Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The current paper is based on the hypothesis that communication through the new digital technologies modifies the moral response of users, and therefore reduces social capital. This approach has been contrasted by designing and conducting an experiment (N=196) using our own adaptation of the Spanish version of the Defining Issues Test on subjects who have been socialized by Internet and who constitute the representative samples of this study. This test on paper was adapted to our research following an expert validation procedure and then transferred onto two types of digital audiovisual formats. Finally, The use of digital communication technologies and students’ fluid intelligence response were evaluated in order to establish whether their response was significant and if it modified moral response. The results confirm the hypothesis and show that the quality of moral response decreases when digital technologies are used instead of pencil and paper. This difference is greater when virtual images of people designed by animation are used rather than visual images of real people. In addition, the results show that fluid intelligence mitigates these modifications.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

This research seeks to discover, measure and assess the undesired effects on moral response when digital technologies are used to communicate. This study does not examine the ethical implications of subjects’ digital behaviour in terms of identity, authorship, participation, credibility, privacy and community membership (Rundle & Conley, 2007), rather the aim is to evaluate the influence that digital communication tools might have on moral response by their very nature and the way they are used. The study analyses the causal relationship between the alteration in moral response and the variable that consists of digital communication versus pencil and paper communication.

The vitality of the Internet, the emergence of the 2.0 and 3.0 networks and the massive, widespread use of digital information and communication technologies have armed all of us users with instruments that have vastly increased our capacity to communicate. This means that it is important to assess not only the evident advantages but also to be aware of the negative effects on moral cognitive capacities and the consequent decrease in social capital that subjects, and the social networks in which they are integrated, could suffer.

While there is more than one concept of social capital (Bourdieu, 1980; Putnam, Leonardi & Nonetti, 1993; Coleman, 2001) and no unanimously accepted restriction on the use of this notion (Annen, 2003; Portes, 2000; Durston, 2000), all authors emphasise the difference between social capital and physical and human capital, in that social capital is specific to individuals and, as such, participants in social networks.

It is also agreed that social capital can also have negative effects, by fomenting inter-group rivalries (Durston, 2000), restricting participants’ freedom and hampering outsiders’ access (Portes, 2000) or undermining individual motivation in communities (Heinze, Ferneley & Child, 2013).

The development of digital communication technologies has led to a proliferation of a wide variety of digital communities and a taxonomy of collaborators that is both open and highly unpredictable. Researchers have observed how digital technology has helped increase the social capital within these communities at very little cost (Shim & Eom, 2009) and how the benefits influence participants’ commitment to a digital community (Heinze, Ferneley & Child, 2013). We propose the revival of what was initially meant by social capital in the analysis and expectations of success in educational institutions (Coleman, 2001; Ramírez-Plascencia & Hernández-González, 2012) in order to study the negative impact of activities mediated by digital technologies on the modification of the links between students, and between students and the institution, as actors within these communities that, by their nature, contain predictability, trust, regulation and coherence.

This is particularly significant when we consider the social skills acquired by those subjects already socialized and intellectually mature, surrounded by the ever-present network of networks. Normally the voices raised in alarm against this digital imperialism are dismissed as apocalyptic, retrograde or reactionary. Nevertheless, there are authors who have developed a deep knowledge of, and who were present at, the founding of digital communication systems (Lanier, 2011); who have charted their emergence as writers in the specialist press (Carr, 2011); who have studied how these technologies have been incorporated in education (Buckingham, 2008; Gardner, 2005; Palfrey & Gasser, 2008); or who simply use their press platforms as observatories (Frommer, 2011) and advise us to exercise caution.

Probably the most complete set of warnings came in the qualified responses posted in 2010 on «edge.org» in response to the question posed that year: «How is the Internet Changing the Way You Think?» (Brockman, 2011). The alert was based on knowledge, reflection and caution and urged that it was important to understand to what extent the advantages of incorporating digital communication technologies could also contain within them certain, as yet unseen, disadvantages.

This admonition is well argued by Prensky (2012) or in international programmatic documents (UNESCO, 2005; Rundle & Conley 2007). Being aware of the hybrid nature of all human actions, perhaps there is no other external object quite like these digital tools, hardware and software, capable of usurping more capacity as moral agent in collaboration with «humanware». Neither should we underestimate the neurological changes that digital communication activities can cause (Wolf, 2008; Small & Vorgan, 2008; Watson, 2011).

These warnings are by no means redundant; they do not take up the cause against the mass communication media initiated by influential 20th century authors (McLuhan, 1993; 2009), warning of the coming of the society of the spectacle (Debord, 1999 a; 1999 b), or the transformation that the subject undergoes (Sartori, 1998). Today, these authors do not perceive a dystopian future like the one that some sociologists wished to avoid (Beck, 1998; Jonas, 1995). They are aware of these criticisms (and in some cases they use them as a starting point) but they remain cautious in their pronouncements and assume that digital communication technologies are here to stay.

This research uses an unusual perspective in its analytical framework. It is not enough to examine the linguistic, technological, interactive, ideological or aesthetic dimensions of the production and reproduction of digital messages (Ferrés & Pisticelli, 2012). Without neglecting concern about why institutional policies agree on common objectives or why schools and families echo the need to digitally educate our youngsters (Aguaded, 2011), we would have to consider, before we contemplate digital equality (Gozálvez, 2011), the possible changes that occur in the moral cognition of digital environments. And this is pressing, as the role of the new communication media in civic education and political activity becomes greater, and it is no longer appropriate to see the media from the learning-service perspective (Middaugh & Kahne, 2013).

The general aim of this research is to determine if the moral response among young people socialized in the omnipresent digital media remains intact or undergoes changes as the sole result of using communication media. The specific objectives are: first, constructing a definition of morality that is procedural, and establishing a diagnostic procedure that enables us to measure any possible modification in moral response as a consequence of communication mediated by digital technologies; second, to design and carry out an experiment on a significant sample of young people socialized in the digital world and who have no academic specialization or particular attributes in the use of these digital technologies.

A diagnostic tool was designed with the aim of confirming or refuting the following hypotheses: first, moral response changes with the use of digital communication media; second, this possible alteration is influenced by exposure to virtual images of people in animated form as opposed to images of real people; third, the subject’s fluid intelligence is relevant in terms of the possible effect on moral response provoked by digital communication.

2. Material and methods

This causal, experimental investigation follows a procedure that is empirical, transversal and prospective, and it is measured quantitatively. First, we take Kohlberg’s (1992) idea of morality as a starting point; second, we design a diagnostic tool to carry out an experiment on a substantial sample; third, we provide quantitative results that are statistically analysed on which to base conclusions.

2.1. Morality: reflection and universabilizability

The capacity of a judgement to raise itself to a universal category (that is, its universabilizability) and the habit of judgement, guarantees a moral response that can be considered worthy of transmission to others; it renders the individual less capable of a desire for wrongdoing and prevents him from making an exception of himself. All attempts to base universal ethics on material instincts have failed, and so far there has been no opportunity for a set of ethics to emerge that has its root in what occurs in our brains (Cortina, 2011). Neither can we deduce any universal ethics from in phylogenetic or ethnographic research since this would presume falling into the trap of the naturalist fallacy that attributes pseudo-sacred character to something that exists.

If we have known since Aristotle that it is in the habit of judgement that the capacity to distinguish right from wrong resides, it was Nietzsche who showed us that good and evil also have their own genealogy. To make our experiment efficient across beyond social, cultural and professional differences, and also to apply it to various contexts, we use procedural ethics based on Kantian tenets that do not aim to frame rules or codes but capture the universal condition of the rules. We subscribe that the rule will have to emerge from sociability, publicity, impartiality, altruism and coherence (Arendt, 1995; 2003).

2.2. The diagnostic method

Our concept of moral judgement as a consequence of the habit that pursues universality is consistent with theorists of moral development such as Piaget (1974) and Kohlberg (1992). Kohlberg expertly developed Piaget’s epistemological procedures by extending to morality the procedure that Piaget applied to the categories of space, time and cause, etc. Hence, cognitive development is not necessarily paired with moral development, it merely enables it. So the very habit from which moral judgement proceeds has to be exercised, with the supposition that the superior cognitive development that fosters it is already given (Kohlberg, 1992; Hersh, Reimer & Paolitto, 2002).

Kohlberg’s diagnostic approach adapts a method from clinical practice in order to understand the moral state in which a subject finds himself. To do so, the interviewee is given some moral dilemmas which are relevant to the subject, and the method follows the reflections that the subject uses to justify his position with regard to the dilemma. After repeating this semi-structured interview over several years with the same group of young people, Kohlberg and his collaborators were able to state that moral development in all individuals can be categorized in the six hierarchical moral states they discovered.

Each moral state involves qualitative differences in the way of thinking, and coalesces with other states within a fixed hierarchical sequence; the six states range from the pre-conventional state (egocentric, the result of a moral heteronomy guided by avoiding punishment and winning the prize) to the post-conventional level that pursues validation of universal principles and commitment to others.

The main criticisms of Kohlberg’s thesis centre on the rigidity of the system of states that the subject must fit into and the likely instability of the procedure, given the importance that it would have in any analyst’s interpretation. Although Kohlberg convincingly countered these criticisms, we refer to the revision of some of his ideas by his followers which came to be known as neo-Kohlbergianism (Rest, Narvaez, Bebeau & Thoma, 1999; Rest, Narváez, Thoma & Bebeau, 2000), and the Defining Issues Test (D.I.T.) produced by James Rest (1979; 1986).

Rest and his team improved the theory and procedure, and provided an objective tool to measure morality in subjects. They emphasise moral schemas rather than moral states, although in essence the hierarchical organization is the same. This enables us to test the individual who, after being presented with a moral dilemma, must evaluate incomplete lines of reasoning in various behavioural options proposed in relation to this dilemma, and which the subject evaluates from his own moral schema. The analyst does not intervene other than to check the correctness of the procedure or interpret, but tabulates and establishes a diagnostic based on the computed data.

The D.I.T. contains six dilemmas each requiring three reflective moments in sequence. On the first reflective level, the subject has to propose a general solution to the dilemma. On the second, the subject must evaluate in order of importance 12 items related to the dilemma. In the third instance, the subject selects four questions from the 12 in order of importance, to then decide on the protagonist’s behaviour in relation to the dilemma.

After tabulating all these results, we obtain a dominant moral schema for the subject’s thinking. And the test’s reliability is backed by numerous studies across different countries, cultures and contexts (Luna & Laca, 2010). The procedure of our experimental design is:

a) Following the recommendations of a panel of experts consisting of eight secondary school teachers of various subjects (Philosophy, English language and translation, and Technology, among others) the wording of the Spanish version of the D.I.T. by Pérez-Delgado (1996) was updated and the translation of several phrases changed to minimize the errors which arose in some items that were expressed as questions but were rewritten in the affirmative form. To improve the test’s usability it was decided that all the questions would be answered on the same sheet that contained the dilemma and not on a separate piece of paper (figure 1).

b) From our D.I.T. version, the six dilemmas were transferred onto two other formats that differed from the version on paper: the format that we call real audiovisual is a spoken audiovisual of the dilemma read out in the style of a news broadcast, with a neutral background and a single image of the speaker in a middle ground shot; there is no musical accompaniment or shot changes or camera movements; and the format we name virtual audiovisual is formed of a presenter in human animation form speaking in a news reporting style made with «iClone v2. Real Time 3D Filmmaking» animation software (Reallusion, 2007); there is music, shot variation and camera movements. We also posted the respective questionnaires of each dilemma on-line with the use of the «Google-Drive» app.

c) We set up «blogs» on «Google’s» «Blogger» platform with the videos and questionnaires distributed in different combinations for each of the sample groups. As a result, each group views two of the six dilemmas in the real audiovisual format and completes their corresponding «online» questionnaires, two dilemmas in the virtual audiovisual format with their «online» questionnaires and two dilemmas in pencil and paper format.


Draft Content 204815531-32650-en065.jpg

Figure 1. Example of this study’s version of the dilemma and questionnaire updated and adapted from the D.I.T. (The videos of this dilemma in their real and virtual audiovisual versions are available on http://goo.gl/xtKtL3 and http://goo.gl/Vy7of8).

2.3. The sample

The population universe consists of subjects born after the emergence of digital technologies in Spain who are accustomed to taking classes in which both printed material and digital technologies are used, who are nondigital technology experts in terms of usage and training, and are old enough to display all the states of moral development. The universe is limited to young people of both sexes, over 14 but under 18, in pre-university education and who are not taking professional courses linked to digital technologies.

The sample was taken from a secondary school in the town of Fuenlabrada, near Madrid, with 233 students that matched these requirements and which, in terms of yearly pass rates, graduation and university places gained, is similar in academic achievement to any other educational centre in the Autonomous Community of Madrid.

These students were given the Raven (2001) progressive matrices test measured on the Standard scale for fluid intelligence (the capacity to think and reason abstractly) which yielded a mean of 49.46 and a standard deviation of 5.842 (the measures proposed for these ages in Spain have a mean score of 47.89 with a standard deviation of 6.19), so the sample was deemed to be adequate.

For the experiment to run smoothly and to enable subsequent comparisons, it was decided to divide the subjects into eight randomly selected groups, from classes in the three years prior to university entrance.

The sample initially consisted of 196 students who performed the experiment in the computer rooms at the school. A total of 184 students completed the test, and after eliminating unavoidable registration errors, 160 were found to have answered the questions on all the dilemmas, with an equal spread among the groups and by gender. Having no data on similar experiences to work on, and given the complexity of the procedure, we consider the figure of 81.6% of participants to be a success, similar to what was expected and acceptable.

3. Analysis and results

The results were significant in terms of scales of incoherence, according to the support they used to resolve the moral dilemmas. Incoherence is defined (Rest, 1996) as a lack of congruence between the levels of reflection that the subject is faced with. The subject shows incoherence when, at the end of the questionnaire for each dilemma, he or she selects in order of importance the four questions (from the 12) that enable them to define the conduct of the protagonist of the dilemma and which are not among the questions given greater importance on the previous level.

Rest and collaborators (1986) proposed eliminating questionnaires with one dilemma that contains more than eight incoherencies, or which revealed incoherencies in two or more dilemmas. The different quantitative levels of incoherence are established in the following way: when the item chosen as the most important does not correspond to any of the items selected from among the 12 as being most significant in the previous stage of reflection, it is computed as 1 point of incoherence. If the second of the four options in importance selected does not have any other item (except the first) considered more important, it does not count as incoherent but if it had one, it would be deemed to be another point of incoherence. If the same happens with the third, another point; and if the fourth also has another option ahead of it (besides the items chosen in first, second and third place) another point is added. So each questionnaire for each dilemma can score a maximum of four points in incoherence when none of the four options chosen and graded in terms of importance is congruent with the evaluation made immediately above on each of these options. The maximum incoherency would be 24 and the minimum 0.

The statistics show a mean of 7.72 incoherencies per individual and a standard deviation of 4.63. The spread of incoherencies per dilemma and individual varies slightly from 1.04 to 1.44, so the different content in the dilemma can be discarded as an influence on the subjects’ incoherencies. Likewise, the number of incoherencies has no significant variances in terms of belonging to a particular group or gender. By contrast, the spread of incoherencies is highly significant with regard to the communication medium used to transmit the dilemma and to the completion of the questionnaire (figures 2, 3 and 4).


Draft Content 204815531-32650-en066.jpg

Figure 2. Total incoherencies among the 160 participants.


Draft Content 204815531-32650-en067.jpg

Figure 3. Incoherencies by dilemma and subject.

For each incoherence that appeared in the pencil and paper format there were 1.8 incoherencies in the real audiovisual «online» format and 2.0 incoherencies in the virtual audiovisual «online» format (figure 2). Compared overall, for each dilemma and subject we find that incoherencies multiply by 2 when we use «online» audiovisual digital communication to apply the test (figure 3).

The ANOVA (a=0.05) test to contrast the dependent viability (virtual audiovisual/real audiovisual/pencil and paper) produces this result: F=10.42> critical value Fc= 3.47 and ANOVA (a= 0.05) which corroborates that the student distribution in their groups that has had no influence, and generates F=1.19< critical value Fc=2.66; the correlations between the different groups of the sample have the same positive values from, 0.57 to 0.99, and with the mean value of 0.89; and the analysis of the correlations of the incoherencies according the communication medium used varies from 0.44 to 0.65. What is also significant is the difference between the appearance of incoherencies when a real person (real audiovisual) is used to present the dilemma in the audiovisual format or when the speaker appears as a news presenter designed by animation software (virtual audiovisual), with even more incoherence when in virtual audiovisual format (figure 4).


Draft Content 204815531-32650-en068.jpg

Figure 4. Incoherencies by dilemma and subject.


Draft Content 204815531-32650-en069.jpg

Figure 5. Dispersion of the incoherencies displayed and the Raven intelligence score for each subject.

It was found that the fluid intelligence in each subject, as measured by the Raven test, manifests a negative and moderate correlation with respect to the total appearance of incoherencies, with a Pearson r value of 0.42 (figure 5).

4. Discussion and conclusions

The moral response of our subjects is modified when communication is mediated by digital communication technologies. The moral response of individuals is of inferior quality (less reflective and with a lower capacity to rise to the universal category) when we use digital communication technologies (to transmit content and extract responses) than when we use the traditional procedure of pencil and paper.

Since all moral response requires coherence to be considered as such, when incoherent it will be less moral given that we have conceived morality as constituted by reflection and universalizability. Reflection demands maintenance of judgement over time, and universalizability is relevant since it does not make judgement dependent on the person who judges or who executes the action. Coherence in each judgement does not determine the moral tenor but it does determine its moral condition.

The audiovisual content in which animated images appear representing virtual people extracts a moral response that is even more incoherent (less reflective, less capable of universalizability) than when the audiovisual content shows real people presenting moral conflicts. The individuals’ fluid intelligence in our sample is a mitigating circumstance of this modification of the moral response in terms of the communication medium used.

Therefore, the formats and digital media tend to devalue the moral response of our subjects, and the use of virtual images of people instead of real people has an even more negative influence on the quality of the moral response. It was found that a subject’s sense of commitment when clicking on the mouse is much less than when ticking a box with pencil on paper. The click of the mouse is easier, the body uses less intensity to carry out the action, the mind decides on something with less sense of responsibility.

Remember that our sample is composed entirely of young people with no academic specialization, and who were born in an era when Internet was starting to form part of our everyday lives; young people who hardly read content that it is nondigital. Yet they show greater respect for the written word on paper than the digital version.

These results cannot be contrasted with previous research that used D.I.T. since those tests were applied to experiments on paper, «online» but not audiovisual (Xu, Iran-Nejad & Thoma, 2007; Jacobs, 2009; Clark, 2010; Palacios-Navarro, 2003). Our procedure is in line with other investigations whose starting point is communication mediated by digital technologies and which examine the social capital of individuals and their digital communities (Heinze, Ferneley & Child, 2013; Shim & Eom, 2009).

The results of our research take on meaning in this field of investigation in which new digital tools become instruments for citizen learning and empowerment (Gozálvez, 2011; Ferrés & Pisticelli, 2012; Middaugh & Kahne, 2013; Buckingham & Rodríguez, 2013), since our findings point to a negative effect on social capital that hitherto had gone unobserved.

It is common to see in early research into social capital (Bourdieu, 1980; Coleman, 2001; Putnam, Leonardi & Nonetti, 1993) that intergroup confidence is an important factor for analysis, that the rules and the acceptance of these rules are crucial and that the benefits that bind the community together are forged by reciprocal expectations. Our research adds factors that could diminish social capital (Durston, 2000; Portes, 2000; Heinze, Ferneley & Child, 2013), that the digital technologies of communication reduce the coherence of the moral response. That is, they limit the commmitment that the social actor establishes with rules and the expectation of complying with them.

Future research based on these conclusions might want to improve the diagnostic tool we have used (incorporating more variables such as the possible audiovisual «framing» effect (Sádaba, 2001), and make it more versatile, reliable, refining it for use with other populations; they could also broaden the universal population (transversally and longitudinally), situations (other settings: metaverses, avatars…; other digital devices: tablets, cell phones…; other contexts: testing individually, with confidence groups…).

Many believe that there can never be a definitive truth in ethics, but that is not entirely true since coherence is the «conditio sine qua non» of ethics. Unstable moral conduct, or incoherent morality, is not moral, which is not to say that it is immoral. The distance between what is good about a quality and how far one is from possessing that quality is not the same. Besides, moral competence underlies the action, and if it not so, the action becomes unstable, changeable, capricious, prone to manipulation and unconscious.

In another way, an accommodating morality is a moral response. As long as the setting does not change, the moral decision remains constant with what has been decided beforehand. But this research concludes that digital media also dilute any possible accommodation of thought in the context.

The discussion of the results of this research suggests we need to reflect on decisions for education in terms of digital communication media, as others have done (García-Canclini, 2007; Gozálvez, 2011; Ferrés & Pisticelli, 2012; Middaugh & Kahne, 2013), and that education needs to recover for the screens and clicks (with the fingertip or the mouse) that commitment which students still show when faced with the written word on paper, the understanding they cultivate from the written word as opposed to the audiovisual, the consistency in thought that is revealed when using pencil and paper. If we do not exercise caution, a mass invasion of decision-making by digital communication media could cause techno-cultural incoherency in all those human aspects susceptible to change when using digital forms of communcation (human relations, consumption, «online» democracy, distance learning, etc.)

There are no blind dynamics at work in human intention, nor is there in the technologies that surround us. Knowing that the compass needle faces north enables us decide our route, not towards the horizon indicated by the needle but towards the destiny we choose. Without discarding any of the advantages of digital communication technologies, just as we have done with the compass needle, it is we ourselves who decide what to leave behind and what to place before us.

Thus, the field of applications that emerges from the interpretation and discussion of the results of this experiment needs to be considered from a double perspective: better knowledge of the undesired effects that communication mediated by digital technologies can cause, and the configuring of systems for consultation, relating and participation for users in which those possible undesired effects are foreseen, considered, minimized or nullified. If the digital technologies are here to stay it is because they contribute definite advantages to our everyday lives. But even our comfortable home sofa has to be used in moderation because it can seriously affect our health.

References

Aguaded, I. (2011). Niños y adolescentes: nuevas generaciones interactivas. Comunicar, XVIII(36), 7-8. (http://doi.org/bv3tgf).

Annen, K. (2003). Social Capital, Inclusive Networks, and Economic Performance. Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 50, 449-463. (http://doi.org/fc6wcm).

Arendt, H. (1995). De la historia a la acción. Barcelona: Paidós.

Arendt, H. (2003). Conferencias sobre la filosofía política de Kant. Buenos Aires: Paidós.

Beck, U. (1998). La sociedad del riesgo. Hacia una nueva modernidad. Barcelona: Paidós.

Bourdieu, P. (1980). Le capital social. Notes provisories. Actes de la Recherche en Sciences Sociales, 31, 2-3. (http://goo.gl/Vq0yKT) (10-04-2013).

Brockman, J. (Ed.) (2011). Is the Internet Changing the Way you Think? NY: Harper Perennial.

Buckingham, D. & Rodríguez, C. (2013). Aprendiendo sobre el poder y la ciudadanía en un mundo virtual. Comunicar, XX(40), 49-58. (http://doi.org/tk6).

Buckingham, D. (2008). Más allá de la tecnología. Aprendizaje infantil en la era de la cultura digital. Buenos Aires: Manantial.

Carr, N. (2011). Superficiales. ¿Qué está haciendo internet con nuestras mentes? Madrid: Santillana.

Clark, L.I. (2010). Exploration of the Relationship Between Moral Judgment Development and Attention. Masters Thesis and Specialist Projects. Paper 210. (http://goo.gl/jWQNLV) (23-07-2013).

Coleman, J.S. (2001). Capital social en la creación de capital humano. Zona Abierta, 94-95, 47-81.

Cortina, A. (2011). Neuroética y neuropolítica. Sugerencias para la educación moral. Madrid: Tecnos.

Debord, G. (1999a). La sociedad del espectáculo. Valencia: Pre-textos.

Debord, G. (1999b). Comentarios sobre la sociedad del espectáculo. Barcelona: Anagrama.

Durston, J. (2000). ¿Qué es el capital social comunitario? Santiago de Chile: Naciones Unidas, División de Desarrollo Social.

Ferrés, J. & Pisticelli, A. (2012). La competencia mediática: propuesta articulada de dimensiones e indicadores. Comunicar, XIX(38), 75-82. (http://doi.org/tj9).

Frommer, F. (2011). El pensamiento PowerPoint. Ensayo sobre un programa que nos vuelve estúpidos. Barcelona: Península.

García-Canclini, N. (2007). Lectores, espectadores e internautas. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Gardner, H. (2005). Las cinco mentes del futuro. Un ensayo educativo. Barcelona: Paidós.

Gozálvez, V. (2011). Educación para la ciudadanía en la cultura digital. Comunicar, XVIII(36), 131-138. (http://doi.org/ffr3hn).

Heinze, A., Ferneley, E. & Child, P. (2013). Ideal Participants in Online Market Research: Lessons from Closed communities. International Journal of Market Research, 55(6), 769-789. (http://goo.gl/sCEHPc) (25-12-2013).

Hersh, R.H., Reimer, J. & Paolitto, D.P. (2002). El crecimiento moral. De Piaget a Kohlberg. Madrid: Narcea.

Jacobs, N.M. (2009). Ethics Questionarie. Modified Version of the Defining Issues Test. (http://goo.gl/lBccXg) (21-02-2013)

Jonas, H. (1995). El principio de responsabilidad. Ensayo de una ética para la civilización tecnológica. Barcelona: Herder.

Kohlberg, L. (1992). Psicología del desarrollo moral. Bilbao: Desclée de Brouwer.

Lanier, J. (2011). Contra el rebaño digital. Un manifiesto. Barcelona: Random House Mondadori.

Luna, A.C. & Laca, F.A. (2010). La teoría cognitiva del desarrollo del juicio moral a la luz de sus resultados empíricos: un análisis de fundamentos. México: XV Congreso Internacional de Filosofía. (http://goo.gl/Shr3Aw) (03-08-2013).

McLuhan, M. (1993). La Galaxia Gutenberg. Génesis del «homo typographicus». Barcelona: Círculo de Lectores.

McLuhan, M. (2009). Comprender los medios de comunicación. Las extensiones del ser humano. Barcelona: Paidós.

Middaugh, E. & Kahne, J. (2013). Nuevos medios como herramienta para el aprendizaje cívico. Comunicar, XX(40), 99-108. (http://doi.org/tk7).

Palacios-Navarro, S. (2003). El uso informatizado del cuestionario de problemas socio-morales (DIT) del (sic) REST. Pixel-Bit, 20, 5-15. (http://goo.gl/NDGR8R) (13-09-2013).

Palfrey, J. & Gasser, U. (2008). Born Digital. New York: Basic Books of Perseus Books Group.

Pérez-Delgado y otros (1996). DIT: Cuestionario de problemas socio-morales. Valencia, Nau Llibres.

Piaget, J. (1974). El criterio moral en el niño. Barcelona: Fontanella.

Portes, A. (2000). Social Capital: its Origins and Applications in Modern Sociology. In E. Lesser (Ed.), Knowledge and Social Capital. (pp. 43-67). Boston: Butterworth-Heinemann.

Prensky, M. (2012). Before Bringing in New Tools, You must First Bring in New Thinking. Amplify. (http://goo.gl/b1ULBg) (22-11-2013).

Putnam, R.D., Leonardi, R. & Nonetti, R.Y. (1993). Making Democracy Work. Civic Traditions in Modern Italy. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.

Ramírez-Plascencia, J. & Hernández González, E. (2012). ¿Tenía razón Coleman? Acerca de la relación entre capital social y logro educativo. Sinéctica 39, 01-14. (http://goo.gl/5IjcPw) (23-07-2013).

Raven, J. (2001). Test de matrices progresivas. Standard Progressive Matrices (SPM-Escala General). Madrid: Tea.

Rest, J. (1986). Manual for the Defining Issues Test. Minneapolis (Minnesota): Center for the study of Ethical Development. University of Minnesota.

Rest, J., Narvaez, D., Bebeau, M. & Thoma, S. (1999). A Neo-Kohlbergian Approach: The DIT and Schema Theory. Educational Psychology Review, 11(4), 291-324. (http://doi.org/ffg3x4).

Rest, J., Narváez, D., Thoma, S.J. & Bebeau, M.J. (2000). A Neo-Kohlbergian Approach to Morality Research. Journal of Moral Education, 29(4), 381-395. (http://doi.org/b8wc8q).

Rest, J.R. (1979). Development in Judging Moral Issues. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota.

Rundle, M. & Conley, C. (2007) Ethical Implications of Emerging Technologies: A Survey. UNESCO: Paris. (http://goo.gl/uc5Xub) (23-07-2013).

Sádaba, M.T. (2001). Origen, aplicación y límites de la teoría del encuadre (framing) en comunicación. Comunicación y Sociedad, XIV(2), 143-175.

Sartori, G.(1998). Homo videns. La sociedad teledirigida. Madrid: Santillana-Taurus.

Shim, D.C. & Eom, T.H. (2009). Efectos de las tecnologías de la información y del capital social en la lucha contra la corrupción. Revista Internacional de Ciencias Administrativas, 75(1), 113-132.

Small, G. & Vorgan, G. (2008). El cerebro digital. Cómo las nuevas tecnologías están cambiando nuestra mente. Barcelona: Urano.

UNESCO (2005). Declaración de Alejandría. Faros para la sociedad de la información. (http://goo.gl/iame6N) (21-02-2014).

Watson, R. (2011). Mentes del futuro. ¿Está cambiando la era digital nuestras mentes? Barcelona: Viceversa.

Wolf, M. (2008). Cómo aprendemos a leer. Historia y ciencia del cerebro y la lectura. Barcelona: Ediciones B.

Xu, Y., Iran-Nejad, A. & Thoma, S.J. (2007). Administering Defining Issues Test Online: Do Response Modes Matter? Journal of Interactive Online Learning, 6(1). (http://goo.gl/Y6ovny) (23-05-2013).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Se investiga cómo la comunicación mediada por tecnologías digitales modifica la respuesta moral de los usuarios, y por tanto, varía el capital social. Se diseña y realiza un experimento con 196 sujetos que se sirve de una adaptación de diseño propio del «Defining Issues Test» en papel, a partir de la versión española, sobre una muestra representativa del universo de sujetos que se han socializado con Internet. Se valida la adaptación del test sometiéndolo a juicio por un panel de expertos, se amplía el mismo a otros dos formatos digitales audiovisuales diferentes: con imágenes reales de personas o con imágenes virtuales de personas a través de animación, y se comprueba si la inteligencia fluida de los sujetos es significativa en la modificación de la respuesta moral. Los resultados confirman las hipótesis y demuestran que la calidad de la respuesta moral disminuye cuando se usan tecnologías digitales respecto a cuando se usa papel y lápiz. Esta diferencia es mayor cuando se usan imágenes virtuales de personas a través de animación que cuando se usan imágenes audiovisuales de personas reales. En todos los casos la inteligencia fluida es un atenuante de estas modificaciones.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Esta investigación busca conocer, medir y evaluar los efectos no deseados en la respuesta moral cuando se usan tecnologías digitales en la comunicación. No se trata de estudiar las implicaciones éticas que los comportamientos digitales de los sujetos tienen en lo referido a su identidad, autoría, participación, credibilidad, privacidad y pertenencia a una comunidad (Rundle & Conley, 2007). El objeto de estudio es comprobar la influencia en la respuesta moral que las herramientas digitales comunicativas, por su naturaleza y su uso, pudieran tener. Se examina, por tanto, la relación causal que se establece entre la alteración de la respuesta moral y la variable comunicación digital «versus» comunicación en papel impreso.

La vitalidad de Internet, el auge de las redes 2.0 y 3.0, y el uso masivo de las tecnologías digitales de la información y comunicación nos han provisto, a todos los usuarios, de unos instrumentos que multiplican nuestras capacidades comunicativas. Pero se hace pertinente conocer no solo las ventajas evidentes que se van acumulando, sino también estar al tanto de los efectos negativos producidos en algunas capacidades cognitivas morales y por ende en la disminución del capital social que los sujetos y las redes sociales en las que ellos se integran, pudieran detentar.

Aunque no existe una única concepción de capital social (Bourdieu, 1980; Putnam, Leonardi & Nonetti, 1993; Coleman, 2001) y tampoco existe una delimitación unánimemente aceptada de los usos que podamos darle (Annen, 2003; Portes, 2000; Durston, 2000), todos los autores destacan el valor diferenciado que este capital tiene del capital físico y del capital humano y cómo este capital social es un activo específico inherente a los individuos, en tanto que integrantes de redes sociales.

Ha quedado sentado también que el capital social puede tener además efectos negativos, fomentando la rivalidad intragrupal (Durston, 2000), provocando restricciones a la libertad de los integrantes y dificultades de acceso para los extraños al grupo (Portes, 2000), o estimulando las nivelaciones a la baja de las motivaciones de los individuos de las comunidades (Heinze, Ferneley & Child, 2013).

El desarrollo que han tenido las tecnologías digitales comunicativas ha provocado una proliferación de comunidades digitales de muy diferente tipología y una taxonomía de colaboradores muy abierta y voluble. Se ha investigado cómo en estas comunidades la tecnología digital ayuda a aumentar el capital social con un coste relativamente bajo (Shim & Eom, 2009), o cómo las recompensas influyen en el compromiso de los integrantes de una comunidad digital (Heinze, Ferneley & Child, 2013). Ahora proponemos recuperar el sentido primigenio que tuvo el capital social en el análisis y en la expectativa de éxito en las instituciones educativas (Coleman, 2001; RamírezPlascencia & HernándezGonzález, 2012), para estudiar el impacto negativo de estas actividades mediadas por tecnologías digitales en la modificación de los vínculos entre los estudiantes, y de ellos con la institución, en tanto que actores, en lo que naturalmente tienen estas comunidades de previsibilidad, confianza, normatividad y coherencia. Esto es especialmente significativo cuando consideramos las habilidades sociales de aquellos sujetos que ya se han socializado, y han alcanzado su madurez intelectual, rodeadas de la omnipresencia de la red de redes.

Habitualmente las voces que se alzan contra este imperio digital son tildadas de apocalípticas, retrógradas o reaccionarias. No obstante, han aparecido autores que conocieron y participaron en la fundación de los sistemas digitales de comunicación (Lanier, 2011); que han seguido su eclosión desde la prominencia de la prensa especializada (Carr, 2011); que han estudiado la incorporación de estas tecnologías a la educación (Buckingham, 2008; Gardner, 2005; Palfrey & Gasser, 2008); o que simplemente utilizan su tribuna periodística como observatorio (Frommer, 2012); y que nos invitan a adoptar cautelas.

Probablemente el registro más completo de todas estas advertencias esté en las cualificadas respuestas que en el 2010 se recibieron en «edge.org» a la pregunta de ese año «How is the Internet Changing the Way You Think?» (Brockman, 2011), y que nos alertan desde el saber, la reflexión y la prudencia, de que urge conocer hasta qué punto la incorporación de las tecnologías digitales de la comunicación pudiera traer enmascarada en su aparejo alguna desventaja entre las evidentes mejoras.

Sirven muy bien para ejemplificar esta cautela el propio Prensky (2012) o documentos programáticos de relevancia internacional (UNESCO, 2005; Rundle & Conley, 2007). Por eso y siendo conscientes de la naturaleza híbrida que toda acción humana tiene, quizá ningún objeto externo como estas herramientas digitales, hardware y software, pudiera usurpar más capacidad de agente moral compartido con el «humanware». Tampoco se han de despreciar los cambios neurológicos que las actividades digitales comunicativas pudieran provocar (Wolf, 2008; Small & Vorgan, 2008; Watson, 2011).

Además, estos avisos no son redundantes, no hacen suya la causa que contra los medios masivos de comunicación iniciaron influyentes autores del siglo XX (McLuhan, 1993; 2009), avisando del advenimiento de la sociedad del espectáculo (Debord, 1999 a; 1999 b), o de la transformación que se opera sobre el sujeto (Sartori, 1998). Ahora, estos autores tampoco atisban un futuro distópico como el que algunos sociólogos querían evitar (Beck, 1998; Jonas, 1995). Ellos conocen estas críticas (y en algunos casos parten de ellas), pero se mantienen inspirados por la prudencia y por la asunción de que las tecnologías digitales de comunicación han venido para quedarse.

Con esta investigación se pretende afinar los análisis precedentes desde una perspectiva que no suele contemplarse. No bastaría con atender a las dimensiones lingüística, tecnológica, interactiva, ideológica o estética de la producción y reproducción de mensajes vía digital (Ferrés & Pisticelli, 2012), sino que, sin dejar de preocuparse porque las diferentes instituciones políticas acuerden objetivos comunes o porque familias y escuelas resuenen al unísono en la educación digital de los jóvenes (Aguaded, 2011), tendríamos que considerar, antes que la isegoría digital (Gozálvez, 2011), las posibles modificaciones de la cognición moral en los entornos digitales. Y esto es perentorio toda vez que es creciente el papel de los nuevos medios comunicativos en la formación cívica y en la actividad política y no bastaría con contemplar los medios desde el objetivo del aprendizajeservicio (Middaugh & Kahne, 2013).

El objetivo general de esta investigación se centra en indagar si la respuesta moral de jóvenes socializados en la omnipresencia de los medios digitales permanece indemne o sufre alteraciones causadas únicamente por el diferente medio comunicativo usado. Para ello se contemplan los siguientes objetivos particulares: primero, tras constituir una definición de moralidad de corte procedimental, establecer un procedimiento diagnóstico, que permita medir la posible modificación de la respuesta moral por el uso de la comunicación mediada por tecnologías digitales; y segundo, diseñar y ejecutar un experimento con una muestra significativa del universo de jóvenes socializados en el mundo digital y que no tienen ningún tipo de especialización académica ni especiales aptitudes para el uso de estas nuevas tecnologías.

Se diseña un aparato diagnóstico con la intención de que se puedan confirmar o refutar las siguientes hipótesis: primera, existe modificación de la respuesta moral cuando media comunicación digital; segunda, esta posible alteración se ve influida por la utilización de imágenes virtuales de personas por animación frente a la presencia de imágenes de personas reales; y tercera, la inteligencia fluida de los sujetos tiene relevancia en el posible efecto en la respuesta moral que provoque la comunicación digital.

2. Material y métodos

Esta investigación experimental causal sigue un procedimiento empírico, transversal y prospectivo con mensurabilidad cuantitativa. Primero, parte de la concepción moral de Kohlberg (1992); segundo, diseña la herramienta diagnóstica para realizar un experimento con una muestra significativa; y tercero, aporta los resultados cuantitativos estudiados estadísticamente a partir de los cuales se deducen conclusiones.

2.1. La moralidad: reflexión y «universalizabilidad»

La capacidad que tiene un juicio de ser elevado a categoría universal (esto es, su «universalizabilidad») y el hábito en el juzgar, garantizan una respuesta moral digna de ser conocida por los demás, hace al individuo menos capaz de desear el mal y le imposibilita para hacer una excepción consigo mismo. Todos los intentos de fundamentar una ética universal en instancias materiales han fracasado y hasta el momento, tampoco existe la posibilidad de una ética que deposite sus raíces en lo que ocurre en nuestro cerebro. Tampoco podemos deducir universales éticos de las investigaciones filogenéticas o etnográficas, pues supondría incurrir en la falacia naturalista de atribuir carácter pseudosacro a aquello que existe.

Si desde Aristóteles sabemos que es en el hábito de juzgar en donde aparece la capacidad para distinguir lo correcto, es Nietzsche quien nos enseña que el bien y el mal también tienen su genealogía. Con la intención de dotar de eficacia más allá de diferencias sociales, culturales o profesionales a nuestro experimento y con la intención de que pueda ser aplicado en diferentes contextos, nos refugiamos en una ética procedimental de inspiración kantiana que no persigue reglas ni códigos, sino la condición universal de las reglas. Suscribimos que la norma habrá de ser fruto de la sociabilidad, publicidad, imparcialidad, desinterés y coherencia (Arendt, 1995; 2003).

2.2. El método diagnóstico

Nuestra concepción de juicio moral como consecuencia del hábito que persigue la universalidad es congruente con los teóricos del desarrollo moral Piaget (1974) y Kohlberg (1992). Kohlberg desarrolló con maestría los procedimientos epistemológicos piagetianos al extender a la moralidad el procedimiento que Piaget usó con las categorías de espacio, tiempo, causa, etc. Así el desarrollo cognitivo no lleva aparejado necesariamente un desarrollo moral, solo lo posibilita. De forma que el hábito propio del que procede el juicio moral ha de ser ejercitado, suponiéndose dado ya el desarrollo cognitivo superior que lo propicia (Kohlberg, 1992; Hersh, Reimer & Paolitto, 2002).

El diagnóstico kohlbergiano adapta un método clínico para conocer el estadio moral en el que se encuentra un sujeto. Para hacerlo, propone al entrevistado algunos dilemas morales que le sean significativos y sigue las reflexiones de las que se sirve el sujeto para justificar su posición frente al dilema. Tras repetir esta entrevista semiestructurada durante años al mismo grupo de jóvenes, Kohlberg y sus colaboradores estipularon que el desarrollo moral de todo individuo se podría encasillar en alguno de los seis estadios morales jerárquicos que descubrieron.

Cada estadio moral implica diferencias cualitativas en el modo de pensar, se organiza con el resto de los estadios en una secuencia invariante y jerárquica, y entre los seis se abarca desde el estadio preconvencional (egocéntrico, fruto de una moral heterónoma guiada por la evitación del castigo y la consecución del premio) hasta el nivel postconvencional que persigue la validez de principios universales y el compromiso con ellos.

Las principales críticas que las tesis de Kohlberg han sufrido tienen que ver con el sistema rígido de estadios en los que se encasilla al sujeto y con la presumible volubilidad del procedimiento por la importancia que tendría la interpretación del analista. Aunque él mismo se defendió sobradamente de estas críticas, nos adherimos a la revisión que han realizado sus seguidores en lo que ha sido definido como neokohlbergianismo (Rest, Narvaez, Bebeau & Thoma, 1999; Rest, Narváez, Thoma & Bebeau, 2000) y al establecimiento del Definig Issues Test (D.I.T.) por James Rest (1979; 1986).

Rest y su equipo mejoran la teoría, mejoran el procedimiento y nos proveen de una herramienta objetiva para medir la moralidad de los sujetos. Prefieren hablar mejor de esquemas morales que de estadios, aunque en esencia la organización jerárquica se mantiene. Esto nos permite aplicar un test en donde el individuo debe valorar, después de leer un dilema moral, líneas de razonamiento incompletas sobre las diferentes opciones de comportamiento con relación al dilema planteado, y que él interpretará desde su esquema moral propio. El analista, por tanto, no interviene más que velando por la virtud del procedimiento, él no interpreta, solo tabula, y establece diagnóstico a partir del cómputo.

El test D.I.T. se completa con seis dilemas, cada uno de los cuales exige tres momentos reflexivos secuenciados. En el primer nivel reflexivo el sujeto ha de proponer una solución general del dilema. En la segunda etapa el sujeto debe valorar en importancia 12 ítems diferentes en relación con el dilema propuesto. Y en última instancia ha de elegir ordenadas las cuatro cuestiones más importantes de las 12 anteriores, para decidir la conducta del protagonista del dilema.

De la tabulación de todos estos resultados obtenemos el esquema moral dominante del pensamiento del sujeto. Y la fiabilidad de este test viene avalada por multitud de estudios previos en diferentes países, culturas y contextos (Luna & Laca, 2010). El procedimiento de nuestro diseño experimental ha sido:

a) Siguiendo las recomendaciones de un panel de expertos constituido por ocho profesores de Enseñanza Secundaria de diferentes especialidades (incluidos especialistas de filosofía, lengua inglesa y traducción o tecnología entre otros), se ha actualizado el lenguaje de la versión española del test D.I.T. de PérezDelgado y otros (1996), cambiando la traducción de algunas frases y reduciendo al máximo los equívocos que se provocaban con algunos ítems que estaban redactados en modo interrogativo, expresándolos en forma enunciativa. Para mejorar también la usabilidad del test se decidió que todos los cuestionarios se contestasen en la misma hoja en la que aparecía el dilema y no en una hoja exenta (figura 1).

b) A partir de nuestra versión del D.I.T., se trasladan los seis dilemas a otros dos formatos diferentes al del papel impreso: el formato que llamamos audiovisual real, que consiste en un audiovisual de una locución del dilema expuesto al estilo de un informativo con fondo neutro, sin otra imagen que el plano medio de un locutor humano, sin música, sin cambios de plano y sin movimientos de cámara; y el formato que llamamos audiovisual virtual consiste en una locución al estilo de un telediario preparada con el software de animación «iClone v2, Real Time 3D Filmmaking», con música, cambios de plano, movimientos de cámara y un locutor de aspecto humano creado por animación. También hemos dispuesto los cuestionarios respectivos de cada dilema para su aplicación online sirviéndonos de la aplicación «GoogleDrive».

c) Hemos confeccionado sendos «blogs» valiéndonos de la plataforma «Blogger» de «Google» con los videos y sus cuestionarios distribuidos en combinaciones diferentes para cada uno de los grupos de la muestra. De manera que cada grupo conocerá dos de los seis dilemas por el formato audiovisual real y contestará sus cuestionarios respectivos «online», dos dilemas por el formato audiovisual virtual con sus correspondientes cuestionarios online y los otros dos restantes por el formato papel.


Draft Content 204815531-32650 ov-es065.jpg

Figura 1. Ejemplo de dilema y cuestionario de nuestra versión (actualización y adaptación) del test D.I.T. (Los vídeos de este dilema, en versiones audiovisual real y virtual, están disponibles en http://goo.gl/xtKtL3 y http://goo.gl/Vy7of8).

2.3. La muestra

Se consideró como universo poblacional a los sujetos nacidos después de la eclosión de las tecnologías digitales en España, que reciben con naturalidad sus clases tanto mediante materiales impresos como con tecnologías digitales, que no son especialistas en tecnologías digitales ni por uso, ni por formación y con edad suficiente para presentar todos los estadios de desarrollo moral. Queda así delimitado el universo por jóvenes de ambos sexos, mayores de 14 años, en etapa educativa anterior a la universidad, menores de 18 años, y que no cursan enseñanzas profesionales vinculadas a las tecnologías digitales.

Para la muestra se elige un instituto de enseñanza secundaria en la ciudad de Fuenlabrada (Madrid) con 233 estudiantes que cumplen estas especificaciones y que académicamente, en cuanto a promoción, titulación y acceso universitario, obtienen resultados similares a los de cualquier otro centro educativo de la misma Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid.

A estos estudiantes se les somete al test Raven (2001), de matrices progresivas, escala Standard, de inteligencia fluida (capacidad para pensar y razonar de manera abstracta), obteniéndose una media de 49,46 puntos y una desviación típica de 5,842 (las medidas propuestas para estas edades en España son de 47,89 puntos de media y una desviación típica de 6,19), quedándose así satisfecha la adecuación de la muestra elegida.

Para facilitar la aplicación del experimento y para permitir ulteriores comparaciones, se decide mantener a los sujetos en ocho grupos según están clasificados en sus aulas, y que se distribuyen en los tres cursos anteriores a la Universidad.

La muestra quedó constituida por 196 estudiantes, quienes realizaron el experimento en las aulas informáticas de su centro de estudio. Terminaron el test 184 y tras eliminar los errores insalvables en el registro, fueron 160 estudiantes los que completaron todos los dilemas, repartidos uniformemente por los grupos de procedencia y por sexos. Sin tener, a este respecto, datos previos de experiencias similares, y dado lo complejo del procedimiento, consideramos este 81,6% de participantes exitosos similar al esperado y asumible.

3. Análisis y resultados

Los resultados fueron significativos en grados de incoherencia según el soporte a partir del cual tenían que resolver los dilemas morales. Una incoherencia se define (Rest, 1986) como una falta de congruencia entre los niveles de reflexión a los que se enfrenta el sujeto. Así, el sujeto manifiesta una incoherencia cuando al elegir, al final del cuestionario de cada dilema, por orden jerárquico, las cuatro cuestiones que considera más importantes para decidir la conducta del protagonista del dilema (de las 12 propuestas) no son aquellas que habían sido valoradas con mayor importancia en el nivel anterior.

Rest y sus colaboradores (1986) proponen que sean eliminados los cuestionarios cuando contengan en un solo dilema más de ocho incoherencias, o que presenten incoherencias en dos o más dilemas. Para establecer los diferentes niveles cuantitativos de incoherencia se procedió del siguiente modo: cuando el ítem elegido, en primer lugar, de importancia no se corresponde con alguno de los ítems elegidos entre los 12 como de más importancia en la reflexión anterior, se computó como un punto de incoherencia. Si la segunda opción en importancia no tiene ninguna otra (salvo la primera) considerada como más importante, no contabiliza incoherencia, pero si la tuviese, sería otro punto de incoherencia. Si sucede con la tercera, otro punto; y si también la cuarta tiene alguna otra opción por delante (además de las elegidas en primer, segundo y tercer lugar), otro punto más. De forma que cada cuestionario, correspondiente a cada dilema, puede obtener un máximo de cuatro puntos de incoherencia cuando ninguna de las cuatro opciones, elegidas y jerarquizadas finalmente, respeta congruencia con la valoración que se ha hecho inmediatamente más arriba sobre cada una de ellas. El máximo de incoherencia sería 24 y el mínimo cero.

Los estadísticos obtenidos son una media de 7,72 incoherencias por individuo y 4,63 como desviación típica. El reparto de incoherencias por dilema e individuo varía levemente del 1,04 al 1,44 por lo cual se descarta que el diferente contenido del dilema influya en las incoherencias de los sujetos. Del mismo modo el número de incoherencias no muestra variaciones significativas en función de la pertenecía del sujeto a un grupo ni a un sexo. En cambio el reparto de incoherencias es muy significativo en función del medio comunicativo usado para transmitir el dilema y para rellenar el cuestionario (figuras 2, 3 y 4).


Draft Content 204815531-32650 ov-es066.jpg

Figura 2. Incoherencias totales de los 160 participantes.


Draft Content 204815531-32650 ov-es067.jpg

Figura 3. Incoherencias por cada dilema y cada sujeto.

Por cada incoherencia aparecida con el formato papel y lápiz aparecen 1,8 incoherencias cuando el formato usado es el audiovisual real «online» y 2,0 incoherencias en el formato que hemos llamado audiovisual virtual online (figura 2). Comparado globalmente, por cada dilema y cada sujeto, nos encontramos con que las incoherencias se multiplican por dos cuando utilizamos la comunicación audiovisual digital «online» para aplicar el test (figura 3).

La prueba ANOVA (a=0,05) para contrastar la fiabilidad de la variable dependiente (audiovisual virtual/audiovisual real/papel y lápiz) nos ofrece: F= 10,42> Valor crítico Fc=3,47 y la ANOVA (a= 0,05) que corrobora que la distribución de los estudiantes en sus grupos no ha tenido influencia arroja F=1,19< Valor crítico Fc= 2,66; las correlaciones entre los diferentes grupos de la muestra conservan siempre valores positivos desde 0,57 a 0,99 y con valor promedio de 0,89; y el análisis de las correlaciones de las incoherencias según el medio comunicativo usado varía del 0,44 al 0,65. También resulta muy significativa la diferencia entre la aparición de incoherencias cuando en el audiovisual con el que se transmite el dilema aparece una persona real (audiovisual real) o cuando quien presenta el dilema es un personaje con apariencia de presentador de telediario obtenido por software de animación (audiovisual virtual), apareciendo todavía más incoherencias cuando el formato es el audiovisual virtual (figura 4).


Draft Content 204815531-32650 ov-es068.jpg

Figura 4. Incoherencias por cada dilema y sujeto.


Draft Content 204815531-32650 ov-es069.jpg

Figura 5. Dispersión de las incoherencias manifestadas y la inteligencia Raven de cada sujeto.

Se ha encontrado que la inteligencia fluida de cada sujeto, medida con el test Raven, manifiesta una correlación negativa y moderada con respecto a la aparición total de las incoherencias con un valor de Pearson r=–0,42 (figura 5).

4. Discusión y conclusiones

La respuesta moral de nuestros sujetos se ve modificada cuando la comunicación es mediada por tecnologías digitales de comunicación. La respuesta moral de los individuos es de menor calidad (menos reflexiva y con menos capacidad de ser elevada a categoría universal) cuando utilizamos (para transmitir el contenido y extraer la respuesta) tecnologías digitales de comunicación que cuando utilizamos el procedimiento tradicional del papel impreso y el lápiz.

Ya que toda respuesta moral exige la coherencia para ser considerada, de no ser coherente será menos moral, puesto que hemos concebido la moralidad constituida por la reflexión y la universalizabilidad. La reflexión exige mantenimiento del juicio en el tiempo, y la universalizabilidad importa por no hacer depender el juicio del que juzga ni del que ejecuta la acción. La coherencia en cada juicio no determina el tenor moral, pero sí su condición moral.

Los contenidos audiovisuales en los que aparecen imágenes animadas representando a personas virtuales extraen una respuesta moral todavía más incoherente (esto es menos reflexiva y menos universalizable), que cuando en los contenidos audiovisuales aparecen personas reales transmitiendo los conflictos morales. La inteligencia fluida de los individuos de nuestra muestra es un atenuante de esta modificación de la respuesta moral en función del medio comunicativo usado.

Por tanto, los formatos y medios digitales tienden a devaluar la respuesta moral de nuestros sujetos, y el uso de imágenes virtuales de personas en vez de personas reales influye aún más negativamente en la calidad de su respuesta moral. Se ha encontrado que el compromiso que los sujetos ponen cuando deciden pulsar con un ratón, es mucho menor que el compromiso que incorporan a una marca hecha con lápiz sobre un papel. El clic del ratón es más liviano, el cuerpo actúa con menos intensidad, la mente decide con menos responsabilidad.

Recuérdese que nuestra muestra está íntegramente compuesta por jóvenes que no tienen especialización académica ninguna, y que nacieron mientras Internet se iba integrando en nuestras vidas. Jóvenes que apenas leen contenidos que no sean digitales. Pues bien, en ellos se manifiesta ese mayor respeto por lo que queda registrado sobre papel que lo que queda registrado digitalmente.

Estos resultados no se pueden contrastar con investigaciones precedentes que usan el test D.I.T., ya que en ellas su aplicación se hizo exclusivamente en papel impreso, o en aplicación «online» no audiovisual (Xu, IranNejad & Thoma, 2007; Jacobs, 2009; Clark, 2010; PalaciosNavarro, 2003). En cambio nuestro procedimiento se alinea con otras investigaciones que parten de la comunicación mediada por tecnologías digitales e indagan en el capital social de los individuos y sus comunidades digitales (Heinze, Ferneley & Child, 2013; Shim & Eom, 2009).

Es aquí donde los resultados de esta investigación alcanzan significación, en donde las nuevas herramientas digitales se convierten en instrumentos para el aprendizaje cívico y el empoderamiento ciudadano (Gozálvez, 2011; Ferrés & Pisticelli, 2012; Middaugh & Kahne, 2013; Buckingham & Rodríguez, 2013), pues se señala un efecto negativo en el capital social que hasta ahora no se había observado.

Es común, entre los primeros estudiosos del capital social (Bourdieu, 1980; Coleman, 2001; Putnam, Leonardi & Nonetti, 1993), advertir que la confianza intragrupal es un factor destacado de análisis, que las normas y su asunción son cruciales y que en las expectativas recíprocas se fraguan las recompensas que aglutinan la comunidad. Pues bien, esta investigación añade a los factores que pudieran reducir el capital social (Durston, 2000; Portes, 2000; Heinze, Ferneley & Child, 2013), que las tecnologías digitales de la comunicación disminuyen la coherencia de la respuesta moral. Esto es, que disminuyen el compromiso que el actor social establece con las normas y su expectativa de cumplimiento.

Las investigaciones futuras que se abren con estas conclusiones pudieran considerarse desde una doble perspectiva: perfeccionar la herramienta diagnóstica que hemos usado (atendiendo a más variables como el posible efecto encuadre audiovisual o «framing» (Sádaba, 2001), dándole más versatilidad, confiabilidad y refinándola para otras poblaciones); y ampliar el universo poblacional (tanto transversal como longitudinalmente) y situacional (otros entornos: metaversos, avatares…; otros aparatos digitales: tabletas, teléfonos…; otros contextos: realizar el test a solas, junto a grupos de confianza…).

Para muchos existe la convicción de que no puede haber ninguna verdad definitiva en ética, pero eso no es cierto del todo, pues la coherencia es la «conditio sine qua non» de la ética. Una conducta moral inestable, o una moral poco coherente, no es moral, que no es decir lo mismo que sea inmoral. La distancia entre lo que una cualidad tiene de óptima y lo lejos que alguien esté de detentar esa cualidad no son lo mismo. Además, la coherencia moral subyace a la acción, y si no se da aquella, la acción será voluble, cambiante, caprichosa, manipulable e inconsciente.

En otro orden, una moral acomodaticia sí que es una respuesta moral. En tanto no cambie el entorno la decisión moral se mantendrá en consonancia con lo decidido con anterioridad. Pero esta investigación concluye que los medios digitales son disolventes, también de la posible acomodación del pensamiento al contexto.

La discusión sobre los resultados de esta investigación sugiere reflexionar sobre las decisiones que afectan a la educación para los medios comunicativos digitales como lo han hecho otras (GarcíaCanclini, 2007; Gozálvez, 2011; Ferrés & Pisticelli, 2012; Middaugh & Kahne, 2013), pero además apunta a una educación que recupere, para las pantallas y los clics (con ratón o con la yema de los dedos), el compromiso que los estudiantes conservan ante el papel, la comprensión que cultivan de la palabra escrita frente a lo audiovisual, la consistencia en el pensar que muestran cuando usan papeles y lápices. De no advertir esta cautela, una invasión masiva de toma de decisiones por medios comunicativos digitales podría provocar una incoherencia tecnoculturalmente inducida en todos aquellos aspectos humanos que sean susceptibles de verse modificados por el uso comunicativo digital (relaciones humanas, consumo, democracia «online», formación a distancia, etc.).

No existen las dinámicas ciegas en los propósitos humanos, ni tampoco en las tecnologías que nos rodean. Sabiendo que las agujas en las brújulas se orientan hacia el norte es cómo podemos decidir la ruta, no hacia el horizonte que señala la punta de la flecha, sino hacia el destino que nosotros elijamos. Sin renunciar a ninguna de las ventajas que nos ofrecen las tecnologías digitales de comunicación, igual que hacemos con la aguja de la brújula, decidimos nosotros qué dejamos atrás y qué ponemos delante.

Así, el campo de aplicaciones que se abre con la interpretación y la discusión de los resultados de este experimento ha de ser considerado desde una doble perspectiva: la de conocer mejor los efectos no deseados que la comunicación mediada por tecnologías digitales pudiera provocar y la de configurar sistemas de consulta, relación y participación, de los usuarios en los que esos posibles efectos no deseados sean previstos, considerados, minimizados o anulados. Si las tecnologías digitales han venido para quedarse es porque aportan unas indudables ventajas que mejoran nuestra cotidianeidad. Pero hasta el cómodo sofá de casa ha de usarse con moderación porque puede perjudicar seriamente nuestra salud.

Referencias

Aguaded, I. (2011). Niños y adolescentes: nuevas generaciones interactivas. Comunicar, XVIII(36), 7-8. (http://doi.org/bv3tgf).

Annen, K. (2003). Social Capital, Inclusive Networks, and Economic Performance. Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 50, 449-463. (http://doi.org/fc6wcm).

Arendt, H. (1995). De la historia a la acción. Barcelona: Paidós.

Arendt, H. (2003). Conferencias sobre la filosofía política de Kant. Buenos Aires: Paidós.

Beck, U. (1998). La sociedad del riesgo. Hacia una nueva modernidad. Barcelona: Paidós.

Bourdieu, P. (1980). Le capital social. Notes provisories. Actes de la Recherche en Sciences Sociales, 31, 2-3. (http://goo.gl/Vq0yKT) (10-04-2013).

Brockman, J. (Ed.) (2011). Is the Internet Changing the Way you Think? NY: Harper Perennial.

Buckingham, D. & Rodríguez, C. (2013). Aprendiendo sobre el poder y la ciudadanía en un mundo virtual. Comunicar, XX(40), 49-58. (http://doi.org/tk6).

Buckingham, D. (2008). Más allá de la tecnología. Aprendizaje infantil en la era de la cultura digital. Buenos Aires: Manantial.

Carr, N. (2011). Superficiales. ¿Qué está haciendo internet con nuestras mentes? Madrid: Santillana.

Clark, L.I. (2010). Exploration of the Relationship Between Moral Judgment Development and Attention. Masters Thesis and Specialist Projects. Paper 210. (http://goo.gl/jWQNLV) (23-07-2013).

Coleman, J.S. (2001). Capital social en la creación de capital humano. Zona Abierta, 94-95, 47-81.

Cortina, A. (2011). Neuroética y neuropolítica. Sugerencias para la educación moral. Madrid: Tecnos.

Debord, G. (1999a). La sociedad del espectáculo. Valencia: Pre-textos.

Debord, G. (1999b). Comentarios sobre la sociedad del espectáculo. Barcelona: Anagrama.

Durston, J. (2000). ¿Qué es el capital social comunitario? Santiago de Chile: Naciones Unidas, División de Desarrollo Social.

Ferrés, J. & Pisticelli, A. (2012). La competencia mediática: propuesta articulada de dimensiones e indicadores. Comunicar, XIX(38), 75-82. (http://doi.org/tj9).

Frommer, F. (2011). El pensamiento PowerPoint. Ensayo sobre un programa que nos vuelve estúpidos. Barcelona: Península.

García-Canclini, N. (2007). Lectores, espectadores e internautas. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Gardner, H. (2005). Las cinco mentes del futuro. Un ensayo educativo. Barcelona: Paidós.

Gozálvez, V. (2011). Educación para la ciudadanía en la cultura digital. Comunicar, XVIII(36), 131-138. (http://doi.org/ffr3hn).

Heinze, A., Ferneley, E. & Child, P. (2013). Ideal Participants in Online Market Research: Lessons from Closed communities. International Journal of Market Research, 55(6), 769-789. (http://goo.gl/sCEHPc) (25-12-2013).

Hersh, R.H., Reimer, J. & Paolitto, D.P. (2002). El crecimiento moral. De Piaget a Kohlberg. Madrid: Narcea.

Jacobs, N.M. (2009). Ethics Questionarie. Modified Version of the Defining Issues Test. (http://goo.gl/lBccXg) (21-02-2013)

Jonas, H. (1995). El principio de responsabilidad. Ensayo de una ética para la civilización tecnológica. Barcelona: Herder.

Kohlberg, L. (1992). Psicología del desarrollo moral. Bilbao: Desclée de Brouwer.

Lanier, J. (2011). Contra el rebaño digital. Un manifiesto. Barcelona: Random House Mondadori.

Luna, A.C. & Laca, F.A. (2010). La teoría cognitiva del desarrollo del juicio moral a la luz de sus resultados empíricos: un análisis de fundamentos. México: XV Congreso Internacional de Filosofía. (http://goo.gl/Shr3Aw) (03-08-2013).

McLuhan, M. (1993). La Galaxia Gutenberg. Génesis del «homo typographicus». Barcelona: Círculo de Lectores.

McLuhan, M. (2009). Comprender los medios de comunicación. Las extensiones del ser humano. Barcelona: Paidós.

Middaugh, E. & Kahne, J. (2013). Nuevos medios como herramienta para el aprendizaje cívico. Comunicar, XX(40), 99-108. (http://doi.org/tk7).

Palacios-Navarro, S. (2003). El uso informatizado del cuestionario de problemas socio-morales (DIT) del (sic) REST. Pixel-Bit, 20, 5-15. (http://goo.gl/NDGR8R) (13-09-2013).

Palfrey, J. & Gasser, U. (2008). Born Digital. New York: Basic Books of Perseus Books Group.

Pérez-Delgado y otros (1996). DIT: Cuestionario de problemas socio-morales. Valencia, Nau Llibres.

Piaget, J. (1974). El criterio moral en el niño. Barcelona: Fontanella.

Portes, A. (2000). Social Capital: its Origins and Applications in Modern Sociology. In E. Lesser (Ed.), Knowledge and Social Capital. (pp. 43-67). Boston: Butterworth-Heinemann.

Prensky, M. (2012). Before Bringing in New Tools, You must First Bring in New Thinking. Amplify. (http://goo.gl/b1ULBg) (22-11-2013).

Putnam, R.D., Leonardi, R. & Nonetti, R.Y. (1993). Making Democracy Work. Civic Traditions in Modern Italy. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.

Ramírez-Plascencia, J. & Hernández González, E. (2012). ¿Tenía razón Coleman? Acerca de la relación entre capital social y logro educativo. Sinéctica 39, 01-14. (http://goo.gl/5IjcPw) (23-07-2013).

Raven, J. (2001). Test de matrices progresivas. Standard Progressive Matrices (SPM-Escala General). Madrid: Tea.

Rest, J. (1986). Manual for the Defining Issues Test. Minneapolis (Minnesota): Center for the study of Ethical Development. University of Minnesota.

Rest, J., Narvaez, D., Bebeau, M. & Thoma, S. (1999). A Neo-Kohlbergian Approach: The DIT and Schema Theory. Educational Psychology Review, 11(4), 291-324. (http://doi.org/ffg3x4).

Rest, J., Narváez, D., Thoma, S.J. & Bebeau, M.J. (2000). A Neo-Kohlbergian Approach to Morality Research. Journal of Moral Education, 29(4), 381-395. (http://doi.org/b8wc8q).

Rest, J.R. (1979). Development in Judging Moral Issues. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota.

Rundle, M. & Conley, C. (2007) Ethical Implications of Emerging Technologies: A Survey. UNESCO: Paris. (http://goo.gl/uc5Xub) (23-07-2013).

Sádaba, M.T. (2001). Origen, aplicación y límites de la teoría del encuadre (framing) en comunicación. Comunicación y Sociedad, XIV(2), 143-175.

Sartori, G.(1998). Homo videns. La sociedad teledirigida. Madrid: Santillana-Taurus.

Shim, D.C. & Eom, T.H. (2009). Efectos de las tecnologías de la información y del capital social en la lucha contra la corrupción. Revista Internacional de Ciencias Administrativas, 75(1), 113-132.

Small, G. & Vorgan, G. (2008). El cerebro digital. Cómo las nuevas tecnologías están cambiando nuestra mente. Barcelona: Urano.

UNESCO (2005). Declaración de Alejandría. Faros para la sociedad de la información. (http://goo.gl/iame6N) (21-02-2014).

Watson, R. (2011). Mentes del futuro. ¿Está cambiando la era digital nuestras mentes? Barcelona: Viceversa.

Wolf, M. (2008). Cómo aprendemos a leer. Historia y ciencia del cerebro y la lectura. Barcelona: Ediciones B.

Xu, Y., Iran-Nejad, A. & Thoma, S.J. (2007). Administering Defining Issues Test Online: Do Response Modes Matter? Journal of Interactive Online Learning, 6(1). (http://goo.gl/Y6ovny) (23-05-2013).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/14
Accepted on 31/12/14
Submitted on 31/12/14

Volume 23, Issue 1, 2015
DOI: 10.3916/C44-2015-16
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 4
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?