Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This article reflect upon MOOCs as technology enhanced learning environments. The increase in numbers of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) has been dramatic in recent years. MOOCs may be considered to be a new form of virtual technology enhanced learning environments. Two types of MOOCs may be distinguished: cMOOCs as proposed by Siemens, based on his ideas of connectivism, and xMOOCs developed in institutions such as Stanford and MIT. Although they have received a great deal of attention, they have also met with criticism. The time has therefore come to critically reflect upon this phenomenon. While there is still relatively little empirical research on the effects of MOOCs on learning, this study tries to shed light on the issue from a theoretical point of view. It will first explore positive and negative expectations regarding MOOCs. MOOCs might constitute a good option if they can be delivered on a large scale, and this will only be possible for a few big institutions. There is no empirical research which would uphold the claims concerning their positive effects. It will then review classical and more recent learning theories with respect to their capability to explain the process of learning in order to compare traditional online courses, xMOOC and cMOOC with respect to their potential to support learning and its self-regulation.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) in Higher Education have received a great deal of attention during recent years (Karsenti, 2013). Udacity, Coursera and EdX, the main providers of MOOCs in the US, are adding universities as partners at a breath-taking speed; the same is true, although to a lesser extent, for MOOC providers in Europe. OpenupEd, for instance, a pan-European initiative founded in 2013 and supported by the European Commission, is offering courses from a number of European and even non-European higher education institutions. Also, a number of national institutions in Europe have started to offer MOOCs (European Commission, 2014).

Despite public enthusiasm concerning MOOCs, participants in MOOCs seem to meet with serious problems leading to enormous dropout rates. A recent study showed that only 4% of students attending Coursera MOOCs completed their courses (Armstrong, 2014). One of the problems may be that many courses were created without taking into consideration findings of research in the fields of learning and self-regulated learning. In the present article we will therefore first explore the positive and negative expectations that have accompanied the rapid spread of MOOCs.

While other recent works are based on a bibliography review (Hew & Cheung, 2014) or on empirical analysis (Gillani & Eynon, 2014), this study is centred on a reflection on the capabilities of MOOCs from a learning theory point of view. Our aim is to analyse how the contributions from learning theories are being reflected in MOOCs.

2. Background

2.1. Understanding MOOCs: historical key elements

When Stephen Downes and George Siemens attended the Desire21Learn conference, tired of discussing connectivism applications, they wondered whether best way to understand how online learning worked was to participate in online learning (Siemens, 2012a). They therefore designed their first open online course CCK08 «Connectivism and Connective Knowledge». 2300 students signed up, and Dave Cormier and Bryan Alexander therefore called it a «massive open online course» or MOOC (Siemens, 2012b).

However, this was not the first MOOC in history. As Siemens (2012a) indicated, courses of this type had already been offered in 2007 by Alec Couros and David Wiley. Also, similar concepts can be found in studies on open universities, open learning and distance education.

It could be claimed the first MOOC appeared in 1922 (Bartolomé, 2013). The University of New York started its radio courses which were open and massive, and soon universities like Columbia, Harvard, Kansas State, Ohio State, NYU, Purdue, Rufts and many others followed suit. However, these were not courses in the form that Downes and Siemens suggested, but courses more in line with courses that are offered today by Standord, Coursera and similar institutions.

At the moment, two types of MOOCs may be distinguished (Lugton, 2012; Adell, 2013). Quinn (2012) talks about the type of MOOCs which were organized by Siemens, Downes and their «co-conspirators» and which are based on Siemens’ ideas of connectivism. On the other hand, there are xMOOCs or simply MOOCs which are based to a large degree on traditional methods of distance education. Some include opportunities for collaboration in discussion forums and peer-based evaluation, a system that was implemented by Coursera.

There are additional criteria to distinguish between different types of MOOCs. Lane (2012) suggested the following classification:

• MOOCs which are based in a network, such as cMOOCs.

• MOOCs which focus on the problems to be solved, such as his own and those of Jim Groom.

• MOOCs focusing on content, such as EdX, Coursera and Udacity.

This is somewhat reminiscent of the classification that was offered by Moodle to design courses using this platform; the distinction is made between themes (content), weekly or Scorm (activities) and social courses (equivalent to cMOOCs).

2.2. Differences between xMOOCs and cMOOCs

It would be wrong to assume that an xMOOC may be converted into a cMOOC simply by introducing activities for collaboration. Siemens (2012a) in his introduction to «MOOC for the win!» makes this point very clear. He wanted to explore and experiment with new forms of online interaction; the question of whether these new forms might help universities improve their teaching was not of interest to him. He was more interested in offering something in the field of learning and instruction that was similar to what MIT had developed in the OpenCourseware Project.

It was in 2012 that the economic potential of MOOCs was discovered. Cupaiuolo (2012) describes how Thrun arrived at his decision to leave Stanford. In his course on Artificial Intelligence, 160.000 students from 190 countries were enrolled, while only 200 students were enrolled in the course offered on campus. In addition, the majority of the campus students stopped going to class and continued the course online. Although only a small percentage of students managed to complete the course, in absolute numbers there were still 23,000 successful students.

Some additional data may help to situate MOOCs in the teaching and learning landscape. At the end of 2011, Stanford started its first three MOOCs on computation, and in December of the same year, MIT started MITx (MIT news office, 2011). A month later, Thrun had abandoned Stanford to collaborate with Udacity (Watters, 2012a) which offered his course CS 101: Build a Search Engine (joined by one of the founders of Google). At the same time, Andrew Ng and Daphne Koller created Coursera, and in April 2012, the universities of Princeton, Penn, Michigan, Stanford and the University of California at Berkeley joined Coursera (Kolowich, 2012).

It soon became known that large amounts of money were being invested in the MOOC business. In May 2012, EdX was founded by MIT and Harvard with a contribution of some 30 million dollars by each institution (Watters, 2012b). A month later, Pearson joined Udacity (Udacity, 2012) and in October it was announced that an additional 15 million dollars had been invested. Also in 2012, Banco Santander and Universia in Spain launched MiriadaX, the biggest platform in the Spanish language. However, according to Sangrà (2013) there is no Spanish university among the universities which intend to control the international market, these being Oxford, Cambridge, MIT, Harvard, Stanford, Princeton and Pearson, Google and Walmart.

3. Problems

It seems to us that there are some problems which are genuinely related to MOOCs and which have to do with their creation and maintenance as well as with their acceptance and use.

3.1. Courses or resources

The 1980s and 1990s may be characterized as the time of computer-based instruction (CBI or similar variants like CAI, CAL, and CBL). In spite of the large amounts of funding these projects received, none of these survived long enough to justify the economic investments. In 1994, Philip Barker (personal communication) pointed out traditional classes were less expensive than computer-based courses. Reasons for this were the low rate of re-utilization and the high costs of keeping them updated. In some cases, it was not possible to update the course for the simple reason that the people who had participated in its creation were no longer available. This is therefore one of the major problems: to update a complete course is much more expensive than to change smaller units. At the same time, a complete course will need more year-to-year updating.

This problem exists independent of the course, be this open and free or closed and with fees, online or face-to-face. In 2006, the first author was invited by DUOC in Chile as a consultant. One problem he encountered was that material that was created for a course by one lecturer was not used by the others. This constitutes another problem: it is rather unlikely, at least in some cultures that lecturers are willing to integrate learning material in their teaching that was created by a colleague.

The idea of working with educational resources that can be re-utilized is as old as the computer. As Gibbons and Ot (2002: 28) wrote, «it is possible to create small curricular units which can be combined in different ways to fit different students». Hodgins (2002) suggested the metaphor of Lego building blocks. No matter to which author or definition of learning objects or visions of learning resources we refer, what they all have in common is the modularity of the resources which makes it possible to integrate them in programs which suit different lecturers and different students. Due to their small size, it is also easier to update or replace them.

Taking all this into consideration, it simply does not seem to be a good idea to design complete courses although this may work out in certain circumstances. If there are some hundred millions of dollars which are available for the creation of a course and if there is a large number of students who will take the course, there is no doubt that it will be possible to develop a course of high quality. However, only the most affluent institutions will be able to do so. In other words, MOOCs might constitute a good solution if they can really be scaled up, and this will only be possible for a few big institutions. In times of austerity, this will be almost impossible. Rather, as in other realms of our lives, a reaction to the contrary can be observed; in the food sector, for example, there is a tendency towards «local consumption».

A similar tendency can be seen in regard to MOOCs. Oremos (2013), for instance, talks about SPOCs, «small private online courses», an idea which was suggested by Armando Fox (Fox, 2013). However, the term does not refer to MOOCs for a few, but rather to a new business model. This is clearly explained by Agarwal, president of EdX: «You create a course and then license it to a university or an organization or corporation» (Goral, 2013). As Oremus points out, something similar may happen in the context of a model of a «flipped classroom», or, to generalize this idea, in the context of any model. What we have then is educational material elaborated by tutors and lecturers that can be sold to institutions, companies or even individuals.

What is different is that the material is being sold in the form of courses. This, however, does not solve the first problem we mentioned: difficulties and costs of updating the material. Evidently, this is not a problem in large-scale economies; SPOCs may be sold to any client who is able to cope with the production costs. But then the second problem still remains: will a university lecturer accept the specific selection of contents and modes of presentation as a whole, or will he prefer to pick some material from different sources and keep this in a space of his own?

Of course, the academic culture of the institution also matters. In recent years, the economic situation in Spain, together with the fact that the mean age of university lecturers has increased, has led to an increase in young lecturers, with short-term contracts resulting in a low level of dedication due to the fact that the teaching job has to be reconciled with other activities. This has limited the role of professors to almost exclusively being the tutor, with little room to design a curriculum or to develop their own material.

3.2. Economic analysis

To return to SPOCs: what we find is not a new proposal or the exploration of new teaching solutions, as Fox maintains, but a new business model which aims at increasing returns. Put bluntly, it is about making money. In a recent study of a MOOC offered by the University of Pennsylvania (Alcorn et al., 2014), 35,000 students who had completed at least one lesson were asked how much they were willing to pay for the course. The results obtained are shown in table 1.


Draft Content 925603499-32644-en043.jpg

The data show that offering MOOCs might represent good business. However, other results from this study o are really disheartening: women, jobless people, people from the third world, students without a higher education degree and people older than fifty-one are clearly underrepresented in MOOCs.

In the case of women, the ratio of 55 to 45 in favour of men in the higher education sector in the industrialised countries turns into 65 to 35 when it comes to register for MOOCs. Only 6 % of the students enrolled in MOOCs in the United States are without work. 86 % of the US students who are enrolled in MOOCs have already completed studies in Higher Education while the mean percentage for this in the general population is 32 %. This difference turns into a real divide when we look at MOOC participation in the BRIC countries (79 % versus 5 %) or in developing countries (79 % versus 6 %). This means that MOOCs particularly offer an opportunity for those who already obtain Higher Education degrees. Possibly, the factor that most courses are offered in English plays a role, but his has not been clarified as yet. We agree with Alcorn & al. (2014) that as far as MOOCs are concerned, at present there is no market study, no business model and no empirical investigation which would uphold the claims that have been made concerning their positive effects.

In the following section, we would like to review theories of learning and of self-regulated learning in order to be able to assess MOOCs with respect to their learning theoretical foundations.

4. Methodology

To allow for a solid reflection on how MOOCs have incorporated learning theoretical aspects, the authors organized a focus group with a collective discussion on MOOCs that developed in two steps. In the first phase, specific learning theories were selected. Also, special attention was given to theoretical approaches to self-regulated learning. In a second step, the concepts of cMOOCs and xMOOCs were reviewed with respect to their potential for incorporating elements from theoretical approaches to learning and self-regulated learning.

4.1. Learning theoretical foundations of MOOCs

In his first presentation of the concept of connectivism, Siemens referred to Driscoll (2000) who defined learning as «a persisting change in human performance or performance potential…[which] must come about as a result of the learner’s experience and interaction with the world» (Driscoll, 2000: 11). This definition is quite valuable because it makes a distinction between performance and performance potential thus allowing to distinguish between overt and observable behaviour on the one hand and competences as performance potential for which overt behaviour may be an indicator on the other. At the same time, it seems wide enough to include different approaches to learning. While behaviourist theories of learning focus on observable behaviour, other approaches to learning assume that learning is related to processes that are not directly observable (cognitive and constructivist theories, connectivism).

It would, however, be unwise to completely discard behaviourist theories. Classical conditioning explains how a formerly neutral stimulus acquires the capacity to elicit an emotional response (Watson, 1913) and there is an increasing acknowledgement of the fact that emotions do play a role in learning. Also, Skinner showed that his theory of operant conditioning lent itself as a basis to develop teaching machines and was also able to explain language acquisition (Skinner, 1957; 1958).

Approaches to learning were also developed in the field of cognitive psychology. The problem with the cognitive approach is, however, that the individual is portrayed as an information processing system, a system without emotions and without the capacity to be conscious of itself. Piaget’s theory focuses on cognitive structures and activities, but is not completely oblivious of emotions and consciousness (Piaget, 1947). While in the course of a child’s cognitive development, cognitive activities (thinking) turn into operations by acquiring a specific formal structure, children –and adults– also develop structures of content (schemata) in which their knowledge about the world is represented. Knowledge is therefore constructed individually, although there is no doubt that knowledge construction is also a social process.

Recent progress in neuroscience has greatly improved our understanding of human beings and how they learn. Findings from neuroscience show that individual learning is a very complex activity, involving emotional as well as cognitive processes. According to Damasio (1994: 2003), all our cognitive activities are accompanied by body feelings (somatic marker hypothesis). On the basis of findings in neuroscience, Caine & Caine (1991) suggested 12 principles of brain-based learning.

The most recent ideas on learning were proposed by Siemens. Siemens (2005) introduced the concept of connectivism as a learning theory for the digital age. Basically, his idea is that learning takes place in a community of individuals interested in a specific topic. His works on learning (Siemens, 2005) and knowledge (Siemens, 2006) are certainly some of the most interesting contributions on these topics. Although Siemens suggests connectivism to be a learning theory for the digital age, it may be doubted that is a learning theory. According to Verhagen (2006) it is more of a pedagogical view than a learning theory. Duke, Harper & Johnston (2013) in their critical analysis of Siemens’ approach come to the conclusion that connectivism as described by Siemens is «a tool to be used in the learning process for instruction or curriculum rather than a standalone learning theory» (Duke, Harper & Johnston, 2013: 10).

What Siemens is describing is actually a community of people interested in a specific subject. This is reminiscent of ideas other authors have proposed. Ivan Illich (1972), for example, suggested that schools should be abandoned and in their place, knowledge centres should be established. Although schools will probably never be abandoned, the Internet may be viewed as one big knowledge centre. The idea of a community of practice had also been proposed by Lave & Wenger (1991; Wenger, 1998).

In his publication «Knowing knowledge» (Siemens, 2006), Siemens states «Learning is the process of creating networks. Nodes are external entities which we can use to form a network. Or nodes may be people, organizations, libraries, web sites, books, journals, database, or any other source of information. The act of learning (things become a bit tricky here) is one of creating an external network of nodes – where we connect and form information and knowledge sources. The learning that happens in our heads is an internal network (neural) (Siemens, 2006: 29).

From our point of view, learning may certainly be described as the formation and strengthening of neural networks, although the neural activities that go on while somebody is learning are much more complex. The external entities –the sources of knowledge– to which we connect in order to increase our knowledge are indispensable for learning and may therefore be considered to be part of the learning process.

4.2. Self-regulated learning

Presently, we are observing a gradual shift from teacher-oriented learning to student-oriented learning. In the Bucharest Communiqué which was signed by ministers of 47 European countries in the context of the implementation of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA), it is stated: «We reiterate our commitment to promote student-centred learning in higher education, characterised by innovative methods of teaching that involve students as active participants in their own learning» (EHEA Ministerial Conference, 2012: 2). The advent of MOOCs seems to have come just in time to turn these political ambitions into reality. Self-regulated learning has been listed as one of the key competences for lifelong learning (European Council, 2006).

Models of self-regulation have also been applied to education (see Boekaerts et al., 2000). Although several models have been proposed for self-regulated learning, probably the best known is the one by Zimmerman (2000) who assumes that self-regulated learning takes place in cycles of: 1) forethought, 2) execution and volitional control and 3) self-reflection. It is also recognised, however, that self-regulation addresses not only cognitive activities. Emotional, motivational and behavioural activities in the learning process are also subject to self-regulation. According to Zeidner et al. (2000), self-regulation involves «cognitive, affective, motivational and behavioural components that provide the individual with the capacity to adjust his or her actions and goals to achieve the desired results in light of changing environmental conditions» (Zeidner & al., 2000: 751). While some learners may have acquired good strategies for self-regulating their learning, others may still be in need to improve these. The development of SRL skills needs scaffolded practice and subsequent fading of the guidance (Beishuizen & Steffens, 2011; Azevedo & Hadwin, 2005).

4.3. A process model of learning

Theories of learning tend to focus on relatively short learning activities. Learning may, however, involve activities that last for a much longer period of time. Learning to walk, leaning to speak, learning a second language, learning to play a musical instrument all require longer learning periods. After all, today we are speaking of lifelong learning. However, even if we speak of extended learning periods, these may be broken up into smaller periods at the macro level. We therefore think that long time learning is achieved in cycles of macro level phases of:

1) Exploring a specific domain.

2) Understanding the domain.

3) Practice and rehearsal of domain-relevant skills.

4) Application of the acquired knowledge and skills to other domains.

We have tried to assess the learning theories which we referred to in the beginning with respect to the question to what degreed they explicitly consider these macro-level phases of learning (table 2).


Draft Content 925603499-32644-en044.jpg

5. Discussion

When we talk about technology enhanced learning environments (TELEs), we are not only talking about technology. Technology provides digital media which may facilitate learning, but learning is the activity of an individual which in most cases is taking place in a social context (although this may be virtual) involving peers and a teacher or tutor.

Although it is difficult to compare traditional online courses with xMOOCs and cMOOCs, there seem to be some characteristics which allow us to describe differences between the three forms of TELEs. We believe that it is important that TELEs support learning in the four macro level phases of learning which we introduced above (explore, understand, practice and transfer). As far as self-regulation of learning is concerned, we believe that TELEs, particularly if they come in the form of online courses, require a greater competence of self-regulation than traditional face-to-face learning environments. We also believe that cMOOCs support self-regulated learning to a greater extent than other forms of online-based TELEs because we conceive of cMOOCs as communities of learners whose members support each other in exploring and learning about the domain in question.

From our point of view, interaction with learning objects, peers and tutors is also important. In fact, in one of our research projects on self-regulated learning in TELEs (Steffens, 2006; Bartolomé & Steffens, 2006), we discovered that teachers/tutors do matter. In this project, we evaluated TELEs with respect to their potential to foster self-regulated learning. We categorised the TELEs into three different kinds of TELEs: (1) container systems with tutor, (2) content systems with tutors and (3) content systems without tutor.

Container systems with tutors were TELEs in universities in which students created content with the assistance of a tutor, using digital technologies (digital portfolios, digital videos, learning management systems, blogs). In the content systems with tutors, content was already provided and was being studied in blended-learning courses. Content systems without tutors involved computer programs or online application, which could be studied individually by students, with little or no interactivity with fellow students and coaches. It seems to us that there is some similarity between container systems with tutors and cMOOCs because in both cases, the creation of content and new knowledge is important. Traditional online courses seem more like content systems with tutors because in both kinds of learning environments, content is already provided and is being studied with a teacher or tutor as coach. xMOOCs seem to resemble most content systems without tutors because they usually provide little interaction with peers and tutors.

In our study of TELEs, we found that container systems with tutors were evaluated highest with respect to their capacity to foster self-regulated learning; this was true for self-regulated learning in general as well as for the cognitive, emotional, motivational and social component of self-regulated learning. While the other kinds of TELEs received lower ratings, the content systems with tutors still received good ratings for fostering the emotional and social component of self-regulated learning, while the content system without tutor did well with respect to fostering the cognitive and motivational component of self-regulated learning.

Of course, the TELEs we studied were not MOOCs, but we think it is possible to extrapolate our findings to these kinds of TELEs. On the basis of our knowledge, we have tried to evaluate the concepts of traditional online courses (OCs), XMOOCs and cMOOCs with respect to their potential to support learning in the four macro-level learning phases that we introduced and to foster self-regulated learning. We also assessed their affordances with respect to interaction with learning objects, peers and tutors. Finally, we considered the aspects of formal evaluation and accreditation important. While this seems to be a problem with xMOOCs, it is not relevant for cMOOCs because participants in cMOOCs seem to be primarily interested in learning, rather than in evaluation or accreditation. Our opinions are documented in table 3.


Draft Content 925603499-32644-en045.jpg

Online courses, XMOOCs and cMOOCs constitute different types of virtual TELEs. In table 3, we indicated which characteristics each type of virtual TELE is likely to possess. These are therefore characteristics which we consider to be typical of each virtual TELE. For some characteristics, it was difficult to decide whether they are typical of the specific TELE. Any virtual TELE might foster interaction with peers, for instance, but there are probably many virtual TELEs which do not provide this opportunity, while it is a typical characteristic of cMOOCs to support interaction with peers, in fact, this is one of the defining characteristics of this type of virtual TELE. Table 3 also documents our belief that cMOOCs have a greater potential to foster learning and its self-regulation than xMOOCs because they foresee a much higher degree of interactivity with learning objects, peers and tutors. cMOOCs constitute virtual learning environments in which participants are active in acquiring, sharing and creating knowledge while xMOOCs focus on delivering knowledge only.

Characteristics that clearly distinguish traditional online courses from xMOOCs and cMOOCs are the large number of enrolled students and the degree of openness. We do not see any value in massive courses; there are no pedagogical or psychological reasons why a course with 100.000 students should foster learning better than a course with 100 students. And while it is desirable to have open online courses, it is questionable whether MOOCs are really open. Participation in MOOCs may be free of charge, but evaluation and accreditation in general is not. Also, as we explained in the first part of our paper, MOOCs seem to be more open to individuals who already possess a university degree than to other individuals.

MOOCs are a specific type of online courses. We doubt that making them massive provides any added value, either from the point of view of education, nor from the point of view of psychology. Nonetheless, they constitute a form of virtual TELEs that needs to be studied in a differentiated manner. At the same time, it might be worthwhile to consider alternative forms of online courses, like Small Private Online Courses (SPOCs, Fox, 2013). One alternative that seems promising to us would be SCOOCs – Small Connectivist Open Online Courses.

References

Adell, J. (2013). Los MOOC, en la cresta de la ola. Edu&tec. (http://goo.gl/tjPFse) (19-03-2013).

Alcorn, B., Christensen, G. & Emanuel, E.J. (2014). Who Takes MOOC? New Republic. (http://goo.gl/TqYtnE) (04-01-2014).

Armstrong, L. (2014). 2013- the Year of Ups and Downs for the MOOC. Changing Higher Education. (http://goo.gl/SqwGWn).

Azevedo R. & Hadwin A.F. (2005). Scaffolding Self-regulated Learning and Metacognition – Implications for the Design of Computer-based Scaffolds. Instructional Science, 33(5-6), 367-379.

Bartolomé, A. & Steffens, K. (2006). Self-regulated Learning in Technology Enhanced Learning Environments. VIII Congreso Iberoamericano de Informática Educativa. Costa Rica: San Jose (13-05-2006).

Bartolomé, A. (2013). Qué se puede esperar de los MOOC. Comunicación y Pedagogía, 269-270, 49-56. (http://goo.gl/VhG7zs).

Beckstrand, S., Barker, P. y Van-Schaik, P. (2001). Towards more independent learning: A Southern Nevada perspective. En ED-MEDIA 2001 World Conference on Educational Multimadia, hypermedia & Telecommunications proceedings, pp. 106-110.

Beishuizen, J. & Steffens, K. (2011). A Conceptual Framework for Research on Self-regulated Learning. In R. Carneiro, P. Lefrere, K. Steffens & J. Underwood (Eds.), Self-regulated Learning in Technology Enhanced learning Environments: A European Perspective. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.

Boekaerts, M., Pintrich, P. & Zeidner, M. (2000). (Eds.). Handbook of Self-regulation. New York: Academic Press.

Caine, R. & Caine, G. (1991). Making Connections: Teaching and the Human Brain. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

Cupaiuolo, C. (2012). The History and Future of MOOC and the New Open Education Week. Spotlight on. (http://goo.gl/3pg8F8) (03-07-2012).

Damasio, A. (1994). Descartes' Error: Emotion, Reason, and the Human Brain. London: Putnam.

Damasio, A. (2003). Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow, and the Feeling Brain. New. York: Harcourt.

Driscoll, M. (2000). Psychology of Learning for Instruction. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Duke, B., Harper, G. & Johnston, M. (2013). Connectivism as a Digital Age Learning Theory? The International HETL Review, Special Issue, 4-13.

EHEA Ministerial Conference (2012). Making the Most of our Potential: Consolidating the European Higher Education Area. Bucharest Communiqué. Bucharest. (http://goo.gl/GgLKXs).

European Comission (2014). European MOOC Scoreboard. Open Education Europa. (http://goo.gl/ut4XDZ).

European Council (2006). Recommendation of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2006 on key competences for lifelong learning. (http://goo.gl/RkSTwf).

Fox, A. (2013). From MOOC to SPOC. Communications of the ACM, 56 (12), 38-40. (http://goo.gl/9yZKX9).

Gibbons, A.S., Nelson, J. & Richards, R. (2000). The Nature and Origin of Instructional Objects. In D.A. Wiley (Ed.), The Instructional Use of Learning Objects: Online Version. (http://goo.gl/NoOlvF).

Gillani, N. & Eynon, R. (2014). Communication Patterns in Massively Open Online Courses. Internet and Higher Education, 23, 18-26. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iheduc.2014.05.004).

Goral, T. (2013). SPOC May Provide what MOOC can’t. University Business, July 2013. (http://goo.gl/gsbQMo).

Hew, K.F. & Cheung, W.S. (2014). Students’ and Instructors’ Use of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC). Motivations and Challenges. Educational Research Review, 12, 45-58 (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.edurev.2014.05.001).

Hodgins, W. (2002). The Future of Learning Objects. (http://goo.gl/LD3WFD) (20-05-2014).

Illich, I.(1972). Deschooling Society. London: Marion Boyars.

Karsenti, T. (2013). The MOOC. What the Research Says. International Journal of Technologies in Higher Education, 10(2), 23-37. (www.ritpu.org/IMG/pdf/RITPU_v10_n02_23.pdf) (20-05-2014).

Kolowich, S. (2012). Elite Universities' Online Play. Inside Higher Education. (http://goo.gl/f8mwuS) (18-04-2012).

Lane, L. (2012). Three Kinds of MOOC. Lisa’s (online) Teaching & History Blog. (http://goo.gl/ThZXHh) (15-08-2012).

Lave, J. & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lugton, M. (2012). What is a MOOC? What Are the Different Types of MOOC? xMOOC and cMOOC. Reflections. (http://goo.gl/9Szd6o) (23/8/2012).

MIT News Office (2011). MIT Launches Online Learning Initiative. MIT News. (http://goo.gl/VLEH6J) (19-12-2011).

Oremus, W. (2013). Forget MOOC. Slate. (http://goo.gl/l55Bgz) (18-09-2013).

Piaget, J. (1947). La psychologie de l'intelligence. Paris: Colin.

Quinn, C. (2012). MOOC Reflections. Learnlets. (http://goo.gl/anKfrw) (29-02-2012).

Sangrà, A. (2013). ¿Prefieres un MOOC o un SPOC? El País, 28/10/2013 (http://goo.gl/Q54igr).

Siemens, G. (2005). Connectivism. A Learning Theory for the Digital Age. ElearnSpace. (http://goo.gl/1yV7WT) (12-12-212).

Siemens, G. (2006). Knowing Knowledge (http://goo.gl/3s2m8d).

Siemens, G. (2012a). MOOC for the Win! ElearnSpace. (http://goo.gl/7kJftu) (05-03-2012).

Siemens, G. (2012b). What is the Theory that Underpins our MOOC? ElearnSpace. (http://goo.gl/NV72pe) (03-06-2012).

Skinner, B.F. (1957). Verbal Behaviour. Acton, MA: Copley Publishing Group.

Skinner, B.F. (1958). Teaching Machines. Science, 128, 969-977.

Steffens, K. (2006). Self-regulated Learning in Technology Enhanced Learning Environments: Lessons of a European Peer Review. European Journal of Education, 41, (3/4), 353-379.

Udacity (2012). Udacity in Partnership with Pearson VUE Announces Testing Centers. Udacity Blog, 1/6/2012 (http://goo.gl/EGLz11).

Verhagen, P. (2006). Connectivism: A New Learning Theory. (http://goo.gl/upLrdx).

Watson, J.B. (1913). Psychology as a Behaviourist Sees it. Psychological Review, 20, 158-177.

Watters, A. (2012a). Stanford AI Professor Thrun Leaves University to Start Udacity, An Online Learning Startup. Hack Education. (http://goo.gl/rbj3NM) (23-01-2012.

Watters, A. (2012b). MITx + Harvard = edX. Hack Education. (http://goo.gl/8WuPQ3) (02-05-2012).

Wenger, E. (1998). Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning, and Identity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Zeidner, M., Boekaerts, M. & Pintrich, P. (2000). Self-regulation. Directions and challenges for future research. In M. Boekaerts, P. Pintrich & M. Zeidner (Eds.), Handbook of self-regulation. (pp. 749-768). New York: Academic Press.

Zimmerman, B.J. (2000). Attaining Self-regulation: A Social Cognitive Perspective. In M. Boekaerts, P. Pintrich, & M. Zeidner (Eds.), Handbook of Self-regulation (pp. 13-39). New York: Academic Press.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Este trabajo reflexiona sobre los MOOC como entornos de aprendizaje. El número de cursos masivos abiertos y en línea (MOOC) ha crecido exponencialmente en pocos años desde que fueron introducidos. Los MOOC son considerados una nueva forma de entornos virtuales de aprendizaje potenciados por la tecnología. Se consideran dos tipos de MOOC: unos los organizados por Siemens y Downes (cMOOC) y otros los desarrollados en lugares como Stanford, con muchos estudiantes y loables objetivos (xMOOC); estos tienen también sus debilidades. Aunque han sido recibidos con altas expectativas, también han encontrado una fuerte oposición que está aumentando con el tiempo, lo que nos permite estudiar este fenómeno en profundidad. Aunque todavía hay pocas investigaciones empíricas sobre los efectos de los MOOC en el aprendizaje, este estudio trata de arrojar luz sobre el tema desde un punto de vista teórico. En primer lugar exploraremos las expectativas positivas y negativas generadas. Los MOOC pueden constituir una buena propuesta a gran escala, lo que solo es posible para unas pocas grandes instituciones. No hay estudio de mercado, ni modelo de negocio, ni investigaciones empíricas que permitan confirmar los anuncios de sus efectos positivos. Revisaremos las teorías del aprendizaje recientes y clásicas respecto a su capacidad para explicar el proceso de aprendizaje y compararemos los cursos en línea tradicionales, los xMOOC y los cMOOC en relación a su potencial para apoyar el aprendizaje y su auto-regulación.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Los cursos masivos, abiertos y en línea (MOOC, por sus siglas en inglés: Massive Open Online Courses) en Educación Superior han despertado un gran interés en estos años (Karsenti, 2013). Udacity, Coursera y EdX, las principales plataformas de MOOC en Estados Unidos, están incorporando continuamente nuevas universidades como socios; lo mismo puede decirse, aunque en menor medida, de las plataformas de MOOC en Europa. OpenupEd, por ejemplo, una iniciativa paneuropea fundada en 2013 y apoyada por la Comisión Europea, está ofreciendo cursos de universidades europeas y no europeas. Igualmente un cierto número de instituciones nacionales en Europa han comenzado a ofrecer MOOC (European Commission, 2014).

A pesar del entusiasmo suscitado por los MOOC, los participantes en estos cursos parecen encontrar serios problemas, lo que genera elevadas ratios de deserción. Un reciente estudio mostró que solo el 4% de los estudiantes que atienden MOOC en Coursera completaron sus cursos (Armstrong, 2014). Uno de los problemas puede radicar en que muchos cursos se crearon sin tener en cuenta los resultados de la investigación sobre aprendizaje y autorregulación del aprendizaje. En esta contribución exploraremos por tanto las expectativas positivas y negativas que han acompañado la rápida difusión de los MOOC.

Mientras otros recientes trabajos se han basado en una revisión bibliográfica (Hew & Cheung, 2014) o un análisis empírico (Gillani & Eynon, 2014), este estudio se centra en una reflexión sobre las capacidades de los MOOC desde la perspectiva de las teorías del aprendizaje. Nuestro objetivo es analizar cómo las contribuciones desde dichas teorías se reflejan en los MOOC.

2. Antecedentes

2.1. Comprendiendo los MOOC: claves históricas

Cuando Stephen Downes y George Siemens atendían la conferencia Desire21Learn, cansados de discutir las aplicaciones del conectivismo, pensaron que el mejor modo para comprender como funciona el aprendizaje en línea era crear un curso de este tipo (Siemens, 2012a). Diseñaron, por tanto, su primer curso en línea CCK08 «Connectivism and Connective Knowledge». 2.300 estudiantes se inscribieron en el curso, y Dave Cormier y Bryan Alexander sugirieron denominarlo un «massive open online course» o MOOC (Siemens, 2012b).

Sin embargo, éste no fue el primer MOOC en la historia. Siemens (2012a) señala que cursos de este tipo ya fueron ofrecidos en el 2007 por Alec Couros y David Wiley. También pueden encontrarse ideas similares en las universidades abiertas y a distancia.

Sin embargo el primer MOOC apareció en 1922 (Bartolomé, 2013). Ese año la Universidad de Nueva York comenzó sus cursos por radio que eran abiertos y masivos, y pronto universidades como Columbia, Harvard, Kansas State, Ohio State, Purdue, Rufts y muchas otras la siguieron. Sin embargo estos no eran cursos tal y como Downes y Siemens proponían, sino cursos según el modelo de los que ofrecen hoy Stanford, Coursera y otras instituciones similares.

En este momento pueden considerarse dos tipos de MOOC (Lugton, 2012; Adell, 2013). Quinn (2012) señala el modelo de los MOOC organizados por Siemens, Downs y sus «coconspiradores» y que se basan en las ideas del conectivismo de Siemens. Por otro lado, están los xMOOC o simplemente MOOC que se basan en una larga serie de métodos tradicionales de educación a distancia. Algunos permiten la colaboración a través de foros de discusión o una evaluación entre pares, un sistema que fue implementado por Coursera.

Hay otros criterios para distinguir diferentes tipos de MOOC. Lane (2012) sugiere la siguiente clasificación:

• MOOC basados en una red como los cMOOC.

• MOOC orientados a la resolución de problemas, como los de Jim Groom.

• MOOC orientados a contenidos como EdX, Coursera y Udacity.

Esta clasificación recuerda a la que ofrece Moodle a la hora de diseñar sus cursos: basados en temas (contenido), semanas o Scorm (actividades) y el formato social (equivalente a los cMOOC).

2.2. Diferencias entre xMOOC y cMOOC

Sería un error asumir que un xMOOC se convierte en un cMOOC con solo introducir actividades para la colaboración. Siemens (2012a), en su introducción a «MOOC for the win!», lo deja claro. El pretendía explorar y experimentar con nuevas formas de interacción en línea, no estando especialmente interesado en si ésta era una fórmula para ayudar a las universidades a mejorar su docencia. Estaba más interesado en desarrollar propuestas en el campo del aprendizaje y la enseñanza similares a lo que el MIT había hecho con el proyecto OpenCourseware.

El potencial económico de los MOOC salió a la luz el año 2012. Cupaiuolo (2012) cuenta cómo Thrun llegó a su decisión de abandonar Stanford. En su curso en línea de Inteligencia Artificial, se inscribieron 160.000 estudiantes de 190 países, por solo 200 que lo hicieron en el mismo curso presencial. E incluso la mayoría de los estudiantes presenciales dejaron de ir a clase y siguieron el curso en línea. Aunque solo un pequeño porcentaje de estudiantes llegaron a completar el curso, en cifras absolutas fueron 23.000 sujetos.

Más información puede ayudar a situar los MOOC en el escenario educativo. A final de 2011 Stanford arrancó sus primeros tres MOOC sobre informática, y en diciembre del mismo año, el MIT comenzó el proyecto MITx (MIT News Office, 2011). Un mes más tarde, Thrun dejó Stanford para colaborar con Udacity (Watters, 2012a) que ofrecía su curso «CS101: Build a Search Engine» (en el que participaba uno de los fundadores de Google). Al mismo tiempo, Andrew Ng y Daphne Koller crearon Coursera, plataforma a la que se incorporaron en abril de 2012 las Universidades de Princeton, Penn, Michigan, Stanford y la Universidad de California en Berkeley (Kolowich, 2012).

Pronto salieron a la luz las grandes inversiones que se estaban dirigiendo al negocio de los MOOC. En mayo de 2012, MIT y Harvard fundaron EdX, con una contribución de unos 30 millones de dólares por cada institución (Watters, 2012b). Un mes más tarde, Pearson se unió a Udacity (Udacity, 2012) y en octubre se anunció una inversión adicional de 15 millones de dólares. También el año 2012, el Banco Santander y Universia en España lanzaron MiriadaX, la mayor plataforma en español. Sin embargo, según Sangrà (2013) no hay ninguna universidad de lengua hispana entre las universidades que pretenden controlar el mercado: Oxford, Cambridge, MIT, Harvard, Stanford, Princeton y Pearson, Google y Walmart.

3. Problemas

Parece haber algunos problemas directamente relacionados con los MOOC y que tienen que ver con su creación y mantenimiento, así como con su uso.

3.1. Cursos o recursos

Los años ochenta y noventa se caracterizaron como la época de la enseñanza asistida por ordenador (EAO o variantes similares como EBO, AAO, ABO). A pesar de los grandes fondos recibidos, ninguna de esas iniciativas sobrevivió suficiente para justificar la inversión económica. En 1994, Philip Barker encontró que las clases tradicionales eran menos costosas que los cursos con ordenadores. Algunos motivos eran la baja ratio de reutilización y el alto costo de mantenerlos al día (Beckstrand, Barker & VanSchaik, 2001). En algunos casos no fue posible actualizar los cursos porque quienes habían participado en su desarrollo habían abandonado la institución y era imposible contar con ellos. Así que éste es uno de los problemas mayores: actualizar un curso completo es mucho más caro que modificar pequeñas unidades. Por otro lado, un curso completo necesita actualizarse más frecuentemente.

Este problema es común a todo tipo de cursos, sean abiertos, gratuitos o cerrados y de pago, en línea o presenciales. El año 2006 el primer autor fue invitado por DUOC en Chile como asesor. Un problema que encontró fue que el material que era creado para un curso por un profesor no acostumbraba a ser aceptado para su uso por los otros. Este es, pues otro problema: en ciertas culturas académicas es poco probable que un profesor acepte literalmente un material creado por otro con el que puede tener ciertas divergencias.

La idea de trabajar con recursos educativos que puedan ser reutilizados es tan vieja como la computadora. Gibbons y otros (2002: 28) señalaron que «es posible crear pequeñas unidades curriculares que pueden ser combinadas de forma diferente para diferentes estudiantes». Hodgins (2002) sugería la metáfora de los bloques de Lego. No importa a qué autor o definición de objeto de aprendizaje o visión sobre recursos de aprendizaje nos refiramos, todos tienen en común la modularidad de los recursos que hace posible integrarlos en programas según las necesidades de diferentes profesores y estudiantes. Debido a su pequeño tamaño, es también más fácil actualizarlos o reemplazarlos.

A partir de lo anterior podemos concluir que no parece una buena idea diseñar cursos completos, aunque esto pueda funcionar en ciertas circunstancias. Si se dispone de una gran cantidad de dinero para desarrollar un curso y existe un gran número de estudiantes interesados en tomarlo, no cabe duda que es posible desarrollar un curso de gran calidad, incluso si solo tiene un par de años de vigencia. Sin embargo, solo algunas instituciones pueden hacerlo. En otras palabras, los MOOC pueden constituir una buena solución si pueden ser proyectados globalmente, y esto solo es posible para muy pocas y grandes instituciones. En una situación económica lejos de la ideal, esto puede ser casi imposible. Por otro lado, esta tendencia hacia la globalizacióncentralización de grandes soluciones se ve cuestionada hoy en otros ámbitos como el «consuma local» en la alimentación.

Podemos ver esa tendencia hacia lo pequeño también en los MOOC. Oremus (2013) habla de los SPOC «small private online courses» (pequeños privados cursos en línea), una idea sugerida por Armando Fox (Fox, 2013). Sin embargo el término no se refiere a MOOC para unos pocos sino más bien a un nuevo modelo de negocio. Agarwal, presidente de EdX, lo explica claramente: «Crea un curso y lo licencia a una universidad, organización o empresa» (Goral, 2013). Como Oremus señala, algo similar puede suceder en el contexto de un modelo de «clase invertida», o, generalizando, en cualquier otro modelo. Lo que tenemos es material educativo elaborado por profesores que puede ser vendido a instituciones, empresas o incluso a individuos.

La diferencia es que el material se vende bajo la forma de cursos. Esto no soluciona el problema mencionado: dificultad y costo para actualizar el material. Evidentemente esto no es un problema en economías a gran escala; un SPOC puede ser vendido a cualquier cliente que pueda pagarlo. Pero entonces todavía permanece el segundo problema: ¿aceptará un profesor la selección de contenidos y materiales en su conjunto o preferirá escoger algunos recursos desde diferentes fuentes y organizarlos en su propio espacio?

Desde luego, la cultura académica de la institución influye. Recientemente, la situación económica en España, junto con el incremento de la edad de los profesores universitarios con dedicación exclusiva ha llevado a un incremento de profesores jóvenes con contratos de bajo nivel, lo que se traduce en una menor dedicación al tener que conciliar su actividad docente con otras actividades. Esto ha limitado la función de los profesores a tareas próxima a las de tutor/lector con pocas oportunidades para desarrollar sus programas docentes y sus propios materiales.

3.2. Análisis económico

Volviendo a los SPOC, lo que encontramos no es una nueva propuesta o nuevas soluciones docentes, como mantiene Fox, sino un nuevo modelo de negocio que pretende incrementar los retornos. Más claramente: estamos hablando de ganar dinero. En un reciente estudio de un MOOC ofrecido por la Universidad de Pennsylvania (Alcorn & al., 2014), se preguntó a 35.000 estudiantes de entre los que habían completado al menos una lección, cuánto estarían dispuestos a pagar por el curso. Los resultados se muestran en la tabla 1.


Draft Content 925603499-32644 ov-es043.jpg

Estos datos muestran que ofrecer MOOC puede ser un buen negocio. Sin embargo otros resultados de este estudio son realmente descorazonadores: mujeres, parados, habitantes de países del tercer mundo, estudiantes sin un grado universitario o adultos de más de 30 años están claramente subrepresentados en los MOOC.

En el caso de mujeres, la ratio de 55 a 45 a favor de hombres en el sector de la Educación Superior en los países industrializados se convierte en 65 a 35 en ese estudio. Solo el 6% de los sujetos en paro inscritos o un 86% de personas que acceden como una segunda titulación (frente al 32% en la universidad en general) son otros datos que contradicen la visión social de los MOOC. La diferencia se convierte en una auténtica fractura digital cuando se analizan los datos en los países BRIC (Brasil, Rusia, India, China) o en países en vía de desarrollo. Es decir, los MOOC son una oportunidad pero para quienes ya han tenido esa oportunidad (ya han realizado estudios superiores). Posiblemente el factor de que el curso se ofrezca en Inglés influya pero esto no está claro todavía. Coincidimos con Alcorn y colaboradores (2014) cuando afirman que en cuanto a los MOOC, todavía no existe un estudio de mercado serio, ni un modelo de negocio ni una investigación empírica que refuerce las declaraciones sobre sus efectos positivos.

En el siguiente apartado revisaremos algunas teorías del aprendizaje y del aprendizaje autorregulado a fin de valorar los MOOC tomándolos como referencia.

4. Metodología

Para generar una sólida reflexión sobre cómo los MOOC han incorporado aspectos de las teorías del aprendizaje, los autores organizaron un «focus group» con una discusión colectiva sobre MOOC que se desarrolló en dos etapas. En la primera se seleccionaron algunas teorías del aprendizaje. Se prestó una especial atención al concepto de aprendizaje autorregulado. En la segunda fase, los conceptos de cMOOC y xMOOC fueron revisados respecto a su potencial para incorporar elementos de estas teorías.

4.1. Fundamentos teóricos del aprendizaje en los MOOC

En su primera presentación del concepto de conectivismo, Siemens se refiere a Driscoll (2000: 11), quien definió el aprendizaje como «un cambio persistente en el desempeño humano o potencial desempeño… [el cual] debe ser el resultado de una experiencia del estudiante y una interacción con el mundo». Esta definición parece bastante adecuada puesto que hace una distinción entre desempeño y desempeño potencial, permitiendo distinguir entre la actuación pública y observable por un lado, y las competencias como potencial desempeño para las que la actuación puede ser un indicador. Al mismo tiempo parece lo suficientemente amplia como para incluir diferentes concepciones del aprendizaje. Mientras las teorías conductistas se concentran en la conducta observable, otras asumen que el aprendizaje se relaciona con procesos no directamente observables (cognitivismo y constructivismo, conectivismo).

Sería, sin embargo, poco sensato descartar totalmente las teorías conductistas. El condicionamiento clásico explica cómo un estímulo neutral adquiere la capacidad de obtener una respuesta emocional (Watson, 1913) lo que coincide con el cada vez más importante papel de las emociones en el aprendizaje. También Skinner (1957; 1958) mostró las aplicaciones de su teoría en el desarrollo de máquinas de enseñar y para explicar la adquisición del lenguaje.

Las teorías cognitivistas también desarrollaron una mejor comprensión del aprendizaje. Su mayor problema radica en que el individuo es descrito como un sistema de procesamiento de la información, un sistema sin emociones y sin la capacidad de ser consciente de sí mismo. La teoría de Piaget se centra en las estructuras y actividades cognitivas, pero no se olvida de las emociones y la consciencia (Piaget, 1947). Mientras a lo largo del desarrollo cognitivo de un niño, las actividades cognitivas (el pensamiento) se convierten en operaciones al adquirir una estructura formal específica, los niños –y adultos– también desarrollan estructuras de contenido (esquemas) que representan su conocimiento sobre el mundo. El conocimiento es así construido individualmente, aunque no hay duda que la construcción del conocimiento es un proceso social.

El progreso en neurociencia ha mejorado en gran medida nuestro conocimiento de los seres humanos y de cómo aprenden. Nos muestra que el aprendizaje individual es una compleja actividad, que incluye procesos emocionales y cognitivos. De acuerdo con Damasio (1994: 2003), todas nuestras actividades cognitivas se acompañan de sentimientos (hipótesis de marcadores somáticos). Basándose en los resultados de la neurociencia, Caine y Caine (1991) sugirieron 12 principios de aprendizaje cerebral.

Las más recientes ideas sobre aprendizaje fueron propuestas por Siemens (2005), que introdujo el concepto de conectivismo como una teoría del aprendizaje para la era digital. Básicamente su idea es que el aprendizaje tiene lugar en una comunidad de individuos interesados en un tema específico. Su trabajo sobre aprendizaje (Siemens, 2005) y conocimiento (Siemens, 2006) es ciertamente una de las contribuciones más interesantes en este tema. Aunque Siemens sugiere que el conectivismo es una teoría del aprendizaje, esto puede ser puesto en duda. De acuerdo con Verhagen (2006) es más una visión pedagógica. Duke, Harper y Johnston (2013), en su análisis crítico del trabajo de Siemens, llegaron a la conclusión de que el conectivismo tal y como lo describe es «una herramienta para ser utilizada en el proceso de aprendizaje para la enseñanza o el currículum más que una teoría del aprendizaje independiente» (Duke, Harper & Johnston, 2013: 10).

Lo que Siemens describe es en realidad una comunidad de sujetos interesados en un tema específico. Esto es una reminiscencia de ideas que otros autores han propuesto. Ivan Illich (1972), por ejemplo, sugirió que las escuelas deberían ser abandonadas y en su lugar establecer centros de conocimiento. Aunque las escuelas probablemente nunca desaparecerán, Internet puede ser visto como un gran centro de conocimiento. La idea de una comunidad de práctica ha sido también propuesta por Lave y Wenger (1991; Wenger, 1998).

En su publicación «Knowing knowledge» (Siemens, 2006), Siemens señala «Aprender es el proceso de crear redes. Los nodos son entidades externas que utilizamos para conformar una red, o los nodos pueden ser personas, organizaciones, bibliotecas, sitios web, libros, revistas, bases de datos o cualquier otra fuente de información. Aprender consiste en crear una red externa de nodos, donde interconectamos y formamos fuentes de información y conocimiento. El aprendizaje que se produce en nuestras cabezas es una red interna (neuronal)» (Siemens, 2006: 29).

Desde nuestro punto de vista, el aprendizaje puede ciertamente ser descrito como la formación y fortalecimiento de redes neuronales, aunque las actividades neuronales que suceden mientras alguien aprende son mucho más complejas. Las entidades externas –fuentes de conocimiento– a las que nos conectamos a fin de incrementar nuestro conocimiento son indispensables para aprender y pueden, por consiguiente, ser consideradas parte del proceso de aprendizaje.

4.2. Aprendizaje autorregulado

Cada vez más observamos un cambio gradual desde un aprendizaje orientado al formador hacia uno orientado al estudiante. En el Comunicado de Bucarest que fue firmado por ministros de 47 países europeos en el contexto de la implementación del Espacio Europeo de Educación Superior (EEES, en inglés EHEA) se señalaba: «Reiteramos nuestro compromiso para promover el aprendizaje centrado en el estudiante en Educación Superior, caracterizado por métodos innovadores de enseñanza que involucra a los estudiantes como participantes activos en su propio aprendizaje» (EHEA Ministerial Conference, 2012: 2). La llegada de los MOOC parece producirse justo a tiempo para convertir estas ambiciones políticas en realidad. El aprendizaje autorregulado ha sido señalado como una de las competencias clave para el aprendizaje a lo largo de la vida (European Council, 2006).

Diferentes modelos de aprendizaje autorregulado han sido aplicados al campo educativo (Boekaerts & al., 2000). Probablemente el más conocido es el propuesto por Zimmerman (2000) que asume que el aprendizaje autorregulado tiene lugar en ciclos de: 1) planificación, 2) ejecución y control voluntario y 3) autoreflexión. Se reconoce también, sin embargo, que la autorregulación se dirige no solo a actividades cognitivas. Actividades emocionales, motivacionales y conductuales durante el proceso de aprendizaje son también sujeto de la autorregulación. De acuerdo con Zeidner y colaboradores (2000: 751), la autorregulación implica «componentes cognitivos, afectivos, motivacionales y conductuales que proporcionan al individuo la capacidad de ajustar sus objetivos y acciones a conseguir los resultados deseados en función de las cambiantes condiciones del entorno». Mientras algunos estudiantes pueden haber adquirido buenas estrategias para autorregular su aprendizaje, otros pueden todavía necesitar mejorarlas. El desarrollo de habilidades de este tipo necesita una práctica estructurada y una posterior desaparición de esa guía (Beishuizen & Steffens, 2011; Azevedo & Hadwin, 2005).

4.3. Un modelo de aprendizaje

Las teorías de aprendizaje tienden a centrarse en actividades a corto plazo. Sin embargo el aprendizaje implica actividades que se generan en periodos mucho más largos. Aprender a caminar, a hablar, aprender un segundo lenguaje o a tocar un instrumento musical pueden ser ejemplos de periodos largos de aprendizaje. Después de todo, hoy hablamos de aprendizaje a lo largo de la vida. Sin embargo, incluso si hablamos de periodos largos de aprendizaje, estos pueden fragmentarse en otros más pequeños. Por consiguiente pensamos que el aprendizaje a largo plazo debe conseguirse en ciclos compuestos de fases:

1) Explorar un tema específico.

2) Comprender el tema.

3) Practicar y ensayar destrezas relevantes para el dominio.

4) Aplicar el conocimiento y las destrezas adquiridas a otros dominios.

Hemos tratado de valorar hasta qué punto las teorías del aprendizaje a las que hicimos referencia anteriormente consideran estas fases del aprendizaje.


Draft Content 925603499-32644 ov-es044.jpg

5. Discusión

Cuando hablamos sobre entornos de aprendizaje potenciados por la tecnología (TELE) no solo hablamos sobre tecnología. La tecnología proporciona medios digitales que pueden facilitar el aprendizaje, pero éste es la actividad de un individuo que, en muchos casos, tiene lugar en un contexto social (aunque éste puede ser virtual) involucrando pares y un profesor o tutor.

Aunque es difícil comparar cursos en línea tradicionales con xMOOC y cMOOC, parece haber algunas características que nos permiten describir las diferencias entre las tres formas de TELE. Creemos que es importante que los TELE permitan el aprendizaje en las cuatro fases del aprendizaje que introducimos antes (explorar, comprender, practicar y transferir). Por lo que se refiere a la autorregulación del aprendizaje, pensamos que los TELE, en especial si se presentan en forma de cursos en línea, requieren una mayor competencia de autorregulación que los entornos tradicionales presenciales. También creemos que los cMOOC soportan la autorregulación del aprendizaje en mayor medida que otras formas de TELE en línea puesto que concebimos los cMOOC como una comunidad de aprendizaje cuyos miembros se apoyan unos a otros.

Desde nuestro punto de vista, la interacción con los objetos de aprendizaje, pares y tutores es también importante. De hecho, en uno de nuestros proyectos de aprendizaje autorregulado en TELE (Steffens, 2006; Bartolomé & Steffens, 2006) descubrimos que los profesores/tutores lo hacen. En ese proyecto evaluamos TELE respecto a su potencial para fomentar el aprendizaje autorregulado. Categorizamos los TELE en tres diferentes tipos: 1) Sistemas «continente» con tutor; 2) Sistemas «contenido» con tutor; 3) Sistemas «contenido» sin tutor.

Los sistemas «continente con tutor» eran TELE en universidades en los que los estudiantes creaban el contenido con ayuda de un tutor, usando tecnologías digitales (portafolios digital, vídeos digitales, sistemas de gestión del aprendizaje, blogs). En los sistemas «contenido con tutor», el contenido era proporcionado a los estudiantes que lo aprendían en cursos de enseñanza semipresencial. Los sistemas «contenido sin tutor» recogían programas o aplicaciones en línea que podían ser estudiadas individualmente por los estudiantes, con poca o ninguna interactividad con otros estudiantes o tutores. Parece que existe alguna similitud entre los sistemas «continente con tutor» y los cMOOC dada la importancia que tiene en ambos la creación de contenido y nuevo conocimiento. Los cursos en línea tradicionales se parecen a los sistemas «contenido con tutor», puesto que en ambos casos, el contenido es proporcionado y posteriormente aprendido con ayuda de un profesor o figura similar. Finalmente los xMOOC se parecen a cursos «contenido sin tutor» puesto que usualmente proporcionan poca interacción con profesores o tutores.

En nuestro estudio de TELE encontramos que los cursos «continente con tutor» fueron evaluados mejor respecto a su capacidad de potenciar el aprendizaje autorregulado; esto sucedía tanto por lo que se refiere al aprendizaje autorregulado en general como a los componentes cognitivos, emocionales, motivacionales y sociales del aprendizaje autorregulado. Los sistemas «contenido con tutor» también obtenían buenos resultados al potenciar las componentes emocionales y sociales del aprendizaje autorregulado, mientras que los sistemas «contenido sin tutor» funcionaban bien respecto a potenciar los componentes cognitivos y motivacionales.

Por supuesto, los TELE que estudiamos no eran MOOC, pero pensamos que es posible extrapolar nuestros resultados. Basándonos en lo que conocemos, hemos tratado de evaluar lo conceptos de cursos tradicionales en línea (OC), xMOOC y cMOOC respecto a su potencial para soportar el aprendizaje en las cuatro fases del aprendizaje así como para potenciar el aprendizaje autorregulado. También medimos su capacidad para interactuar con objetos de aprendizaje, pares y tutores. Finalmente consideramos la importancia de la evaluación formal y la acreditación. Mientras este tema parece ser un problema con los xMOOC, no es relevante con los cMOOC puesto que los participantes en cMOOC parecen estar principalmente interesados en conocer y no en su acreditación. Esto queda documentado en la tabla 3.


Draft Content 925603499-32644 ov-es045.jpg

Los cursos en línea, xMOOC y cMOOC constituyen diferentes tipos de TELE virtuales. En la tabla 3 hemos indicado qué características pueden poseer cada tipo de TELE virtual. Por consiguiente hay características que consideramos típicas de cada uno de ellos. En algunos casos, era difícil decidir si eran típicas de ese tipo en concreto. Cualquier TELE virtual puede potenciar la interacción con los pares, por ejemplo, pero muchos de ellos no lo hacen, mientras que es propio de los cMOOC y de hecho los define. La tabla 3 también documenta nuestro convencimiento de que los cMOOC tienen también un mayor potencial que los xMOOC para promover el aprendizaje y su autorregulación puesto que prevén un mayor grado de interactividad con los objetos de aprendizaje, pares y tutores. Los cMOOC son entornos de aprendizaje virtual en los que los participantes son activos para adquirir, compartir y crear conocimiento, mientras que los xMOOC se centran solamente en proporcionar conocimiento.

Dos características que claramente distinguen los cursos en línea tradicionales de los xMOOC y los cMOOC son el número de estudiantes inscritos y su gratuidad y accesibilidad. No vemos ningún valor pedagógico en los cursos masivos; no hay razones pedagógicas o psicológicas por las que un curso con 100.000 estudiantes potencien el aprendizaje mejor que uno con 100. Y aunque es deseable tener cursos en línea abiertos y gratuitos, es cuestionable si los MOOC son realmente gratuitos. La participación en los MOOC puede ser gratuita, pero la evaluación y la acreditación no lo son. Por otro lado, como hemos visto anteriormente, los MOOC parecen ser más accesibles para sujetos que ya han obtenido un grado universitario que a otras personas.

Los MOOC son un tipo específico de cursos en línea. Dudamos que hacerlos masivos proporcionen un valor añadido ni desde el punto de vista pedagógico ni psicológico. No obstante constituyen una forma de TELE virtuales que necesitan ser estudiados de forma diferente. Al mismo tiempo merece la pena considerar formas alternativas de cursos en línea como los SPOC ya comentados. Una alternativa prometedora son los SCOOC, pequeños cursos conectivistas abiertos y en línea (Small Connectivist Open Online Courses).

Referencias

Adell, J. (2013). Los MOOC, en la cresta de la ola. Edu&tec. (http://goo.gl/tjPFse) (19-03-2013).

Alcorn, B., Christensen, G. & Emanuel, E.J. (2014). Who Takes MOOC? New Republic. (http://goo.gl/TqYtnE) (04-01-2014).

Armstrong, L. (2014). 2013- the Year of Ups and Downs for the MOOC. Changing Higher Education. (http://goo.gl/SqwGWn).

Azevedo R. & Hadwin A.F. (2005). Scaffolding Self-regulated Learning and Metacognition – Implications for the Design of Computer-based Scaffolds. Instructional Science, 33(5-6), 367-379.

Bartolomé, A. & Steffens, K. (2006). Self-regulated Learning in Technology Enhanced Learning Environments. VIII Congreso Iberoamericano de Informática Educativa. Costa Rica: San Jose (13-05-2006).

Bartolomé, A. (2013). Qué se puede esperar de los MOOC. Comunicación y Pedagogía, 269-270, 49-56. (http://goo.gl/VhG7zs).

Beckstrand, S., Barker, P. y Van-Schaik, P. (2001). Towards more independent learning: A Southern Nevada perspective. En ED-MEDIA 2001 World Conference on Educational Multimadia, hypermedia & Telecommunications proceedings, pp. 106-110.

Beishuizen, J. & Steffens, K. (2011). A Conceptual Framework for Research on Self-regulated Learning. In R. Carneiro, P. Lefrere, K. Steffens & J. Underwood (Eds.), Self-regulated Learning in Technology Enhanced learning Environments: A European Perspective. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.

Boekaerts, M., Pintrich, P. & Zeidner, M. (2000). (Eds.). Handbook of Self-regulation. New York: Academic Press.

Caine, R. & Caine, G. (1991). Making Connections: Teaching and the Human Brain. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

Cupaiuolo, C. (2012). The History and Future of MOOC and the New Open Education Week. Spotlight on. (http://goo.gl/3pg8F8) (03-07-2012).

Damasio, A. (1994). Descartes' Error: Emotion, Reason, and the Human Brain. London: Putnam.

Damasio, A. (2003). Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow, and the Feeling Brain. New. York: Harcourt.

Driscoll, M. (2000). Psychology of Learning for Instruction. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Duke, B., Harper, G. & Johnston, M. (2013). Connectivism as a Digital Age Learning Theory? The International HETL Review, Special Issue, 4-13.

EHEA Ministerial Conference (2012). Making the Most of our Potential: Consolidating the European Higher Education Area. Bucharest Communiqué. Bucharest. (http://goo.gl/GgLKXs).

European Comission (2014). European MOOC Scoreboard. Open Education Europa. (http://goo.gl/ut4XDZ).

European Council (2006). Recommendation of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2006 on key competences for lifelong learning. (http://goo.gl/RkSTwf).

Fox, A. (2013). From MOOC to SPOC. Communications of the ACM, 56 (12), 38-40. (http://goo.gl/9yZKX9).

Gibbons, A.S., Nelson, J. & Richards, R. (2000). The Nature and Origin of Instructional Objects. In D.A. Wiley (Ed.), The Instructional Use of Learning Objects: Online Version. (http://goo.gl/NoOlvF).

Gillani, N. & Eynon, R. (2014). Communication Patterns in Massively Open Online Courses. Internet and Higher Education, 23, 18-26. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iheduc.2014.05.004).

Goral, T. (2013). SPOC May Provide what MOOC can’t. University Business, July 2013. (http://goo.gl/gsbQMo).

Hew, K.F. & Cheung, W.S. (2014). Students’ and Instructors’ Use of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC). Motivations and Challenges. Educational Research Review, 12, 45-58 (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.edurev.2014.05.001).

Hodgins, W. (2002). The Future of Learning Objects. (http://goo.gl/LD3WFD) (20-05-2014).

Illich, I.(1972). Deschooling Society. London: Marion Boyars.

Karsenti, T. (2013). The MOOC. What the Research Says. International Journal of Technologies in Higher Education, 10(2), 23-37. (www.ritpu.org/IMG/pdf/RITPU_v10_n02_23.pdf) (20-05-2014).

Kolowich, S. (2012). Elite Universities' Online Play. Inside Higher Education. (http://goo.gl/f8mwuS) (18-04-2012).

Lane, L. (2012). Three Kinds of MOOC. Lisa’s (online) Teaching & History Blog. (http://goo.gl/ThZXHh) (15-08-2012).

Lave, J. & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lugton, M. (2012). What is a MOOC? What Are the Different Types of MOOC? xMOOC and cMOOC. Reflections. (http://goo.gl/9Szd6o) (23/8/2012).

MIT News Office (2011). MIT Launches Online Learning Initiative. MIT News. (http://goo.gl/VLEH6J) (19-12-2011).

Oremus, W. (2013). Forget MOOC. Slate. (http://goo.gl/l55Bgz) (18-09-2013).

Piaget, J. (1947). La psychologie de l'intelligence. Paris: Colin.

Quinn, C. (2012). MOOC Reflections. Learnlets. (http://goo.gl/anKfrw) (29-02-2012).

Sangrà, A. (2013). ¿Prefieres un MOOC o un SPOC? El País, 28/10/2013 (http://goo.gl/Q54igr).

Siemens, G. (2005). Connectivism. A Learning Theory for the Digital Age. ElearnSpace. (http://goo.gl/1yV7WT) (12-12-212).

Siemens, G. (2006). Knowing Knowledge (http://goo.gl/3s2m8d).

Siemens, G. (2012a). MOOC for the Win! ElearnSpace. (http://goo.gl/7kJftu) (05-03-2012).

Siemens, G. (2012b). What is the Theory that Underpins our MOOC? ElearnSpace. (http://goo.gl/NV72pe) (03-06-2012).

Skinner, B.F. (1957). Verbal Behaviour. Acton, MA: Copley Publishing Group.

Skinner, B.F. (1958). Teaching Machines. Science, 128, 969-977.

Steffens, K. (2006). Self-regulated Learning in Technology Enhanced Learning Environments: Lessons of a European Peer Review. European Journal of Education, 41, (3/4), 353-379.

Udacity (2012). Udacity in Partnership with Pearson VUE Announces Testing Centers. Udacity Blog, 1/6/2012 (http://goo.gl/EGLz11).

Verhagen, P. (2006). Connectivism: A New Learning Theory. (http://goo.gl/upLrdx).

Watson, J.B. (1913). Psychology as a Behaviourist Sees it. Psychological Review, 20, 158-177.

Watters, A. (2012a). Stanford AI Professor Thrun Leaves University to Start Udacity, An Online Learning Startup. Hack Education. (http://goo.gl/rbj3NM) (23-01-2012.

Watters, A. (2012b). MITx + Harvard = edX. Hack Education. (http://goo.gl/8WuPQ3) (02-05-2012).

Wenger, E. (1998). Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning, and Identity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Zeidner, M., Boekaerts, M. & Pintrich, P. (2000). Self-regulation. Directions and challenges for future research. In M. Boekaerts, P. Pintrich & M. Zeidner (Eds.), Handbook of self-regulation. (pp. 749-768). New York: Academic Press.

Zimmerman, B.J. (2000). Attaining Self-regulation: A Social Cognitive Perspective. In M. Boekaerts, P. Pintrich, & M. Zeidner (Eds.), Handbook of Self-regulation (pp. 13-39). New York: Academic Press.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/14
Accepted on 31/12/14
Submitted on 31/12/14

Volume 23, Issue 1, 2015
DOI: 10.3916/C44-2015-10
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 33
Views 1
Recommendations 0

Share this document

Keywords

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?