A Case Study of Counter-framing in the Editorial Pages. Critical Studies in Media Communication, 28 (1), 30-49. (DOI:10.1080/15295036.2010.544613).

Stewart, C.J., Smith, C.A. & Denton, R.E. (1994). Persuasion and Social Movements (3rd ed.). Prospect Heights, IL: Waveland Press.

Tapscott, D. (2009). Grown Up Digital. How the Net Generation is Changing your World. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Thompson, K. (1998). Moral Panics. New York: Routledge.

Valdivia, A.N. (2010). Latina/os in the Media. Malden, MA: Polity Press.

Valenzuela, S. (2013). Unpacking the Use of Social Media for Protest Behavior: The Roles of Information, Opinion Expression, and Activism. American Behavioral Scientist, 57 (7), 920-942. (DOI: 10.1177/0002764213479375).

Valenzuela, S., Arriagada, A. & Scherman, A. (2012). The Social Media Basis of Youth Protest Behavior: The Case of Chile. Journal of Communication, 62 (2), 299-314. (DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-2466.2012.01635.x).

Xenos, M. & Moy, P. (2007). Direct and Differential Effects of the Internet on Political and Civic Engagement. Journal of Communication, 57 (4), 704-718. (DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-2466.2007.00364.x).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/06/14
Accepted on 30/06/14
Submitted on 30/06/14

Volume 22, Issue 2, 2014
DOI: 10.3916/C43-2014-02
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 29
Views 1
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?