Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Several studies on youth and social networks have generally revealed extensive usage of these Internet services, widespread access from almost any location and the special importance that the youth attach to these services in building their social relations. This article presents part of the analyses and results from a research questionnaire on «Scenarios, digital technologies and youth in Andalusia», administered to a population of 1,487 youth between the ages of 13 and 19. The discussion on young Andalusians and social networks revolves around the structure and configuration of their profiles, intended uses and the privacy and security involved. The results reveal a population with nearly unlimited access to social networks and with very little adult monitoring; moreover, those connecting are younger than the legal minimum age defined by the Internet services themselves. The motivations of Andalusian youth for using social networks fall into three areas. The first two, social and psychological/affective motivations, are also commonly found in other studies; the third refers to the need to use social networks in matters concerning everyday life. This paper suggests certain new aspects in its conclusions in order to explain the nature and meaning of the practices of Andalusian youth in social networks.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Social networks are web-based services that allow individuals to construct a public or semi-public profile within a system managed by a third party, articulate a list of other users with whom they share a connection, and, depending on the self-defined privacy of their profiles, view and traverse their list of connections and those made by others within the system (Boyd, 2007; Boyd & Ellison, 2007).

Social networks open an interaction space that has increasingly been occupied by youth, as shown by recent international studies (Chew & al., 2011; Mazur & Richards, 2011; Mikami & al., 2010; Pfiel & al., 2009; Subrahmanyam & al., 2008; Gross & al., 2002) as well as studies in Spain (TCA, 2012; EU Kids on line, 2011; Injuve, 2009). Use of social networks is spreading independently of the family income of Internet users (TCA, 2011).

The location where access is established, perhaps due to mobile devices and free wifi networks, has expanded to include streets, squares and public spaces, although the majority of connections continue to take place from home (OIA, 2010; Inteco, 2009), at the expense of school, due to the Avanza plan and the Escuela 2.0 plan. For all these reasons, using and connecting to social networks has become a new socialization environment for youth, a space for constructing one’s social identity with one’s peers, sometimes without any parental advice or control, despite the realization that youth are connecting at younger and younger ages, and below the minimum age allowed (Inteco, 2009). On the other hand, the youth themselves manage and maintain certain levels of safety and protection over the profiles they create (OIA, 2012; Inteco, 2012).

Research studies with large samples (Bringué & Sádaba, 2009; 2011; Sánchez & Fernández, 2010; Inteco, 2009; TCA, 2008, 2010, 2011) have inquired into horizontal social networks as a new social space for youth, which they can connect to from any screen or device; they describe the main reason for creating an account on one or more social networks as communication, perhaps because communication barriers are removed (Barker, 2009; Ellison, 2007). This could be understood, on the one hand, as the need to be available and present at whatever may be occurring in this environment (Bringué & Sádaba, 2009), thus associated with values such as social inclusion, i.e., the process of making friends among one’s peers (Mazur & Richards, 2011; Pfiel & al., 2009) and strengthening friendship relations from outside the Net (Subrah ma nyam & al., 2008; Gross & al., 2002), as well as self-affirmation before the other members of the network, where one maintains relationship patterns over time, online and offline (Mikami & al., 2010), and as social recognition, according to the number of one’s followers (TCA, 2008). On the other hand, since there is a desire to relate to others, to meet members of the network, including strangers, the social networks are interpreted as a consumer item in its most recreational dimension. The popularity of social networks, as a fashion, converts them into services/products that must be consumed (TCA, 2010).

These studies also describe user profiles in terms of frequency of access and social network application, revealing age differences. Taking into account only the data that refer to a sample similar to the one presented in this paper (ages 13 to 19), the evidence shows that between the ages of 10 and 18, social network activity constitutes 70.7% of their Internet use (Bringué & Sádaba, 2009), with 55% of users connecting daily and only 22% connecting less than once per month (TCA, 2010); also, starting at 16, more than 71% have profiles on more than one network (TCA, 2009). Under 20, the network of preference is Tuenti, incorporating between 60% (Bringué & Sábada, 2011a) and 92% of the population (TCA, 2009), followed by Facebook and, unlike earlier studies, no gender difference is found in these age groups.

In summary, the profile that emerges from these studies may be considered fairly consistent, drawing a picture of youth who use social networks, in particular, and the Internet in general, for instrumental purposes; the events that occur in these services and the actions taken are limited to tools for meeting specific ends, falling within the range of four themes: communicating, getting to know, sharing and consuming (Bringué & Sábada, 2009). Although differences can still be found within such a homogeneous group, the fact of sharing a single space where the individuals carry on a more or less stable set of relations results in the generation of common interests among the members. Along with common interests, relationships within the community tend to generate shared behavioral norms, accepted either implicitly or explicitly by the members. Identity and a sense of belonging are other group dimensions encouraged by interacting within the community (Robles, 2008: 39).

Studies with large samples of Andalusian youth (Bringué & Sábada, 2011b; OIA, 2010; 2012; INE, 2011; 2012) have not inquired directly into the use and interactions within social networks, with the exception of the Infancia 2.0 paper on emerging social networks and technological uses in the native Anda lusian online population (Rodríguez & al, 2012).

This emerging phenomenon of the use of social networks has been explained in earlier studies in terms of the types of use, activities and content associated with Internet, but there are no concrete data about these. For this reason, the Infancia 2.0 research, along with the research presented in this article, are the only two studies that inquire into the relationship of children (ages 11 to 18) or youth (ages 13 to 19) in Anda lusia with social networks; together with demographic and socioeconomic data from the National Institute of Statistics, they describe a fairly accurate picture of this social phenomenon.

In terms of frequency of Internet connection, in Anda lusian youth (ages 16 to 24) as well as youth from Canary Islands, Castilla-León, and Extremadura, there are seven percentage points of difference between those who access the Internet once every three months, and those with weekly access over the same three month period; in the remaining regions of Spain there is no more than 2 points difference (INE, 2012).

The presence of broadband networks in homes varies between 50 and 71% according to monthly incomes, with categories falling between the extremes of less than 1100 euros per month and more than 2700 euros. The regions that fall between 60 and 71% are, in order, Melilla, Castilla-León, Extremadura, La Rioja, Andalusia, Murcia, Navarra, Asturias and Ceuta (INE, 2012).

On the other hand, when analyzing the percentage difference of Internet access in children under 16, for the two extremes of monthly household incomes (less than 1100 euros and more than 2700 euros), we find a difference of 29 percentage points for the regions of Ceuta, Galicia, Valencia, Castilla-La Man cha, La Rioja and Melilla. Between 19 and 10 points of difference, we find Andalusia, Cantabria, Castilla-León, Murcia, Madrid, Extremadura, Basque Coun try, and Catalonia. And with less than 7 points difference we find Canary Islands, Asturias and Navarra. The Balearic Islands are a special case requiring a separate study, since the differential found was minus twenty-one; in other words, minors under 16 with the lowest household incomes were the most frequent Internet users.

Difference in family income is a key factor in the quality (in terms of speed) of Internet access. This difference exists in the homes of young people regardless of the device being used, and is fundamental to the use of social networks, thereby creating a gap that should be studied (Rodríguez & al., 2012).

Just as we have seen in nationwide studies, Anda lusian youth create a profile in social networks before the legal age, males more than females, and naturally the above affirmations about the importance of social networks in youth sociability also apply to them. At the same time a lack of security is acknowledged, meaning a lack of behaviors that encourage proper use and consumption of social network services (Rodríguez & al., 2012).

2. Methodology

This investigation, in line with the general trend of analyzing several socio-educational scenarios, has made combined use of qualitative methodologies (interviews, case studies, discussion groups) and quantitative methodology (a questionnaire); the latter seeks to expand on results from the former through applying a questionnaire to a representative population of Anda lusian youth (Facer, Furlong & al., 2003; Living stone & Bovill, 1999).

Although questionnaires are widely used in social and educational research, it is often overlooked that an inverse approach may ensure greater relevance of the instrument’s content. Carr-Hill (1984) recommends that more qualitative strategies be taken into consideration in drawing up a questionnaire. For this reason, the questionnaire applied in this study was developed in light of the results from ethnographic interviews that were carried out, such that the questions forming the instrument would have an initial validity made possible by the qualitative data.

Use of this procedure is justified on two accounts: on the one hand, to «verify» the results obtained, primarily from the interviews, but also from the case studies and discussion groups; on the other hand, to allow the results to be generalized to the youth and adolescent population of Andalusia.

The questionnaire was therefore organized around topic areas that emerged from using the qualitative strategies. Due to the substantial body of qualitative data already collected, the questionnaire gave priority to closed ended questions (Bell, 2002; Cohen, Manion & Morrison, 2006).

Questionnaire specifications can be summarized as follows: a universe of the teenaged population (ages 13 to 19) enrolled in public schools in Andalusia, with a province-stratified sample of 1487 cases, distributed across the eight Andalusian provinces, ultimately weighted by gender and age. The confidence interval was 95% and sampling error was p=q=0.5 of ± 2%. Sample composition was 49.5 % boys and 50.5 % girls.

The statistical analysis used was descriptive analysis based on frequencies and percentages.

3. Results

The study characterizes Andalusian youth (between ages 13 and 19; mean age 15) as perceiving themselves to be good students (72%), creating their first profile on a social network at the mean age of 12, beginning cell phone usage between the ages of 8 and 12 (80.1%), 62.3% connecting to Internet on a daily basis, and 69.2% connecting in order to contact their friends. The primary location for connecting to social networks is the bedroom (74.3%), followed by the living room (25.4%). More than 90% receive in excess of 1000 visits to their social network profile.

Results from this study on social networks and youth can be grouped into three sections, the first having to do with the structure and configuration of their profiles, where the youth make decisions about what to show to the other members of their list. In this study, 92.8% of youth modify their profile by adding a photograph and information on how they can be contacted, and 14.5% have modified the initial structure, for example, moving the location or size of elements on the page, adding a certain gadget or external plugin, or modifying the default template. The reasons given for making such profile changes are, in 51.7% of the cases, to show their true self, or, in 8.6%, to show a different image of themselves. Another notable reason for these changes was to have control over the content and information that is visible to others (21.4%).

The work involved in this personalization of profiles and content on social networks is oriented toward the people with whom one interacts or wishes to interact. The study shows that friends, at 45.6%, are the primary communication partners on social networks, followed by acquaintances at 22.9%, while strangers take last place at 6.7%, behind family members (24.6%) and boyfriends/girlfriends (32.8%).

The main use of social networks among Andalusian youth is chatting (86.7%). A form of staying in contact with one’s social reference group, chatting creates a placeholder by uploading images created by the members themselves (69.2%), when the environment or event does not allow them any other option. What emerges as most important in social networks is that they open the door to personal confidences, users can share with friends how they are feeling (41%), and they can meet new people, usually friends of friends (41.2%), or meet people who have the same hobbies or interests (24%). It is important to stress that the vast majority do not look on social networks as a resource for making yourself known (19.1%); on the contrary, social networks are adopted as a complementary, necessary resource in today’s world for staying in contact and sharing experiences with your friends (83.5%), for expanding your personal network (46.5%), but above all for becoming closer to your network of contacts. Thus, 50.7% of participants like to know what their friends say about the photos that they post, or the experiences that they tell about, because it is important to them to know that they are liked and valued by their friends (26.1%), on the social network they can be more open than when physically together, and get the chance to feel better when they are sad (24.2%), and they can explore and do things that they would not do otherwise (21.2%).

Finally, Andalusian youth are aware of the importance of managing privacy and security on social networks, and they give access only to their friends (84.5%), that is, to the contacts on their list, those that they have accepted or those that they requested access to and were in turn accepted. Only 4.4% have set their profile to be open to all, in other words, to all who use the same service and even to those who do not. Managing one’s privacy and security is meaningful to them mainly because of harassment and bullying situations. Even though they are aware of the dangers of valuable information being stolen, or that someone might crack their password and enter their accounts, they consider this to be unlikely, in the first case. As one young woman said, «What are they going to get into my account for, I don’t have anything. If they break into some account, it would be a bank or something that’s worth money» (EF15). Another girl argued, «If they wanted to screw me, what would bother me the most is if they started to insult me or post crappy photos of me» (EM14). In the second case, it is usually classmates, friends or acquaintances that get hold of passwords either due to carelessness or excessive familiarity; they usually give them back to the same people that they steal them from. Therefore, the concern of the youth, and what they pursue when managing their profiles, is proper safekeeping of the image they have constructed, of the relationships established, and in general their own position within the network. As for aggression between members of a network, two profiles emerge. The first profile includes two main causes for aggression: (1) arguments and fights, at 39.7%, and (2) envy, at 38.5%. The type of aggression is verbal (56.4%), this being the main type of harassment occurring on the social network. The second profile has to do with stereotypes –geeks with 24%, nerds with 13.2% and leaders with 12% – where the type of aggression is psychological (43.5%), and consists of confronting and discrediting that stereotype.

Finally, regarding the bully profile, there are two clear typologies, one is found among the people closest to the victim, a male or female friend (22.2%), or the friend of a sibling or a friend (6.6%); the other is an adult male (17.7%).

4. Discussion

Findings from this scientific study and from the Infancia 2.0 research (Rodríguez, 2012) are complementary. On the one hand, they mutually support each other with similar conclusions and results; on the other hand, they describe different aspects of children and youth as social network users, useful for posing further questions in the future.

Certain aspects of this study are especially useful. First, it has been demonstrated that the practices of youth, with and within the social networks, fulfill roles that go beyond what has been described or demonstrated to date. For example, Andalusian youth are knowledgeable about the risks and benefits of social networks in their daily use; moreover, they themselves develop and manage different ways to avoid risk, through the means offered by the system itself, and also through usage styles. Second, it has been observed that the youth seek personal contact and construction of their social personhood in social networks. Future studies should delve further into one aspect that is present, but inconclusive, in both studies: the repercussions of the quality of the Internet connection, as the obligatory gateway to social networks. Also to be considered is the importance of the cultural background of families and communities to the relationships, practices and culture that are shared in and through social networks.

Acknowledgments

Research Project HUM-SEJ-02599, «Scenarios, digital technologies and youth in Andalusia», in progress from 2008 to 2011, was funded by the Andalusia Regional Government with an allocation of €110,000. Coordination was provided by the University of Cádiz, with participating researchers from the Universities of Huelva, Seville, Granada, Jaén and Almería.

References

Barker, V. (2009). Older Adolescents’ Motivations for Social Net­work Site Use: The Influence of Gender, Group Identity, and Collec­tive Self-Esteem. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 12 (2), 209-213.

Bell, J. (2002). Cómo hacer tu primer trabajo de investigación. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Boyd, D. (2007). Why Youth (Heart) Social Network Sites: The Role of Networked Publics in Teenage Social Life. In D. Buckin­gham (Ed.), MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Learning – Youth, Identity, and Digital Media Volume. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Boyd, D.M. & Ellison, N.B. (2007). Social Network Sites: Definition, History and Scholarship. Journal of Computer-mediated Comunication, 13 (1), 210-230.

Bringué, X. & Sádaba, C. (2009). La generación interactiva en Es­pa­ña. Niños y adolescentes ante las pantallas. Resumen ejecutivo. Madrid: Foro Generaciones Interactivas, Colección Fundación Te­le­fónica.

Bringué, X. & Sádaba, C. (2011a). Menores y redes sociales. Ma­drid: Foro Generaciones Interactivas, Fundación Telefónica. (www.­ge­ne­racionesinteractivas.org/wp–content/uploads/­2011/­01/Libro–Menores–y–Redes–Sociales_Fin.pdf). (22-02-11).

Bringué, X. & Sádaba, C. (2011b). La generación interactiva en Andalucía. Niños y adolescentes ante las pantallas. Madrid: Foro Generaciones Interactivas, Colección Fundación Telefónica.

Carr-Hill, R.A. (1984). Radicalising Survey Methodology. Quality & Quantity. 18 (3), 275-292

Chew, H.E., LaRose, R., Steinfield, C. & al. (2011). The Use of Online Social Networking by Rural Youth and its Effects on Community Attachment. Information, Communication & Society, 14 (5), 726-747.

Cohen, L., Manion, L. & Morrison, K. (2006). Research Methods in Education. London: Routledge.

Ellison, N.B., Steinfield, C. & Lampe, C. (2007). The Benefits of Facebook «Friends»: Social Capital and College Students’ Use of Online Social Network Sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Commu­nication, 12 (4), 5-27.

Facer, K., Furlong, J., Furlong, R. & Sutherland, R. (2003). Screen Play. Children and Computing in the Home. London: Rout­ledge Falmer.

Garmendia, M., Garitaonandia, C., Martínez, G. & Casado, M.A. (2011). Riesgos y seguridad en Internet: Los menores españoles en el contexto europeo. Bilbao: EU Kids Online, Universidad del País Vasco.

Gross, E.F., Juvonen, J. & Gable, S.L. (2002). Internet Use and Well-being in Adolescence. Journal of Social Issues, 58 (1), 75-90.

Ine (Ed.) (2011). Encuesta sobre equipamiento y uso de tecnologías de la información y comunicación en los hogares. Madrid: Instituto Nacional de Estadística.

Ine (Ed.) (2012). Encuesta sobre equipamiento y uso de tecnologías de la información y comunicación en los hogares. Madrid: Insti­tu­to Nacional de Estadística.

Injuve (Ed.) (2009). Adolescentes y jóvenes en la Red: factores de oportunidad. Directora: Ángeles Rubio Gil. Madrid: INJUVE.

Inteco (Ed.) (2009). Estudio sobre hábitos seguros en el uso de las TIC por niños y adolescentes y e-confianza de sus padres. Obser­vatorio de la Seguridad de la Información. Ministerio de Industria, Energía y Turismo

Inteco (Ed.) (2012). Estudio sobre la seguridad de la información y la e-confianza de los hogares españoles. Madrid: Ministerio de Indus­tria, Energía y Turismo.

Livingstone, S. & Bovill, M. (1999). Young people and new media. London: London School of Economics and Political Science.

Mazur, E. & Richards, L. (2011). Adolescents and Emerging Adults’ Social Networking Online: Homophily or Diversity? Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 32, 180-188.

Mikami, A.Y., Szwedo, D.E., Allen, J.P. & al. (2010). Adolescent Peer Relationships and Behavior Problems Predict Young Adults’ Communication on Social Networking Websites. Developmental Psychology, 46 (1), 46-56.

Observatorio de la Infancia en Andalucía (Ed.) (2010). Activi­dades y usos de TIC entre los chicos y chicas de Andalucía. Informe 2010. Granada: Fundación Andaluza de Servicios Sociales, Conse­jería de Innovación.

Observatorio de la Infancia en Andalucía (Ed.) (2012). Tecno­logías de la Información y Comunicación. Serie: Estado de la In­fancia y Adolescencia en Andalucía. Granada: Consejería para la Igualdad y Bienestar Social, Agencia de Ser­vicios Sociales.

Pfeil, U., Arjan, R. & Zaphiris, P. (2009). Age Differences in On­li­ne Social Networking. A Study of User Profiles and the Social Ca­pi­tal Divide among Teenagers and Older Users in MySpa­ce. Computers in Human Behavior, 25 (3), 643-654.

Robles, J.M. (2008). Ciudadanía digital. Una introducción a un nuevo concepto de ciudadano. Barcelona: UOC.

Rodríguez, I. & al. (2012). La población infantil ante las nuevas tecnologías de la información Una aproximación a la realidad de los nativos digitales andaluces. Sevilla: Fundación Pública Anda­luza Centro de Estudios Andaluces de la Junta de Andalucía.

Sánchez-Buron, A. & Fernández-Marín, M. (2010). Generación 2.0, Hábitos de los adolescentes en el uso de las redes sociales. Madrid: Universidad Camilo Jose Cela (www.slideshare.net/­ucjc/­ge­­neracin-20-­hbitos-de-los-ad (20-04-2011).

Subrahmanyam, K., Reich, S.M., Waechter, N. & al. (2008). On­line and Offline Social Networks: Use of Social Networking Sites by Emerging Adults. Journal of Applied Developmental Psy­chology, 29 (6), 420-433.

The Cocktail Analysis (Ed.) (2008). Herramientas de comunicación on-line: las redes sociales. (www.tcanalysis.­com/uploads/­2008/­­11/informe_observatorio_redes_sociales.pdf) (20-03-2011).

The Cocktail Analysis (Ed.) (2009). Estudio de eficacia de formatos publicitarios de display y actitudes de los usuarios de redes sociales ante la publicidad en estas plataformas. http://tcanalysis.com/uploads/2009/06/IAB_SPAIN_Eficacia_Formatos_primera_oleada.pdf (22-03-2011).

The Cocktail Analysis (Ed.) (2010). Informe de resultados. Ob­ser­vatorio Redes Sociales 2ª oleada. (http://tcanalysis.com/uploads/2010/02/tca–2a_ola_observatorio_redes_informe_publico.pdf) (22-03-2011).

The Cocktail Analysis (Ed.) (2011). III Oleada. Informe de Re­sultados. Observatorio Redes Sociales. (www.tca­naly­sis.com/­uploads/2011/02/Observatorio-RedesSociales­2011.pdf) (03-11-2011).

The Cocktail Analysis (Ed.) (2012). IV Oleada. Observatorio de Redes Sociales Informe Público de Resultados. (www.slideshare.­net/­­TCAnalysis/­4-oleada-observatorio-de-redes-sociales) (05-05-2012)..



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Diversos estudios sobre jóvenes y redes sociales han demostrado, en general, el alto consumo de estos servicios de Internet, generalizándose su uso en casi todo tipo de ubicaciones y valorando su importancia en la construcción de las relaciones sociales entre la juventud. En este artículo se presenta parte de los análisis y resultados del cuestionario de la investigación sobre los «Escenarios, tecnologías digitales y juventud en Andalucía», administrada a una población de 1.487 jóvenes entre los 13 y 19. La discusión sobre jóvenes andaluces y redes sociales gira en torno a la es­tructura y configuración de sus perfiles, a las finalidades de uso, y a la privacidad y seguridad en las mismas. Los re­sultados destacados muestran una población con acceso a las redes sociales sin casi restricciones y con poco seguimiento adulto, y además las edades de acceso son menores de las legalmente definidas por los propios servicios de Internet. Las motivaciones de los jóvenes andaluces para el uso de las redes sociales se pueden agrupar en tres áreas; las dos primeras están presentes en otras investigaciones: motivación social y la psicológico-afectiva; y menos la tercera: la necesidad ligada a la vida cotidiana. Este trabajo aporta en sus conclusiones nuevos aspectos para explicar la naturaleza y los significados de las prácticas de los jóvenes andaluces con las redes sociales.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Las redes sociales son un servicio de Internet que permite a cualquier cibernauta construirse un per fil –público o semipúblico– dentro de un sistema ges tionado por un tercero; compartir relacio nes –experiencias, contenidos, etc.– con una lista de otros usuarios que, dependiendo de la privacidad autodefinida de su perfil, podrá tener acceso a todos los seguidores y a sus experiencias de los miembros de las listas que sigan las suyas (Boyd, 2007; Boyd & Ellison, 2007).

Las redes sociales abren un espacio para las interacciones que ha sido ocupado «in crescendo» por la juventud, como así lo demuestran los estudios internacionales (Chew & al., 2011; Mazur & Richards, 2011; Mikami & al., 2010; Pfiel & al., 2009; Subrah manyam & al., 2008; Gross & al., 2002) y los estatales en los últimos años (TCA, 2012; Garmendia & al., 2011; Injuve, 2009), extendiéndose con independencia de la renta de las familias con acceso a Internet (TCA, 2011).

El lugar de acceso –quizás por los dispositivos mó viles y las redes wifi libres– se ha generalizado a plazas y espacios abiertos, si bien el punto de acceso mayoritario sigue siendo el hogar (OIA, 2010; Inteco, 2009), en detrimento de la escuela, a pesar del Plan Avanza y Escuela 2.0. Por todo ello, el uso y acceso de las redes sociales ha llegado a ser un nuevo entorno de socialización para los jóvenes, un espacio para la construcción de la identidad social con sus iguales, a veces con ningún control o asesoramiento parental; y aun conociéndose que la inmersión en las mismas es cada vez más prematuro y por debajo de la edad mínima permitida (Inteco, 2009). Por otra parte, la juventud mantiene y gestiona, con una cierta seguridad y protección, sus perfiles creados (OIA, 2012; Inteco, 2012).

Los trabajos de investigación con grandes muestras (Bringué & Sádaba, 2009; 2011a; Sánchez & Fer nández, 2010; Inteco, 2009; TCA, 2008, 2010, 2011) que han indagado sobre las redes sociales horizontales como nuevo espacio social de la juventud –al que acceden desde cualquier dispositivo o pantalla– describen que el motivo principal para crearse una cuenta o más en las redes sociales, es la comunicación, quizás porque elimina barreras comunicativas (Barker, 2009; Ellison & al., 2007), pudiéndose entender, por un lado, como la necesidad de estar disponible y estar presente ante lo que ocurra en ese entorno (Bringué & Sádaba, 2009), asociándolo a valores como inclusión social, es decir como proceso de búsqueda de amistad entre sus iguales (Mazur & Richards, 2011; Pfiel & al., 2009) y para reforzar las relaciones de amistad de fue ra de la Red (Subrah man yam & al., 2008; Gross & al., 2002), como autoafirmación ante los demás miembros de la red al mantenerse patrones de relación a lo largo del tiempo dentro y fuera de la Red (Mikami & al., 2010) y como reconocimiento social, según el nú mero seguidores (TCA, 2008). Por otro lado, como el deseo de relacionarse con otros, conocer a miembros de la red, incluso desconocidos; las redes sociales se interpretan como objeto de consumo, en su dimensión más lúdica. La popularidad de la red social, al estar de mo da, se convierte en servicios/productos que hay que consumir (TCA, 2010).

Estas investigaciones también describen perfiles de usuario, en relación con la frecuencia de acceso y por aplicación de red social, mostrando que existen diferencias por edades; tomando solo los datos referidos a la muestra semejante al trabajo que aquí se presenta (de 13 a 19 años), se evidencia que entre los 10 y 18 años las redes sociales son un 70,7% de la actividad en la Red (Bringué & Sádaba, 2009) y que el 55% tiene una frecuencia de acceso diaria y solo un 22% menos de una vez al mes (TCA, 2010); también que a partir de los 16 años más de un 71% tiene varios perfiles en más de una red (TCA, 2009), que la red preferida es Tuenti antes de los 20 años con una dispersión según estudio entre un 60% (Bringué & Sábada, 2011a) y el 92% de la población (TCA, 2009), seguida de Face book, y que a diferencia de estudios anteriores tampoco existe distinción por sexo en estas edades.

En resumen, se puede plantear que el perfil emergente de estos estudios no varía mucho, al esbozar una imagen utilitarista de la juventud como usuaria de las redes sociales en particular y de Internet en general, al reducir las acciones y acontecimientos que suceden en estos servicios de la Red como meras herramientas pa ra alcanzar fines concretos, que pueden abarcar cinco ejes, comunicar, conocer, compartir y consumir (Brin gué y Sábada, 2009). Aunque sí se pueden en contrar diferencias dentro de un grupo tan homogéneo, pues «el hecho de compartir un mismo espacio en el que los individuos llevan a cabo un conjunto más o menos es table de relaciones tienen como consecuencia la generación de intereses comunes entre los miembros. Jun to a los intereses comunes, las relaciones dentro de la comunidad suelen generar reglas de comportamiento compartidas y aceptadas por los miem bros, ya sea de forma implícita o explícita. La identidad y la sensación de pertenencia son otras de las dimensiones grupales favorecidas por la interacción dentro de la comunidad» (Robles, 2008: 39).

Los estudios consultados de grandes muestras so bre la juventud andaluza (Bringué & Sábada, 2011b; OIA, 2010; 2012; INE, 2011; 2012) no han indagado directamente sobre el uso e interacciones en la redes sociales, a excepción del trabajo Infancia 2.0: re des sociales y usos tecnológicos emergentes en la po bla ción nativa digital andaluza (Rodríguez & al, 2012).

Este fenómeno emergente del uso de las redes so ciales se ha explicado, en los primeros estudios anteriores, desde los tipos de uso, actividades, y contenidos asociados a Internet, pero no hay datos en concreto sobre ellas. Por ello, las investigaciones «Infancia 2.0», junto con la que se presenta en este artículo, son los dos únicos estudios que indagan en la relación de la infancia (entre 11 y 18 años) y la juventud (entre 13 y 19 años) con las redes sociales en Anda lu cía; que, junto a los datos de mográficos y socioeconómicos del Instituto Na cional de Es ta dística, forman una imagen bas tante aproximada de este fenómeno social.

El contexto de acceso a In ternet de los jóvenes andaluces (16 a 24 años) es, junto a las comunidades de Canarias, Cas tilla-León, y Extremadura, siete puntos de diferencia en el porcentaje entre el acceso a In ternet una vez cada tres me ses, y el acceso semanal durante los mismos tres meses; mientras que en el resto de las co munidades la máxima diferencia es de casi dos puntos (INE, 2012).

La dotación de banda an cha en los hogares según los ingresos mensuales varía entre 50 y 71 puntos porcentuales, entre los ingresos mensuales de menos de 1.100€ y los de más de 2.700€. Las comunidades que están entre los 60 y 71 puntos de diferencia son por orden Melilla, Castilla y León, Extremadura, La Rioja, Andalucía, Murcia, Navarra, Asturias y Ceuta (INE, 2012).

Por otro lado, analizando la diferencia porcentual en el acceso a Internet de los niños menores de 16 años entre los ingresos mensuales por hogar menores de 1.100€ y más de 2.700€, se encuentran con más de 29 puntos de diferencia en el porcentaje de acceso a Internet las comunidades de Ceuta, Galicia, Co mu nidad Valenciana, Castilla-La Mancha, La Rioja y Melilla. Entre 19 y 10 puntos de diferencia, las co mu ni dades de Andalucía, Cantabria, Castilla-León, Mur cia, Madrid, Extremadura, País Vasco y Cataluña. Y con menos de siete puntos de diferencia Canarias, As turias y Navarra. La Comunidad de las Islas Ba leares es un caso particular que requeriría de un estudio específico al tener un diferencial de menos veintiuno, es decir que los menores de 16 años con ingresos men suales más bajos en sus hogares son los que más acceden a Internet.

La diferencia de los ingresos familiares es un factor clave de la calidad, en términos de rapidez, de acceso a Internet, esta diferencia en los hogares de los jóvenes –independientemente del dispositivo de acceso– es fun damental para el uso de las redes sociales, generando una brecha que debe ser estudiada (Rodríguez & al., 2012).

La juventud andaluza también se crea un perfil en las redes sociales antes de la edad permitida, más los chicos que las chicas, como vimos en los estudios estatales, y por supuesto también se comparten las afirmaciones sobre la relevancia para la sociabilidad de los jóvenes, a la vez que se reconoce el estado de inseguridad entendida por la falta de conductas que refuercen el uso y consumo adecuado de las redes sociales (Rodríguez & al., 2012).

2. Metodología

Esta investigación, siguiendo la tendencia generalizada en este tipo de estudios, que analiza varios escenarios socio-educativos, ha empleado conjuntamente metodologías cualitativas –entrevistas, estudios de ca so, grupos de discusión– y cuantitativa –cuestionario– con la intención de amplificar los resultados de los primeros con la aplicación de un cuestionario a una muestra representativa de la población juvenil andaluza (Facer, Furlong & al., 2003; Livingstone & Bovill, 1999).

Aunque el cuestionario es un instrumento ampliamente utilizado en la investigación social y educativa, se olvida con frecuencia que un enfoque inverso po dría asegurar una mayor relevancia al contenido mis mo de dicho instrumento. Carr-Hill (1984) aconseja ela borar el cuestionario ateniéndose a estrategias mu cho más cualitativas. Por ello, esta investigación ha elaborado el cuestionario en relación a los resultados de las entrevistas etnográficas realizadas, de tal manera que las cuestiones planteadas en el mismo tengan la validez inicial que los datos cualitativos aportan.

La razón que justifica la inclusión y la utilización de este procedimiento es doble. Por un lado, para verificar los resultados obtenidos a través de las entrevistas, principalmente, pero también de los estudios de caso y los grupos de discusión. Por el otro, se generalizan los resultados a la población juvenil y adolescente andaluza.

El cuestionario que se ha elaborado se organiza en torno a las temáticas que hemos ido descubriendo con las estrategias cualitativas y, dada la presencia notable de datos cualitativos, dicho cuestionario se compone preferentemente de preguntas cerradas (Bell, 2002; Cohen, Manion & Morrison, 2006).

La ficha técnica del cuestionario se resume en un universo de la población andaluza escolarizada en centros de la red pública de enseñanza entre 13 y 19 años, con una muestra estratificada por provincias de 1.487 casos distribuidos en las ocho provincias andaluzas, con ponderación final por sexo y edad. Con un nivel de confianza 95% y un error muestral de p=q= 0.5 de ± 2%. Esta muestra se compone de un 49,5% de chicos y un 50,5% de chicas.

El análisis estadístico empleado ha sido el análisis descriptivo basado en frecuencias y porcentajes.

3. Resultados

La investigación caracteriza a una juventud andaluza (entre 13 y 19 años; la media de 15 años) con una autopercepción de buen estudiante (72%), que la edad media en la que se crean su primer perfil en una red social es a los 12 años, que el inicio en el uso del teléfono móvil es de los 8 a los 12 años (80,1%), donde el 62,3% accede diariamente a Internet, y un 69,2% se conecta a la Red para contactar con sus amigos. El hábitat principal de acceso a las redes sociales es su habitación (74,3%), seguido del sa lón de casa (25,4%), hay que tener presente también que más del 90% de ellos recibe más de 1.000 visitas en su perfil de red social.

Los resultados del estudio respecto a las redes sociales y la juventud se agrupan en tres apartados, el primero asociado a la estructura y configuración de sus perfiles, donde los jóvenes andaluces toman decisiones sobre qué es lo que muestran de su perfil a los demás miembros de su lista. Así en este estudio el 92,8% de los jóvenes modifican su perfil aña diendo una fotografía e in formando de cómo pue de ser contactado y un 14,5% han modificado la es truc tura inicial, por ejemplo cambiando de lugar o tamaño los elementos de la página, añadiendo algún «gadget» o «plugins» externos, o modificando la plantilla predeterminada. Las razones por las que han realizado dichos cambios en su perfil son con un 51,7% para mostrar su verdadero yo, y con un 8,6% para mostrar otra imagen distinta de ellos mismos. Otra razón destacable de esos cambios es tener control sobre los contenidos o informaciones que son visibles (21,4%).

La labor que conlleva esta personalización de los perfiles y contenidos en las redes sociales está orientada en relación con las personas con las que se mantiene o quiere mantener una interacción; así el estudio muestra que son los amigos con el 45,6% los principales interlocutores en las redes sociales, seguidos de las personas conocidas con el 22,9%, mientras que los desconocidos con un 6,7% quedan por detrás de familiares (24,6%) y parejas (32,8%).

El principal uso de las redes sociales de los jóvenes andaluces es «chatear» (86,7%) como una forma de estar en contacto con el grupo social de referencia, que se sustituye por subir imágenes que ellos mismos hacen (69,2%) cuando el entorno o el acontecimiento no les permite otra cosa. Pero también las redes sociales se convierten en un modo de actuar que da lugar para las confidencias, donde compartir con las amistades el estado de ánimo (41%), conocer nuevas personas, normalmente amigos de mis amigos (41,2%), y conocer gente con las mismas aficiones o intereses (24%) se vuelve lo más importante. Aunque es importante destacar que la gran mayoría se aleja de la idea de que las redes sociales sea un recurso para darse a conocer (19,1%), por el contrario asumen que es el recurso complementario y necesario actualmente para estar en contacto y compartir las experiencias con sus amigos (83,5%), para ampliar su red (46,5%), pero sobre todo para estrechar los lazos con la red de contactos, y así al 50,7% les gusta saber lo que dicen sus amigos de las fotos que suben o las experiencias que narran; para ellos es importante saber que gustan y que son bien valorados por sus amistades (26,1%), porque en la red social pueden ser más sinceros que cuando están físicamente con ellos, dándoles la posibilidad de sentirse bien cuando están tristes (24,2%), y de explorar y hacer cosas que no harían de otra manera (21,2%).

Por último, los jóvenes andaluces son conscientes de la importancia de la gestión de la privacidad y seguridad en las redes sociales, dando solo acceso a sus amigos (84,5%), es decir a los contactos de su lista, los que ellos han aceptado o los que ellos han solicitado y les han aceptado a su vez. Solo el 4,4% de ellos y ellas tienen configurado un perfil abierto a toda la Red, es decir a todos los usuarios de ese mismo servicio, e incluso a los que no lo son.

El sentido y significado de la importancia de gestionar su privacidad y seguridad viene asociada a situaciones de acoso y abuso principalmente, pues aunque conocen los peligros de que roben información va liosa, o de que puedan piratear la clave y suplantarte, etc., lo primero lo ven como una posibilidad lejana, una joven decía «para que me van a entrar en mi cuenta, si no tengo nada. Si entran en algún lado será en un banco o en algo que valga dinero» (EF15). Y otra argumentaba «a mí si me quieren j... lo que más me molestaría es que empezaran a insultarme o a pu blicar fotos chungas mías» (EM14). Y lo segundo, que suelen ser compañeros, amigos, conocidos, personas cercanas que se apropian de la clave por descuido o por exceso de confianza y que suelen devolvérsela las mismas personas que se la han robado. Por lo tanto, su preocupación y lo que da sentido a su gestión es la salvaguarda de la imagen construida, de las relaciones establecidas, y en general la posición dentro de la Red. Surgen así dos perfiles: el primero donde las discusiones y peleas con un 39,7% y la envidia con un 38,5% son las dos causas o motivos principales de agresión entre los miembros de una red; siendo la agresión de tipo verbal (56,4%) la manera principal del tipo de aco so en la red social. El segundo viene definido por estereotipos: el «friki» con el 24%, el «empollón» con el 13,2% y el «líder» con el 12% son los segundos motivos de acoso; siendo la agresión de tipo psicológico (43,5%) la manera de confrontar y deslegitimar ese es tereotipo. Para finalizar, y en relación con el perfil del acosador de estos jóvenes, se muestran dos claras ti pologías, ambas asociadas a las personas que tenemos más próximas, la primera, el amigo/a (22,2%), el amigo de un hermano o un amigo (6,6%), y la segunda la de un adulto hombre (17,7%).

4. Discusión

Los hallazgos de este trabajo científico y la investigación «Infancia 2.0» (Rodríguez, 2012) son complementarios. Por un lado, porque se refuerzan entre ambas al alcanzar conclusiones y análisis similares; por otro lado, porque han aportado información a aspectos distintos sobre la infancia y la juventud como usuarios de las redes sociales muy útiles para replantearse futuras preguntas.

Entre los aspectos que los aproximan están los si guientes: primero, el haber demostrado que las prácticas en y con las redes sociales de los jóvenes tienen un papel más activo en cuestiones que hasta ahora no se ha bían dicho, ni podido demostrar. Por ejemplo, el he cho de que la juventud andaluza es conocedora de los riesgos y beneficios de las redes sociales en su cotidianeidad, y de que además ellos mismos elaboran y gestionan distintas formas de evitarlos empleando los medios del propio sistema, pero también por estilos de uso. Se gundo, que la juventud busca en las redes so ciales el contacto personal y la construcción de su ser social. Se debería profundizar en un futuro estudio –y que am bos trabajos presentan pero no concluyen– en la calidad del acceso a Internet, puerta de paso obligatoria para las redes sociales, y sobre la im portancia del capital cultural de las familias y comunidades en las relaciones, prácticas y cultura compartida en y con las redes sociales.

Apoyos

Proyecto de Investigación de la Junta de Andalucía, cuya ejecución se realizó desde 2008 a 2011, con un presupuesto de 110.000 €, coordinada por Universidad de Cádiz y participada por investigadores de las Universidades de Huelva, Sevilla, Granada, Jaén y Almería con el título «Escenarios, tecnologías digitales y juventud en Andalucía», con clave HUM-SEJ-02599.

Referencias

Barker, V. (2009). Older Adolescents’ Motivations for Social Net­work Site Use: The Influence of Gender, Group Identity, and Collec­tive Self-Esteem. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 12 (2), 209-213.

Bell, J. (2002). Cómo hacer tu primer trabajo de investigación. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Boyd, D. (2007). Why Youth (Heart) Social Network Sites: The Role of Networked Publics in Teenage Social Life. In D. Buckin­gham (Ed.), MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Learning – Youth, Identity, and Digital Media Volume. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Boyd, D.M. & Ellison, N.B. (2007). Social Network Sites: Definition, History and Scholarship. Journal of Computer-mediated Comunication, 13 (1), 210-230.

Bringué, X. & Sádaba, C. (2009). La generación interactiva en Es­pa­ña. Niños y adolescentes ante las pantallas. Resumen ejecutivo. Madrid: Foro Generaciones Interactivas, Colección Fundación Te­le­fónica.

Bringué, X. & Sádaba, C. (2011a). Menores y redes sociales. Ma­drid: Foro Generaciones Interactivas, Fundación Telefónica. (www.­ge­ne­racionesinteractivas.org/wp–content/uploads/­2011/­01/Libro–Menores–y–Redes–Sociales_Fin.pdf). (22-02-11).

Bringué, X. & Sádaba, C. (2011b). La generación interactiva en Andalucía. Niños y adolescentes ante las pantallas. Madrid: Foro Generaciones Interactivas, Colección Fundación Telefónica.

Carr-Hill, R.A. (1984). Radicalising Survey Methodology. Quality & Quantity. 18 (3), 275-292

Chew, H.E., LaRose, R., Steinfield, C. & al. (2011). The Use of Online Social Networking by Rural Youth and its Effects on Community Attachment. Information, Communication & Society, 14 (5), 726-747.

Cohen, L., Manion, L. & Morrison, K. (2006). Research Methods in Education. London: Routledge.

Ellison, N.B., Steinfield, C. & Lampe, C. (2007). The Benefits of Facebook «Friends»: Social Capital and College Students’ Use of Online Social Network Sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Commu­nication, 12 (4), 5-27.

Facer, K., Furlong, J., Furlong, R. & Sutherland, R. (2003). Screen Play. Children and Computing in the Home. London: Rout­ledge Falmer.

Garmendia, M., Garitaonandia, C., Martínez, G. & Casado, M.A. (2011). Riesgos y seguridad en Internet: Los menores españoles en el contexto europeo. Bilbao: EU Kids Online, Universidad del País Vasco.

Gross, E.F., Juvonen, J. & Gable, S.L. (2002). Internet Use and Well-being in Adolescence. Journal of Social Issues, 58 (1), 75-90.

Ine (Ed.) (2011). Encuesta sobre equipamiento y uso de tecnologías de la información y comunicación en los hogares. Madrid: Instituto Nacional de Estadística.

Ine (Ed.) (2012). Encuesta sobre equipamiento y uso de tecnologías de la información y comunicación en los hogares. Madrid: Insti­tu­to Nacional de Estadística.

Injuve (Ed.) (2009). Adolescentes y jóvenes en la Red: factores de oportunidad. Directora: Ángeles Rubio Gil. Madrid: INJUVE.

Inteco (Ed.) (2009). Estudio sobre hábitos seguros en el uso de las TIC por niños y adolescentes y e-confianza de sus padres. Obser­vatorio de la Seguridad de la Información. Ministerio de Industria, Energía y Turismo

Inteco (Ed.) (2012). Estudio sobre la seguridad de la información y la e-confianza de los hogares españoles. Madrid: Ministerio de Indus­tria, Energía y Turismo.

Livingstone, S. & Bovill, M. (1999). Young people and new media. London: London School of Economics and Political Science.

Mazur, E. & Richards, L. (2011). Adolescents and Emerging Adults’ Social Networking Online: Homophily or Diversity? Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 32, 180-188.

Mikami, A.Y., Szwedo, D.E., Allen, J.P. & al. (2010). Adolescent Peer Relationships and Behavior Problems Predict Young Adults’ Communication on Social Networking Websites. Developmental Psychology, 46 (1), 46-56.

Observatorio de la Infancia en Andalucía (Ed.) (2010). Activi­dades y usos de TIC entre los chicos y chicas de Andalucía. Informe 2010. Granada: Fundación Andaluza de Servicios Sociales, Conse­jería de Innovación.

Observatorio de la Infancia en Andalucía (Ed.) (2012). Tecno­logías de la Información y Comunicación. Serie: Estado de la In­fancia y Adolescencia en Andalucía. Granada: Consejería para la Igualdad y Bienestar Social, Agencia de Ser­vicios Sociales.

Pfeil, U., Arjan, R. & Zaphiris, P. (2009). Age Differences in On­li­ne Social Networking. A Study of User Profiles and the Social Ca­pi­tal Divide among Teenagers and Older Users in MySpa­ce. Computers in Human Behavior, 25 (3), 643-654.

Robles, J.M. (2008). Ciudadanía digital. Una introducción a un nuevo concepto de ciudadano. Barcelona: UOC.

Rodríguez, I. & al. (2012). La población infantil ante las nuevas tecnologías de la información Una aproximación a la realidad de los nativos digitales andaluces. Sevilla: Fundación Pública Anda­luza Centro de Estudios Andaluces de la Junta de Andalucía.

Sánchez-Buron, A. & Fernández-Marín, M. (2010). Generación 2.0, Hábitos de los adolescentes en el uso de las redes sociales. Madrid: Universidad Camilo Jose Cela (www.slideshare.net/­ucjc/­ge­­neracin-20-­hbitos-de-los-ad (20-04-2011).

Subrahmanyam, K., Reich, S.M., Waechter, N. & al. (2008). On­line and Offline Social Networks: Use of Social Networking Sites by Emerging Adults. Journal of Applied Developmental Psy­chology, 29 (6), 420-433.

The Cocktail Analysis (Ed.) (2008). Herramientas de comunicación on-line: las redes sociales. (www.tcanalysis.­com/uploads/­2008/­­11/informe_observatorio_redes_sociales.pdf) (20-03-2011).

The Cocktail Analysis (Ed.) (2009). Estudio de eficacia de formatos publicitarios de display y actitudes de los usuarios de redes sociales ante la publicidad en estas plataformas. http://tcanalysis.com/uploads/2009/06/IAB_SPAIN_Eficacia_Formatos_primera_oleada.pdf (22-03-2011).

The Cocktail Analysis (Ed.) (2010). Informe de resultados. Ob­ser­vatorio Redes Sociales 2ª oleada. (http://tcanalysis.com/uploads/2010/02/tca–2a_ola_observatorio_redes_informe_publico.pdf) (22-03-2011).

The Cocktail Analysis (Ed.) (2011). III Oleada. Informe de Re­sultados. Observatorio Redes Sociales. (www.tca­naly­sis.com/­uploads/2011/02/Observatorio-RedesSociales­2011.pdf) (03-11-2011).

The Cocktail Analysis (Ed.) (2012). IV Oleada. Observatorio de Redes Sociales Informe Público de Resultados. (www.slideshare.­net/­­TCAnalysis/­4-oleada-observatorio-de-redes-sociales) (05-05-2012)..

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 28/02/13
Accepted on 28/02/13
Submitted on 28/02/13

Volume 21, Issue 1, 2013
DOI: 10.3916/C40-2013-02-02
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 33
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?