Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Drawing on in-depth interviews conducted with residents at an old-aged home in Cape Town, South Africa, this study examines the main uses and gratifications elderly people get from computers. While the research focus in Africa has been on the health of elderly people, particularly with respect to HIV/AIDS, there is little research into their adoption of new technologies, as the research focus with respect to that topic has been primarily on youth. This study found that the participants use email and social media to maintain contact with family and friends outside of, and sometimes even within the neighborhood. Furthermore, keeping in contact involved not only communication, but also observation of activities - like news, photographs and discussions. Using a uses and gratifications framework, this study found that participants felt connected with society both through their communication with and observation of people, and through keeping themselves informed about news and current interest topics. By using the Internet the elderly people communicated with more people than they had before. Some of the participants felt less isolated and lonely because of their computer use. Nevertheless, use of computers did not weaken their interpersonal contact outside of computer use.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Gilly & Zeithaml (1985) wrote that «interest in the elderly [had] burgeoned in the last ten years because this demographic segment –defined as adults aged 65 and older– [had] expanded in size and spending power» (353). The interest they referred to had mostly been consumer market research in the USA, and they explored whether older adults were using new consumer-related technologies. Findings showed that older adults held negative views of innovations and were not quick to adopt new innovations. They were also not as aware of new technologies as younger people were. The research used these findings to make recommendations for making technologies and sources of information more accessible and useful to older adults.

During the 1990s the focus became more specific – researching recommendations for making computers more accessible and useful to older adults. This research trend was located mainly in the field of educational gerontology in the USA. The older adult age group was still expanding in size, the 75+ age group being the fastest growing age group in the USA (Lawhon & Ennis, 1996). Trends during the period leading up to 1985 suggested that older adults were unwilling and unable to use new innovations, like computers. It was predicted that computer illiteracy among older adults would increase as the size of the age group increased (Baldi, 1997; Morgan, 1994). As a result, the overarching recommendation that came out of research in the 1990s was for computer skills training courses for older adults. It was found that older adults approached such courses with a positive view, believing in the suggested benefits of computer use (Morgan, 1994). The conclusion was that previous research results related to older adults’ use of new technologies could not be applied to older adults’ use of computers, especially where older adults were offered computer skills training courses specific to their age group’s needs. Recommendations were then also made for adapting computer software interface design to cater for older adults’ needs (Hutchison & Eastman, 1997).

Going into the new millennium, the Internet –as the newest medium of communication– still occupied, with computers, significant research space (Ruggiero, 2000).While progress was made in discovering how best to adapt computer training and the Internet to users’ needs, it was recognised that a better understanding of these needs would illuminate why different users came away from their experience with computers with varying degrees of satisfaction and partiality (Papacharissi & Rubin, 2000). Consequently, uses and gratifications studies often appeared in research into older adults’ media use. Mellor, Firth and Moore (2008) conducted quantitative and qualitative research in Australia to investigate whether the use of computers and the Internet could lower levels of social isolation of older adults. However, the results were mixed, with surveys showing that the older adults’ overall well-being did not significantly improve, but the older adults saying in interviews that they did benefit from using computers and the Internet. In another study in Australia in 2008, quantitative research showed that reduced feelings of loneliness in older adults appeared where they used the Internet for communication, but not where they used it to make new social contacts (Sum, Mathews, Hughes & Campbell, 2008).

More recently, a uses and gratifications study in the USA focused on social networking that older adults engaged in online. A survey had shown that «about 51% of all Americans aged 50-64 and 33% of those over 65 had a Facebook account, although a lot less [were] regular daily users» (Ancu, 2012: 1). In 2013, Lelkes’s research in Europe reported results similar to those of Mellor et al. (2008) in Australia. It found that older adults who used the Internet reported that their well-being benefitted from this. It also found that the more older adults used the Internet, the less they experienced social isolation outside of Internet use.

In summary, research over the past forty years or so has identified various reasons why older adults use media – for information, entertainment and social utility, with social utility including communicating with others in society and making new social contacts. Research has also explored how these uses have affected older adults’ sense of loneliness versus community, how the uses have affected their social involvement (networking versus isolation) and how they feel about that, and how they feel about their well-being. The research covered in this review was conducted in the USA, Australia and Europe, and displays a movement from the general – new technologies and innovations –to the more specific– computers, the Internet, then Facebook.

Since life expectancy in South Africa is lower than in the USA or Europe there has not been the same extent of research trends around the older adult age group. In addition, South Africa’s economic climate differs from those in the USA, Australia or Europe in ways that cause differences in the populations’ use of computers. A uses and gratifications study of older adults’ computer use in South Africa thus makes new contributions to existing research.

South Africa is placed 5th in Africa for Internet usage with only 2.2 out of every 100 people connected to broadband services, but mobile broadband subscriptions are growing at a rate of 30% per year1. Despite the digital divide, Internet access in South Africa is growing with 40.9% of South African households having access to the Internet at home or elsewhere in 2013 (Statistics South Africa, 2013). The growth of the mobile Internet has meant that more people use their mobile phones to browse the Internet, and as a result there is wide popularity of social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter (Donner & Gitau, 2009).

2. Statement of the problem

Research into elderly people’s (aged 65 and above) use of media has developed as the demographic has grown in size and spending power (Gilly & Zeithaml, 1985). In South Africa, the older population has had to adapt to a changing society, as a result of political changes and the dynamics of society which led to migration of young people to cities for jobs (Bohman & al., 2007). While the research focus in Africa has been on the health of elderly people, particularly with respect to HIV/AIDS, there has been little to no research into their adoption of new technologies, as the research focus here has been primarily on youth. The elderly are an important section of society and it is important to study their use of media, particularly as it may have implications for intergenerational communication.

Drawing on interviews conducted with residents at an old-aged home in Cape Town, South Africa, this study examines the main uses and gratifications elderly people get from computers. Firstly, the study asked, why do they use computers? This explored whether they used computers for sending emails to or receiving emails from family, friends, colleagues or subscriptions, playing games, finding information via search engines, watching or listening to media, engaging with social media, or any further uses. Secondly, the study asked, what are the effects of these uses on elderly people? I.e. whether advantages included strengthened contact with others in society either through the computer only or outside of computer use too, weakened contact with others in society outside of computer use, a higher or lower sense of affiliation with others in society, relief from boredom, greater or reduced feelings of loneliness, or anything else.

The present study emphasises how the use of computers affects elderly people’s social connections. The impact of the Internet on social connections is under-researched, with some literature concluding that the Internet strengthens interpersonal contact and other literature concluding the opposite (Hogeboom, McDermott, Perrin, Osman & Bell-Ellison, 2010). In 2012 statistics showed that the fastest growing age group to use social networking sites (e.g. Facebook) were older adults (Ancu, 2012). Therefore a study of how elderly people use computers and how they are consequently affected is of significance, particularly in the African context where the focus has been primarily on youth adoption of new technologies and social media.

Moreover, a uses and gratifications approach to this study is appropriate as the intention is to understand why and how elderly people seek out specific media to satisfy specific needs. According to Katz, Blumler and Gurevitch’s (1973-1974) seminal research in this area, the audience is active and seeks out 5 potential uses ofmedia : information, identifying with media characters, simple entertainment, to enhance social interaction or to escape from the stress of daily life. The uses and gratifications approach is a theoretical approach that seeks to understand why and how people choose specific media to satisfy specific needs. The emergence of computer mediated communication revived the uses and gratifications approach (Ruggiero, 2000), which sees the audience as active though it does not explore media content or take into account the socio-cultural context.

3. Methodology

The methodology for this research article was in-depth interviews, focusing on a limited number of participants. Given that the interpretive paradigm is what underlies this study, a qualitative research design was the best approach. The interpretive paradigm has to do with the everyday behaviour of people in interpreting events and creating meaning (Wimmer & Dominick, 2006). Similarly, qualitative research is conducted to «describe routine and problematic moments and meanings in individuals’ lives» (Denzin & Lincoln, 1994: 2).

This study was informed by the notion that older adults use computers for particular reasons, and further guided by the notion that older adults obtain particular gratifications from computer use. The interpretive paradigm underlying the qualitative approach to this study is logical because the use of computers is an everyday, routine behaviour of individuals –in this study, older adults– in response to problems of social inactivity, boredom, loneliness or anything else; and the gratifications from computer use are meanings created by these individuals as they interpret the effects of their computer use.

Use of in-depth interviews was the methodological choice because the participants could be observed and in-depth information such as their deeper thoughts and the meanings behind their words could be collected from them. According to Denzin and Lincoln (1994: 361), «interviewing is one of the most common and most powerful ways we use to try to understand our fellow human beings». Participants were drawn from the pool of residents of the Glen Retirement Hotel (pseudonym). This was a hotel in Cape Town that was converted in 2012 to a home for the elderly. Its communal areas are a dining-room, lounge, sunroom, bar and reading room and, more significantly for this study, a computer area equipped with two computers. In addition, there is Wi-Fi access in the computer area, lounge, and bar and reading room. The Glen is within walking distance of a beach and other social locales. The Glen is located in an affluent socio-economic area and it was assumed that sample would include affluent grandparents who use the Internet to communicate with loved ones outside of the neighborhood. Moreover, interviews included questions about social networking via the Internet versus social networking in the Glen’s communal areas (without use of the Internet) and the neighborhood’s social locales.

Residents aged 65 and older who used computers and for whom English was a first language were invited to sign up to be interviewed. Six residents out of The Glen’s 25 residents met the age requirements –they were all 73 and older– and used the computers or Internet at The Glen. In the research discussed in the literature review, the most significant qualitative research was conducted by Mellor, Firth and Moore (2008) using 20 participants over 12 months. The data for this study was collected over one week –the times offered by the Glen– and six residents were interviewed. As a result, the conclusions drawn from this sample serve only the purposes of this study and cannot be generalised.

Since this research made use of human subjects as sources of data, based on the University of Cape Town (UCT) Code for Research involving Human Subjects, informed consent was secured from the research subjects in this study, offering privacy and confidentiality to participants who wished to remain anonymous – no information that reveals participants’ identities has been included in this article. The interviews took place in a neutral venue at The Glen where noise would not interfere negatively with the quality of the recordings. As an ethical consideration, participants were asked permission for the interviews to be recorded after a rapport had first been built with them. Pre-set interview questions were at first general, progressing into more specific and possibly less comfortable questions for the participants to answer. Discretion was exercised regarding how far participants were allowed to go off topic before they were brought back to the purpose of the interviews. Time was monitored as participants should not become bored or weary. No single interview was allowed to last longer than 45 minutes. Data was not only collected in recordings but also in observation notes made during interviews and visits to The Glen.

This data was analysed using thematic analysis as described by Braun and Clarke (2006). The observation notes aided in selection of extracts to be transcribed from each interview’s recording. The extracts selected were those that pertained to the interview questions, both pre-set and spontaneous follow-up questions. Initial codes were then written onto the transcription. These are the key points identified. As the theoretical framework of this study is uses and gratifications, the initial codes that were identified were points that related to why the participant used computers and how the participant was affected by this computer use. Next, the initial codes were grouped into themes. After that, the final themes and subthemes were sorted and consolidated and were those that emerged across, not within, interviews. These were about social networking via the Internet, and social networking without using the Internet, and how the one affects the other.

It is a limitation of this methodology that the conclusions drawn in the research article cannot be generalised. However, an advantage of the in-depth interviews as methodological choice is that the data collection times were free and uninterrupted. The advantage of this study’s qualitative approach is that it supports a recent trend in uses and gratifications research of investigating subjective experience of new media use –especially to see «the extent to which these media… create dependency or replace other forms of human communication» (Sherry & Boyan, 2008: 5.242).

4. Results and discussion

a) Use of computers. The three eldest participants, aged early 80s to early 90s, were the more regular computer users. One of them had a Macintosh computer and his own Internet connection in his room, and used this every evening. Another participant also had her computer in her room with her own Internet connection, and used it every night. The third one used her laptop in The Glen’s computer area two or three times a day for various periods of time depending on what was on email and Facebook. Of the three youngest participants, all in their 70s, only one used the computer on a regular basis –a couple of times a week, usually Skyping on a Sunday evening. The other two wanted to use the computer to email more regularly.

All six of the participants used email, mostly to correspond with family and friends. One of them used to correspond with colleagues but had not done so since he retired. He wanted to start using The Glen’s computers to email his son living 50 kilometers away, a cousin living in Canada and granddaughters living in Gauteng. Another participant had only started using computers three months previously and had only ever sent about three emails to her son living on an island off the coast of Spain. These two participants were among the youngest of the six participants. One of the eldest participants was subscribed to the Yacht Club’s newsletter emails.

Half of the participants used computers to play card games. One of them also played Scrabble, an application on Facebook. She said: «It’s lovely because you can take all the time in the world. And you can put in words and you can take them out and you can take all day. [My friend has] got her laptop at home and she plays and when she’s had her turn then it comes my turn» (interview, May 9, 2014).

Setting one’s own pace when using media is a preference that emerged before 1985 in research into older adults’ sources of information about new technologies. Because of this preference, whereas younger people’s main source of information about technologies was television (a medium that presents information at an externally set pace), older adults’ main source of information was newspapers which can be read at a self-controlled pace (Gilly & Zeithaml, 1985). One of the participants who did not play computer games found it too difficult to control the mouse. Another said that games were a waste of time.

The three eldest participants used Google to find information. One of them also did all his banking online but expressed concern about security, which was a reason given by another for not using online banking. One of the three youngest participants wanted to start using The Glen’s computers to use the Internet for general knowledge. Only one of the participants played DVDs and listened to music on the computer. He said that he had a music library of 10,000 tracks. He also used an application called Desktop Lyrics so that the songs’ lyrics would appear on the computer screen when they were played. In addition, he used the computer to type and print letters to the media, read online newspapers, make posters for The Glen’s notice-board, and scan photographs to save them and sometimes to create slideshows. Another participant kept photographs of her family on her laptop. A third participant, although she emailed some people, also used the computer to type and print regular letters to post to a friend.

With regard to social media, it was the three eldest participants who used Facebook. Two of them brought up the subject of Twitter without being asked about it in the interview, one of them saying he used it and another saying that she did not use it as she did not know how. Three participants used Skype and a fourth wanted to start using Skype. The participant who used a Macintosh said he belonged to three Mac user groups. Research has shown that elderly people would benefit from using computers not only for information, but also for entertainment, social utility, and business or daily functions (Lawhon & Ennis, 1996). The uses and gratifications theory that frames this study maintains that «audience members actively [select] media products to satisfy a range of needs: new information, entertainment, news, relaxation, and more» (Melkote, 2002: 427).

b) Entertainment and relaxation gratification. Gratification from using computers for entertainment or relaxation was not very prevalent across interviews. Nevertheless, one of the effects of this use was relief from boredom. One participant said: «If I’m not going out I come down in the morning and [use the computer], and then I’ll come down again in the afternoon I suppose – two or three times a day, if I’m not going anywhere else» (interview, May 9, 2014). This participant’s emphasis that she used the computer only if she was not going out suggested that her computer use was her entertainment and relief from boredom at The Glen.

Another participant said that he played Solitaire on the computer whenever he was put on hold when making a call to a service provider. While this particular situation may not be something that happened very often, this same participant explained that he used the computer to keep himself mentally active. For example, writing had been part of his profession, so after he retired he decided he would write letters to the media and use the dictionary and thesaurus on his computer to help maintain the quality of his language usage.

c) Information and social utility gratifications. Across half of the interviews it emerged that the older adults obtained gratification from using computers for information. Two of the eldest participants said that during conversations they made mental notes of things they wanted to know more about, and then googled these when they were in front of the computer. According to Chandler and Munday (2011), «using the mass media as conversational currency» is an example of social utility use because it increases «contact with others» and is derived «from a need of individuals for affiliation» (399). Therefore these two participants obtained both information and social utility gratifications from googling information for conversational currency.

These same two participants also read news online. One of them had impaired hearing and used Google to supplement information from songs (like lyrics) and films (like plot revealed in dialogue). According to the older adults, online information was convenient, and helped them «keep track of things» and appreciate more. One of the participants who wanted to use the computer to email more regularly also wanted to start using computers for information –email and information were the only computer uses that were important to him.

Overall, the greatest gratification that the older adults obtained out of computers was from social utility usage. Email and Skype were used to communicate with family and friends both near and far. Email was preferred above SMS because more could be said, above handwritten letters because less could be said and above phone-calls because it was cheaper. The three participants who used Skype found it easy but were not completely satisfied, the most common reason being uneasiness with seeing the other person and being seen.

Social utility via Facebook was more observation than communication. A uses and gratifications study in the USA found that most older adults did not use Facebook for communication, but rather for entertainment; yet, this was still a social utility usage as it included observing friends’ Facebook activity (Ancu, 2012). The older adults in my study obtained gratification from viewing news posted on Facebook pages, and even more from viewing photographs posted by family. Some posts provoked a response and brief communication with Facebook friends, but the most significant effect of Facebook use on participants appeared to be a sense of affiliation with family as they followed their lives in photographs. Other examples of computer use that affected the older adults with a higher sense of community with others in society were the Yacht Club newsletters that one participant received via email, and the forum discussions that another participant followed within the Mac user groups he was part of.

It becomes apparent that a sense of affiliation or community is linked with the sense of «keeping track of things» that was obtained from getting information from the Internet. As with conversational currency, this reveals a link between the information and social utility uses of computers. The notion has been confirmed through a 2009 survey that found that older adults in Australia who used the Internet for communication, as well as those who used it for information, felt a greater sense of community (Sum & al., 2009). The notion is further supported by this study’s findings that the three participants who used Google to find information were also the three participants who used Facebook. And two of them were also members of, respectively, the Yacht Club and the Mac user groups.

These same three participants were the more regular computer users in the study. One of them explained his regular use of the computer: «My wife was ill for 10 years and I looked after her the last four years of her life because she was immobile. And being stuck in the house, not being able to go away too often, [using the computer] was my relief, to keep in touch with what was going on in the rest of the world. So that created a habit that this is the way I keep myself interested. It’s just carried on really» (interview, May 9, 2014). This illustrates the point that participants who used computers for information and social utility experienced reduced feelings of loneliness and lower levels of social isolation. Another one of the three participants in question said: «I’m very sold on computers. My life would not be the same without a computer. I would be totally isolated from my family. I mean how often does anybody actually ever call, you know? My life is 100% better because of computers. It would be good anyway because I keep busy but when I don’t have it I feel quite bereft» (interview, May 9, 2014).

d) Social networking with and without the Internet. As 1980s and 1990s uses and gratifications researcher, Rubin (as cited in Sherry & Boyan, 2008) specified, «media use is just one of many alternatives people have; thus media competes with other communication to best satisfy needs and motives» (5239).

The older adults in this study made contact with others in society via email. All of them emailed people living in different cities or countries, while half of them also emailed people living nearby – people they also contacted in person from time to time. The older adults described social networking via the Internet as non-intrusive. One participant saw this positively, saying, «I’d prefer to communicate with my son by email because he’s got his life to live; he’s got his family and I don’t want to interfere, so it would be easier to email» (interview, May 9, 2014). For another participant, non-intrusive meant distant and she preferred person-to-person communication. A third participant said that although emails came across as stilted, at least they were accurate. Whether viewed positively or negatively, half the participants acknowledged that social networking via the Internet had increased their contact with some people.

The older adults were not so dependent on social networking via the Internet that other forms of human communication were replaced. The participants made phone calls to various people. There was interpersonal contact in The Glen’s communal areas; and four of the participants showed significant motivation for going out often and connecting with others in local social locales. Two of the participants still wrote letters to friends who did not use computers. Although it was at times more convenient for some participants to find information online, their contact with others in society outside of computer use was not weakened. Only one of the participants avoided the company of too many people, saying that she was a private person and that her husband was losing his memory and did not like noise around him.

The older adults were private about their computer use. The Glen’s computer area was usually only occupied by one person at a time and the participants did not usually talk with other people about their use of the computers. There were two exceptions. Firstly, there were two participants who from time to time would try to get their husbands interested in what they were doing on the computer. Secondly, five of the six participants would from time to time give or receive help with using computers.

In the 1990s, research showed that older adults came away from computer skills training courses feeling more familiar with computers and therefore more confident – both about computer use and about their place as older adults in a technological society (Morgan, 1994). One of the participants in this study supported these findings when she spoke about the help she received, and passed on, with using the computers at The Glen:

«They were quite eager for people to learn. Why not? It’s not difficult. Now I Skype my brother. I used to contact him by phone, letter –the old fashioned way. Skype is nice. It’s nice to be able to see them and chat to them. There’s one lady here whose son is on an island off the coast of Spain so I sometimes help her to get through on Skype– not that I’m an expert» (interview, May 9, 2014).

Furthermore, while participants did not usually talk with other people about their use of the computers specifically, there were two participants whose use of computers strengthened their contact with others in society outside of computer use. Similarly in Japan, Kanayama (2003) found that elderly people are becoming part of virtual communities, increasing social connectedness to others by sharing stories and memories online. The participant who played Scrabble with a friend via Facebook also emailed this friend and met up at the Yacht Club every Friday where some of their topics of conversation would come from their Scrabble game or emails. And a participant who liked to help people in need provided face-to-face counsel with these people and kept in contact with them afterwards via email.

Research conducted in the USA in 2010 quantitatively explored correlations between older adults’ Internet use and their social networking outside of Internet use, and added «to the body of research that [suggested] Internet use [could] strengthen social networks» (Hogeboom & al., 2010: 93). The two examples from this study of participants whose use of computers strengthened their contact with others in society outside of computer use also add to this body of research.

5. Conclusions

The main uses and gratifications elderly people get out of computers in South Africa were explored in this study. From in-depth interviews with six residents of The Glen Retirement Hotel it was found that the elderly people used email and social media to keep in contact with family and friends outside of, and sometimes even within the neighborhood. The primary gratification was thus to enhance social interaction, as well as information seeking. Furthermore, keeping in contact meant not only communication, but also observation of activity – like news, photographs and discussions. It was in this computer usage that information and social utility gratifications overlapped. Participants felt connected with society both through communication with and observation of people, and through keeping themselves informed about news and topics that came up in conversation. By using the Internet they communicated with some people more than they had before. Some of the participants felt less isolated and lonely because of their computer use. Nevertheless, use of computers did not weaken their interpersonal contact outside of computer use. Most of the participants used The Glen’s other communal areas more than they used the computer area. Although there were participants who kept in contact with people within the neighborhood via email, this did not replace face-to face communication with these people in local social locales. Instead, in one case it provided topics of conversation (like Scrabble), and in another it allowed communication to continue (beyond one in-person counselling session).

The participants used games and other media on computers for entertainment and relief from boredom, but these were not main uses and gratifications in the findings. Future research might compare use of computers by different age groups within the older adult age group, as in this study the eldest participants got more uses and gratifications out of computers than the youngest participants.

Notes

www.southafrica.info/about/media/broadband-260913.htm#.VM8UxijEOkw.

References

Ancu, M. (2012). Older Adults on Facebook: A Survey Examination of Motives and Use of Social Networking by People 50 and older. Florida Communication Journal, 40(2), 1-12.

Baldi, R.A. (1997). Training Older Adults to Use the Computer: Issues related to the Workplace, Attitudes, and Training. Educational Gerontology, 23(5), 453-465.

Bohman, M., & al. (2007). We Clean our Houses, Prepare for Weddings and go to Funerals: Daily Lives of Elderly Africans in Majaneng, South Africa. Journal of Cross Cultural Gerontology, 22, 323-337.

Braun, V., & Clarke, V. (2006).Using Thematic Analysis in Psychology. Qualitative Research in Psychology, 3(2), 77-101.

Chandler, D., & Munday, R. (2011). Oxford Dictionary of Media and Communication. New York: Oxford University Press.

Denzin, N., & Lincoln, Y. (1994). Handbook of Qualitative Research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Donner, J., & Gitau, S. (2009). New Paths: Exploring Mobile-centric Internet Use in South Africa. Mobile 2.0: Beyond Voice? Pre-conference Workshop at the International Communication (ICA) Conference 3, Chicago, Ilinois, 20-21 May.

Gilly, M.C., & Zeithaml, V.A. (1985).The Elderly Consumer and Adoption of Technologies. Journal of Consumer Research 12(3), 353-357.

Hogeboom, D.L., McDermott, R.J., Perrin, K.M., Osman, H., & Bell-Ellison, B.A. (2010). Internet Use and Social Networking among Middle Aged and Older Adults. Educational Gerontology, 36(2), 93-111.

Hutchison, D., & Eastman, C. (1997). Designer User Interfaces for Older Adults. Educational Gerontology, 23(6), 497-513.

Kanayama, T. (2003). Ethnographic Research on the Experience of Japanese Elderly People Online. New Media, and Society, 5(2), 267-288.

Katz, E., Blumler, J., & Gurevitch, M. (1973). Uses and Gratifications Research. The Public Opinion Quarterly, 509-23. http://jstor.org/stable/2747854.

Lawhon, T., & Ennis, D. (1996). Senior Adults and Computers in the 1990s. Educational Gerontology, 22(2), 193-201.

Lelkes, O. (2013). Happier and less Isolated: Internet use in Old Age. Journal of Poverty & Social Justice, 21(1), 33-46.

Melkote, S. (2002). Theories of Development Communication. In W.B. Gudykunst, & B. Mody (Eds.), Handbook of International and Intercultural Communication. (pp. 419-436). London: Sage.

Mellor, D., Firth, L., & Moore, K. (2008). Can the Internet Improve the Well-being of the Elderly? Ageing International, 32(1), 25-42.

Morgan, J. (1994). Computer Training Needs of Older Adults. Educational Gerontology 20(6), 541-555.

Papacharissi, Z., & Rubin, A.M. (2000). Predictors of Internet Use. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 44(2), 175-196.

Ruggiero, T.E. (2000). Uses and Gratifications Theory in the 21st Century. Mass Communication & Society, 3(1), 3-37.

Sherry, J., & Boyan, A. (2008). Uses and Gratifications. In W. Donsbach (Ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Communication. (pp. 5.239-5.244). Oxford: Blackwell.

Statistics South Africa (2013). General Household Survey 2013. (http://goo.gl/xkOHff) (x14-11-2014).

Sum, S., Mathews, R., Hughes, I., & Campbell, A. (2008). Internet Use and Loneliness in Older Adults. Cyberpsychology & Behavior, 11(2), 208-211.

Sum, S., Mathews, R., Pourghasem, M., & Hughes, I. (2009). Internet Use as a Predictor of Sense of Community in Older People. Cyberpsychology & Behavior, 12(2), 235-239.

Wimmer, R., & Dominick, J. (2006). Mass Media Research: An Introduction. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

A partir de entrevistas en profundidad, realizadas en un hogar de la tercera edad en Ciudad del Cabo (Sudáfrica), este estudio analiza los principales usos y gratificaciones que reciben las personas mayores en interacción con los ordenadores. En África, mientras el énfasis investigador se ha puesto en los últimos años en la salud de los mayores, especialmente en cuanto al SIDA, existe muy poca investigación sobre el uso de los mayores en cuanto a nuevas tecnologías, ya que la investigación en relación con las mismas se ha centrado principalmente en la juventud. En este estudio se halló que los participantes utilizan el correo electrónico y las redes sociales para mantener el contacto con familiares y amigos y a veces incluso con su vecindario. Además, mantener el contacto suponía no solo comunicación, sino también observación de actividades, como noticias, fotografías y conversaciones. En el contexto de los usos y gratificaciones, el trabajo ha evidenciado que los participantes se sentían conectados con la sociedad, tanto por su comunicación como por la observación de las personas, y por mantenerse informados de las noticias y los temas de interés actuales. Mediante el uso de Internet, las personas de edad avanzada se comunicaban mucho más de lo que antes se habían comunicado con otras personas. Algunos de los participantes se sentían menos aislados y solos, debido a su uso del ordenador. Sin embargo, se demostró también que el uso de los ordenadores no obstaculizó los contactos interpersonales tradicionales.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Gilly y Zeithaml (1985) afirmaron que «el interés por las personas mayores [había] florecido en los últimos diez años debido a que este segmento demográfico –definido como adultos de 65 años de edad y mayores– [había] crecido en tamaño y poder adquisitivo» (353). El interés al que hacían referencia había sido en su mayor parte estudios de mercado sobre consumidores en los EEUU, y exploraban si los mayores estaban usando las nuevas tecnologías relacionadas con el consumo. Los resultados mostraron que las personas mayores tenían opiniones negativas de las innovaciones y no tenían prisa por adoptarlas. Tampoco eran tan conscientes de las nuevas tecnologías como las personas más jóvenes. La investigación utilizó estos resultados para hacer recomendaciones para que las nuevas tecnologías y las fuentes de información fueran más accesibles y útiles para los mayores.

Durante la década de 1990 el enfoque se hizo más específico, apareció la investigación de recomendaciones para hacer que los ordenadores fueran más accesibles y útiles para las personas mayores. Esta línea de investigación se situó principalmente en el campo de la gerontología educativa en los EEUU. El grupo de edad de mayores estaba creciendo en tamaño, siendo el grupo de mayores de 75 años el grupo de crecimiento más rápido en los EEUU (Lawhon & Ennis, 1996). Las tendencias durante el período previo a 1985 sugerían que los mayores eran reacios e incapaces de usar las nuevas innovaciones, como los ordenadores. Se predijo que el analfabetismo informático entre los mayores podría aumentar a medida que aumentara el tamaño del grupo de edad (Baldi, 1997; Morgan, 1994). Como resultado de ello, la recomendación general que surgió de la investigación en la década de 1990 fue la de cursos de formación en informática para mayores. Se encontró que veían este tipo de cursos como algo positivo, y creían en los beneficios del uso del ordenador sugeridos (Morgan, 1994). La conclusión fue que los resultados de investigaciones previas relacionadas con el uso de nuevas tecnologías por parte de mayores no se podían aplicar al uso de los ordenadores por parte de estos, especialmente cuando se ofrecían a los mayores cursos de formación en informática específicos para las necesidades de su grupo de edad. También se hicieron recomendaciones para adaptar los diseños de interfaces de software para satisfacer las necesidades de los mayores (Hutchison & Eastman, 1997).

Al entrar en el nuevo milenio, Internet –como el medio de comunicación más reciente– todavía ocupaba, junto con los ordenadores, un volumen de investigación significativo (Ruggiero, 2000). Mientras se avanzaba para descubrir la mejor manera de adaptar la formación en informática e Internet a las necesidades de los usuarios, se reconoció que una mejor comprensión de estas necesidades aclararía por qué los diferentes usuarios mostraban, tras su experiencia con ordenadores, diversos grados de satisfacción (Papacharissi, & Rubin, 2000). En consecuencia, los estudios de usos y gratificaciones aparecían a menudo en las investigaciones sobre el consumo de los medios por parte de los mayores. Mellor, Firth y Moore (2008), llevaron a cabo una investigación cuantitativa y cualitativa en Australia para investigar si el uso de los ordenadores e Internet podrían disminuir los niveles de aislamiento social de los mayores. Sin embargo, los resultados fueron mixtos, con encuestas que mostraban que el bienestar general no había mejorado significativamente, pero los mayores afirmaban en las entrevistas que sí se beneficiaban del uso de los ordenadores e Internet. En otro estudio realizado en Australia en 2008, la investigación cuantitativa mostró que aparecía una reducción de sentimientos de soledad cuando utilizaban Internet para la comunicación, pero no cuando lo usaban para hacer nuevos contactos sociales (Sum, Mathews, Hughes & Campbell, 2008).

Más recientemente, un estudio de usos y gratificaciones en los Estados Unidos se centró en las redes sociales en las que participaban mayores en línea. Este estudio ha demostrado que «cerca del 51% de todos los estadounidenses entre 50 y 64 años de edad y el 33% de los mayores de 65 años tenían una cuenta en Facebook, aunque muchos menos [eran] usuarios diarios regulares» (Ancu, 2012: 1). En 2013, la investigación de Lelkes en Europa produjo resultados similares a los de Mellor y otros (2008) en Australia. Encontró que los mayores que utilizaban Internet afirmaban que su bienestar aumentaba. También encontró que cuanto más usaban Internet, menos experimentaban aislamiento social fuera del uso de la Red.

En resumen, la investigación en los últimos cuarenta años más o menos ha identificado varias razones por las cuales los mayores utilizan los medios para la información, el entretenimiento y la utilidad social, incluyendo esta la comunicación social con los demás en la sociedad y los nuevos contactos sociales. La investigación también ha explorado cómo estos usos han afectado a la sensación de soledad respecto de la comunidad entre los mayores, cómo los usos han afectado a su participación social –la interacción en redes frente al aislamiento–, cómo se sienten al respecto, y cómo se sienten con respecto a su bienestar. La investigación que se relata en este análisis se llevó a cabo en los EEUU, Australia y Europa, y muestra un movimiento desde lo general (las nuevas tecnologías y las innovaciones) hacia lo más específico (los ordenadores, Internet, y después Facebook).

Ya que la esperanza de vida en Sudáfrica es menor que en los EEUU o Europa, no ha habido aquí las mismas tendencias en la investigación en torno al grupo de edad de mayores. Además, el clima económico de Sudáfrica difiere del de los EEUU, Australia o Europa provocando diferencias en el uso de los ordenadores por parte de las distintas poblaciones. El estudio sobre usos y gratificaciones del ordenador, por parte de los mayores en Sudáfrica, por lo tanto, aporta nuevas contribuciones a investigaciones existentes.

Sudáfrica ocupa el 5º lugar en África en cuanto al uso de Internet, con solo 2,2 de cada 100 personas conectadas a servicios de banda ancha, pero las suscripciones de banda ancha móvil están creciendo a un ritmo del 30% anual1. A pesar de la brecha digital, el acceso a Internet en Sudáfrica está creciendo, con el 40,9% de los hogares sudafricanos conectados a Internet en casa o en otro lugar en 2013 (Statistics South Africa, 2013). La expansión de Internet móvil ha supuesto que más personas utilicen sus teléfonos móviles para navegar por Internet, y como resultado las redes sociales como Facebook y Twitter gozan de una gran popularidad (Donner & Gitau, 2009).

2. Planteamiento del problema

La investigación sobre el uso de los medios entre las personas de edad avanzada (65 años y mayores) se desarrolló porque demográficamente ha crecido en tamaño y poder adquisitivo (Gilly & Zeithaml, 1985). En Sudáfrica, la población de mayor edad ha tenido que adaptarse a una sociedad cambiante, como resultado de cambios políticos y la dinámica de la sociedad relacionada con la migración de los jóvenes a las ciudades en busca de trabajo (Bohman & al., 2007). Aunque el enfoque de la investigación en África se ha centrado en la salud de las personas mayores, en especial con respecto al VIH/SIDA, ha habido poca investigación sobre su adopción de nuevas tecnologías, ya que la investigación en este campo se ha focalizado sobre todo en la juventud. Los ancianos son un sector importante de la sociedad y es importante estudiar su uso de los medios de comunicación, especialmente porque puede tener implicaciones para la comunicación intergeneracional.

A partir de entrevistas realizadas a residentes de un hogar de la tercera edad en Ciudad del Cabo (Sudáfrica), este estudio examina los principales usos y gratificaciones que reciben personas mayores de los ordenadores. En primer lugar, el estudio planteó la pregunta: ¿por qué usan ordenadores? Esto exploraba si usaban los ordenadores para enviar mensajes de correo electrónico o recibir mails de familiares, amigos y colegas, o para suscripciones, para jugar a juegos, buscar información a través de buscadores, ver o escuchar otros medios de comunicación, participar en los medios de comunicación social, o para cualquier otro tipo de uso. En segundo lugar, el estudio planteaba la pregunta: ¿cuáles son los efectos de tales usos sobre las personas mayores? Es decir, si las ventajas incluían el refuerzo del contacto con los demás en la sociedad, ya fuera solamente a través del ordenador o fuera del uso del ordenador también, o la debilitación del contacto con los demás en la sociedad fuera del uso del ordenador, o un mayor o menor sentido de afiliación con los demás en la sociedad, o el alivio del aburrimiento, o más o menos sentimientos de soledad, o cualquier otra cosa.

El presente estudio pone de relieve cómo el uso de los ordenadores afecta a las conexiones sociales de las personas de edad avanzada. El impacto de Internet sobre las relaciones sociales se investiga poco. Algunas investigaciones concluyen que Internet refuerza el contacto interpersonal y otras concluyen lo contrario (Hogeboom, McDermott, Perrin, Osman & Bell-Ellison, 2010). En 2012 las estadísticas mostraron que el grupo de edad de crecimiento más rápido en el uso de las redes sociales (como Facebook) era el de los mayores (Ancu, 2012). Por lo tanto, el estudio sobre cómo los ancianos utilizan los ordenadores y cómo se ven por consiguiente afectados es importante, especialmente en el contexto africano, donde la atención se ha centrado principalmente en la adopción de nuevas tecnologías y medios de comunicación social por parte de la juventud.

Por otra parte, un enfoque de usos y gratificaciones en este estudio es apropiado ya que el propósito es entender por qué y cómo los mayores buscan medios específicos para satisfacer necesidades específicas. Según la investigación de Katz, Blumler y Gurevitch (1973-74), en este área, el público es activo y busca cinco usos potenciales de los medios de comunicación: información, identificarse con personajes de los medios de comunicación, entretenimiento simple, mejorar la interacción social o escapar del estrés de la rutina diaria. El enfoque de usos y gratificaciones es un enfoque teórico que trata de comprender por qué y cómo la gente elige medios específicos para satisfacer necesidades específicas. La aparición de la comunicación mediada por ordenador reavivó el enfoque de usos y gratificaciones (Ruggiero, 2000), que ve el público como activo a pesar de no explorar el contenido de los medios y de no tener en cuenta el contexto sociocultural.

3. Metodología

La metodología de este artículo de investigación consistió en entrevistas en profundidad, centrándose en un número limitado de participantes. Teniendo en cuenta que el paradigma interpretativo es lo que subyace a este estudio, el mejor enfoque era un diseño de investigación cualitativa. El paradigma interpretativo tiene que ver con la conducta cotidiana de las personas en la interpretación de acontecimientos y la creación de significado (Wimmer & Dominick, 2006). Del mismo modo, la investigación cualitativa se lleva a cabo para «describir momentos y significados habituales y problemáticos en las vidas de los individuos» (Denzin & Lincoln, 1994: 2).

Este estudio partió de la idea de que los mayores utilizan los ordenadores por razones particulares, y se guió también por la idea de que estos obtienen gratificaciones específicas por el uso del ordenador. El paradigma interpretativo subyacente al enfoque cualitativo de este estudio es lógico debido a que el uso de los ordenadores es un comportamiento habitual diario de los individuos –en este estudio, por parte de los mayores– en respuesta a los problemas de inactividad social, aburrimiento, soledad o cualquier otra cosa; y las gratificaciones del uso del ordenador son significados creados por estas personas al interpretar los efectos de su uso del ordenador.

Se eligieron las entrevistas en profundidad como metodología porque los participantes podían ser observados y podrían recolectarse de ellos informaciones detalladas, tales como sus pensamientos más profundos y los significados detrás de sus palabras. Según Denzin y Lincoln (1994: 361), «la entrevista es una de las formas más comunes y más poderosas que utilizamos para intentar entender a nuestros semejantes». Los participantes procedían del grupo de residentes de «The Glen Retirement Hotel» (seudónimo). Se trata de un hotel en Ciudad del Cabo que se convirtió en 2012 en un hogar de la tercera edad. Sus zonas comunales eran un comedor, un salón, una terraza acristalada, el bar y sala de lectura y, más significativamente para este estudio, una zona de ordenadores con dos equipos informáticos. Además, había conexión wifi en el área de informática, el salón y el bar y sala de lectura. «The Glen» está a poca distancia de una playa y otros lugares sociales, y se encuentra en un lugar socioeconómicamente acomodado; se dio por hecho que la muestra incluiría mayores adinerados que utilizan Internet para comunicarse con sus familiares más allá del vecindario. Por otra parte, las entrevistas incluían preguntas sobre las redes sociales a través de Internet en comparación con la interacción social en las zonas comunales de «The Glen» (sin el uso de Internet) y los locales sociales del barrio.

Fueron invitados a apuntarse para la entrevista los residentes de 65 años o mayores que utilizaban ordenadores y cuyo primer idioma es el inglés. Seis de los 25 residentes de «The Glen» cumplían los requisitos de edad –tenían todos 73 años o más– y utilizaban los ordenadores o Internet en la residencia. En las investigaciones mostradas en la presentación de este artículo, la investigación cualitativa más significativa la realizaron Mellor, Firth y Moore (2008) con 20 participantes a lo largo de 12 meses. Los datos para este estudio se recolectaron a lo largo de una semana –en las horas ofrecidas por «The Glen»– y fueron entrevistados seis residentes. Como resultado, las conclusiones extraídas de esta muestra sirven solo para los fines de este estudio, y no se pueden generalizar.

Ya que esta investigación se realizaba con sujetos humanos como fuentes de datos, basándonos en el Código para la Investigación con la participación de sujetos de la Universidad de Ciudad del Cabo (UCT), se obtuvo el consentimiento informado de los sujetos de la investigación en este estudio, ofreciendo privacidad y confidencialidad a los participantes que deseaban permanecer en el anonimato (no se ha incluido información que revele las identidades de los participantes en este artículo). Las entrevistas se llevaron a cabo en un lugar neutral en «The Glen» donde el ruido no interferiría negativamente con la calidad de las grabaciones. Como consideración ética, se les pidió permiso a los participantes para grabar las entrevistas después de establecer primero una buena relación con ellos. Las preguntas preestablecidas de la entrevista eran al principio generales, y progresaban hacia preguntas más específicas y, posiblemente, menos cómodas de responder para los participantes. Se ejerció discreción con respecto a cuánto se les permitía a los participantes desviarse del tema antes de traerlos de vuelta al objetivo de las entrevistas. Se controló el tiempo para que los participantes no se aburrieran ni se cansaran. Ninguna entrevista duró más de 45 minutos. Se recogieron datos, no solamente en grabaciones, sino también en notas de observación realizadas durante las entrevistas y visitas a The Glen.

Estos datos fueron analizados mediante un análisis temático, tal como describen Braun y Clarke (2006). Las notas de observación ayudaron en la selección de los extractos que serían transcritos de cada entrevista grabada. Los extractos seleccionados fueron los que se referían a las preguntas de la entrevista, tanto preguntas preestablecidas como preguntas de seguimiento espontáneas. Se escribieron los códigos iniciales en la transcripción. Estos son los puntos clave identificados. Ya que el marco teórico de este estudio es de usos y gratificaciones, los códigos iniciales que se identificaron estaban relacionados con por qué el participante utiliza ordenadores y cómo el participante se ve afectado por ese uso del ordenador. A continuación, se agruparon los códigos iniciales por temas. Después de eso, los temas y subtemas finales fueron ordenados y consolidados y fueron aquellos que surgieron a través de, no dentro de, las entrevistas. Estos tenían que ver con las redes sociales a través de Internet, y la interacción social sin el uso de Internet, y cómo uno afectaba al otro.

Es una limitación de esta metodología el hecho de que las conclusiones extraídas en el artículo de investigación no puedan ser generalizadas. Sin embargo, una ventaja de las entrevistas en profundidad como opción metodológica es que los tiempos de recolección de datos fueron libres y sin interrupciones. La ventaja del enfoque cualitativo de este estudio es que respalda una tendencia reciente en la investigación de usos y gratificaciones consistente en analizar la experiencia subjetiva del uso de los nuevos medios, especialmente para ver «la medida en que estos medios de comunicación... crean dependencia o sustituyen a otras formas de comunicación humana» (Sherry & Boyan, 2008: 5242).

4. Resultados y discusión

a) Uso de los ordenadores. Los tres participantes mayores (entre 80 y 90 años) eran los usuarios más regulares. Uno de ellos tenía un ordenador Macintosh y su propia conexión a Internet en su habitación, y la utilizaba cada noche. Otra también tenía su propio ordenador en su habitación con Internet, y lo utilizaba todas las noches. La tercera usaba su ordenador portátil en el área de informática de «The Glen» dos o tres veces al día durante diferentes períodos de tiempo, según lo que tenía en el correo electrónico y Facebook. De los tres participantes más jóvenes, en torno a los 70 años, solo uno utilizaba el ordenador regularmente: un par de veces a la semana, por lo general para llamar por Skype el domingo por la tarde. Los otros dos manifestaban intención de usar el ordenador para enviar correos electrónicos con más frecuencia.

Los seis participantes utilizaban el correo electrónico sobre todo para la correspondencia con la familia y amigos. Uno de ellos solía escribirse con colegas, pero no lo había hecho desde que se había jubilado; quería empezar a utilizar los ordenadores de «The Glen» para escribirle a su hijo que vivía a 50 kilómetros, un primo de Canadá y sus nietas que vivían en Gauteng. Otra de las participantes solo había empezado a usar ordenadores hacía tres meses y solamente había enviado unos correos electrónicos en su vida a su hijo, que vive en una isla de España. Estos dos participantes eran de los más jóvenes de los seis participantes. Uno de los participantes mayores estaba suscrito a los boletines por correo electrónico del club de yates.

Solo la mitad de los participantes utilizaba los ordenadores para jugar a juegos de cartas. Uno de ellos también jugaba a Scrabble, una aplicación en Facebook y decía que «es una maravilla porque puedes tomarte todo el tiempo que quieras. Y puedes meter palabras y puedes sacarlas y te puedes tomar todo el día. [Mi amiga] tiene su portátil en casa y ella juega y cuando ha jugado, me toca mi turno» (entrevista, 9 de mayo de 2014).

Fijarse un ritmo propio en el uso de los medios de comunicación es una preferencia que surgió antes de 1985 en la investigación de las fuentes de información sobre las nuevas tecnologías para los mayores. Debido a esta preferencia, mientras que la principal fuente de información acerca de tecnologías para la gente más joven era la televisión (un medio que presenta información a un ritmo establecido externamente), la principal fuente de información eran los periódicos, que se pueden leer a un ritmo autocontrolado (Gilly & Zeithaml, 1985). Uno de los participantes que no jugaba a juegos de ordenador indicó que le resultaba demasiado difícil controlar el ratón. Otro expresó que los juegos eran una pérdida de tiempo.

Los tres participantes mayores utilizaban Google para buscar información. Uno de ellos también hacía todas sus transacciones bancarias en línea, pero expresó su preocupación por la seguridad, razón que dio otro participante para no utilizar la banca en línea. Uno de los tres participantes más jóvenes quería empezar a utilizar los ordenadores de «The Glen» para usar Internet con el fin de ampliar su conocimiento general. Solo uno de los participantes reproducía DVD y escuchaba música en el ordenador. Aseguraba que tenía una biblioteca musical de 10.000 canciones. También utilizaba una aplicación llamada Desktop Lyrics que hace que aparezcan las letras de las canciones en la pantalla del ordenador al reproducirlas. Además, utilizaba el ordenador para escribir e imprimir cartas a los medios de comunicación, leer periódicos en línea, hacer carteles para el tablón de anuncios de «The Glen», y escanear fotografías para guardarlas, y a veces para crear presentaciones de diapositivas. Otra de las participantes guardaba fotografías de su familia en su ordenador portátil. Una tercera participante, aunque enviaba correos electrónicos a algunas personas, también utilizaba el ordenador para escribir e imprimir cartas para enviarle a una amiga.

Con respecto a los medios sociales, eran los tres participantes mayores los que utilizaban Facebook. Dos de ellos plantearon el tema de Twitter sin haberles preguntado al respecto en la entrevista; uno dijo que lo utilizaba y la otra dijo que ella no hacía uso de Twitter porque no sabía usarlo. La mitad de los seis participantes usaban Skype y un cuarto quería empezar a usar Skype. El participante que usaba un Macintosh dijo que pertenecía a tres grupos de usuarios de Mac. La investigación ha demostrado que las personas mayores se beneficiarían del uso de los ordenadores, no solo para obtener información, sino también para el entretenimiento, la utilidad social, y funciones diarias o de negocios (Lawhon & Ennis, 1996). La teoría de usos y gratificaciones que enmarca este estudio sostiene que «los miembros del público, de forma activa, [seleccionan] productos mediáticos para satisfacer una variedad de necesidades: información nueva, entretenimiento, noticias, relajación, y más» (Melkote, 2002: 427).

b) Gratificación de entretenimiento y relajación. La gratificación por utilizar ordenadores para el entretenimiento o la relajación no era muy frecuente en las entrevistas. Sin embargo, uno de los efectos de este uso era aliviar el aburrimiento. Una participante dijo: «Si no voy a salir, vengo abajo por la mañana y uso [el ordenador], y luego bajo de nuevo por la tarde, supongo: en total, dos o tres veces al día, si es que no salgo a ninguna parte» (entrevista, 9 de mayo de 2014). El énfasis de esta participante en que utilizaba el ordenador solo si no iba a salir sugiere que su uso del ordenador era para entretenerse y aliviar el aburrimiento en «The Glen».

Otro participante dijo que jugaba al Solitario en el ordenador cada vez que lo ponían en espera en una llamada a algún proveedor de servicios. Si bien esta situación particular no puede ser algo que sucediera muy a menudo, este mismo participante explicó que utilizaba el equipo para mantenerse mentalmente activo. Por ejemplo, la escritura había sido parte de su profesión, por lo que después de jubilarse decidió que iba a escribir cartas a los medios de comunicación y utilizar el diccionario y el tesauro en su ordenador para mantener la calidad de su uso del lenguaje.

c) Gratificaciones de información y utilidad social. Al pasar la mitad de las entrevistas, se puso de manifiesto que los mayores obtienen gratificación por usar los ordenadores para obtener información. Dos de los participantes mayores dijeron que durante las conversaciones hacían notas mentales de cosas sobre las que querían saber más, y luego las buscaban en Google cuando estaban frente al ordenador. Según Chandler y Munday (2011), «el uso de los medios de comunicación como moneda conversacional» es un ejemplo del uso como utilidad social porque incrementa «el contacto con los demás» y se deriva «de la necesidad de afiliación de los individuos» (399). Por lo tanto, estos dos participantes obtuvieron tanto gratificaciones de la información como de la utilidad social de buscar información en Google como «moneda conversacional».

Estos mismos participantes también afirmaron leer las noticias on-line. Uno de ellos tenía una discapacidad auditiva y utilizaba Google para complementar información de canciones (como las letras) y películas (como la trama revelada en el diálogo). Según los mayores, la información en línea era conveniente, y les ayudaba a «hacer un seguimiento de las cosas» y apreciarlas más. Uno de los participantes que quería utilizar el ordenador para enviar correos electrónicos con más frecuencia también quería empezar a usar los ordenadores para obtener información: el correo electrónico y la información eran los únicos usos del ordenador que eran importantes para él.

En general, la mayor gratificación que obtenían los mayores de los ordenadores era la del uso como utilidad social. El correo electrónico y Skype los utilizaban para comunicarse con sus familiares y amigos que estaban tanto cerca como lejos. Se prefería el correo electrónico al SMS ya que se puede decir más, se prefería también a las cartas escritas a mano porque se podía decir menos, y se prefería también a las llamadas telefónicas porque era más barato. A los tres participantes que usaban Skype les resultaba fácil, pero no estaban del todo satisfechos: la razón más común era la inquietud de ver a la otra persona y ser vistos.

La utilidad social, a través de Facebook, era más de observación que de comunicación. El estudio sobre usos y gratificaciones en EEUU encontró que la mayoría de los mayores no usan Facebook para la comunicación, sino más bien como entretenimiento; sin embargo, esto era todavía un uso de utilidad social ya que incluía la observación de la actividad de sus amigos en Facebook (Ancu, 2012). Los mayores en este estudio obtenían gratificación al ver noticias publicadas en páginas de Facebook, y aún más al ver las fotografías publicadas por su familia. Algunos mensajes provocaban una respuesta y comunicación breve con amigos de Facebook, pero el efecto más significativo del uso de Facebook sobre los participantes parecía ser un sentido de afiliación con la familia al seguir sus vidas a través de las fotografías. Otros ejemplos de uso del ordenador que afectaban a las personas mayores con mayor sentido de comunidad en la sociedad, eran los boletines del club de yates que recibía uno de los participantes por correo electrónico, y los foros de debate que seguía otro participante dentro de los grupos de usuarios de Mac del que formaba parte.

Se hace evidente que el sentido de pertenencia o de comunidad está vinculado al sentido de «hacer un seguimiento de las cosas», algo que les proporcionaba la obtención de información a través de Internet. Al igual que con la «moneda conversacional», esto revela una relación entre los usos de información y de utilidad social de los ordenadores. La idea ha sido confirmada a través de una encuesta de 2009 que encontró que los mayores en Australia que utilizaban Internet para la comunicación, así como los que lo usaban para obtener información, acusaban un mayor sentido de comunidad (Suma & al., 2009). La idea se ve respaldada por los hallazgos de este estudio de que los tres participantes que utilizaban Google para encontrar información eran también los tres participantes que usaban Facebook. Y dos de ellos eran también miembros, respectivamente, del club de yates y los grupos de usuarios de Mac.

Estos mismos tres participantes del estudio eran los que usaban ordenadores con más regularidad. Uno de ellos explicó su uso regular del ordenador: «Mi esposa estuvo enferma durante 10 años y yo la cuidé los últimos cuatro años de su vida porque estaba inmóvil. Y al estar metido en casa, y no poder salir muy a menudo, [usar el ordenador] era mi único desahogo, para mantenerme en contacto con lo que estaba pasando en el resto del mundo. Así que eso creó un hábito, esa es la manera en que me mantengo interesado. Y así ha seguido» (entrevista, 9 de mayo de 2014). Esto ilustra el punto en que los participantes que usaban los ordenadores para obtener información y por utilidad social experimentaron una reducción en los sentimientos de soledad y menores niveles de aislamiento social.

Otro de los tres participantes en cuestión afirmó: «Estoy muy entusiasmado con los ordenadores. Mi vida no sería la misma sin un ordenador. Estaría totalmente aislado de mi familia. O sea, ¿con qué frecuencia suele llamarte la gente, no? Mi vida es un 100% mejor gracias a los ordenadores. Sería bueno de todos modos porque me mantengo ocupado, pero cuando no lo tengo me siento bastante despojado» (entrevista, 9 de mayo de 2014).

d) La interacción en redes sociales con y sin Internet. Un investigador de usos y gratificaciones de los años 80 y 90, Rubin (Sherry & Boyan, 2008: 5.239) señala que «el uso de los medios es solo una de las muchas alternativas que tiene la gente; por tanto, los medios compiten con otros tipos de comunicación para satisfacer de la mejor forma las necesidades y motivos».

Los mayores en este estudio se ponían en contacto con otros en la sociedad a través de correo electrónico. Todos ellos escribían por correo electrónico a personas que vivían en diferentes ciudades o países, mientras que la mitad de ellos también les escribía por correo electrónico a personas que vivían cerca, gente con la que también tenían contacto en persona de vez en cuando. Describían la interacción en redes sociales a través de Internet como no invasiva. Un participante veía esto de manera positiva, señalando que «Yo prefiero comunicarme con mi hijo por correo electrónico porque él tiene su vida; tiene su familia y no quiero interferir, por lo que es más fácil comunicarme por correo electrónico» (entrevista, 9 de mayo de 2014). Para otra participante, no invasiva significaba distante y ella prefería la comunicación cara a cara. Un tercer participante decía que aunque los correos electrónicos podían percibirse como poco naturales, por lo menos eran precisos. Ya fueran vistos de manera positiva o negativa, la mitad de los participantes reconocieron que la interacción en redes sociales a través de Internet había aumentado su contacto con algunas personas.

Los mayores no dependían de las redes sociales a través de Internet hasta el punto de que las sustituían por otras formas de comunicación humana. Los participantes hacían llamadas telefónicas a diferentes personas. Había contacto interpersonal en las zonas comunales de «The Glen»; y cuatro de los participantes se mostraron muy motivados para salir a menudo y conectar con otra gente en lugares sociales locales. Dos de los participantes todavía escribían cartas a amigos que no usaban ordenadores. A pesar de que a veces era más conveniente para algunos participantes encontrar información en línea que fuera de «The Glen», su contacto con otras personas en la sociedad fuera del uso del ordenador no se vio debilitado. Solo una de las participantes evitaba la compañía de mucha gente, diciendo que ella era una persona particular y que su marido estaba perdiendo la memoria y no le gustaba el ruido a su alrededor.

Los mayores eran discretos con respecto a su uso del ordenador. El área de informática de «The Glen» la usaba por lo general solo una persona a la vez y los participantes no solían hablar con otras personas acerca de su uso de los ordenadores. Había dos excepciones. En primer lugar, había dos participantes que de vez en cuando intentaban conseguir que sus maridos se interesaran en lo que estaban haciendo en el ordenador. En segundo lugar, cinco de los seis participantes recibían de vez en cuando ayuda con el uso de los ordenadores.

En la década de 1990, las investigaciones mostraron que los mayores se sentían más familiarizados con los ordenadores después de hacer cursos de informática, y por lo tanto se sentían más seguros, tanto con respecto al uso del ordenador como en cuanto a su lugar como mayores en una sociedad tecnológica (Morgan, 1994). Una de las participantes en este estudio apoyó estos hallazgos al hablar de la ayuda que recibía, y que transmitía a otros, con el uso de los ordenadores en «The Glen»: «Estaban muy ansiosos por que la gente aprendiera. ¿Por qué no? No es difícil. Ahora llamo por Skype a mi hermano. Yo solía ponerme en contacto con él por teléfono, por carta a la antigua usanza. El Skype está bien. Es agradable poder verlos y charlar con ellos. Hay una señora aquí cuyo hijo está en una isla cerca de la costa de España, así que a veces la ayudo a conectarse a través de Skype, aunque no es que yo sea una experta» (entrevista, 9 de mayo de 2014).

Además, aunque los participantes no solían hablar con otras personas acerca de su uso de los ordenadores en concreto, había dos participantes para quienes el uso de los ordenadores reforzaba su contacto con otras personas en la sociedad, fuera del uso del ordenador. Del mismo modo, en Japón, Kanayama (2003) encontró que las personas mayores están formando parte de comunidades virtuales, aumentando así la conexión social con otros al compartir historias y recuerdos en línea. La participante que jugaba al Scrabble con una amiga a través de Facebook también escribía por correo electrónico a esta amiga y se reunían en el club de yates todos los viernes, donde algunos de sus temas de conversación provendrían de su partida de Scrabble o de los correos electrónicos. Y un participante al que le gustaba ayudar a las personas necesitadas ofrecía asesoramiento en persona a estos individuos y después mantenía contacto con ellos por correo electrónico.

Las investigaciones realizadas en los EEUU en 2010 exploraban cuantitativamente las correlaciones entre el uso de Internet por parte de los mayores y su interacción social fuera del uso de Internet, y se añadieron «al cuerpo de investigaciones que [sugería] que el uso del Internet [podía] fortalecer las redes sociales» (Hogeboom & al., 2010: 93). Los dos ejemplos de este estudio de participantes cuyo uso de los ordenadores fortalecían su contacto con otras personas en la sociedad fuera del uso del ordenador también se suman a este grupo de investigaciones.

5. Conclusiones

En este estudio fueron explorados los principales usos y gratificaciones de los que se beneficiaban las personas mayores en Sudáfrica. A partir de entrevistas en profundidad con seis residentes de «The Glen Retirement Hotel» se encontró que las personas mayores utilizaban el correo electrónico y las redes sociales para mantenerse en contacto con familiares y amigos fuera de, y a veces incluso en, su vecindario. La principal gratificación era, por tanto, mejorar la interacción social, así como buscar información. Además, mantener el contacto suponía no solo la comunicación, sino también la observación de la actividad, como las noticias, fotografías y conversaciones. Fue en este uso del ordenador en donde las gratificaciones de información y la utilidad social se solapaban. Los participantes se sentían conectados con la sociedad, tanto a través de la comunicación y la observación de las personas, como a través de la información sobre noticias y temas que surgían en conversaciones. Mediante el uso de Internet se comunicaban con algunas personas más de lo que se habían comunicado antes. Algunos de los participantes se sentían menos aislados y solos debido a su uso del ordenador. Sin embargo, el uso de los ordenadores no debilitó su contacto interpersonal fuera del uso del ordenador. La mayoría de los participantes utilizaban otras zonas comunales de «The Glen» más que el área de ordenadores. Aunque había participantes que se mantenían en contacto con personas de su mismo vecindario a través del correo electrónico, este no reemplazó la comunicación cara a cara con estas personas en espacios sociales locales. En cambio, en un caso esto proporcionaba temas de conversación (como el Scrabble), y en otro permitía que la comunicación continuara (más allá de una sesión de asesoramiento en persona).

Los participantes utilizaban juegos y otros medios en los equipos para su entretenimiento y para aliviar el aburrimiento, pero estos no eran los principales usos y gratificaciones en los hallazgos. Investigaciones futuras podrían comparar el uso de los ordenadores por parte de diferentes grupos de edad dentro del grupo de edad de mayores, ya que en este estudio los participantes mayores obtenían más usos y gratificaciones de los ordenadores que los participantes más jóvenes.

Nota

1 www.southafrica.info/about/media/broadband-260913.htm#.VM8UxijEOkw.

Referencias

Ancu, M. (2012). Older Adults on Facebook: A Survey Examination of Motives and Use of Social Networking by People 50 and older. Florida Communication Journal, 40(2), 1-12.

Baldi, R.A. (1997). Training Older Adults to Use the Computer: Issues related to the Workplace, Attitudes, and Training. Educational Gerontology, 23(5), 453-465.

Bohman, M., & al. (2007). We Clean our Houses, Prepare for Weddings and go to Funerals: Daily Lives of Elderly Africans in Majaneng, South Africa. Journal of Cross Cultural Gerontology, 22, 323-337.

Braun, V., & Clarke, V. (2006).Using Thematic Analysis in Psychology. Qualitative Research in Psychology, 3(2), 77-101.

Chandler, D., & Munday, R. (2011). Oxford Dictionary of Media and Communication. New York: Oxford University Press.

Denzin, N., & Lincoln, Y. (1994). Handbook of Qualitative Research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Donner, J., & Gitau, S. (2009). New Paths: Exploring Mobile-centric Internet Use in South Africa. Mobile 2.0: Beyond Voice? Pre-conference Workshop at the International Communication (ICA) Conference 3, Chicago, Ilinois, 20-21 May.

Gilly, M.C., & Zeithaml, V.A. (1985).The Elderly Consumer and Adoption of Technologies. Journal of Consumer Research 12(3), 353-357.

Hogeboom, D.L., McDermott, R.J., Perrin, K.M., Osman, H., & Bell-Ellison, B.A. (2010). Internet Use and Social Networking among Middle Aged and Older Adults. Educational Gerontology, 36(2), 93-111.

Hutchison, D., & Eastman, C. (1997). Designer User Interfaces for Older Adults. Educational Gerontology, 23(6), 497-513.

Kanayama, T. (2003). Ethnographic Research on the Experience of Japanese Elderly People Online. New Media, and Society, 5(2), 267-288.

Katz, E., Blumler, J., & Gurevitch, M. (1973). Uses and Gratifications Research. The Public Opinion Quarterly, 509-23. http://jstor.org/stable/2747854.

Lawhon, T., & Ennis, D. (1996). Senior Adults and Computers in the 1990s. Educational Gerontology, 22(2), 193-201.

Lelkes, O. (2013). Happier and less Isolated: Internet use in Old Age. Journal of Poverty & Social Justice, 21(1), 33-46.

Melkote, S. (2002). Theories of Development Communication. In W.B. Gudykunst, & B. Mody (Eds.), Handbook of International and Intercultural Communication. (pp. 419-436). London: Sage.

Mellor, D., Firth, L., & Moore, K. (2008). Can the Internet Improve the Well-being of the Elderly? Ageing International, 32(1), 25-42.

Morgan, J. (1994). Computer Training Needs of Older Adults. Educational Gerontology 20(6), 541-555.

Papacharissi, Z., & Rubin, A.M. (2000). Predictors of Internet Use. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 44(2), 175-196.

Ruggiero, T.E. (2000). Uses and Gratifications Theory in the 21st Century. Mass Communication & Society, 3(1), 3-37.

Sherry, J., & Boyan, A. (2008). Uses and Gratifications. In W. Donsbach (Ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Communication. (pp. 5.239-5.244). Oxford: Blackwell.

Statistics South Africa (2013). General Household Survey 2013. (http://goo.gl/xkOHff) (x14-11-2014).

Sum, S., Mathews, R., Hughes, I., & Campbell, A. (2008). Internet Use and Loneliness in Older Adults. Cyberpsychology & Behavior, 11(2), 208-211.

Sum, S., Mathews, R., Pourghasem, M., & Hughes, I. (2009). Internet Use as a Predictor of Sense of Community in Older People. Cyberpsychology & Behavior, 12(2), 235-239.

Wimmer, R., & Dominick, J. (2006). Mass Media Research: An Introduction. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/06/15
Accepted on 30/06/15
Submitted on 30/06/15

Volume 23, Issue 2, 2015
DOI: 10.3916/C45-2015-01
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 4
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?