Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The use of the Internet by children at an increasingly early age today constitutes a major challenge for families and schools, as well as affecting educational and social policy. This is a qualitative piece of research that analyzes parents’ beliefs, everyday practices and the difficulties they face in teaching their children the benefits and risks inherent in Internet use. The researchers used the discussion group technique, with four groups of parents of primary school children from four different schools. The results indicate that they share a pessimistic rather than an optimistic attitude towards Internet use among children in this age group, and perceive a number of difficulties when trying to foster children's responsible use of Internet. A wide range of parental control and mediation strategies were identified (laying down rules, organization of time and space for Internet use, limits and supervision (direct, agreedupon, non agreedupon and technical), along with various support strategies (parent and sibling modeling, diverse teaching strategies for stimulation and family communication) which, with the exception of technical supervision, they often use to educate their children and control their behavior in other areas, and which form part of their general parenting style. The conclusions point to the need to develop digital competence among parents, and there is some justification for educational intervention such as in promoting collaboration between families and schools.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

One of the biggest challenges faced by families, schools and social and educational policymakers today is to maximize the benefits and minimize the risks of Internet use among young children and teenagers. According to Livingstone & Helsper (2008), “mediation” refers to the parents’ management of their children’s relationship with media. From the perspective of social and educational intervention, effective parental mediation is seen as one of the several important actions for promoting children’s safe and responsible use of Internet that also include campaigns to raise awareness, software tools to filter content, and the development of digital competence at schools (Bringué & Sádaba, 2009; Garmendia, Casado, Martínez, & Garitaonandia, 2013; Valcke, De-Weber, Van-Keer, & Schellens, 2011).

In the family setting, the way young boys and girls use media is one of the issues that most concerns parents today (Duggan, Lenhart, Lampe, & Ellison, 2015). Connell, Lauricella and Wartella (2015) have reflected on the debate among researchers around the fact that the ubiquitous nature of media leads to a distancing between family members (Turkle, 2011). Others that suggest that media are fundamental aspects of family life today that can influence how a family functions, for better or for worse (Takeuchi, 2011).

There are two complementary strands of research on parental mediation in Internet use in infancy (Livingstone & Helsper, 2008). The first identifies various typologies of parental mediation styles. Their sources of influence and their efficacy in reducing the risks posed by unsuitable Internet use (Garmendia, Garitaonandia, Martínez, & Casado, 2011; Garmendia & al., 2013; Kirwil, 2009; Livingstone, Haddon, Görzig, & Ólafsson, 2011; Livingstone & Helsper, 2008; Ofcom, 2014; Sonck, Nikken, & de Haan, 2013). These works emphasize that parental mediation is universal (Kirwil, 2009). Although mothers and fathers apply many different mediation strategies, they tend to prefer social mediation and the shared/co-use of Internet involving communication with their children and instructive mediation rather than just installing professional computer protection software tools to block undesirable content (Kirwil, 2009; Livingstone & Helsper, 2008; Ofcom, 2014). The results on effective parental mediation are contradictory: some works state that the most effective strategies are those which are restrictive, banning their children from any online interaction with their peers (Livingstone & Helsper, 2008). Others declare that the efficacy of parental mediation strategies is determined by the values promoted during the child’s upbringing within a given sociocultural context (Kirwil, 2009).

The second approach by parental mediation researchers studies socialization practices that contribute to the formation of the beliefs, values and ethno-theories of the progenitors that affect infant media consumption and, more recently, on media literacy (Livingstone, Marsh, Plowman, Ottovordemgentschenfelde, & Fletcher-Watson, 2015). Sorbring (2014) found that the concerns of parents (N=798), regarding teenagers’ (in this case, aged 13-15) use of Internet, was related to the parents’ attitudes, knowledge, and experiences of Internet use, to their beliefs in their children’s ability to use Internet, and to the use they made of it. The parents who showed greatest concern were those who were aware of the negative experiences suffered by their children on Internet, and who consider that the use of Internet during adolescence is positively related to their level of concern about issues such as searching for inappropriate information on the Net, losing friendships, being physically inactive or being exposed to potentially dangerous people or material that is disturbing or violent, although a parental perception of the maturity of their teenage children also figures.

Cheung (2010) studied 2,579 families with children ranging from 6 to 17 and found that parents’ knowledge of how to use the Internet was a key factor in their supervision of their children’s use of Internet and that mothers were more likely to assume this role. About half the parents expressed satisfaction with their ability to help their children to benefit from Internet use and protect them from the risks, whereas one-third were dissatisfied and acknowledged difficulties in protecting their kids. Parents’ level of education, knowledge and a positive attitude towards Internet use, as well as adopting an authoritative parental style and maintaining good relations within the family, are positively associated with parents’ skill in helping their children to benefit from the Internet and in protecting them from risk; however, parental satisfaction reduces as their children get older and they spend more time online.

Ihmeideh and Shawareb (2014) concluded that the style of upbringing played a fundamental role in promoting, or restricting, a child’s exposure to Internet: when the parents adopted an authoritative style that combines a high level of support and control (laying down rules about Internet use and discussing them together, and encouraging them to talk freely about their online activities), it was more likely to stimulate Internet use than when parents adopted an authoritarian (low level of support and high level of control), permissive (high level of support, low level of control) or negligent (low level of support and control) attitude, confirming the results in other works (Valcke, Bonte, De-Wever, & Rots, 2010; Valcke & al., 2011).

The majority of the research in Spain on parental mediation in children’s Internet use (Bringué & Sádaba, 2009; Casas, Figuer, González, & Malo, 2007; Garmendia & al., 2013; INTECO, 2009; Álvarez, Torres, Rodríguez, Padilla, & Rodrigo, 2013; Padilla & al., 2015; Sureda, Comas, & Morey, 2010) has been based on surveys and focused mainly on the teenage phase. Some studies have combined quantitative methodologies via surveys and more qualitative methods, with the aim of investigating parental mediation of children’s Internet use in the earlier stages of child development (Chaudron, 2015; Livingstone & al., 2015).

The aim of this research is to analyze the beliefs and daily practices of parents in Spain in promoting the responsible use of Internet by their children. The specific aims are: 1) To analyze parental beliefs on Internet use by primary school pupils; 2) To identify parents’ mediation strategies; 3) To recognize the difficulties parents perceive in teaching responsible use of the Internet and in avoiding its dangers; 4) To detect the needs of parents in their mediation and draw practical conclusions for educational interventions aimed at helping families.

2. Methodology

This is a qualitative investigation that uses the group discussion technique to perform an in-depth analysis of the beliefs, daily practices and main difficulties that parents face when trying to teach their children how to use the Internet responsibly. This study does not aim to generalize its results but to respond to a need perceived by schools and parents for information, instruction and guidance on parental mediation in the use of Internet by primary school children.

The choice of schools was intentional and based on specific characteristics such as families with children in the third and sixth year of primary school in state or private state-funded schools who were aware of their children’s use of Internet, families from urban and rural settings, immigrant and native families. The parents participated voluntarily and formed four groups (NG1=10, NG2=8, NG3=15 and NG4=11), they numbered 44 parents in total (37 women, 7 men), whose children were attending the third (aged 8-9) and sixth (aged 12-13) grades at four primary schools in the Guipuzcoa province of the Basque Country, in northern Spain. Two were state schools and two private state-funded schools. The sociocultural diversity of the families of students was greater at the two state schools; in terms of size, three of the four schools were secular, offering two classes per course while one of the private state-funded schools had four; one of the four schools was religious; two were located in rural and two in urban areas.

The procedure was to request parents’ collaboration in the study through the head teachers and teacher-parents associations at the four centers for them take part in a debate on their role in their children’s consumption of media through various screens. The questions posed to the parents were: 1) What positive and negative aspects do you believe consumption of media has at these ages? 2) How do you act about your children’s consumption of media? 3) What do you believe are the main difficulties? This study only compiled information related to the parents’ beliefs and mediation practices regarding their children’s use of Internet. The Nvivo 10 software program was used to classify, analyze and synthesize the data obtained.

3. Results

3.1. Parental beliefs

The parents had positive and negative conceptions on the use of Internet at these ages, but the negative ones (70.55%) outweighed the positive (29.45%) by more than double. The main negative conception was the inappropriate use that their children could make of the Internet (30.13%), specific access to violent content (and to a lesser extent, pornographic, stereotypical or drug-related). Another worry was the children’s lack the maturity in dealing with content aimed at older children: “What worries me is that my nine-year-old daughter has hooked up with boys of 11 or 13, so she has access to the world that for her is fascinating, and now she wants a tablet to play online with some people, to play some war game. They want to have access to this older world which is still far beyond their understanding”. Parents expressed concerns about the excessive amount of time spent online, and the inappropriateness of the time and place for doing so: “At Christmas, I was surprised to find that so many children send each other WhatsApp messages, often well after midnight”.

A second set of concerns covered the negative consequences of using Internet (20.87%), especially the social ones (difficulties in communication (“people communicate worse”), misunderstandings, problems in relating to others, loss of direct face-to-face communication (“There’s no conversation”, “We have forgotten how to relate to each other, the day-to-day communication”), fewer opportunities to “learn to play together” as opposed to “playing on machines”, the trend towards individualism and individualization, and the psychologies (isolation (“They don’t listen”), dependence, lack of conversation, they get easily frustrated, lack of imagination, the sense of boredom if they are not online (“They don’t know how to play” or “have fun”), bullying, invasion of privacy, consumption of pornography (“sexting”), frustrations, concern about stereotypes, lack of real positive role models on Internet, getting stigmatized if they do not connect to certain trendy social networks. These concerns were matched by those relating to academic performance (“They don’t know how to write”, spelling mistakes, low attention span, an excessive search for immediate gratification and lack of reflection, a lack of effort and perseverance when faced with difficult tasks (for example, in Maths) and the physical consequences (a more sedentary lifestyle, less inclination to do physical games or sporting activities).

Other parental concerns include the uncertainty generated by their children’s use of Internet (17.59%) (“Right now I don’t know how they use it, now they are joining groups, and the more they join, the better it makes them feel; it’s not about how he uses it, but the stuff he is receiving”), the perception of their children being beyond their control (14.76%), (“I believe the problem is this, you give them a cell phone, but with the Internet connection, you give them freedom that you can no longer control… what they do is now beyond your control”) and the risks they perceive (16.65%) such as the invasion of privacy (“we are very worried about photos, the videos they record of each other, how they use them because they use Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, they use all of them; it is very fashionable among girls of 13-14 to take topless selfies and pass them around the WhatsApp groups”). There is also dependency (“I think they are addicted; at the weekends they get up early and we have to tell them that they cannot use their cell phones until 10am”), interpersonal conflicts (“The serious misunderstandings that occur on WhatsApp, you are not seeing the person’s face; they don’t realize, they think they are funny, they have been working on the issue of bullying, ‘don’t you call me that!’), or even criminal actions on the Net (“At school, it began with some photos, then there were more problems, yes, it’s bullying, no it isn’t bullying”).

In contrast, there were positive conceptions of the use of Internet by children in these two age groups, in particular, the potential offered by Internet for the child to develop (25.19%) in areas such as digital competence, self-management, social integration, autonomy, critical attitude, responsibility, mental development and spatial orientation. The parents also mentioned positive aspects such as access to information (22.4%), Internet’s usefulness for learning and/or educating (15.22%), assistance in parental supervision (14.52%) and, to a lesser extent, its potential for communication and socialization (9.95%), leisure activities (9.9%) and a certain veneration for technology (2.82%). “This world has many positive things, access to information, knowing how to use it, talks about drugs; sometimes it surprises you, my child has seen the brain on Internet, it can raise critical capacity, searching for information; on the Internet you have all the options available from black to white, let the child decide”.

The parents also acknowledged that Internet is a source of information for adults too, and is very useful for passing on knowledge to their children: “You get informed, and it is easier to sit down and talk about things with your kids, about sex, etc.; sometimes they ask ‘Dad, what’s this?’; in the morning, I go on the Internet to find out, and later I say, ‘that thing you asked about yesterday…and I can answer them”. The parents also emphasized the support of parents’ groups who exchange information online.

3.2. Parental mediation strategies

The parents recognized that they use various strategies to mediate their children’s use of Internet; 53.54% responded that they impose restrictions or control measures, while 46.46% said their interventions were of an instructive and supportive nature.

Restrictive parental strategies refer to daily practices of regulation and control of their children’s use of Internet. Inappropriate behaviour on the Internet was punished (for example, by the withdrawal of cell phone), and they considered that it was important to be coherent, to reason and match the negative consequences to any online misbehaviour.

The type and quantity of restrictions the families established on Internet use varied when dealing with online activity during the week or at the weekend, with parents giving their children more freedom at weekends. The following control strategies were identified (Table 1): establishment and application of norms (57%), time-space organization (36%) and supervision (7%).

It is also important to note that some mothers were openly against none agreed-upon supervision because they see it as an attack on their privacy: “I have nothing to hide, but I’d get angry if they read my conversations; my conversations are mine, and I don’t want my daughter or anyone else to read them”.

The survey also revealed parental mediation in the form of support activities (Table 2) such as communication and teaching strategies (73.01%) and, to a lesser extent, of modeling (13.76%) and stimulation (13.2%).


Bartau-Rojas et al 2018a-62679-en028.jpg

The choice or combination of mediation strategies selected by the parents depends on the characteristics of their children, such as age and perceived maturity: “I have one older boy who I like to think that, because of his level of education, doesn’t need to be controlled so much; he manages himself very well. As for my younger son, if I knew the method for getting him to manage himself, I would patent it; I can see big battles ahead, he is less aware of the risks”.

The survey also showed that some parents tend to mediate reactively rather than proactively (forward planning), which they show both when trying to educate (“My son, for example, asks me questions as he goes along, and I answer them”) as when imposing restrictions: “When I see her answering somebody using her real name I tell her, ‘are you stupid? I’ve told you not to do that, so there! No more Internet for three months!’ and I take it off her again”.

3.3. Perceived difficulties


Bartau-Rojas et al 2018a-62679-en029.jpg

When parents try to help their children use the Internet responsibly, they perceive the following difficulties:

1) Their own low level of knowledge about how to use the Internet, and that their children know more than them: “I don’t know how to do it, my son knows much more about it than I do”; “In my house, the one who knows something about computers is me, I have learnt how to use it, on a very basic level, but I can get by”.

2) Difficulties in controlling children’s use of Internet: “Sometimes you just don’t know what to do. I don’t know what to do; take it off him. But it doesn’t make any difference, he goes and takes the tablet and uses it on there”.

3) Difficulties in negotiating rules on Internet use with children and up to what age they will abide by them: “There are rules for everything in this life. Another thing is whether you can negotiate them, or use your position of power, but at a certain age, they might no longer be willing to accept them”.

4) Feeling insecure about how to teach them to live without being addicted to technology: “It’s us parents who are in the wrong because we believe that ‘they have been taught all they need to know’. We take many things for granted; it’s us that need to be insistent in teaching them about the good things and showing them how to avoid the bad. At school, we have seen how children are now suddenly on their own; they get given a cell phone so they can be located, and we have forgotten that our parents had more control over us. The father can locate his son through the cell phone to know where he is, but if it gets stolen…”.

5) Difficulties in controlling access to the Net in other spaces: “It’s like putting up fences in a field (imposing rules); I am trying to get them to understand which content they can see and which not. I can more or less control my daughter of 11, but I have set rules for the older ones. I take the Wi-Fi off them, but they go outside and find another network to connect to”.

6) Difficulties in planning instruction on how to use the Internet responsibly: “Answering the question of what you have done about planning. I think it’s very difficult because you can have an idea, but then your son goes to a friend’s house who has an older brother, and I hadn’t planned to give them access to the Internet until they were 15, but they have now already been on the Internet. One thing is your idea of responsible use, and another is that they already have access to it”.

7) Although there are new demands and strains on family-school relations, parents emphasize the importance of the role of the school in the development of pupils’ digital competence: “We are very lucky with this school because they deal with this issue well. They give informal chats and our children know what is happening in the real world”. One mother who took part, also a teacher at the school, recognized that the teachers are often overwhelmed by the problems that parents bring to them about how to control Internet access at these young ages: “I am the tutor for a group of third-year primary school pupils. The parents come to me to solve the problem. It’s not me that has given them this device, but I must solve the problems that have arisen over the weekend about using it. Is it my responsibility to get involved in these questions, about something that the parents themselves bought for their children? Then they send me messages (via WhatsApp). Don’t they have rules? On Saturday at six in the afternoon and I have to solve their problems. What do I do?”.

4. Discussion and conclusions

The analysis of parents’ beliefs regarding their sons’ and daughters’ use of Internet at primary school age shows that parents are more pessimistic than optimistic, which confirms that it is an issue that concerns them, as is evidenced in other works and cultural contexts (Duggan & al., 2015; Fletcher & Blair, 2014; Sorbring, 2014). The types of negative parental conceptions are, in this order of importance, the concern about the inappropriate use of the Net, the negative consequences of surfing the Internet (social, psychological, academic or physical), the uncertainty that Internet arouses in them as parents, and the risks and uncontrollable nature that they perceive in it. However, they also acknowledge that the use of the internet at this age can have its benefits: 1) It is an aid to children development in areas such as digital competence, self-management, social integration, autonomy, developing a critical attitude and responsibility; 2) It offers endless possibilities for accessing information, for learning, communication, and socialization; 3) It acts as a stimulus for parental supervision. The parents also recognized that the internet was a source of information and guidance for them too.

One contribution of this work is that it has gathered, expressed and publicized the main concerns and mediation practices that families use when trying to adapt themselves to their children’s use of Internet at these ages. Our study identifies various support and control strategies used by parents to instruct their children about the benefits and drawbacks of Internet use although the choice of strategy depends on characteristics such as age and perceived maturity, as indicated in previous works (Livingstone & Helsper, 2008; Sorbring, 2014). Parental mediation strategies for control of Internet use include the establishment of rules, organization of the time and space that limits its use, and supervision (direct, agreed-upon, nonagreed-upon and technical). Parental mediation strategies for support range from parental modeling, sibling modeling to teaching strategies for stimulation and communication within the family. These results coincide with those of other works that have found that the most common parental mediation strategies are social rather than just installing professional software on the computer to protect against unsuitable content (Garmendia & al., 2013; Kirwil, 2009; Livingstone & Helsper, 2008). Most of these strategies amount to day-to-day practices that families use to educate and control the behavior of their children in other areas, and which authors have related to the basic positive parental competences (Cheung, 2010; Padilla & al., 2015). This result confirms, as Cheung (2010) suggests, that control and supervision of children’s use of Internet form part of a general parenting style, and that the strategies applied to solve problems arising from Internet use do not differ substantially from those used to deal with other problematic behaviors. Therefore, the level of parental self-confidence in supervising and directing their children’s use of Internet would increase with the narrowing of the digital divide and the adoption of more effective parenting methods.

In general, parental mediation in the use of Internet tends to be more negative than positive, as evidenced by the amount of advice, rules and prohibitions regarding what children “must not” do when using the Internet rather than what they “should” do in order to make the most of using it, which could be related to parents’ low level of Internet knowledge and experience. Our study also found that parental mediation is more reactive than proactive, more a reaction than a previously planned response when instructing their children how to use the Internet correctly, as other works have mentioned (Fletcher & Blair, 2014). When facing what they perceive as unsuitable behaviour, it seems that parents tend to react by both instructing their children and restricting their use of Internet. Kirwil (2009) suggests that this reactive rather than proactive tendency is related to parenting mediation styles rooted in specific sociocultural contexts and that proactive intervention would be more recommendable when showing their children the benefits of Internet use and drawing attention to its dangers. When the mothers and fathers try to help their children to use the Internet, they perceive difficulties such as their own lack of experience and/or competence in using it. Although some works (Cheung, 2010) have found that even when parents do not know how to use the Internet, they can keep a close watch on their children when going online, other studies have related low digital competence to a lack of confidence in mediating and less awareness of the risks that can await children on Internet (Livingstone & Helsper, 2008). In addition, other authors have found that this adult Internet skill shortage relates to difficulties in providing support, structure and supervision of their children’s Internet use, suggesting guided participation of children in the process of learning from the use of Internet is impoverished as the child is not accompanied or regulated by an adult’s presence (Padilla & al., 2015). Fletcher and Blair (2014), basing on Mead’s theory of societies that follow prefigurative cultural transmission patterns in which change happens so quickly that older generations find themselves disconnected from current social phenomena, conclude that expert knowledge is a fundamental element that minors take into account when evaluating the legitimacy of parental authority in a specific domain and that the progenitors could be experiencing a loss of authority in this area. Parents also perceive other difficulties when negotiating the rules on Internet use, feelings of insecurity about how to teach them to live without dependence on technology, on controlling access in spaces outside the home and planning for teaching them how to use the Internet responsibly. Finally, parents are concerned about the role of schools in the mediation of Internet use among primary school pupils. Other works highlight the lack of communication between schools and parents on questions related to the use of technology, and that families today demand with ever greater insistence advice on how to protect their children from dangerous content on the Internet (Fletcher & Blair, 2014; Livingstone & al., 2015).

The results on parents’ beliefs, practices, and difficulties identified in this work point to the need to develop digital competence in parents, and to recognize the specific needs of training parents in three areas: 1) To promote the development of parents’ digital skills; 2) To promote parental skills for mediating their children’s use of Internet by reinforcing areas such as: organization of time and space, instruction on the risks and benefits, planning ahead to prevent unsuitable behaviour, strengthening parental authority, combining support (stimulation, communication, modelling) with control (rules and limits, supervision, negotiation), education in values of respect, equality, responsibility, critical thinking and autonomy, among others; 3) To promote collaboration between schools and families to increase pupils’ digital competence.

Our study shows that there are implications for educational intervention directed at families and schools in our particular context. The first would be the need to design a protocol for joint action between schools and families on the use of Internet in primary education based on consensus between the entire educational community (head teachers, teachers, pupils, and families). The second is directly related to programs for the development of positive parenting which, according to these results, should explicitly integrate measures to improve parental digital competence. The third is that educational policy should recognize the concerns of families on the use of Internet by primary school pupils and provide new resources for training parents, combining various methodologies such as group work, online courses and MOOCs (massive open online courses). This research is limited by the fact that the results cannot be generalized.

Finally, for future lines of research, following the recommendations of the “European strategy for a more suitable Internet for children” (https://goo.gl/Z7btvQ), a range of courses and programs have been developed such as “Red.es” (https://goo.gl/E4NMbk), “Pantallas Amigas” (https://goo.gl/rG3hK), “Fundación Alia2” (https://goo.gl/RQc4), “Fundación ANAR” (https://goo.gl/CXC4y) and “Padres 2.0 ONG” (https://goo.gl/MWEYwx). However, as several works point out (Kirwil, 2009; Livingstone & al., 2015), more research is needed on the evaluation and efficacy of these programs.

Funding agency

This research was carried out as part of the “Infant media consumption, attentional level and perceived values” [EHU 13/65] Project and through the “Gender socialization and educational contexts” [GIU 15/14] Research Group subsidized by the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU). The third author, Eider Oregui, has a Predoctoral Contract [BES-2015-071923] jointly financed by MINECO (Government of Spain) and the European Social Fund.

References

Álvarez, M., Torres, A., Rodríguez, E., Padilla, S., & Rodrigo, M.J. (2013). Attitudes and parenting dimensions in parents’ regulation of Internet use by primary and secondary school children. Computers & Education, 67, 69-78. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2013.03.005

Bringué, X., & Sádaba, T. (2009). La generación interactiva en España: Niños y adolescentes frente a las pantallas. Barcelona: Ariel y Fundación Telefónica. (https://goo.gl/GES298).

Casas, F., Figuer, C. González, M., & Malo, S. (2007). Los medios audiovisuales entre los progenitores y los hijos e hijas. Cultura y Educación, 19(3), 311-330. https://doi.org/10.1174/113564007782194499

Chaudron, S. (2015). Young Children (0-8) and Digital Technology: A qualitative exploratory study across seven countries. Luxembourg: Publications Office of the European Union. https://doi.org/10.2788/00749

Cheung, Y. (2010). Cyber-Parenting: Internet benefits, risks and parenting issues. Journal of Technology in Human Services, 28(4), 252-273. https://doi.org/10.1080/15228835.2011.562629

Connell, S.L., Lauricella, A.R., & Wartella, E. (2015). Parental co-use of media technology with their young children in the USA. Journal of Children and Media, 9(1), 5-21. https://doi.org/10.1080/17482798.2015.997440

Duggan, M., Lenhart, A., Lampe, C., & Ellison, N.B. (2015). Parents and Social Media. Washington, DC: Pew Research Centre Report: Internet &Technology. (https://goo.gl/AMXm7G).

Fletcher, A.C., & Blair, B.L. (2014). Maternal authority regarding early adolescents’ social technology use. Journal of Family Issues, 35(1) 54-74. https://doi.org/10.1177/0192513X12467753

Garmendia, M., Casado, M.A., Martínez, G., & Garitaonandia, C. (2013). Las madres y padres, los menores e Internet: Estrategias de mediación parental en España. Doxa, 17, 99-117. (https://goo.gl/HbZyKZ).

Garmendia, M., Garitaonandia, C., Martínez, G., & Casado, M.A. (2011). Riesgos y seguridad en Internet: Los menores españoles en el contexto europeo. Universidad del País Vasco, Bilbao: EU-Kids Online. (https://goo.gl/7SytA8).

Ihmeideh, F.M., & Shawareb, A.A. (2014). The association between Internet parenting styles and children’s use of the Internet at home. Journal of Research in Childhood Education, 28(4), 411-425. https://doi.org/10.1080/02568543.2014.944723

INTECO (Ed.) (2009). Estudio sobre hábitos seguros en el uso de las TIC por niños y adolescentes y e-confianza de sus padres. Observatorio de la seguridad de la información. (https://goo.gl/1T8YCb).

Kirwil, L. (2009). Parental mediation of children’s Internet use in different European countries. Journal of Children and Media, 3(4), 394-409. https://doi.org/10.1080/17482790903233440

Livingstone, S., & Helsper, E. (2008). Parental mediation and children’s Internet use. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 52(4), 581-599. https://doi.org/10.1080/08838150802437396

Livingstone, S., Haddon, L., Görzig, A., & Ólafsson, K. (2011). EU-Kids Online II: Final Report. LSE, London: EU Kids Online. (https://goo.gl/hOKTxn).

Livingstone, S., Marsh, J., Plowman, L., Ottovordemgentschenfelde, S., & Fletcher-Watson, B. (2015). Young children (0-8) and digital technology: A qualitative exploratory study - National Report - UK. Joint Research Centre, European Commission, Luxembourg: LSE Research Online. (https://goo.gl/ym2EJK).

Ofcom (2014). Children and Parents: Media Use and Attitudes Report. London: Office of Communications. (https://goo.gl/7jx2BV).

Padilla, S., Rodríguez, E., Álvarez, M., Torres, A., Suárez, A., & Rodrigo, M.J. (2015). La influencia del escenario educativo familiar en el uso de Internet en los niños de primaria y secundaria. Infancia y Aprendizaje, 38(2), 402-434. https://doi.org/10.1080/02103702.2015.1016749

Sonck, N., Nikken, P., & de Haan, J. (2013). Determinants of Internet mediation. A comparison of the reports by Duch parents and children. Journal of Children and Media, 7(1), 93-113. https://doi.org/10.1080/17482798.2012.739806

Sorbring, E. (2014). Parents’ concerns about their teenage children’s Internet use. Journal of Family Issues, 35(1), 75-96. https://doi.org/10.1177/0192513X12467754

Sureda, J., Comas, R., & Morey, M. (2010). Menores y acceso a Internet en el hogar: Las normas familiares. Comunicar, 34(17), 135-143. https://doi.org/10.3916/C34-2010-03-13

Takeuchi, L.M. (2011). Families matter: Designing media for a digital age. New York, NY: The Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop. (https://goo.gl/on63qU).

Turkle, S. (2011). Alone together. New York: Basic Books. (https://goo.gl/E6baX).

Valcke, M., Bonte, S., De-Wever, B., & Rots, I. (2010). Internet parenting styles and the impact on Internet use of primary school children. Computers & Education, 55(2), 454-464. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2010.02.009

Valcke, M., De-Weber, B., Van-Keer, H., & Schellens, T. (2011). Long-term study on safe Internet use of young children. Computers & Education, 57(1), 1292-1305. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2011.01.010



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

El uso de Internet de los niños y las niñas a edades cada vez más tempranas constituye un reto para las familias, las escuelas y la política educativa y social en la actualidad. Se presenta una investigación cualitativa cuyo objetivo es analizar las creencias, prácticas cotidianas y dificultades que afrontan los padres y las madres cuando tratan de enseñar a sus hijos e hijas los beneficios y riesgos de Internet. Se ha utilizado la técnica de los grupos de discusión con cuatro grupos de madres y padres de alumnado de Educación Primaria de cuatro centros educativos. Los resultados indican que comparten una concepción más pesimista que optimista sobre el uso de Internet a estas edades y que perciben diversas dificultades cuando tratan de promover su uso responsable. Se identifican diversas estrategias de mediación parental de control: establecimiento de normas, organización espaciotemporal de límites y supervisión (presencial directa, consensuada, no consensuada y técnica) y de apoyo (modelado parental, entre hermanos y diversas estrategias instructivas, de estimulación y comunicación familiar) que, a excepción de la supervisión técnica, habitualmente utilizan para educarles o controlar su comportamiento en otras áreas formando parte de su estilo general de parentalidad. Las conclusiones apuntan la necesidad de desarrollar la competencia parental digital y algunas implicaciones para la intervención educativa como promover la colaboración entre la familiaescuela.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Uno de los retos actuales de las familias, las escuelas y la política educativa y social es incrementar los beneficios y evitar los riesgos del uso de Internet en la infancia y en la adolescencia. Según Livingstone y Helsper (2008), el término «mediación» se refiere a la gestión parental de la relación de los niños y las niñas con los medios de comunicación. Desde el ámbito de la intervención educativa y social, la mediación parental eficaz se considera uno de los tipos de intervención relevante para promover el uso responsable y seguro de Internet, junto con las campañas de sensibilización, las herramientas de software para el filtraje de los contenidos y el desarrollo de la competencia digital desde el propio sistema educativo (Bringué & Sádaba, 2009; Garmendia, Casado, Martínez, & Garitaonandia, 2013; Valcke, De-Weber, Van-Keer, & Schellens, 2011).

Desde el ámbito familiar, el uso que hacen los hijos y las hijas de los medios tecnológicos es uno de los temas que más preocupa a los padres y las madres en la actualidad (Duggan, Lenhart, Lampe, & Ellison, 2015). Connell, Lauricella y Wartella (2015) recuerdan el debate entre investigaciones que sostienen que la naturaleza ubicua de los medios de comunicación va a distanciar a las familias (Turkle, 2011) y otras que sugieren que los medios de comunicación son aspectos fundamentales de la vida familiar actual y que pueden influir en el funcionamiento familiar, tanto de forma positiva como negativa (Takeuchi, 2011).

Se pueden diferenciar dos enfoques complementarios en la investigación sobre la mediación parental del uso de Internet en la infancia (Livingstone & Helsper, 2008). Siguiendo el primer enfoque, se han identificado diversas tipologías de estilos de mediación parental, sus fuentes de influencia y su eficacia para evitar riesgos en Internet (Garmendia, Garitaonandia, Martínez, & Casado, 2011; Garmendia & al., 2013; Kirwil, 2009; Livingstone, Haddon, Görzig, & Ólafsson, 2011; Livingstone & Helsper, 2008; Ofcom, 2014; Sonck, Nikken, & de Haan, 2013). Estos trabajos destacan que la mediación parental es universal (Kirwil, 2009) y aunque los padres y las madres utilizan múltiples estrategias de mediación, en general, prefieren la mediación social y compartida/co-uso de Internet que implica utilizar la comunicación con sus hijos/as y la mediación instructiva en mayor medida que la instalación de protección de software profesional en el equipo (Kirwil, 2009; Livingstone & Helsper, 2008; Ofcom, 2014). Con respecto a la eficacia de la mediación parental, los resultados son contradictorios, si bien en algunos trabajos las estrategias más eficaces son las restrictivas que prohíben a sus hijos/as las interacciones en la Red con sus iguales (Livingstone & Helsper, 2008); en otros, se sostiene que la eficacia de las estrategias de mediación parental está determinada por los valores de crianza infantil en un contexto sociocultural dado (Kirwil, 2009).

El segundo enfoque de la investigación sobre la mediación parental se centra en el estudio de las prácticas de socialización que contribuyen a la formación de creencias, valores y etno-teorías de los progenitores que repercuten en el consumo mediático infantil y, en última instancia, en la alfabetización mediática (Livingstone, Marsh, Plowman, Ottovordemgentschenfelde, & Fletcher-Watson, 2015). Sorbring (2014) encontró que la preocupación de los progenitores (N=798) por el uso de Internet en la adolescencia (13-15 años) se relacionaba, por un lado, con sus propias actitudes, conocimientos y experiencias parentales del uso de Internet, por otro, con las creencias sobre la habilidad de sus hijos/as para usar Internet y, finalmente, con el uso que hacían. Y que los más preocupados son los que conocen las experiencias negativas de sus hijos/as en Internet y que el uso de Internet en la adolescencia se relaciona positivamente con su nivel de preocupación por temas como encontrar información errónea en la Red, perder amigos, permanecer inactivos o contactar con personas y materiales peligrosos que contengan violencia o contenidos angustiantes, aunque también incide la percepción parental de la madurez del adolescente.

Cheung (2010), en su estudio con 2.579 familias con menores de 6 a 17 años, encontró que el conocimiento parental sobre Internet era un factor clave de la supervisión parental del uso de Internet de sus hijos/as y que era más probable que las madres asumieran esta responsabilidad. Aproximadamente la mitad de los progenitores valoraba positivamente su habilidad para ayudarles a beneficiarse de Internet y protegerles de sus riesgos frente a un tercio que reconocía un alto nivel de insatisfacción y dificultades para protegerles. El nivel educativo, el conocimiento y la actitud positiva de los progenitores hacia Internet, adoptar un estilo de parentalidad autoritativo y mantener una buena relación familiar se asociaba positivamente con su habilidad para ayudarles a beneficiarse del uso y protegerles de los riesgos en Internet; los niveles de satisfacción parental disminuían según aumentaba su edad y el tiempo que pasaban usando Internet.

Ihmeideh y Shawareb (2014) concluyeron que el estilo de crianza jugaba un papel fundamental en la promoción o, en su caso, restricción de la exposición en la infancia a Internet: cuando los progenitores adoptaban el estilo de crianza autoritativo que combina alto nivel de apoyo y de control (definían las reglas, hablaban conjuntamente y les animaban a hablar de sus actividades en la Red), era más probable que fomentaran la exposición de sus hijos/as a la Red que cuando adoptaban tendencias autoritarias (bajo nivel de apoyo y alto nivel de control), permisivas (alto nivel de apoyo y bajo de control) o negligentes (bajo nivel de apoyo y de control) confirmando lo encontrado en otros trabajos (Valcke, Bonte, De-Wever, & Rots, 2010; Valcke & al., 2011).

La mayoría de las investigaciones realizadas en España sobre la mediación parental del uso de Internet de los menores (Bringué & Sádaba, 2009; Casas, Figuer, González, & Malo, 2007; Garmendia & al., 2013; INTECO, 2009; Álvarez, Torres, Rodríguez, Padilla, & Rodrigo, 2013; Padilla & al., 2015; Sureda, Comas, & Morey, 2010) se han realizado utilizando encuestas y con mayor frecuencia en la etapa adolescente. En algunos estudios se está reclamando la combinación de metodologías cuantitativas por encuesta con otras más cualitativas y con el objeto de investigar la mediación de las familias en el uso de la Red en etapas anteriores (Chaudron, 2015; Livingstone & al., 2015).

El objeto de esta investigación es analizar las creencias y prácticas cotidianas que utilizan las madres y los padres en nuestro contexto más cercano para promover el uso responsable de sus hijos e hijas de Internet. Los objetivos concretos son: 1) Analizar las creencias parentales acerca del uso de Internet de alumnado en Primaria; 2) Identificar las estrategias de mediación parental que utilizan; 3) Reconocer las dificultades que perciben para enseñarles el uso responsable de Internet y evitar sus riesgos. La finalidad última de la investigación es detectar necesidades de formación parental y extraer implicaciones prácticas para la intervención educativa dirigida a las familias.

2. Metodología

Se presenta una investigación cualitativa en la que se ha empleado la técnica de los grupos de discusión con el objeto de realizar un análisis en profundidad de las creencias, prácticas cotidianas y principales dificultades que afrontan los padres y las madres cuando tratan de enseñar a sus hijos e hijas el uso responsable de Internet. Con este estudio no se pretende generalizar los resultados sino responder a una necesidad percibida por parte de los centros y las familias de información, formación u orientación sobre la mediación parental del uso de la Red del alumnado en Educación Primaria.

La selección de los centros fue intencional y se centró en características específicas tales como: familias con menores que cursan tercero y sexto de Primaria de centros concertados y públicos, sensibilizadas con el uso de Internet de sus hijos e hijas, familias rurales y urbanas, familias inmigrantes y autóctonas. Los progenitores participaron voluntariamente en cuatro grupos (NG1=10, NG2=8, NG3=15 y NG4=11), un total de 44 (37 madres y 7 padres), de alumnado de tercero (8-9 años) y sexto (12-13 años) de Educación Primaria de cuatro centros educativos guipuzcoanos (dos públicos y dos concertados). En los dos centros públicos la diversidad sociocultural de las familias del alumnado es mayor que en los concertados y, respecto al tamaño, tres de ellos son laicos y ofertan dos líneas por curso mientras que uno de los concertados tiene cuatro y otro es religioso; el contexto de dos centros es rural y de los otros dos urbano.

Con respecto al procedimiento, se solicitó la colaboración de las familias a través de las Direcciones y Asociaciones de Padres de los centros en un debate sobre su papel ante el consumo mediático infantil de diversas pantallas. Las preguntas planteadas fueron: 1) ¿Qué aspectos positivos y negativos creéis que tiene el consumo mediático a estas edades?; 2) ¿Cómo soléis actuar ante el consumo mediático de vuestros hijos/as?; 3) ¿Qué dificultades destacaríais?

No obstante, en este trabajo solo se recoge la información relacionada con las creencias y prácticas de mediación parental del uso de Internet por parte de sus hijos. Para la clasificación, análisis y síntesis de la información obtenida se ha utilizado el programa NVivo 10.

3. Resultados

3.1. Creencias parentales

Los progenitores mencionan tanto concepciones positivas como negativas sobre el uso de Internet en estas edades pero el porcentaje de las negativas (70,55% referencias) es más del doble que el de las positivas (29,45%). Entre las concepciones parentales negativas, la principal preocupación es el uso inadecuado que puedan hacer de Internet (30,13%), en concreto, que accedan a contenidos violentos (en menor medida a contenidos pornográficos, estereotipados o sobre drogas), que no tengan la madurez suficiente a la edad en la que acceden: «Una preocupación es que la chavala mía con 9 años se relaciona con chavales de 11 o 13 años, entonces tiene acceso a un mundo que para ella es la leche, porque la mía lleva pidiéndome una tablet para jugar en línea con no sé quién, no sé qué de guerras, quieren acceder a ese mundo y todavía se les escapa absolutamente»; que la cantidad de tiempo que invierten sea excesiva y que el lugar y momento de acceso sea inadecuado: «En las Navidades me sorprendía que había un montón de niños que enviaban WhatsApp hasta las doce o una de la madrugada».

Una segunda preocupación son las consecuencias negativas del uso de Internet (20,87%), destacando las sociales: dificultades en la comunicación («La gente se comunica peor»), los malentendidos, problemas en las relaciones con los demás, pérdida de la comunicación directa presencial («No hay conversación», «Hemos perdido el relacionarnos, la comunicación del día a día»), menos oportunidades de «aprender a jugar juntos» frente a «jugar con las máquinas», tendencia más individualista e individualizada y las psicológicas: aislamiento («No escuchan»), dependencia, no conversar, escasa capacidad de frustración, pérdida de la imaginación, aburrimiento si no están conectados («No saben jugar» ni «divertirse»), los malentendidos, el bullying, la pérdida de la privacidad, consumo pornográfico («sexting»), frustraciones, preocupación por los estereotipos y carencia de modelos reales y positivos en Internet, que les etiqueten si no se conectan a las redes sociales de moda, seguidas por las consecuencias académicas: «No saben escribir», faltas de ortografía, falta de atención, búsqueda excesiva de la inmediatez y falta de reflexión, disminución del esfuerzo y la perseverancia ante contenidos difíciles (ejemplo: matemáticas) y las consecuencias físicas (vida más sedentaria y disminución de juegos físicos o actividades deportivas).

Otras preocupaciones parentales son que les genera incertidumbre (17,59%) («Ahora mismo no sé cómo lo usan, ya están haciendo grupos en cuantos más grupos estén mejor; ya no es cómo lo use él sino lo que va recibiendo»), la percepción de incontrolabilidad (14,76%) («Creo que el problema es ese, tú les das el teléfono pero con la conexión a Internet le das una libertad que ya no puedes controlarla tú… lo que hacen ya se te escapa») y los riesgos que perciben (16,65%) tales como la pérdida de la privacidad («A nosotros nos preocupa mucho el tema de las fotos, los vídeos cuando se graban entre ellos, cómo los utilizan porque utilizan Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, utilizan todo; está muy de moda en chavalas de 13-14 años sacarse la típica foto en topless –selfies– y rularla por todos los grupos de WhatsApp»), la dependencia («Tienen un poco yo creo de vicio, llega el fin de semana se levantan antes y tenemos que decirles que hasta las diez de la mañana no se puede»), los conflictos interpersonales («Los malos malentendidos por el WhatsApp no estás viendo la cara a esa persona; no se dan cuenta, se creen que están haciendo la gracia; han estado trabajando el tema del bullying, ‘a mí no me llames así’») o incluso que se cometan delitos en la Red: «En el colegio, empezó como un tema de fotos, luego hubo más problemas, que si bullying o no bullying».

Por otro lado, también manifiestan concepciones positivas sobre el uso de Internet a estas edades, destacando las posibilidades que ofrece para favorecer el desarrollo infantil (25,19%) en áreas como habilidad digital, autogestión, integración social, autonomía, actitud crítica, responsabilidad, desarrollo cerebral u orientación espacial. También mencionan otros aspectos positivos como el acceso a la información (22,4%), su utilidad para aprender y/o educar (15,22%), para la supervisión parental (14,52%) y, en menor grado, las posibilidades de comunicación y socialización que brinda (9,95%), el ocio (9,9%) y cierta veneración tecnológica (2,82%): «Positivo tiene un mundo, acceso a la información, saber cómo usarlo, charlas sobre drogas; a veces te sorprende, ha visto en Internet el cerebro, elevar su capacidad crítica, buscar información; en Internet tiene todas las opiniones del blanco al negro, que decida».

También reconocen que Internet es una fuente de información para los adultos y de gran utilidad para luego enseñar a sus hijos/as: «Te informas y es más fácil sentarte a hablar con ellos, la vida sexual, etc.; hay veces que dicen ‘papá esto qué es’; por la mañana me meto en el ordenador indago un poco y luego le digo ‘lo que me preguntabas ayer…’ y le respondo», y destacan el apoyo de grupos de progenitores que intercambian información vía online.

3.2. Estrategias de mediación parental

Reconocen que utilizan diversas estrategias para mediar el uso de Internet de sus hijos/as, un 53,54% de las referencias son de tipo restrictivo o de control y un 46,46% son de tipo instructivo o de apoyo.

Las estrategias parentales restrictivas comprenden prácticas cotidianas de regulación y control del uso de Internet de sus hijos/as. Ante comportamientos inadecuados afirman utilizar el castigo como medida (ejemplo: retirar el móvil) y consideran que es importante ser coherentes, razonar y aplicar las consecuencias negativas que se derivan del mismo.

En general, el tipo y la cantidad de restricciones que establecen las familias sobre el uso de Internet difiere si se refiere al uso entre semana o durante los fines de semana, les suelen dar más libertad durante los fines de semana y según van creciendo. Se han identificado las siguientes estrategias de control (Tabla 1): establecimiento y aplicación de normas (57%), organización espacio-temporal (36%) y supervisión (7%).

Cabe destacar que algunas madres se manifestaron abiertamente contrarias a la práctica de la supervisión no consensuada porque creían que puede coartar la propia intimidad: «Yo no tengo nada que esconder, pero sí me molesta que me miren mis conversaciones, a mí sí, mis conversaciones son mías, no me apetece que ni mi hija ni que nadie me las lea».


Bartau-Rojas et al 2018a-62679 ov-es028.jpg

También se han identificado prácticas de mediación parental de apoyo (Tabla 2:?página siguiente) tales como estrategias de comunicación y enseñanza (73,01%) y, en menor medida, de modelado (13,76%) y de estimulación (13,2%).

La selección o combinación de las estrategias de mediación parental depende de las características de sus hijos/as como la edad o la madurez percibida: «Tengo un hijo mayor y quiero pensar que por la educación que ha recibido no hace falta controlar tanto; se autogestiona muy bien; el menor, para autogestionarse, si lo supiera, patentaría el método, vamos a tener que batallar más, es más inconsciente».

También se ha encontrado que algunos progenitores muestran una tendencia de mediación reactiva más que proactiva (centrada en la planificación previa) que la manifiestan tanto cuando instruyen («El mío por ejemplo va preguntando y le vas explicando») como cuando restringen: «Vi cómo ella le contestaba a otra persona con su verdadero nombre ‘¡tú qué eres tonta! te estoy avisando que no hagas eso, pues ¡hala!, retirado tres meses’ y se lo volví a quitar».


Bartau-Rojas et al 2018a-62679 ov-es029.jpg

3.3. Dificultades percibidas

Cuando los padres tratan de ayudar a sus hijos/as a utilizar Internet de forma responsable perciben las siguientes dificultades:

1) Bajo nivel de conocimiento del uso de Internet y que sus hijos/as tienen mayor conocimiento que ellos: «No sé cómo hacerlo, sabe mucho más mi hijo que yo»; «En mi casa la que sé algo de ordenador soy yo, lo he aprendido yo, muy básico, pero me arreglo».

2) Dificultades para controlar el uso que realizan sus hijos/as de Internet: «A veces no sabes qué hacer, yo no sé qué hacer; retirárselo. Pero da igual, va y lo hace con la tablet».

3) Dificultades para negociar y que acepten las normas a determinadas edades: «Normas hay en todo en la vida, otra cosa es que las puedas o no negociar, o utilizar tu posición de poder y a determinadas edades no sean aceptadas».

4) Inseguridad sobre cómo enseñarles a vivir sin depender de la tecnología: «Lo negativo somos los padres porque creemos que ‘ya les han enseñado’, damos por hecho muchas cosas, somos nosotros los que tenemos que ser pesados en recalcar. Enseñar también lo bueno y lo malo. En el colegio hemos visto que de repente los niños van solos, se les da un móvil para localizarlos y nos hemos olvidado que nuestros padres tenían más control. El padre ha puesto el seguimiento en el móvil para saber dónde está, pero si le roban el móvil…».

5) Dificultades para controlar el acceso a la Red en otros espacios: «Es como poner puertas al campo (ponerle normas); estoy intentando que comprendan cuáles son los contenidos que pueden ver o no. La pequeña de 11 la puedo controlar algo pero a las mayores les he puesto normas, quitarles Internet, pero al final se enganchan con una red de la calle».

6) Dificultades para planificar la enseñanza del uso responsable de Internet: «Respondiendo a la pregunta que has hecho, la planificación. Creo que eso es muy difícil porque tú puedes tener una idea, pero luego tu hijo se va a casa de un amigo que tiene un hermanito mayor y yo tenía planificado que no lo tuviera hasta los 15, pero ya ha tenido acceso; una cosa es la idea que tú tengas en mente y otra que tienen acceso».

7) Nuevas demandas y dificultades en las relaciones familia-escuela aunque destacan la importancia del papel de la escuela en el desarrollo de la competencia digital del alumnado: «Somos muy afortunados con este colegio porque tratan muy bien estos temas, tienen sus charlas; porque nuestros hijos saben lo que está pasando en el mundo real». Una madre participante, profesora en el centro reconoció que el profesorado a veces se siente abrumado con las dificultades planteadas por los progenitores para controlar el uso de Internet a estas edades: «Soy la tutora de un grupo de 3º de Primaria, los padres vienen a mí para que les solucione; yo no les he dado ese dispositivo pero debo solucionarles los problemas que les surgen el fin de semana. ¿Me corresponde entrar en estas cuestiones de algo que les habéis comprado? Entonces rebota hacia mí (WhatsApp…). ¿Tienen normas? Un sábado a las seis de la tarde y ¿debes solucionarlo?, ¿qué hago yo con esto?».

4. Discusión y conclusiones

El análisis de las creencias parentales sobre el uso de Internet de sus hijos e hijas en primaria revela que los padres y las madres comparten una concepción más pesimista que optimista, lo que confirma que es un área que les preocupa tal y como se ha encontrado en otros trabajos y contextos culturales (Duggan & al., 2015; Fletcher & Blair, 2014; Sorbring, 2014). Los tipos de concepciones parentales negativas más recurrentes, por este orden, son la preocupación por el uso inadecuado de la Red, las consecuencias negativas de la navegación (sociales, psicológicas, académicas o físicas), la incertidumbre que les provoca la Red, los riesgos y la incontrolabilidad que perciben. No obstante, también reconocen que el uso de Internet a estas edades puede tener los siguiente beneficios: 1) Favorecer el desarrollo infantil en áreas como la competencia digital, autogestión, integración social, autonomía, actitud crítica y responsabilidad; 2) Ofrecer amplias posibilidades de acceso a la información, aprendizaje, comunicación y socialización; 3) Posibilitar la supervisión parental. También valoran que Internet es una fuente de información y asesoramiento para los progenitores.

Una aportación de este trabajo es recoger, constatar y difundir las principales inquietudes y prácticas de mediación que utilizan las familias cuando tratan de adaptarse progresivamente al uso de Internet de sus hijos/as a estas edades. Se han identificado diversas estrategias parentales de apoyo y de control que utilizan para enseñar los beneficios y riesgos de Internet aunque su selección y combinación depende de algunas de sus características como la edad o la madurez percibida, ya apuntadas en otros trabajos (Livingstone & Helsper, 2008; Sorbring, 2014). Las estrategias de mediación parental de control comprenden el establecimiento de normas, la organización espacio-temporal de límites y la supervisión (presencial directa, consensuada, no consensuada y técnica). Por su parte las estrategias de mediación parental de apoyo incluyen el modelado parental, modelado entre hermanos/as y diversas estrategias instructivas, de estimulación y comunicación en la familia. Estos resultados coinciden con otros trabajos que han encontrado que las estrategias más habituales de mediación parental son de tipo social más que la instalación de protección de software profesional en el equipo (Garmendia & al., 2013; Kirwil, 2009; Livingstone & Helsper, 2008). La mayoría de estas estrategias constituyen prácticas cotidianas que habitualmente utilizan las familias para educar o controlar el comportamiento infantil en otras áreas y que se han relacionado con las competencias básicas de parentalidad positiva (Cheung, 2010; Padilla & al., 2015). Este resultado confirma, como sugiere Cheung (2010), que el control y la supervisión del uso de Internet forma parte del estilo general de parentalidad y que las estrategias para solucionar los problemas digitales no difieren mucho de las utilizadas para afrontar otros comportamientos problemáticos. Por lo tanto, se incrementaría el nivel de autoconfianza parental para supervisar y orientar el uso de Internet a estas edades reduciendo la brecha digital y adoptando métodos de parentalidad más efectivos.

En general, la mediación parental del uso de Internet tiende a ser más negativa que positiva como lo demuestra la cantidad de consejos, normas y prohibiciones sobre lo que los niños y las niñas «no tienen» que hacer en la Red en comparación con lo que «tienen» que hacer para beneficiarse del uso de Internet que podría estar relacionado con un bajo nivel de conocimiento y experiencia en Internet de los progenitores.

También se ha encontrado que la mediación parental es más reactiva que proactiva, que constituye más una reacción que una respuesta planificada de antemano para educar a sus hijos/as en el uso de Internet, como se ha apuntado en otros trabajos (Fletcher & Blair, 2014). Y parece que tienden a reaccionar tanto cuando instruyen como cuando restringen el uso de Internet ante un comportamiento que perciben inadecuado. Kirwil (2009) sugiere que esta tendencia reactiva versus proactiva se relaciona con estilos de mediación parental enraizados en determinados contextos socioculturales y que la intervención proactiva sería una práctica de mediación parental recomendable para promover los beneficios de Internet y evitar los riesgos.

Cuando los padres y las madres tratan de ayudar a sus hijos/as a utilizar Internet perciben dificultades como la escasa experiencia y/o habilidad en el uso de la Red. Aunque en algunos trabajos (Cheung, 2010) se ha encontrado que incluso cuando no saben usar Internet mantienen una estrecha supervisión del uso de Internet de sus hijos/as, en otros trabajos se ha relacionado con menor nivel de confianza para mediar y menor conciencia de los riesgos que se pueden encontrar en la Red (Livingstone & Helsper, 2008). Y en otros con dificultades para apoyar, estructurar y supervisar su uso sugiriendo el empobrecimiento de la participación guiada en el proceso de aprendizaje del uso de Internet al no estar acompañado y regulado por una persona adulta (Padilla & al., 2015). Fletcher y Blair (2014), basándose en la teoría de Mead sobre las sociedades que siguen patrones de transmisión cultural prefigurativo, en las que el cambio se produce tan rápidamente que las generaciones mayores se encuentran desconectadas de los fenómenos sociales actuales, concluyen que el conocimiento experto es un elemento fundamental que los menores consideran cuando valoran la legitimidad de la autoridad parental en un dominio específico y los progenitores podrían estar experimentando una pérdida de la autoridad en este área.

Además perciben otras dificultades para negociar las normas, inseguridad sobre cómo enseñarles a vivir sin depender de la tecnología, para controlar el acceso en otros espacios fuera del hogar y para planificar anticipadamente la enseñanza del uso responsable de Internet. Y, por último, les preocupa el papel de las escuelas en la mediación del uso de Internet del alumnado en primaria. En otros trabajos se ha apuntado la escasa comunicación entre las escuelas y las familias sobre cuestiones relativas al uso de la tecnología y que las familias demandan encarecidamente asesoramiento sobre cómo fomentar la seguridad infantil en la Red (Fletcher & Blair, 2014; Livingstone & al., 2015).

Los resultados sobre las creencias, prácticas y dificultades parentales identificadas en este trabajo permiten constatar la necesidad de desarrollar la competencia parental digital y reconocer necesidades específicas de formación parental en tres áreas: 1) Favorecer el desarrollo de la propia competencia digital de los progenitores; 2) Fomentar las competencias parentales para mediar el uso de Internet de sus hijos/as reforzando áreas tales como: organización de tiempos y espacios, enseñanza de riesgos y beneficios, planificación para la prevención, fortalecimiento de la autoridad parental, combinación del apoyo (estimulación, comunicación, modelado) y del control (normas y límites, supervisión, negociación), educación en valores de respeto, igualdad, responsabilidad, pensamiento crítico y autonomía, entre otras; 3) Promover la colaboración familia-escuela para fomentar la competencia digital del alumnado.

De todo ello se pueden extraer algunas implicaciones para la intervención educativa dirigida a las familias y escuelas en nuestro contexto cercano. La primera sería la necesidad de elaborar un protocolo de actuación conjunta familia-escuela sobre el uso de Internet en la Educación Primaria fruto del consenso entre toda la comunidad educativa (equipo directivo, profesorado, alumnado y familias). La segunda tiene que ver directamente con los programas para el desarrollo de la parentalidad positiva que, según estos resultados, deberían integrar explícitamente la mejora de la competencia parental digital. Y la tercera es que desde la política educativa se debería reconocer la preocupación de las familias por el uso de Internet en el alumnado de primaria y ofrecer nuevos recursos de formación parental combinando diversas metodologías como el formato presencial en grupo, cursos online y MOOC (Cursos en línea masivos y abiertos). No obstante, hay que recordar que el trabajo presenta limitaciones y no se pueden generalizar los resultados de esta investigación.

Por último, con respecto a futuras líneas de investigación, siguiendo las recomendaciones de la «Estrategia Europea en favor de una Internet más adecuada para los niños/as» (https://goo.gl/Z7btvQ), se han desarrollado diversidad de cursos y programas como «Red.es» (https://goo.gl/E4NMbk), «Pantallas Amigas» (https://goo.gl/rG3hK), «Fundación Alia2» (https://goo.gl/RQc4), «Fundación ANAR» (https://goo.gl/CXC4y) o «Padres 2.0 ONG» (https://goo.gl/MWEYwx); no obstante, como señalan diversos trabajos (Kirwil, 2009; Livingstone & al., 2015), se requiere de mayor investigación sobre la evaluación y la eficacia de estos programas.

Apoyos

Esta investigación se ha realizado dentro del Proyecto «Consumo mediático infantil, nivel atencional y valores percibidos» [EHU 13/65] y por el Grupo de Investigación «Socialización de género y contextos educativos» [GIU 15/14], subvencionados por la Universidad del País Vasco (UPV/EHU). La tercera autora, Eider Oregui, cuenta con un Contrato Predoctoral [BES-2015-071923], financiado por el Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad (Gobierno de España) y el Fondo Social Europeo.

Referencias

Álvarez, M., Torres, A., Rodríguez, E., Padilla, S., & Rodrigo, M.J. (2013). Attitudes and parenting dimensions in parents’ regulation of Internet use by primary and secondary school children. Computers & Education, 67, 69-78. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2013.03.005

Bringué, X., & Sádaba, T. (2009). La generación interactiva en España: Niños y adolescentes frente a las pantallas. Barcelona: Ariel y Fundación Telefónica. (https://goo.gl/GES298).

Casas, F., Figuer, C. González, M., & Malo, S. (2007). Los medios audiovisuales entre los progenitores y los hijos e hijas. Cultura y Educación, 19(3), 311-330. https://doi.org/10.1174/113564007782194499

Chaudron, S. (2015). Young Children (0-8) and Digital Technology: A qualitative exploratory study across seven countries. Luxembourg: Publications Office of the European Union. https://doi.org/10.2788/00749

Cheung, Y. (2010). Cyber-Parenting: Internet benefits, risks and parenting issues. Journal of Technology in Human Services, 28(4), 252-273. https://doi.org/10.1080/15228835.2011.562629

Connell, S.L., Lauricella, A.R., & Wartella, E. (2015). Parental co-use of media technology with their young children in the USA. Journal of Children and Media, 9(1), 5-21. https://doi.org/10.1080/17482798.2015.997440

Duggan, M., Lenhart, A., Lampe, C., & Ellison, N.B. (2015). Parents and Social Media. Washington, DC: Pew Research Centre Report: Internet &Technology. (https://goo.gl/AMXm7G).

Fletcher, A.C., & Blair, B.L. (2014). Maternal authority regarding early adolescents’ social technology use. Journal of Family Issues, 35(1) 54-74. https://doi.org/10.1177/0192513X12467753

Garmendia, M., Casado, M.A., Martínez, G., & Garitaonandia, C. (2013). Las madres y padres, los menores e Internet: Estrategias de mediación parental en España. Doxa, 17, 99-117. (https://goo.gl/HbZyKZ).

Garmendia, M., Garitaonandia, C., Martínez, G., & Casado, M.A. (2011). Riesgos y seguridad en Internet: Los menores españoles en el contexto europeo. Universidad del País Vasco, Bilbao: EU-Kids Online. (https://goo.gl/7SytA8).

Ihmeideh, F.M., & Shawareb, A.A. (2014). The association between Internet parenting styles and children’s use of the Internet at home. Journal of Research in Childhood Education, 28(4), 411-425. https://doi.org/10.1080/02568543.2014.944723

INTECO (Ed.) (2009). Estudio sobre hábitos seguros en el uso de las TIC por niños y adolescentes y e-confianza de sus padres. Observatorio de la seguridad de la información. (https://goo.gl/1T8YCb).

Kirwil, L. (2009). Parental mediation of children’s Internet use in different European countries. Journal of Children and Media, 3(4), 394-409. https://doi.org/10.1080/17482790903233440

Livingstone, S., & Helsper, E. (2008). Parental mediation and children’s Internet use. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 52(4), 581-599. https://doi.org/10.1080/08838150802437396

Livingstone, S., Haddon, L., Görzig, A., & Ólafsson, K. (2011). EU-Kids Online II: Final Report. LSE, London: EU Kids Online. (https://goo.gl/hOKTxn).

Livingstone, S., Marsh, J., Plowman, L., Ottovordemgentschenfelde, S., & Fletcher-Watson, B. (2015). Young children (0-8) and digital technology: A qualitative exploratory study - National Report - UK. Joint Research Centre, European Commission, Luxembourg: LSE Research Online. (https://goo.gl/ym2EJK).

Ofcom (2014). Children and Parents: Media Use and Attitudes Report. London: Office of Communications. (https://goo.gl/7jx2BV).

Padilla, S., Rodríguez, E., Álvarez, M., Torres, A., Suárez, A., & Rodrigo, M.J. (2015). La influencia del escenario educativo familiar en el uso de Internet en los niños de primaria y secundaria. Infancia y Aprendizaje, 38(2), 402-434. https://doi.org/10.1080/02103702.2015.1016749

Sonck, N., Nikken, P., & de Haan, J. (2013). Determinants of Internet mediation. A comparison of the reports by Duch parents and children. Journal of Children and Media, 7(1), 93-113. https://doi.org/10.1080/17482798.2012.739806

Sorbring, E. (2014). Parents’ concerns about their teenage children’s Internet use. Journal of Family Issues, 35(1), 75-96. https://doi.org/10.1177/0192513X12467754

Sureda, J., Comas, R., & Morey, M. (2010). Menores y acceso a Internet en el hogar: Las normas familiares. Comunicar, 34(17), 135-143. https://doi.org/10.3916/C34-2010-03-13

Takeuchi, L.M. (2011). Families matter: Designing media for a digital age. New York, NY: The Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop. (https://goo.gl/on63qU).

Turkle, S. (2011). Alone together. New York: Basic Books. (https://goo.gl/E6baX).

Valcke, M., Bonte, S., De-Wever, B., & Rots, I. (2010). Internet parenting styles and the impact on Internet use of primary school children. Computers & Education, 55(2), 454-464. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2010.02.009

Valcke, M., De-Weber, B., Van-Keer, H., & Schellens, T. (2011). Long-term study on safe Internet use of young children. Computers & Education, 57(1), 1292-1305. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2011.01.010

Back to Top
GET PDF

Document information

Published on 31/12/17
Accepted on 31/12/17
Submitted on 31/12/17

Volume 26, Issue 1, 2018
DOI: 10.3916/C54-2018-07
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 9
Views 253
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?