Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

One of the «black holes» of academic research in Communication is the shallowness of reflections on the classic origins of Communication, its aims and points of entry. In this respect, the study of communicative processes on the Internet becomes particularly relevant (specifically the social networks processes) when observed from the classic rhetorical perspective. We focus on the use of persuasion strategies (ethos, pathos, logos) as well as the abundant use of rhetorical figures. Such parameters, along with the resources that emergent technologies offer, unleash creativity and afford humanist aspects to network communication. These give online platforms an extremely persuasive strength. Thus, we may speak of the network user of the 21st century as the new «Rhetorician». Our research on Facebook addresses the presence of rhetoric in online social network communication: the user of these platforms applies communicative strategies described by the Rhetoricians dating back to GrecoRoman antiquity. The methodology in this work (the study of three typified cases and the content analysis of conversations generated on Facebook walls) allows us to intertwine rhetoric and communication today, mediated by the emergence of online networks. We propose the retrieval of certain parameters of deep, critical thought to the benefit of a more human communication.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction and state of the art

This article tackles the presence of rhetoric in communication in online social networks. Specifically, the research intends to show how the user of these platforms makes use of communication strategies described by rhetoricians since its origins in Greco-Roman antiquity. The use of «ethos, logos and pathos», and –notably– the abundant use of rhetorical figures, anticipates the presence of humanist aspects in network communication, endowing it with a great deal of creativity. Such parameters, along with the resources that emergent technologies offer, shape these platforms’ typical persuasive strength, because of so-called collective intelligence (Flores, 2009: 78; Aguaded & al., 2009). In a very short time, an «all-communication» society became established, one in which information circulates mainly through social networks, connecting millions of people all over the world. Social networks prevail, playing a significant part in our personal, social and work life (Boyld & Ellison, 2008). By getting closer to social network discourse –technology-mediated Communication– it is easy to observe deep epistemological changes within the Communications field. The authors of this study think, along with Cuadras (2009: 23), an expert in Semiotics, that one of the theoretical paradoxes of our time lies in that «together with the great techno-scientific mutations which redefine the communication phenomenon, the models which try to explain it are logo-centric and literary-based». We therefore share the need to review the communication phenomenon from a techno-generated communication theory. This phenomenon has proved difficult to apprehend with the usual models, i.e. communication theory models, which have been the guidelines for communication thought –, and now appear likely to undergo revision in order to reveal their limitations and, therefore, open them up to new constructions of their elements.

Within this changing process, classic rhetorical elements and strategies are still clearly recognizable, and now reinforced by the possibilities which emergent technologies offer.

Faced with the shift of the above-mentioned models, we need to study and look for new standards in order to critically these models. Thus, St. Amant (2002) states the need to compare computer-mediated communication models with intercultural communication in order to find convergences. Along this line, the presence of rhetoric on the Internet is at the origin of many interesting academic articles (Albaladejo, 2007; Warnick, 2011; Berlanga & Alberich 2012: 143-144); Internet is a rhetorical space in its configuration (Barbules, 2002) and in its interface, due to the presence of rhetorical figures (Clément, 1995; Gamonal, 2004). Nevertheless, mutual transferences between rhetoric and the social network appear to be an innovative field of study with no concluding results so far. Within this changing process and concept replacement, the present study contributes to the current research trend by looking into its widening scope and possibilities.

In the same way, and being active within the communication field, we consider it apt to shift our view to the classics. This is not only due to one obvious reason: that the art of persuasion was born and structured precisely in Greco-Roman culture through discourse based on principles that are still valid today. It is also timely and convenient to go back to classic principles, original –there is nothing more original than going back to the origins– in a historic moment such as ours, characterized by such vibration, immediacy and information surplus, which makes us head willy-nilly towards a depersonalized and superficial communication. In contrast, this research is framed within a generic line of humanism and classic anthropology recovery in the field of technological communication (Sanderson, 1989; Victoria, Gómez & Arjona, 2012).

1.1. Communication on the Internet, a new paradigm

When analyzing communicative processes on the Internet, we face certain theoretical problems which stem from online communication’s own features. This communication is interpersonal and collective, synchronous or asynchronous –in combination of both modalities for social network interactions–, which breaks with linearity and requires, based on its virtuality, new approaches for its constitutive elements. The communication subject, or in this context the user, becomes relevant in the face of the traditional model: interpersonal communication shows important differences in the structure of sending-receiving. By user, we mean someone taking an active part in the Web, as sender or receiver, as actor or mere spectator. Some authors are very critical of the user: «As a new Ulysses of the twenty-first century, net users navigate this virtual ocean, it being a network, a crossroads word for: being nobody» (Cuadras, 2009: 22-32). However, it is true that the user is open to new suggestions through possibilities for interaction (Rintell, Mulholland & Pittam, 2001).

Kiss and Castro (2004: 227-231) explain the construction process of the subject of enunciation. The possibility we have for creating real or invented worlds on the Internet begins with the construction of the individual referent: the subject of enunciation elaborates a self-image to communicate. In turn, we may only think of the network functionalist model as a multipolar whole of integrated nodes through which flows of messages occur according to Web-based codes and languages. Interaction participants are no longer required to share the same reference frame or the sociocultural paradigm, as required in communication described by traditional models. Referentiality is displaced by the concept of virtual «trans-contexts: digital constructs which act as devices in the communicational space. These contexts «set up beyond progression taken as «calendar time and cardinality»: we face an unhistorical and territorialized space» (Cuadras, 2009: 26).

1.2. Convergence of classical rhetoric and online social networks

We perceive deep, underlying changes in this type of communication, a clear-cut analogy and convergence between the social network format and the resources of persuasion, such as the creators of rhetoric conceived them. Each user intervening in the social networks acts in order to communicate with diverse persuasive aims (convince, seduce, please, move, be interesting, etc.); rarely do the users just «share their life», and when they do, it is with the aim of prompting certain responses amongst friends-users within the social network, an intention with a certain degree of persuasion. In order to attain these persuasive aims, social network users turn to –most probably unconscious of it– several rhetorical strategies. We may even establish that they follow a similar process in discourse construction to that of classical orators (inventio, dispositio, elocutio, actio and memoria): they look for ideas and arguments (inventio) which they then somehow organize, even though not in the typical discursive order (dispositio). The users express them according to certain elocution strategies, and finally they represent these strategies using new forms of pronunciation (actio). Thus, such discourses give feedback to the treasure of contents within the social network (memoria) once they belong to it by having been «spoken out». By contrast, social networks allow for the inclusion of multiple text variants (text, fixed image, video, multimedia, etc.). These widen their expressive potential and support discourse to achieve their persuasive aim. Thus, with a short message one may say a lot. In other words, these are all typical aspects of rhetoric, well suited for written communications and interpersonal communication.

Along these lines, network users display the typical features of the classical orators, those persuasive techniques passed down without interruption throughout history, now evidently reinforced by technology. We hereby refer to the frequent use of literary figures such as creative language deviations, and specifically, to the use of ethical, logical and pathetical strategies (Aristotle, 1991), and thus we can call this user the new 21st century rhetorician.

2. Materials and methods

We formulate our initial research question as follows: H1 – social networks may be referred to as the new rhetorical space or the 21st century agora. Rhetoric has a long-standing presence in audiovisual communication generated on social networks. To this hypothesis can be added: H1a) the discourse of social network users is full of rhetorical figures; H1b) rhetorical figures employed on social networks generate thought, dialogue and more efficient communication.

Our research objectives are: to underline the presence of rhetoric in social network discourse, specifically the use of persuasive strategies by the user. Following on from this, we will present our interpretations of the studied phenomenon looking at the specific features of the various selected profiles. Finally, as an operational objective, we will evaluate research results and put forward theoretical and practical applications.

The research mainly follows the case study method. According to Stake (1995: 28-29), we need to study and look for new standards in order to understand these models from a critical viewpoint. Case studies are welcome in underdeveloped fields of knowledge in which new theories should be stated. We believe that using this methodology in the rhetorical study of a social network, Facebook, may prove interesting, since it is a seldom-used point of entry. We also use data collected in the content analysis (Berelson, 1952) of discourses on users’ walls to extract data about the rhetorical figures employed. This quantitative content analysis stems from a prior research work (Berlanga & Alberich, 2012: 146): wall discourses were studied across 16 micro-networks, with 200 intervening users. Following a rigorous selection rule, daily screen shots were taken of the users’ wall over 3-4 weeks: with just a few screen shots we already perceived an enormous quantity of rhetorical figures so it was deemed unnecessary to continue taking shots for any longer. The users did not know about the screen shots, in order not to influence their activity. Obviously, those finally selected to take part in the research were informed about the project and we asked them for permission to use personal data. For the present research work, we extract percentages and the use of different rhetorical figures, and three profiles are analyzed in depth.

The study uses as its sample social network users from among the Spanish population in 2011-12. Three subjects, Facebook users, make up the sample; each of them represents one typified profile in the fourth report of the Social Networks Observatory, «The Cocktail Analysis» (2012)2. We chose these users as we needed easy access to their user wall. Therefore, it is an incidental sampling method. We selected conversations over a period of 30 days throughout February-March 2011. We chose Facebook because of the data supplied by that report, and because Facebook absolutely predominates, reaching 85% of net users, whereas Tuenti has a 36% share, and Twitter (32%) is developing fast to become the third social network by penetration.

In each case in the analysis, the following aspects have been taken into account: personal profile data, one question of the survey undertaken by each user on the conscious use (or not) of rhetoric; wall content: discourse, conversations and interventions; and finally, the rhetorical density/intensity of their discourses. We understand by density the ratio of total rhetorical figures by space. Diversity is the ratio of different rhetorical figures by space, and intensity defines the relationship between the figure and its strength (García, 2000: 29-60).

3. Analysis and results

3.1. Profiles on Facebook

The three cases studied in this research correspond to three types of social network user profile listed by the Social Networks Observatory, in their 2012 «The Cocktail Analysis» report.

• Case 1: Female, 59, teacher. The user responds to a profile called «Social Controller» (40%). This is the oldest profile age, 43% are over 36. It represents a user segment, which already has significant network usage experience, but needs to be in «control» of their use. To the questions: Do you consider that classic rhetoric, specifically the use of figures, is present in Facebook wall conversations? And particularly in your conversations? Have you ever thought that your discourse on Facebook may be following rhetorical strategies? The subject answers: «I love rhetoric, and I think that it is a creative way of expressing feelings. To do so, helps me to de-dramatize, it is a way to say something more indirectly; or it helps me to exaggerate things I want to emphasize, I find it very amusing. I think I use rhetoric each time I want to express something more about me on Facebook».

• Case 2: Male, 34, lawyer. The user responds to the «Social Media Addict» profile (25%). This is a particularly male profile and the average age is 31. Although «hooked on» social networks, the subjects do not feel this to be a problematic. In response to the question about the intentional use of rhetoric, the subject answered: «Hum, it never occurred to me... I usually make sure I write properly because there are many people reading your stuff and I guess the use of those figures is implied. However, getting to it is another question».

Case 3: Male, 16, high school student. The user responds to the «Youth in Search» profile (35%). This is the youngest profile, more than half of its components are 25 or younger. The profile is quite heterogeneous: some «hooked on» subjects coexist with others who are less active. To the question about the intentional use of rhetoric, the subject answered: «Rhetoric? On Facebook? No. Absolutely. I don’t think we spend our time making metaphors, ha, ha, the Spanish teacher would be thrilled!».

3.2. Discourse rhetoric

Each of the users analyzed in the study has employed persuasion to «share their lives» but also with the aim of generating a particular response among their friends-relatives-users of the same social network. A hint of persuasion may be present in this particular aim. The users turn to different rhetorical strategies in a particular way, and make frequent use of rhetorical figures. The following wall excerpt is an example: the user uses figures such as metaphor, rhetorical interrogation, synecdoque, pleonasm, hyperbaton, epanalepsis and personification.


Draft Content 174074950-26789-en056.jpg

The authors have noticed that user postings have different objectives (to inform about a certain matter, show support, congratulate…). But often the senders only wanted to express their mood when posting, and by doing so, they expect a certain reaction from their audience by using an essentially emotional argumentation. No matter how short the message is, it can still be rhetorical, for this modality of influence may become persuasion. Thus, in most cases, the interventions consist of short sentences, which are the most appropriate to this modality of persuasion. This is particularly clear in Case 3, the prototype of an adolescent user deploying typical resources of cyber language (Paolillo, 1999).

One of the social networks’ advantages when configuring rhetorical discourse, is particularly clear on these users’ walls: the availability of multiple textual variants (writing, fixed image, video, multimedia, etc.) which considerably increase the expressive potentiality of discourse and support it to enable the discourse to reach its persuasive objective. This advantage also means that a short message can convey a lot of information. We are, therefore, dealing with synthetic language frequently dominated by image. In Case 2, the user writes on the wall to talk about politics, generate debate and criticize the government. The wall was also used to campaign for votes when there were elections at a certain lawyers’ association. In the two remaining cases, we noticed references to social topics that were generating public opinion at the time. As in the old agora, there is now a public space which allows for communication without hindrance or censorship (Dahlberg, 2001: 617). The scarce participation of User 3 and the tone of his communication messages correspond to the profile type: on the one hand, these users are mainly active on Tuenti, a social network: on the other hand, the language used by this age range is usually poor and full of grammatical mistakes. Oral speech infects this kind of written communication (Yus, 2011). Looking at the rest of his wall activity, User 3 seems to have used this social network to keep in contact (accepting friendships, profile cataloguing, or video uploading).

3.3. Rhetorical strategies of discourse

Each of the wall conversations analyzed in this study presents one objective (to inform, convince, move or attract attention to something), and in order to reach these persuasive goals social network users have turned, perhaps unknowingly, to ethical, pathetical or logical reasoning. The Web displays those three communication strategies –already described by Aristotle— in every discourse. The logic lies in conceiving Internet as an extension of personal and professional relations. Facebook, in particular, is structured in such a way that enables the use of these strategies.

Ethos. We know the speaker through the posts generated by the user, whose use of written information, pictures or links reveals tastes and preferences... Thus, the user acquires a certain prestige (ethos). Most certainly, an idea of all «authority» survives in the user’s discourse. The relationship one maintains or has established in the real world remains in the virtual world. This is indeed the reason why the relation is added as «friend». It is true that on many other occasions contacts are added only to increase the number of friends, in order to create a better reputation within the social network (this is so among younger profile users or among those who use the social network as an extension of their professional lives). Many conversations revolve around the same person, reinforced by image (different, changing profiles photos).

Logos as rhetorical strategy very rarely appears on this social network; it depends on the other two strategies. Most of the time, topics and messages per se are secondary for persuasion; they may be qualified as irrelevant or trivial, for what becomes essential in each micro-network is the fact that the user relates to friends-relatives. The profile 3 user, who also uses Facebook as an extension of his professional field, is the only one in which the content of «what is said» takes on a more central role.


Draft Content 174074950-26789-en057.jpg

As far as pathos is concerned, Facebook’s very nature makes it the dominant factor within the social network. Facebook walls are clearly oriented towards empathy and affective relationships. That is the reason for naming them «friends» (along with all the semantic depth of the term) all those who enter the micro-network even briefly. Pathos mainly supports communication: adhesion feelings or happiness, congratulations, and is much accentuated by smileys (emoticons). Image and video reinforce text. These stimulate receivers, prompting plenty of adhesion gestures: «like», congratulations, sentences expressing admiration, which constantly underline the reaction provoked, and which indicate the sender as the true persuader: the user has decided to include such images that initiate and reinforce the discourse.

3.4. Figure usage

Conversation flows on social networks are not particularly suited to more elaborate discourse; «ornatus», in addition to knowledge, requires pause and re-elaboration. Nevertheless, the most outstanding characteristic when analyzing these networks from a rhetorical point of view is the strong presence of figures and tropes in all profiles, regardless of age or education. As we predicted, and these subjects have confirmed, figures and tropes are used in two of the three cases, the sender being unaware of it when writing messages. Average rhetorical density in all three cases is 3.2 figures per intervention. It is a very high average in all cases except for Case 3, an adolescent user who scores 1.5 per intervention. Distribution by figure type is similar across cases: figures of substitution abound, reaching almost 50% of total use, followed by figures of addition (around 25%) and of suppression (around 25%). Cases 1 and 2 are the only ones to use figures of permutation, using hyperbaton on two-three occasions respectively. Regarding figure usage the following stand out in this particular order: metaphor, synecdoque and ellipsis appear in all three cases; only the youngest user exhibits symbols. We may conclude that this particular use of figures adds expressivity, creativity and depth to communication, as displayed below.


Draft Content 174074950-26789-en058.jpg

As an example, we present a visual representation of the users’ discourse. The graph is shaped as a network, with nodes and edges. The particular user’s interventions (3c) are in green; his contacts’ interventions (indicated by their initials) are in orange. In each box, we show the rhetorical figures used in the particular wall intervention.


Draft Content 174074950-26789-en059.jpg

4. Discussion and conclusions

After analyzing the wall conversations of three specific users, each representing a social network profile typified for Spain by The Cocktail Analysis report of 2012, we maintain that there is a rhetorical component in the communication taking place within these platforms, especially on Facebook. We reach our objective by showing the rhetorical nature of the conversations, because users employ rhetorical strategies, operations, and figures.

The results point to the use of rhetoric by social network users in the way that rhetoric has been used throughout history: as a social tool. Rhetoric has found new channels and unsuspected dimensions on this social network (in fact on all social networks). We offer as examples, firstly, dialogue enhancing with the interaction of all instances sharing communication; ease of the speaker’s productive activity; ease of the receiver’s interpretative ability; opportunity to lead the discourse along other lines because of acceptance or rejection by users; possibility of rational storage of information; and finally, ease of linking information and documentary sources. Thus, the micro-network shaped by the Facebook users’ wall provides a better fit between discourse, speaker, receiver, and context.

In particular, the Facebook user applies strategies common to all discourses, which Aristotle described as: «ethos, pathos, and logos»1. Facebook has a structure that enables these strategies to function. Regarding «ethos», an idea of all «authority» can be clearly seen in the users’ discourse. The relationship one maintains or has established in the real world, still remains in the virtual world. This is indeed the reason why the user confirms that particular relation as «friend». «Logos» as rhetorical strategy hardly appears on Facebook; it depends on the other two strategies. Topics and messages per se are secondary for persuasion; they may be qualified as irrelevant or trivial, for what becomes essential in each micro-network is the fact that the user relates to friends-relatives. Nevertheless, in other social networks (such the professionally oriented LinkedIn), logos takes on a predominant role. As for «pathos», Facebook’s very nature places it as the dominant factor within the social network. Facebook walls are clearly oriented towards empathy and affective relationships. That is the reason why all are called «friends» (along with all the semantic depth of the term), even those who only enter the micro-network briefly. The rhetorical nature of Facebook walls becomes more important because of the dialogic nature of the Web. Dialogue and consent are at the root of joining a social network such as Facebook. Many interventions on user walls prompt an interactive expression: «like». The message senders who participated in our research looked for a reaction from the receivers; that is to say, that the receivers agree with the message content (clicking on this expression), or rather, that the receivers open a debate and write something on the space allowed for comments.

Facebook users employ certain rhetorical parameters, although they are unaware of this fact in most cases. Therefore, it is not really off-topic to conclude that rhetoric has as an inherently human dimension –humans being social and open to dialogue–. Studying rhetoric coincides with human discourse itself, and therefore affects all human activities. According to our results, plotted on a social network image, the use of rhetoric contributes to communication and generates responses.

The abundant use of rhetorical figures enables the listener’s active participation in the discourse. This stimulates imagination, avoids the mere passive reception of messages and wraps the conversational partner up in such a personal way that the reply has a touch of originality and creativity. In short, this social network provides persuasion and communication with supporting elements hitherto unseen. All of these particular aspects shape the Facebook user as the new rhetorician of our time. As we predicted, the initial hypotheses in this research are confirmed: the social network can be considered a new rhetorical space or agora of the 21st century. Rhetoric has a strong presence in the audiovisual communication emerging from social networks. Social network users’ discourse contains plenty of rhetorical figures which prompt thought, dialogue and a more efficient communication.

We would like to open up new ways of thinking in pedagogy-communication research based on these results. Thus, future research would include a transversal field –rhetoric– whose principles offer many possibilities for achieving a more efficient, humane and creative communication; in short, we provide the opportunity to read a reality that is breaking up, with parameters that belong to just one standpoint. We offer the opportunity to transcend immediacy, making use of a very different kind of knowledge, theories and experiences. Terence’s saying, «I am a human being, I consider nothing that is human alien to me», is very much needed in the present scientific model, where pragmatism imposes itself as the only value. Such pragmatism also floods the social realm and, accordingly, the point of entry to communication studies. However, with our results in hand, we believe that rhetorical discourse intensity, that is, the ratio between figures used and their strength, could have been deeper and more direct. This point is hampered by the limitations of written conversation analysis and by having contacted with the wall owner only. In order to provide more conclusive evidence, we believe it necessary to include the remaining participants of wall conversation focus groups. Thus, this research work remains unfinished. The research object evolves and demands constant updating and methodological reformulation. Therefore, future lines of research should focus on the rhetorical component in emerging communication media.

Notes

1 Aristotle in chapters I-III, Book I of his «Rhetoric» explains the three types of arguments which are offered in every discourse (1356a): «Ethos», which lies in the behaviors and authority of the speaker; «Logos», when the speaker convinces the audience by the discourse; Pathos, which persuades through emotions aroused in the audience.

2 «The Cocktail Analysis» is a market research and strategy consultant agency, specialized in consumer trends, communication, and new technologies. Its social network observatory has published several reports in 2008, 2010, 2011, and 2012 (http://tcanalysis.com).

Acknowledgements

Study framed under the R+D Project Call, Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness: key code EDU2010-21395-C03-03, titled «La enseñanza obligatoria ante la competencia en comunicación audiovisual en un entorno digital».

References

Aguaded, J.I. & López-Meneses, E. & Ballesteros, C. (2009). Web 2.0. Un nuevo escenario de inteligencia colectiva. In La universidad y las tecnologías de la información y el conocimiento. Reflexiones y experiencias (pp. 55-69). Sevilla: Mergablum.

Albaladejo, T. (2007). Creación neológica y retórica en la comunicación digital. In R. Sarmiento & F. Vilches, (Coords.), Neologismos y sociedad del conocimiento. Funciones de la lengua en la era de la globalización. (pp. 79-90). Barcelona: Ariel.

Aristotle (1991). On Rhetoric. A Theory of Civic Discourse (Trans. and ann. by George A. Kennedy). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Berelson, B. (1952). Content Analysis in Communication Research. Glencoe: Free Press.

Berlanga, I. & Alberich, J. (2012). Retórica y comunicación en red: convergencias y analogías. Nuevas propuestas docentes. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico 18, 141-150. (doi.org/10.5209/rev_ESMP.2012.v18.40920).

Boyd, D. & Ellison, N. (2008). Social Network Sites: Definition, History, and Schol-arship. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 13, 11. Indiana: University of Indiana. http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol13/issue1/boyd.ellison.htm (28-01-2013)

Burbules, N. (2002). The Web as a Rethorical Place. In I. Snyder (Ed.), Silicon Liter-acies. Communication, Innovation and Education in the Electronic Age (pp. 75-84). Abingdon: Routledge.

Castells, M. (2008). The New Public Sphere: Global Civil Society, Communication Net-works, and Global Governance. The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 616, 1, 78-93.

Clément, J. (1995). Du texte à l’hypertexte: vers une épistémologie de la discursivité hyper-textuelle. In J.P. Balpe, A. Lelu & I. Saleh (Coords.), Hypertextes et hypermédias: Réalisations, outils, méthods. Paris: Hermès.

Cuadras, A. (2009). La comunicación política en la era digital. A propósito de la irrupción de Barack Obama. Comunicación: estudios venezolanos de comunicación, 145, 22-32. (http://gumilla.org/biblioteca/bases/biblo/texto/COM2009145_22-32.pdf) (11-01-2013).

Dahlberg, L. (2001). The Internet and Democratic Discourse: Exploring. The Prospects of Online Deliberative Forums Extending the Public Sphere. Information, Communication & Society, 4 (4), 615-633.

Flores, J. M. (2009). Nuevos modelos de comunicación, perfiles y tendencias en las redes sociales. Revista Comunicar, 33, 73-81. (DOI:10.3916/c33-2009-02-007).

Gamonal, A. (2004). La Retórica en Internet. Icono 14, 3. Madrid: Asociación científica Icono 14. (www.icono14.net/revista/num3/art1/all.html) (09-01-2013).

García-García, F. (2000). La publicidad en radio: imágenes de baja intensidad retó-rica. In Pena, A. (coord.), La publicidad en la radio. (pp. 29-60). Pontevedra: Diputación de Pontevedra.

Kiss, D. & Castro, E. (2004). Comunicación interpersonal en Internet, Convergencia 11, 227-301.

McLuhan, M. (2009). Comprender los medios de comunicación. Las extensiones del ser humano. Barcelona: Paidós.

Paolillo, J. (1999). The Virtual Speech Community: Social Network and Language Variation on IRC. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1083-6101.1999.tb00109.x).

Rintell, E, Mulholland, J. & Pittam, J. (2001). First Things First: Internet Relay Chat Openings, Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 6, 3. (DOI:10.1111/j.1083-6101.2001.tb00125.x).

Sanderson, S. (1989): Human Communication as a Field of Study. New York: State University of New York.

St.Amant, K. (2002). When Cultures and Computers Collide. Rethinking Computer-Mediated Communication according to International and Intercultural Communica-tion Expectations, Journal of Business and Technical Communication, 16, 2, 196-214. (DOI:10.1177/1050651902016002003).

Stake, R. (1995). Investigación con estudio de casos. Madrid: Morata.

The Cocktail Analysis (2012). (http://tcanalysis.com/blog/posts/infografia-4-c2-aa-oleada-observatorio-de-redes-sociales) (09-01-2013).

Victoria, J.S., Gómez, A. & Arjona, B. (2012): Comunicación Slow (y la publicidad como excusa). Madrid: Fragua.

Warnick, B. (2011). Rhetorical Criticism in New Media Environments. Rhetoric Re-view, 20, 1/2. JSTOR.

Yus, F. (2011). Cyberpragmatics: Internet-mediated Communication in Context. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Uno de los «agujeros negros» de la investigación en comunicación tiene que ver con una carencia de profundización en los orígenes clásicos de nuestros estudios, de sus objetos y de los acercamientos a estos. En este sentido, cobraría especial relevancia el estudio de los procesos comunicativos en Internet (en concreto a través de las redes sociales) bajo el prisma de la Retórica clásica. Especialmente, nos referimos al uso de las estrategias de persuasión (ethos, pathos, logos) así como al abundante uso de figuras retóricas. Tales parámetros unidos a los recursos que ofertan las tecnologías emergentes otorgan una enorme creatividad y aportan aspectos humanistas a la comunicación en red, claves de la fuerza persuasiva que caracteriza a estas plataformas online. De esta forma podemos hablar del usuario de redes como el nuevo «rétor» del siglo XXI. Nuestra investigación sobre Facebook aborda la presencia de la ciencia retórica en la comunicación generada en las redes sociales online: el usuario de estas plataformas utiliza las estrategias comunicativas descritas por la disciplina retórica desde sus comienzos en la antigüedad grecolatina. La metodología empleada (el estudio de tres casos tipificados y el análisis de contenidos de las conversaciones generadas en los muros de Facebook) nos permite entrelazar la Retórica y nuestro presente comunicativo mediado por la emergencia de las redes. Proponemos así recuperar unos parámetros que devuelvan el pensamiento profundo y crítico en favor de una comunicación más humana.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

El presente estudio aborda la presencia de la Retórica en la comunicación generada en las redes sociales on-line. Concretamente pretende mostrar cómo el usuario de estas plataformas utiliza las estrategias comunicativas descritas por la disciplina retórica desde sus comienzos en la antigüedad grecolatina. Este empleo del «ethos, logos y pathos» y –de forma señalada– el abundante uso de figuras retóricas, presupone la presencia de aspectos humanistas en la comunicación en red y al mismo tiempo le otorga una enorme creatividad. Tales parámetros unidos a los recursos que ofertan las tecnologías emergentes configuran la fuerza persuasiva que caracteriza a estas plataformas como fruto de la llamada inteligencia colectiva (Flores, 2009: 78; Aguaded & al., 2009). En pocos años se ha consolidado una sociedad de «todo comunicación», en la que la información circula prioritariamente a través de redes sociales, con millones de personas conectadas en todo el mundo. Las redes se han impuesto formando ya parte de nuestra vida personal, social y laboral (Boyld & Ellison, 2008). Al acercarnos al discurso de las redes –Comunicación mediada por tecnología– es fácil apreciar los profundos cambios epistemológicos producidos en el campo de la comunicación. Pensamos que una de las paradojas teóricas de nuestro tiempo, radica en el hecho de que «junto a las grandes mutaciones tecno-científicas que redefinen el fenómeno de la comunicación, los modelos que pretenden explicarlo son de inspiración logo-céntrico y literaria» (Cuadras, 2009: 23). Compartimos con este experto en Semiología la creencia de que el fenómeno comunicacional precisa ser repensado desde una teoría comunicacional en red de índole tecno-genética. Y puesto que este fenómeno se resiste a ser aprehendido desde los modelos al uso, los modelos teóricos comunicacionales y que han sido la falsilla para pensar la comunicación y se presentan ahora como susceptibles de revisión a fin de poner en evidencia sus límites y abrirse así a nuevas construcciones de sus elementos.

En este proceso de cambio siguen reconociéndose claramente los elementos y estrategias de la Retórica clásica pero ahora reforzados por las posibilidades que ofertan las tecnologías emergentes.

Ante el desplazamiento de los modelos comunes anteriores se requiere la necesidad del estudio y prospección de nuevas pautas para su necesaria comprensión crítica. Así, St. Amant (2002) defiende la necesidad de comparar los modelos de la comunicación mediada por ordenadores con los de la comunicación intercultural para encontrar convergencias. En esta línea, la presencia de la Retórica en Internet está generando interesantes producciones científicas (Albaladejo, 2007; Warnick, 2011; Berlanga & Alberich, 2012: 143-144); la red es un espacio retórico en su configuración (Barbules, 2002), y también lo es por la presencia de figuras retóricas en su interfaz (Clément, 1995; Gamonal, 2004). Pero las mutuas transferencias entre retórica y las redes sociales se presentan como un campo de estudio novedoso donde no existen por el momento investigaciones concluyentes. En el seno de este proceso de cambio y sustitución de nociones y herramientas claves, nuestro estudio contribuiría a la actual fase de investigación de sus posibilidades y alcance.

De igual forma consideramos muy pertinente que, moviéndonos en el campo de la comunicación, la mirada se dirija al mundo clásico. No solo por una razón obvia: fue en la cultura grecolatina donde nació y se estructuró el arte de persuadir mediante el discurso con unos principios aún vigentes en la actualidad. También es conveniente y oportuno recalar en los principios clásicos, originales –no hay nada más original que volver a los orígenes– en un momento histórico como el que vivimos, caracterizado por tal trepidación, inmediatez y superávit de información, que nos aboca, aun sin quererlo, a una comunicación despersonalizada y superficial. Frente a ello, la presente investigación se enmarca en una línea genérica de recuperación del humanismo y la antropología clásica para el campo de la comunicación tecnológica (Sanderson, 1989; Victoria, Gómez & Arjona, 2012).

1.1. La comunicación en Internet, nuevo paradigma

A la hora de analizar el proceso comunicativo en Internet nos topamos con una serie de problemas teóricos que parten de las propias características de la comunicación en red; una comunicación que es a la vez interpersonal y colectiva, que puede ser sincrónica o asincrónica –con la combinación de las dos modalidades en las interacciones en redes sociales– que rompe con lo lineal y que exige, por su virtualidad, nuevos planteamientos en lo que se refiere a la concepción de sus elementos constitutivos. El sujeto de la comunicación o usuario en este contexto cobra relevancia ya que, frente al modelo tradicional, la comunicación interpersonal presenta diferencias importantes en la estructura de emisión-recepción. Por usuario entendemos ser parte activa de la red, sea como emisor, sea como receptor, sea como actor o como mero espectador. Algunos autores lo han interpretado muy críticamente: «Como nuevo Ulises del siglo XXI, los internautas navegan por este océano virtual, siendo red, un modo oblicuo de decir: siendo nadie» (Cuadras, 2009: 22-32). Lo que sí es cierto es que las posibilidades interactivas del usuario lo abren a nuevas propuestas (Rintell, Mulholland & Pittam, 2001).

Kiss y Castro (2004: 227-231), explican el proceso de construcción del sujeto de la enunciación. La posibilidad que tenemos en Internet de creación de mundos, reales o no, se inicia con la construcción del referente individual: el sujeto de la enunciación elabora una imagen de sí mismo para ser comunicada. A su vez, el modelo funcional en red, solo es concebible como una totalidad multipolar de nodos integrados entre los cuales se verifican los flujos de mensaje, según los códigos y lenguajes patrimonio de la red. Ya no es necesario que los participantes de la interacción tengan el mismo marco de referencia ni tampoco que compartan el paradigma sociocultural, conceptos claves en la comunicación descrita por los modelos tradicionales. La referencialidad se desplaza por la noción de «transcontextos» virtuales: constructos digitales que operan como dispositivos en el espacio comunicacional. Estos contextos se instalan más allá del devenir, entendido como «calendariedad y cardinalidad»: estamos ante un espacio ahistórico y territorializado» (Cuadras, 2009: 26).

1.2. Convergencia de la Retórica clásica y las redes sociales on-line

En esta comunicación, soporte de cambios profundos, apreciamos una clara analogía y convergencia entre el formato red social y los recursos persuasivos tal y como lo idearon los creadores del arte de la Retórica. En las redes sociales cada usuario que interviene lo hace para comunicar con fines persuasivos de diferente tipo (convencer, seducir, agradar, conmover, interesar, etc.), pocas veces se limita a «compartir su vida» y cuando lo hace es con la intención de motivar cierta respuesta entre sus amigos-usuarios de esa misma red, intención en la que se puede vislumbrar cierto grado de persuasión. Para lograr esos fines persuasivos, los usuarios de redes sociales recurren, probablemente de forma inconsciente, a diversas estrategias retóricas. Incluso se puede determinar que, como los oradores clásicos, sigan un proceso parecido al que ellos seguían en la construcción de discursos (inventio, dispositio, elocutio, actio y memoria), ya que buscan ideas y argumentos (inventio) que luego organizan de algún modo aunque no sigan un orden discursivo habitual (dispositio), para expresarlos a continuación, según ciertas estrategias elocutivas y representarlos, finalmente, recurriendo a nuevas formas de pronunciación (actio), de manera que tales discursos retroalimentan el tesoro de contenidos de la red social (memoria) al formar parte de él una vez han sido «pronunciados». Por otro lado, las redes sociales permiten la inclusión de múltiples variantes textuales (escritura, imagen fija, video, multimedia, etc.). Esto amplía su potencial expresivo enormemente y apoyan al discurso para que logre su objetivo de persuasión. Así, con una breve extensión del mensaje se puede decir mucho. En definitiva, son ideales como forma de comunicación escrita y como fomento de relaciones interpersonales, aspectos típicos de toda Retórica.

En este sentido el usuario de red emplea técnicas persuasivas que han sido características de los oradores clásicos y que han permanecido sin solución de continuidad a lo largo de la historia, eso sí, ahora potenciadas por las tecnologías. Nos referimos al uso frecuente de las figuras literarias como desviaciones creativas del lenguaje y, especialmente, al uso de las estrategias éticas, lógicas y patéticas (Aristóteles, 1991). De esta forma, podemos denominar a este usuario el nuevo «rétor» del siglo XXI.

2. Material y métodos

La hipótesis de partida de esta investigación se puede formular de la siguiente manera: H1. Las redes sociales pueden denominarse como un nuevo espacio retórico o ágora del siglo XXI. La Retórica tiene una intensa presencia en la comunicación audiovisual que se genera en las redes sociales. Esta hipótesis se concreta a su vez en otras particulares: H1a) el discurso de los usuarios de las redes sociales está pleno de figuras retóricas; H1b) las figuras retóricas que se emplean en las redes sociales generan pensamiento, diálogo, comunicación más eficaz.

Como objetivos nos proponemos, en primer lugar, destacar la presencia de la Retórica en las redes sociales, concretamente del uso de las estrategias persuasivas por parte del usuario de estas plataformas. A partir de ahí, ofreceremos las interpretaciones del fenómeno estudiado atendiendo a las características peculiares de los diferentes perfiles seleccionados. Por último, como objetivo operativo, valoraremos los resultados de la investigación y propondremos aplicaciones tanto teóricas como prácticas. Con este fin emplearemos especialmente la técnica del estudio de caso. Según Stake (1995: 28-29), los estudios de caso se aconsejan en áreas de conocimiento poco desarrolladas, en las que se tienen que crear nuevas teorías. Nos ha parecido interesante emplear esta técnica en el estudio retórico de una red social, concretamente Facebook, por ser éste un enfoque apenas trabajado por el momento. También utilizaremos los datos recogidos en un análisis de contenido (Berelson, 1952) de los discursos del muro del usuario a fin de extraer el dato de las figuras retóricas que se emplean en los mismos. Este análisis de contenido cuantitativo fue objeto de una anterior investigación (Berlanga y Alberich, 2012: 146) en la que se estudiaron los discursos de 16 microrredes en las que intervenían un total de 200 usuarios. Con un criterio de selección riguroso, se procedió a la captura diaria de pantallas de sus muros durante un tiempo breve que osciló alrededor de un 3/4 semanas: con pocas pantallas ya apreciamos una ingente cantidad de figuras retóricas por lo que no pareció oportuno prolongarlo por más tiempo. Estas capturas se hicieron sin conocimiento del usuario examinado para no influir en su actividad. Obviamente a los que finalmente se seleccionaron para formar parte de la investigación se les explicó el proyecto y se les pidió el permiso para contar con sus datos. Para la investigación presente extraemos los datos sobre los porcentajes y usos de las diferentes figuras retóricas y seleccionamos los tres perfiles que analizaremos en profundidad.

Nuestro universo lo conforman, así, los usuarios de redes sociales de la población española en los años 2011/12. Y la muestra la componen tres sujetos usuarios de Facebook representantes de cada uno de los perfiles tipificados en el 4º informe del observatorio de redes sociales de la agencia «The Cocktail Analysis» (2012)2. La elección de los mismos se ha hecho directa e intencionadamente debido a la necesidad de tener un fácil acceso a sus muros de usuario. Se trata, por tanto, de un muestreo casual o incidental. Las conversaciones analizadas responden a un periodo de 30 días de febrero-marzo de 2011.

En cuanto a la elección de la red en la que se centra el análisis queda justificada también por los datos ofrecidos en este informe. En él se destaca el absoluto dominio de la red social Facebook, que llega al 85% de los internautas, mientras que Tuenti (36%) se estanca y Twitter (32%) experimenta un gran crecimiento y se convierte en la tercera red por penetración.

En cada uno de los casos estudiados se han tenido en cuenta los siguientes aspectos: los datos personales del perfil y una pregunta de la encuesta realizada a cada usuario sobre el empleo consciente o no de la Retórica; el contenido de su muro: discursos, conversaciones y otras intervenciones, y finalmente, la densidad/intensidad y diversidad retórica de sus discursos. Entendemos por densidad la relación de número total de figuras retóricas por espacio. Diversidad sería la relación de figuras retóricas diferentes entre sí en un espacio, e intensidad define la relación entre la figura y su fuerza (García, 2000: 29-60).

3. Análisis y resultados

3.1. Perfiles en Facebook

Los tres estudios de tres casos que se han llevado a cabo en esta investigación corresponden a cada uno de los perfiles de usuarios de redes españoles tipificados por el Observatorio de Redes Sociales de «The Cocktail Analysis» publicado en 2012.

• Caso 1: Mujer de 59 años, maestra. Usuario que responde al perfil «Social Controller Social» (40%). Es el perfil más maduro, en el que un 43% tiene una edad por encima de los 36 años. Representa a un segmento que ya ha dado pasos significativos en el uso de las redes, pero que necesita seguir sintiendo que «controla» el uso que hace de las mismas. A las preguntas: ¿Consideras que la Retórica clásica, concretamente el uso de figuras, tiene presencia en las conversaciones del muro de Facebook, y en la tuya especialmente?, ¿te has planteado que tu discurso en Facebook pueda seguir unas estrategias retóricas? Responde: «Me encanta la Retórica, y me parece que es una manera creativa de expresar los sentimientos, también hacerlo así te ayuda a desdramatizar, un poco a decir algo de una manera más indirecta o bien a exagerar las cosas que quieres enfatizar, me resulta divertida. Me parece usarla, cada vez que quiero expresar algo mas mío en el Facebook».

• Caso 2: Hombre de 34 años, abogado. Usuario que responde al perfil «Social Media Addict» (25%). Es un perfil particularmente masculino y su edad oscila en los 31 años. «Enganchado» a las redes sociales, pero sin vivirlo como problemático. A la pregunta sobre el uso intencionado o no de la Retórica responde: «Pues jamás me lo había planteado... Generalmente procuro redactar bien por eso de que te pueda leer mucha gente y supongo que el uso de esas figuras va implícito en ello. No obstante, que lo consiga es otra cuestión».

• Caso 3: Varón de 16 años estudiante de Bachillerato. Usuario que responde al perfil «Youth in Search» (35%). Es el perfil más joven donde la mitad cuenta con menos de 25 años. Perfil con cierta heterogeneidad: algunos «enganchados» conviven con otros con un nivel de actividad más limitado. A la pregunta sobre el uso intencionado o no de la Retórica responde: «¿Retórica?, ¿en Facebook? Pues no, en absoluto, no creo que nos dediquemos a hacer metáforas, ja, ja, ya quisiera el profe de lengua…».

3.2. Retórica del discurso

Se puede decir que cada uno de los usuarios analizados ha usado su red con fines persuasivos, no solo para «compartir la vida» sino con la intención de motivar cierta respuesta entre sus amigos-familiares-usuarios de esa misma red, intención en la que se puede vislumbrar cierto grado de persuasión. Para ello han recurrido a diversas estrategias retóricas, de una forma muy particular y frecuente al uso de figuras retóricas. Sirva de ejemplo el fragmento de muro que se muestra a continuación, en pocas líneas utiliza abundantes figuras: metáfora, interrogación retórica, sinécdoque, pleonasmo, hipérbaton, epanalepsis y personificación.


Draft Content 174074950-26789 ov-es056.jpg

Hemos visto que en las publicaciones de los usuarios examinados se han perseguido diferentes objetivos (informar de un asunto, demostrar adhesión, felicitar…) pero muchas veces los emisores solo han pretendido expresar su estado de ánimo en el momento de la publicación; y al hacerlo han buscado una reacción en su auditorio, recurriendo a una argumentación esencialmente emocional. Por pequeño que sea el discurso publicado se puede decir que es retórico, pues esa forma de búsqueda de influencia puede interpretarse como una forma de persuasión. Así, en la mayoría de los casos, las intervenciones son frases breves, que son las más adecuadas para este tipo de persuasión. Lo vemos de forma especial en el perfil 3, prototipo del usuario adolescente, con los recursos propios del ciberlenguaje (Paolillo, 1999).

En el muro de estos usuarios aparece también claramente una de las ventajas que las redes sociales añaden a la configuración de un discurso retórico: la posibilidad de inclusión de múltiples variantes textuales (escritura, imagen fija, vídeo, multimedia, etc.), que amplían su potencial expresivo enormemente y apoyan al discurso para que logre su objetivo de persuasión. También implica que con una breve extensión del mensaje se logre decir mucho. Se trata pues de un lenguaje sintético en el que con frecuencia hay un dominio de la imagen. En el caso 2, el usuario ha utilizado el muro de su red para hablar de política, generar debate y crítica al gobierno del momento, así como para hacer campaña electoral de las elecciones en una asociación de abogados. En los otros dos casos se hacen referencias a temas sociales presentes en la opinión pública. Como en el antiguo ágora, estamos en un espacio público que permite comunicarse sin trabas ni censura (Dahlberg, 2001: 617). La escasa participación del usuario 3 y el tono de sus comunicaciones están de acuerdo con el perfil: por un lado estos usuarios concentran su actividad en la red Tuenti; por otro, el lenguaje de los usuarios de esta edad suele ser pobre y lleno de incorrecciones. Estamos ante una comunicación escrita que está muy contaminada por las características de la oral (Yus, 2011). Por el resto de su actividad en el muro, apreciamos que ha utilizado la red para relacionarse (aceptación de amistad, catalogación de un perfil o colgar vídeos), más que para dialogar.

3.3. Estrategias retóricas del discurso

En cada una de las conversaciones de muro que se han analizado hemos podido destacar un objetivo (informar, convencer, conmover o interesar, por algo), y para lograr esos fines persuasivos, los usuarios de redes sociales han recurrido, probablemente de forma inconsciente, a argumentos éticos, patéticos o lógicos. Las tres estrategias comunicativas de todo discurso –que fueron ya descritas por Aristóteles– se encuentran en la red. Esta presencia tiene su lógica si concebimos Internet como una ampliación de las relaciones personales y profesionales. Concretamente Facebook presenta una estructura que favorece y ayuda a concretar estas estrategias.

Ethos. Conocemos al orador gracias a los post que va originando, con información escrita, fotografías, enlaces que revelan sus gustos y preferencias… Así se va creando un prestigio (ethos). Ciertamente, en todos los usuarios examinados subsiste una idea de «autoridad». La relación que se tiene o ha tenido con una persona en el mundo real influye en la relación con ella en el mundo virtual. Este conocimiento es la razón por la que se le agrega como «amigo». Cierto que otras veces se agregan contactos simplemente porque interesa aumentar el número de amigos para crearse un mayor prestigio en la red social (es el caso de los usuarios que responden a los perfiles más jóvenes o que usan la red como prolongación de su vida profesional). Muchos discursos giran alrededor de la persona, reforzada por la imagen (diferentes y cambiantes fotografías de perfil).

El logos como estrategia retórica apenas aparece en esta red; se encuentra supeditada a las otras dos. La mayoría de las veces los temas y mensajes del propio discurso «per se» son secundarios para la persuasión, y se pueden calificar de intrascendentes o triviales, pues lo fundamental en cada micro-red es que el usuario se mueve entre amigos-familiares. Solo en el caso del usuario que responde al perfil 3, quien utiliza la red también como prolongación del ámbito profesional, el «qué dice» adquiere un papel más central.


Draft Content 174074950-26789 ov-es057.jpg

En cuanto al pathos, la propia naturaleza de Facebook lo configura como el factor dominante de la red. El muro tiene una clara orientación hacia la empatía y la relación afectiva. Por eso se llama «amigos» (con toda la profundidad semántica del término) a quienes simplemente han tenido entrada en la micro-red. La comunicación está principal y fundamentalmente basada en el pathos: en sentimientos de adhesión, de alegría, de felicitación, muy marcada por los continuos emoticonos. El texto se refuerza con la imagen y el vídeo. Este hecho estimula a los receptores entre los que abundan los gestos de adhesión: «me gusta», felicitaciones, frases de admiración, que subrayan continuamente la reacción que provoca y que muestran al emisor como el verdadero persuasor pues ha sido él quien ha decidido la inclusión de las imágenes con las que inicia y refuerza su discurso.

3.4. En cuanto al uso de figuras

El flujo de las conversaciones de las redes sociales no hace de estas plataformas el mejor contexto para un discurso muy elaborado; el «ornatus», además de conocimiento, requiere pausa, reelaboración. Sin embargo, la característica más llamativa al analizar retóricamente estas redes es la intensa presencia de figuras y tropos en todos los perfiles, independientemente de su edad o formación. Y como era previsible y han confirmado los propios sujetos, se emplean en dos de los tres casos, sin que el emisor sea consciente de ello a la hora de crear sus mensajes. La media de densidad retórica de los tres casos es de 3,2 figuras por intervención. Es una media alta, resultado de una densidad muy alta en todos menos en el caso 3º, del usuario adolescente, que es de 1,5 por intervención. La distribución por tipos de figuras es similar en todos: abundan las de sustitución con casi un 50% de empleo, seguido de las de adición (alrededor de 25%) y las de supresión (alrededor del 25%). Solo los casos 1º y el 2º usan figuras de permutación, limitándose al hipérbaton en 2-3 ocasiones respectivamente. Entre el uso de figuras destacan por este orden: la metáfora, la sinécdoque y la elipsis en todos; también el símbolo, pero solo en el usuario más joven. Se puede concluir que este empleo de figuras aportan expresividad, creatividad y profundidad a la comunicación tal y como se puede apreciar en los discursos analizados.


Draft Content 174074950-26789 ov-es058.jpg

Queda ejemplificado al representar visualmente el discurso retórico llevado a cabo por uno de los usuarios examinados. Lo simbolizamos como una red, con sus nudos y aristas. Las intervenciones del usuario estudiado (3c) aparecen en verde; las del resto de sus contactos (representados con sus iniciales) aparecen en color naranja. En cada recuadro se recogen las figuras retóricas empleadas en una intervención de muro.


Draft Content 174074950-26789 ov-es059.jpg

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Después de analizar las conversaciones del muro de tres usuarios que representan cada uno de los perfiles de redes en España tipificados según el estudio de The Cocktail Analysis en 2012, podemos sostener la existencia de un componente retórico de la comunicación que se genera en estas plataformas, concretamente en la red Facebook. Se confirma así el objetivo que nos habíamos propuesto: demostrar la naturaleza retórica de las conversaciones por el empleo de los usuarios de redes de estrategias, operaciones y figuras retóricas.

Los resultados obtenidos apuntan a un uso de la Retórica por parte de los usuarios de la red con el sentido que a lo largo de la historia ha tenido: el de instrumento social. Pero además, en esta red social –y en todas, en general– la Retórica ha encontrado nuevos cauces y dimensiones insospechadas: potenciación del diálogo con la interacción entre las distintas instancias participantes en la comunicación; facilidad en la actividad productiva del orador así como la actividad interpretativa del oyente; oportunidad de reconducir el discurso a raíz de la aceptación o del rechazo por parte de los usuarios; posibilidad de almacenamiento racional de la información; una pronta recuperación de la información y facilidad de enlace entre fuentes informativas y documentales. Así, la micro-red en la que se configura el muro de usuario de Facebook proporciona una mejor adecuación entre el discurso, el orador, el oyente, el contexto.

Concretamente, el usuario de Facebook hace uso de las estrategias de todo discurso ya descritas por Aristóteles: el «ethos, el pathos y el logos». Facebook presenta una estructura que favorece y ayuda a concretar estas estrategias. Con respecto a la estrategia del «ethos», en los usuarios subsiste una idea de autoridad puesto que la relación que se tiene o ha tenido con una persona en el mundo real influye en la relación con ella en el mundo virtual, y este conocimiento es la razón por la que se le agrega como amigo. El «logos» como estrategia retórica apenas aparece en esta red; se encuentra supeditada a las otras dos. En Facebook los temas y mensajes del propio discurso «per se» son secundarios para la persuasión, y se pueden calificar de intrascendentes o triviales, pues lo fundamental en cada micro-red es que el usuario se mueve entre amigos-familiares. No obstante en otro tipo de redes (por ejemplo, la red profesional LinkedIn) el logos adquiere un papel predominante. En cuanto al «pathos», la propia naturaleza de Facebook lo configura como el factor dominante de la red. El muro tiene una clara orientación hacia la empatía y la relación afectiva. Por eso se llama «amigos» (con toda la profundidad semántica del término) a quienes simplemente han tenido entrada en la micro-red. La naturaleza retórica del muro de Facebook gana peso por el carácter dialógico de la red. La participación en una red como Facebook se basa en el diálogo y en el asentimiento: cada intervención en el muro del usuario viene acompañada por la expresión interactiva: «me gusta». Los emisores de los mensajes que hemos recogido han buscado una reacción por parte de sus receptores; esto es, que estén de acuerdo con el contenido del mensaje (haciendo clic en esta expresión), o bien que abran un debate y escriban algo en el espacio que se les ofrece para ello. Se ha visto que los usuarios de Facebook han seguido unos parámetros retóricos, aun sin saberlo o ser muy conscientes de ese uso en casi la totalidad de los casos. Por tanto, no está fuera de lugar concluir que la Retórica se presenta como una dimensión inherente al ser humano –ser social y dialogante– cuyo estudio coincide con el propio discurso humano y que afecta, por tanto, a todas las actividades humanas. Según los datos obtenidos, plasmados en la imagen de una red, su empleo contribuye a la comunicación y genera respuestas.

El abundante uso de figuras retóricas permite la participación activa del oyente en el discurso, estimula la imaginación, evita acoger pasivamente el mensaje, envuelve al interlocutor en el proceso de comunicación de un modo tan personal que su respuesta, ante la información recibida, tiene un toque de originalidad y de creatividad. En definitiva, la red suministra unos apoyos a la persuasión y a la comunicación como nunca antes había tenido. Todas estas particularidades configuran al usuario de Facebook como el nuevo rétor de nuestro tiempo. Las hipótesis de partida de esta investigación quedan, por tanto, verificadas: las redes sociales pueden verse como un nuevo espacio retórico o ágora del siglo XXI. La Retórica tiene una intensa presencia en la comunicación audiovisual que se genera en las redes sociales. El discurso de los usuarios de las redes sociales está pleno de figuras retóricas que generan pensamiento, diálogo, comunicación más eficaz.

Con estos resultados queremos abrir vías de reflexión en la investigación edu-comunicativa para no obviar una disciplina transversal –como es la Retórica– cuyos principios aportan enormes posibilidades a la hora de lograr una comunicación más eficaz, humana y creativa; en definitiva, brindar la oportunidad de efectuar una lectura de la realidad que rompa con los parámetros de una sola visión, de trascender lo inmediato, haciendo uso de saberes, teorías y experiencias muy diferentes. El «soy humano y nada humano me es ajeno» de Terencio, es necesario para el actual modelo científico, donde la orientación pragmática se impone como único valor. Pragmática que inunda también lo social y en consonancia, el enfoque actual de la comunicación.

Ahora bien, con los resultados en mano, nos parece que el reflejo de la intensidad retórica de los discursos de los usuarios, esto es, la relación entre las figuras empleadas y su fuerza, podría haber sido más profunda y directa. Este aspecto sufre las limitaciones derivadas de analizar unas conversaciones escritas y en las que se ha contactado solo con el usuario dueño del muro. Para llegar a afirmaciones más concluyentes en este aspecto creemos se precisaría un focus group con el resto de participantes de una conversación de muro. Permanece la sugerencia para futuras profundizaciones. Y es que esta investigación, por sus mismas peculiaridades, no la consideramos ni acabada ni definitiva. La propia evolución del objeto de estudio demanda una constante actualización y reformulación metodológica. Quedan así abiertas líneas futuras de trabajo acerca del componente retórico en los medios de comunicación emergentes.

Notas

1 Aristóteles en los capítulos I-III del Libro I de la «Retórica» explica los tres tipos de argumentos que se procuran en todo discurso (1356a): el «ethos», que reside en el comportamiento y la autoridad del que habla; el «logos», cuando se convence por el propio discurso; el «pathos», que persuade por las emociones que despierta en el auditorio.

2 «The Cocktayl Analysis» es una agencia de investigación y consultoría estratégica especializada en tendencias de consumo, comunicación y nuevas tecnologías. Su observatorio de redes sociales ha publicado diferentes informes en 2008, 2010, 2011 y 2012 (http://tcanalysis.com).

Apoyos y agradecimientos

Estudio enmarcado en la Convocatoria de Proyectos I+D del Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad con clave: EDU2010-21395-C03-03, titulado «La enseñanza obligatoria ante la competencia en comunicación audiovisual en un entorno digital».

Referencias

Aguaded, J.I. & López-Meneses, E. & Ballesteros, C. (2009). Web 2.0. Un nuevo escenario de inteligencia colectiva. In La universidad y las tecnologías de la información y el conocimiento. Reflexiones y experiencias (pp. 55-69). Sevilla: Mergablum.

Albaladejo, T. (2007). Creación neológica y retórica en la comunicación digital. In R. Sarmiento & F. Vilches, (Coords.), Neologismos y sociedad del conocimiento. Funciones de la lengua en la era de la globalización. (pp. 79-90). Barcelona: Ariel.

Aristotle (1991). On Rhetoric. A Theory of Civic Discourse (Trans. and ann. by George A. Kennedy). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Berelson, B. (1952). Content Analysis in Communication Research. Glencoe: Free Press.

Berlanga, I. & Alberich, J. (2012). Retórica y comunicación en red: convergencias y analogías. Nuevas propuestas docentes. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico 18, 141-150. (doi.org/10.5209/rev_ESMP.2012.v18.40920).

Boyd, D. & Ellison, N. (2008). Social Network Sites: Definition, History, and Schol-arship. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 13, 11. Indiana: University of Indiana. http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol13/issue1/boyd.ellison.htm (28-01-2013)

Burbules, N. (2002). The Web as a Rethorical Place. In I. Snyder (Ed.), Silicon Liter-acies. Communication, Innovation and Education in the Electronic Age (pp. 75-84). Abingdon: Routledge.

Castells, M. (2008). The New Public Sphere: Global Civil Society, Communication Net-works, and Global Governance. The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 616, 1, 78-93.

Clément, J. (1995). Du texte à l’hypertexte: vers une épistémologie de la discursivité hyper-textuelle. In J.P. Balpe, A. Lelu & I. Saleh (Coords.), Hypertextes et hypermédias: Réalisations, outils, méthods. Paris: Hermès.

Cuadras, A. (2009). La comunicación política en la era digital. A propósito de la irrupción de Barack Obama. Comunicación: estudios venezolanos de comunicación, 145, 22-32. (http://gumilla.org/biblioteca/bases/biblo/texto/COM2009145_22-32.pdf) (11-01-2013).

Dahlberg, L. (2001). The Internet and Democratic Discourse: Exploring. The Prospects of Online Deliberative Forums Extending the Public Sphere. Information, Communication & Society, 4 (4), 615-633.

Flores, J. M. (2009). Nuevos modelos de comunicación, perfiles y tendencias en las redes sociales. Revista Comunicar, 33, 73-81. (DOI:10.3916/c33-2009-02-007).

Gamonal, A. (2004). La Retórica en Internet. Icono 14, 3. Madrid: Asociación científica Icono 14. (www.icono14.net/revista/num3/art1/all.html) (09-01-2013).

García-García, F. (2000). La publicidad en radio: imágenes de baja intensidad retó-rica. In Pena, A. (coord.), La publicidad en la radio. (pp. 29-60). Pontevedra: Diputación de Pontevedra.

Kiss, D. & Castro, E. (2004). Comunicación interpersonal en Internet, Convergencia 11, 227-301.

McLuhan, M. (2009). Comprender los medios de comunicación. Las extensiones del ser humano. Barcelona: Paidós.

Paolillo, J. (1999). The Virtual Speech Community: Social Network and Language Variation on IRC. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1083-6101.1999.tb00109.x).

Rintell, E, Mulholland, J. & Pittam, J. (2001). First Things First: Internet Relay Chat Openings, Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 6, 3. (DOI:10.1111/j.1083-6101.2001.tb00125.x).

Sanderson, S. (1989): Human Communication as a Field of Study. New York: State University of New York.

St.Amant, K. (2002). When Cultures and Computers Collide. Rethinking Computer-Mediated Communication according to International and Intercultural Communica-tion Expectations, Journal of Business and Technical Communication, 16, 2, 196-214. (DOI:10.1177/1050651902016002003).

Stake, R. (1995). Investigación con estudio de casos. Madrid: Morata.

The Cocktail Analysis (2012). (http://tcanalysis.com/blog/posts/infografia-4-c2-aa-oleada-observatorio-de-redes-sociales) (09-01-2013).

Victoria, J.S., Gómez, A. & Arjona, B. (2012): Comunicación Slow (y la publicidad como excusa). Madrid: Fragua.

Warnick, B. (2011). Rhetorical Criticism in New Media Environments. Rhetoric Re-view, 20, 1/2. JSTOR.

Yus, F. (2011). Cyberpragmatics: Internet-mediated Communication in Context. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/05/13
Accepted on 31/05/13
Submitted on 31/05/13

Volume 21, Issue 1, 2013
DOI: 10.3916/C41-2013-12
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 16
Views 1
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?