Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The emergence of Twitter appears to be changing information practices. Hence, a great deal of recent research is based on its popularity among communicators, reaching the conclusion that it serves to increase interactivity with readers. But to what degree is it true that it contributes to a type of journalism which is more open to the public? This research aims especially to clarify two main questions: what specific uses do journalists make of Twitter and to what extent does twoway interaction with the public take place through this medium? It is based on the quantitative analysis of a sample comprising almost 5 million tweets posted by 1,504 Spanish media communicators, perhaps the largest sample studied so far. The analysis shows the existence of a twospeed Twitter (with a minority of influential communicators and a majority who have little impact), which has negligible interaction with followers. With few exceptions, the communicators establish endogamous relationships on Twitter. They respond to mention and retweet colleagues, failing to take advantage of the multidirectional potential offered by the platform. This research expands the empirical basis which can be used to consider and discuss the scope and limits of user participation in information events. Many authors have theorized on this subject, perhaps too enthusiastically and arguably from a somewhat utopian perspective.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Twitter was born in March 2006. It was a unique voice in the polysemic concert of social networks. From that point on, although it has never been able to compete with Facebook, many consider it to be far more influential. It is said that it does not win elections, but there is not a politician in the world who does not spend some time, energy and resources on the service, especially during campaigns (Conway, Kenski, & Wang, 2015), nor any «celebrity» worth their salt, some with over 50 million followers. Its power is attested by the fact that it has even been blocked by several governments, such as Egypt, Iran and Turkey.

Its unique form of interaction has been welcomed by communicators, who feel especially at home on Twitter: due to its format, similar to headlines or short news items (Carrera, Sainz-de-Baranda, Herrero, & Limón, 2012); due to ease of interaction with sources, protagonists and even readers (Posetti, 2009); due to the fact it is useful for detecting, storing, indexing and recovering trends and news (Martínez, 2014); due to the adult profile of its users, «more serious» than that of other networks and more interested in the news (Miller, 2009; González, Fanjul, & Cabezuelo, 2015); due to its speed and brevity, ideal for informing readers of breaking news and following interesting journalists (Hermida, 2010).

In fact, the media created powerful profiles with millions of followers, with the result that little by little Twitter changed the way in which we communicate: there is not a prime time television programme which does not display the «hashtag» Twitter users can use to interact with each other, with the programme or with the sponsors; every radio chat show receives listeners’ opinions via short messages on Twitter; the @ symbol appears together with the byline on columns and articles (Farhi, 2013); each communication medium has an official Twitter account on which they permanently post messages; editorial departments create jobs which did not exist before to generate contents for Twitter and other networks and to monitor everything that goes on in them.

But Twitter also has its weaknesses. Many people question how much truth there is in its messages and if they are not merely transmitting unfounded rumours (Sutter, 2009). Some are of the opinion that looking to Twitter for significant information is like searching for medical advice in a world of quacks (Goodman, 2009), as one has to negotiate tons of rubbish among totally irrelevant tweets. Twitter´s 140 character straitjacket is another important limitation together with the «timeline» structure itself: the actual effectiveness of the tweets which are posted is not known, as it would seem that no-one goes back to read previous posts. The interface also lacks intuitiveness and many people abandon the service before they understand it. Some of the keywords, abbreviations and language used by expert Twitter users appear to be characteristic of a sect. Also, the presence of anonymous profiles who post offensive and threatening tweets drives users away. Even the continuity of service is worrying as it is not profitable and may be unviable; the company still does not know how to convert its millions of users into clients. There is also the challenge of promoting loyalty, another unresolved issue for the network: various research studies have concluded that 60% of people who open a Twitter account do not return to it in the following month.

Despite these weaknesses and a few disagreements, (Lee, 2015), Twitter and communicators, as we have mentioned, have mutual affection for each other. If we accept that the hidden agenda of the platform is not to compete with professional journalism, as some conspiracy theory lovers have ventured (Winer, 2012), it has to be admitted that current academic literature seems to agree that the benefits of Twitter for communication outweigh the threats. Twitter is one of the most powerful journalistic tools to appear in the last ten years, according to Alan Rusbridger, of «The Guardian» (Elola, 2010). Professor Orihuela (2011) is also of the opinion that Twitter is an «indispensable» tool for journalism and that communicators should be aware of conversations which affect the news, their brand, and their medium, as well as facilitating permanent contact with their sources, monitoring trends, revealing exclusives, publishing news and interacting with the audience. Some emphasize the compatibility of the service with an increasingly important type of «data journalism», in compiling, screening and observing what is going on (Lorenz, 2013), with the credibility afforded by numbers (Gillmor, 2012).

There is even a part of this literature which reflects on the skills which future communicators will have to develop in this new environment of «compulsive hyperconnection and global information overload» (Aguaded, 2014: 7). Some believe that the criteria used to check sources and information provided by prosumers will be the same as they have always been, but a significant increase in precaution will be necessary (Hernández, 2013). There is also speculation about the future of schools of journalism, concluding that they will be obliged to change their focus towards the creation of contents for all types of applications, including those for mobile devices, and to equip future professionals with the skills required by a market which has been blown away by the speed of Twitter (Franco, 2008): how to write headlines, select contents correctly and adapt them to each platform (De-Aguilera, 2009).

Twitter, especially, is thought to offer an unbeatable capacity for interaction with the audience, generating conversations with users and conducting them intelligently (Carrera, Herrero, Limón, Sainz, & Ocaña, 2012). It is also particularly useful for confirming news with direct witnesses, contrasting perspectives, debating points of view, preparing future articles and producing stories through the very people who will receive the information (Soria, 2015; Watson, 2015).

But has Twitter really changed the practice of the profession to such an extent? Recent academic research has tried to explain the correlation.

2. Status of the issue

Over and above the large amount of research relating to how the public uses the information published on the network, a significant number of papers which directly examine the use of Twitter have been written by communication professionals. Most of this research confirms that communicators prefer to use Twitter rather than other platforms. In the United States, a study carried out by PR Week / PR Newswire (2010) among 1,300 professionals in the communication industry concluded that over 50% of professional journalists use Twitter as an investigative tool when writing news articles. According to this analysis, one out of every three journalists acknowledges having quoted a Twitter post in a news article they were writing.

A study carried out on «How Spanish Journalists Are Using Twitter» (Carrera, Sainz-de-Baranda, Herrero, & Limón, 2012) reached the same conclusion, confirming also that the network most used by journalists is Twitter (95% of the 50 journalists interviewed use it very frequently), not only to transmit their own news (82%), but also to transmit information from other sources and from the competition (67%). Twitter is the preferred medium due to its speed and variety, and it is also used as a means to turn something viral. This latter fact was confirmed by researchers from ten Latin-American universities who analysed 5,010 messages from the communication media (García, Yezers’Ka, & al., 2011): the flow of information is greater on the microblogging platform, where the speed at which the news is spread and the possibility of contacting witnesses to events immediately is considered important. In this same vein, Martínez defended her doctoral thesis in 2014 on «The new media and journalism in social media» in which she concluded that, after interviewing 50 directors of Spanish media, Twitter was their preferred tool. The subsidiary company of PR Newswire in Brazil (2011) reached the same conclusion, establishing that it was also the preferred network for 73.4% of the almost 400 Brazilian journalists who were surveyed.

Coming back to the United States, in 2013 «The State of the News Media 2013» was published, an annual report on the state of journalism published by The Pew Research Centre’s Project for Excellence in Journalism. According to this report, Twitter had consolidated its reputation in the U.S.A. as a place to which both readers and journalists turn in order to discover the latest news updates. More recent research has confirmed the same data: in 2014 Oriella published a survey of 550 journalists from 15 countries in which he underlined the increase in the number of Twitter accounts held by those surveyed.

The spirit of belonging to the media itself has also been the subject of investigation, such as the research carried out by the Chilean professors Alberto López-Hermida and Cecilia Claro (2011), as well as the relationship between information and opinion (Lasorsa, Lewis, & Holton, 2012).

Much research has focused on investigating the interactivity afforded by this platform: in the field of radio, in 2012 Susana Herrera and José Luis Requejo published an interesting study on how Spanish radio stations use Twitter, concluding that they fail to exploit the potential which the service offers. However, this data is in paradoxical contrast to the majority of research, which concludes that interactivity is what communication professionals value most. Take, for example, the study «Who am I and who are you?» (Carrera, Herrero, Limón, Sainz, & Ocaña, 2012), in which 91.24% of those surveyed stated that they would retweet comments made by any user, or the research on «What is going on? The ‘twitterization’ of the Columbian media» (Duque & Zúñiga, 2012), which highlights the use of Twitter as a place for debate with readers and where the news can be gone into in more depth. The conclusions reached by Noguera (2013) and Diezhandino (2012) seem to point in this same direction, confirming the self perception held by communicators that they have not lost contact with the public.

3. Material and methods

This research analysed the behaviour on Twitter of 1,504 communicators in Spain. The sample was selected at random from the written press: 16 newspapers were chosen and all regular contributors who had published an article in them were included. After three inspections on days chosen at random, with the provision that some Sundays be included, an initial figure of 1,560 communicators was reached, which, after successive eliminations in order to avoid duplications and possible errors, was reduced to 1,504 communicators, authors of 4,687,215 tweets, almost five million messages. There is no evidence to date of any other research which has worked with such a large sample.

The newspapers which were included in the sample were, firstly, the eight Spanish daily newspapers with the largest readership according to the Spanish General Media Survey: «Marca», «El País», «As», «El Mundo», «La Vanguardia», «El Periódico», «Sport» and «El Mundo Deportivo». Also included were two of the most widely read national, not regional, dailies: «ABC» and «La Razón». To this were also added the two financial journals with the largest circulation: «Expansión» and «Cinco Días», as well as the three most widely sold newspapers in Malaga, where the research was conducted: «SUR», «Málaga Hoy» and «La Opinión de Málaga». Finally, «20 Minutos», an online newspaper with over a million readers daily, was also included.

The information was encoded by means of a Microsoft for Apple Excel spreadsheet, interrelating over 166,000 cells of data. For the statistical analysis of the data, measures of central tendency (mode, mean and median), measures of dispersion (standard deviation and variance), tables (simple data distribution, frequency distribution, interval frequency distribution and percentage frequency distribution) and graphs (histogrammes, circular graphics, word clouds, frequency polygons, and frequency curves) were used.

The research analyzed the behaviour of 40 variables relating to the identity and the activity of the account, and to the text published in the press.

4. Analysis and results

4.1. Sex, length of time the account has been open and frequency

The research defined six baseline hypotheses. The first of these examined various general aspects of the profiles and it was affirmed that Spanish communicators who use Twitter were for the most part male, had held an account for over two years and posted at least three messages a day. The analysis of the profiles concluded that this hypothesis was only partly correct.

Regarding the use of Twitter, not all the communicators use it. The majority do, that is, 61% of the sample, over half of the group which was analyzed, but far fewer than would be expected in a medium which, judging by the aforementioned research, enjoys popularity with communicators. The newspapers in the sample which hold proportionally more accounts are «20 Minutos» (76.92%) and «As» (76.19%); those which had fewest, «La Opinión de Málaga» (46.88%) and «La Razón» (37.50%).

In relation to sex, the first piece of data is paradoxical and striking: without taking into consideration the use of Twitter, 73.17% of the sample, that is, the majority, are male. Out of 1,504 communicators, with or without a Twitter account, women represent only 26.83%. In other words, those who write in the printed press, the sole criterion for being included in the sample, are for the most part male. The paradox is that despite the fact that in the last few years the media has become the foremost defender of parity between the sexes, in their editorial departments, at any rate, it would seem that women are in the minority. None of the newspapers comes close to the figures given by the Active Population Survey (EPA), which calculates that women represent 46.15% of the total workforce in Spain.

However, in relation to the use of Twitter, if we look at relative values, that is, the number of Twitter accounts in relation to the number of persons of the same sex, women outnumber men, as 67.09% of women have a Twitter account compared to 61.37% of men. Although this contradicts the aforementioned hypothesis, nonetheless, the average number of tweets posted by the men in the sample since the account was opened (5,638 tweets) is greater than the average number posted by the women (3,800 tweets). This data is confirmed when we look at the average number of tweets per day: women, 4.11; men, 5.52. That is to say, although the women hold a larger number of active Twitter accounts, the men make slightly more use of the service: they are somewhat more active than the women. In this respect, the prediction of the hypothesis is true. This is also the case in relation to the length of time the account has been open: 68.81% of the accounts analyzed were opened between 2010 and 2011.

4.2. Sense of belonging

The second hypothesis of this research affirmed that communicators identify themselves on Twitter as journalists, indicating that they belong to the newspaper for which they work. Firstly, 89.77% of the accounts include a «description» or «bio», and 94.30% of these descriptions indicate that the holder’s profession is related to the communication industry, as they define themselves specifically as a «journalist», «reporter», «columnist», «copywriter», etc. This figure is exceedingly high and undoubtedly reflects a strong sense of belonging to the profession, which makes them appear more trustworthy in the eyes of their followers.

In relation to references to the newspaper, noticeable differences appear in the sample: those who identify most with their publishing houses would appear to be the communicators from «Cinco Días» and «20 Minutos», who name their newspaper in over 90% of the descriptions of their accounts; those who identify least with their publishers are those from «La Razón» (40%) and «Sur» (53.33%).

4.3. Influence of the accounts

In the third hypothesis, it is affirmed that the communicators analyzed have a high degree of influence, and that this is expressed in the number of followers, the retweeting of their messages, list membership or having their messages marked as favourites.

In effect, the data shows that the communicators show influence scores which are above the average 40 points, as the average for the sample analyzed was 44.99. Although these almost 5 points may not seem enough to talk about «influential profiles», the truth is that 73.51% of the total number of accounts analyzed score well above 40, but the accounts which have little or no activity significantly lower the arithmetical average.

Furthermore, the «Klout» Score states that scores over 60 are reserved for a select group of «very influential» accounts, representing a mere 5% of Internet users; however, in the case of this sample, this percentage increases significantly as accounts with scores of over 60 make up 10.21% of the sample, in other words, double the percentage which would be present in any other group of users. Of all the accounts which were analyzed, the profiles with the highest Klout Score are those held by Risto Mejide, Elvira Lindo, Guillem Balagué, Enrique Dans and Mister Chip.

Another of the variables examined which has a direct repercussion on the influence of an account is the number of «followers». The average number of followers in the sample is 12,959 followers per account. The reality is a little lower, as the median is 991 followers, due to the fact that some accounts with a large number of followers artificially push up this average. In any case, the average number of followers is well above the average number for the typical Twitter user, which is estimated at 61 followers. Mejide, for example, has more than two million followers; Jordi Évole, almost two million; not far behind is Alexis Martín Tamayo, Mister Chip.

The number of messages retweeted by other users is a further indicator of influence. Retweeting may be interpreted in many ways, but it always involves relative adhesion to the message which is resent. 23.51% of the posts in the sample were retweeted by others. This figure is extremely high, but it is insignificant if we compare it to the 93.84% of messages posted by Mister Chip which were retweeted by other users. Moreover, if we examine not the percentage of tweets which were retweeted by others, but the number of times they were retweeted, the figures shoot up astoundingly, reaching those of «celebrities»: Mister Chip, over a million times; Tomás Roncero and Mejide, over half a million times (note: after analyzing only the 3,200 tweets which Twitter allows the recovery of from each account).

Another variable relating to influence is the number of lists created by users which include the account in question. The average figure in the sample is 217.85 lists per account, a truly extraordinary figure. The two accounts in the sample which were included in the highest number of lists are those belonging to Évole and Ignacio Escolar, which were present in over 10,000 lists. The person with the highest rate of incidence «in lists per 1,000 followers» is Professor Dans, with almost 40 lists per 1,000 followers.

Finally, the fact that a tweet is marked as «favourite» by another user is also a factor which affects the influence a user has on others, as it is an indicator of the interest which his or her messages arouses. The data repeats itself: the sample average is 288 tweets marked as favourite. 92.3% of the messages posted by Míster Chip were marked as favourite. The analyzed tweets posted by Mejide were marked as favourite 178, 198 times. These are undoubtedly spectacular figures.

4.4. Mediatic communicators

The fourth hypothesis stated that the communicators with greatest influence on Twitter are those who combine their presence in the written press with presence in other forms of media, such as radio or television.

This research interrelated several variables in order to select the profiles in the sample with the greatest influence, such as those with the highest Klout Score, the largest number of followers and the most number of times their posts were retweeted. Once the 15 most influential accounts had been identified, it was found that the hypothesis was confirmed without exception, as all of them conduct their professional activities not only in the written press but in different audiovisual media.

4.5. Interactivity

The fifth hypothesis dealt with one of the aspects with which the latest academic research has been most concerned: it affirmed that communicators use Twitter to interact with their sources, detect new stories to report, contrast information, talk to their readers and request their cooperation in compiling news articles. In other words, Twitter encourages interactivity.

In order to verify this hypothesis, it was important to know who the communicators were retweeting, who they were answering, which posts they retweeted or who they mentioned. Bearing in mind the size of the sample and its high output, this was an especially laborious task.

The first step was to identify which accounts the communicators in the sample retweeted. To do this, the study examined the ten accounts which were retweeted most by each and every one of the profiles in the sample, without exception, and selected those accounts which had been retweeted by at least two profiles from each newspaper. The subsequent preferences produced an astonishing and unexpected piece of data: 82% of the messages originated from accounts which were found to belong to the newspaper itself or to the same business group and less than 1% of these most retweeted accounts came from outside the profession.

The second variable which was examined were mentions. These are also a significant indicator of interactivity as their purpose is to inform the user who is mentioned that they are being talked about, to agree with something they said or to post a question or comment to them. We were therefore interested in finding out who the communicators in the sample mentioned. The same procedure was followed and once again a striking discovery was made: only 2.52% of these mentions referred to accounts belonging to individuals outside the profession.

Finally, the replies were analyzed, as they are also a valuable indicator of interactivity. We were interested in finding out who the communicators replied to, so the same procedure was followed. Once again, surprisingly, it was concluded that the majority were replies to colleagues, as only 3.68% of the replies were addressed to users unrelated to the profession.

Consequently, the analysis of the indicators of interactivity did not confirm the desired bidirectionality of the messages and contradicted the assumptions which are made in a large part of the literature on the relationship between Twitter and Journalism.

4.6. The Press and Twitter

The sixth and final hypothesis stated that communicators use Twitter to comment on the information published in the press, enhancing it with new perspectives through links to diverse sources.

The analysis of the tweets, however, would appear to negate this hypothesis, as 70% of the links lead to the pages of the group itself or to the personal blogs of the communicators. There is neither much diversity nor much enhancement.

Nor would it appear that Twitter is used to enhance articles the communicators are writing as the research failed to find any tweet in which the communicators requested information relating to the topics on which they were working. Consequently, there was no evidence of the use of Twitter as a tool which contributes to generating news.

5. Discussion and conclusions

The quantitative analysis of the 40 variables included in this research provides an overall view of how Spanish communicators use Twitter, far beyond the simple self perception of previous qualitative research. The size of the sample, unprecedented to date, means that considerably significant conclusions may be drawn.

Firstly, it can be concluded that Spanish communicators use Twitter (61%), which is perhaps less than expected, especially if we take into account some of the earlier research which claims, as we have mentioned previously, that the platform has been adopted by 95% of these professionals. Bearing in mind that the majority of this research has concentrated on profiles of directors or on profiles of communicators who are specifically related to new technologies, it could be claimed that the use of Twitter by the vast majority of journalists is lower than expected.

What is clear is that the communicators have achieved a degree of influence on Twitter which is above average, especially those whose work combines the written press with audiovisual media. This data may lead us to believe that this influence is not a result of their activity on the networks but of their presence in the traditional media. In any event, it is true that the sample as a whole brings to light averages of influence and presence on Twitter which are slightly higher than those of the average user of the platform.

Moreover, although this above average influence is apparent, there is evidence also of the existence of two «divisions» between the communicators, something like a «two speed Twitter». The continual references the research makes to the median as a statistical measure of central tendency are justified, given that in almost all the variables the average has been perceived as a misleading indicator. This is due to the existence of a leading group which produces extreme statistics which distort reality, statistics with breathtaking figures, typical of celebrities, in contrast to a majority with statistics which were only slightly above the Twitter average.

This leading group, which represents only 5% of the sample, has turned out to be especially productive, as it produced 35% of the tweets which were published daily in the sample. Moreover, if we were to narrow the spectrum even more and reduce it to 1% of the sample, we would discover that this minority absorbs 52% of the total number of times the posts in the sample were retweeted, in other words, these accounts alone produced half of the retweeted messages in the sample.

The second group of communicators, which makes up 95% of the sample, produced much more modest figures. Nevertheless, although it does not reach the rock star statistics of the first group, it is above the average for Twitter users in important variables such as the Klout Score, number of followers, number of daily tweets, tweets which have been marked as favourite, retweets, list membership, etc.

However, there is a common denominator between both the leading group and the crowd: both the former and the latter, both the most influential tweeters and the less influential, establish endogamous relationships: they respond to colleagues, retweet colleagues and mention colleagues. Not even the majority of the most influential accounts in the sample can be excluded from this affirmation, with the exception of Professor Dans and, in part, that of the Onda Cero collaborator, Míster Chip.

This affirmation allows us to conclude that for the majority of communicators Twitter is just another, rather unidirectional, traditional medium. Hence, the belief that its use has modified the paradigm of communication or its practices is a fallacy, or the expression of an aspiration, no matter how much the idea abounds in the academic literature on the subject and how much communicators themselves hold this self perception, as is evident in some of the aforementioned research. Much has been written on the participation of users in the information reporting process and the effects of this participation on communication models and, in general, our life as a society, as well as other similar and undoubtedly interesting and significant phenomena; but these reflections are not always based on sufficient empirical evidence and rather frequently respond to a perspective which could be called cyber-utopian.

On the contrary, according to the data produced by our research, it could be deduced that the recent adoption of the service has seemingly affected only the medium, the mantle, the dissemination of the messages, but not the origin or the destination of the information, and far less the processes whereby it is produced.

Although the new tool offers unquestionable attractions as it is fast, it detects trends and is a source of information, there is no indication that it has come to be an instrument of communication for the public, in which professionals and non professionals participate in creating news. The reality is this: with some exceptions, the interactivity afforded by Twitter is not being used to full advantage.

These affirmations, obviously, should not be generalized as the research also verified that some profiles show a high degree of interactivity, although these are a minority and not statistically significant. Nor should these conclusions question the use and benefits of the service, which has adjusted very well to the practices of the profession. But the data is conclusive.

References

Aguaded, I. (2014). Desde la infoxicación al derecho a la comunica­ción. Comunicar, 42, 07-08. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C­42-2014-a1

Carrera, P., Herrero, E., Limón, N., Sainz, C., & Ocaña E. (2012). ¿Quién soy yo y quién eres tú? ¿Están transformando las redes sociales la imagen que los periodistas radiofónicos españoles tienen del público? Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico, 18, 223-231. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5209/rev_ESMP.2012.v18.40976

Carrera, P., Sainz-de-Baranda, C., Herrero, E., & Limón, N. (2012). Journalism and SocialMedia : How Spanish Journalists Are Using Twitter. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Perio­dístico, 18, 31-53. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5209/rev_­eSMP.2012.v18.n1.39353

Conway, B. A., Kenski, K. & Wang, D. (2015). The Rise of Twitter in the Political Campaign: Searching for Intermedia Agenda-Setting Effects in the Presidential Primary. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 20, 363-380. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcc­4.12124

De-Aguilera, M. (2009). Innovación, prácticas culturales y contenidos audiovisuales. Una introducción. In M. De-Aguilera, & M. Meere (2009), Una tele en el bolsillo. Málaga: Círculo de Estudios Visuales AdHoc.

Diezhandino, M.P., & al. (2012). El periodista en la encrucijada. Madrid: Fundación Telefónica.

Duque, Á., & Zúñiga, D. (2012). ¿Qué está sucediendo? La ‘twitte­ración’ de los medios colombianos. Bogotá: Universidad del Rosa­rio. (http://goo.gl/UbsfpM) (08-08-2014).

Elola, J. (2010). Debo ser más radical en lo digital. El País, 12-09-2010. (http://goo.gl/YOf9dI) (12-01-2015).

Farhi, P. (2013). El boom de Twitter. Cuadrivio. (http://goo.gl/XRMY1I) (21-04-2014).

Franco, G. (2008). Cómo escribir para la web. Austin: Universidad de Texas, Centro Knight para Periodismo en las Américas.

García, E., Yezers’Ka, L., & al. (2011). Uso de Twitter y Facebook por los medios iberoamericanos. El Profesional de la Información, 20(6), 611-620. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3145/epi.2011.nov.02. (http://goo.gl/49Iu5U) (09-02-2015).

Gillmor, D. (2012). Hagan números. Nieman Journalism Lab, Pre­dicciones para el Periodismo en 2013. Universidad de Harvard. (http://goo.gl/9tZGxL) (09-02-2015).

González, C., Fanjul, C., & Cabezuelo, F. (2015). Uso, consumo y conocimiento de las nuevas tecnologías en personas mayores en Francia, Reino Unido y España. Comunicar, 45, 19-28. doi: ht­tp://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C45-2015-02

Goodman, E. (2009). Journalism Needed in Twitter Era. Columbia Daily Tribune, 05-07-2009. (http://goo.gl/DHDsaV) (07-02-2015).

Hermida, A. (2010). From TV to Twitter: How Ambient News Be­came Ambient Journalism. M/C Journal, 13, 2. (http://goo.gl/v73­eDG) (09-02-2015).

Hernández, C. (2013). El desafío periodístico en tiempos 2.0. Cla­sesdeperiodismo.com. (http://goo.gl/1Z2Pye) (01-02-2015).

Herrera, S., & Requejo J.L. (2012). Difundir información, principal uso que las emisoras generalistas españolas están haciendo de Twitter. Observatorio Journal, 6(3), 193-227.

Lasorsa, D.L., Lewis, S.C., & Holton, A.E. (2012). Normalizing Twitter: Journalism Practice in an Emerging Communication Space. Journalism Studies, 13(1), 19-36. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/­1461670X.2011.571825

Lee, J. (2015). The Double-Edged Sword: The Effects of Journalists’ Social Media Activities on Audience Perceptions of Journalists and Their News Products. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 20, 312-329. doi: http://dx.doi.org/­10.1111/jcc4.12113

López-Hermida, A., & Claro, C. (2011). Medios y periodistas en Twitter: el caso chileno. Correspondencias & Análisis, 1, 17-33.

Lorenz, M. (2013). Data Journalism Handbook (http://goo.gl/­PTDZdM) (08-02-2015).

Martínez, F. (2014). Los nuevos medios y el periodismo de medios sociales. Tesis doctoral. Madrid: Universidad Complutense (http://eprints.ucm.es/24592/1/T35106.pdf) (08-02-2015).

Miller, C. (2009). Twitter es más atractivo para los adultos que para los adolescentes. La Nación, 27-08-2009. (http://goo.gl/L51hHy) (28-8-2014).

Noguera, J.M. (2013). How Open Are Journalists on Twitter? Trends towards the End-user Journalism. Comunicación & Socie­dad, 26(1), 95-116.

Oriella (2014). The New Normal for News. Have Global Media Changed Forever? Oriella PR Network Global Digital Journalism Study 2013. (http://goo.gl/5EiQOM) (12-05-2014).

Orihuela, J.L. (2011). Twitter: una guía para comprender y dominar la plataforma que cambió la Red. Barcelona: Alienta.

Posetti, J. (2009). Twitter’s Difficult Gift to Journalism. NewMa­tilda.com. (http://goo.gl/j6jucM) (29-12-2014).

PR Newswire Brasil (2011). Brazilian Journalists and Social Net­works. Brasil: PR Newswire. (http://goo.gl/O3opbS) (22-01-2015).

PR Week / PR Newswire (2010). 2010 PR Week / PR Newswire Media Survey: Longer Hours, Heavier Workloads Persist; but Fears Over Further Job Erosion Moderate. New York. (http://goo.gl/UCSYFa) (13-06-2014).

Soria, M. (2015). El uso de Twitter para analizar el activismo ciudadano: las noticias económicas de los principales periódicos de referencia nacional. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico. 21, 59­9­-614. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5209/rev_ESMP.2015.v21.n1.­49­113

Sutter, J.D. (2009). Celebrity Death Rumors Spread Online. CNN.­com. (http://goo.gl/BsglA1) (15-06-2014).

The Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism (2013). The State of the News Media, 2013. Annual Report on the Status of American Journalism. The Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism. (http://goo.gl/rKIRm8) (12-01-2015).

Watson, B.R. (2015). Is Twitter an Alternative Medium? Comparing Gulf Coast Twitter and Newspaper Coverage of the 2010 BP Oil Spill. Communication Research. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1­177/0093650214565896

Winer, D. (2012). News Guys, Twitter is not your Friend. Scripting News, 07-06-2012. (http://goo.gl/cyvCda) (22-01-2015).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

La irrupción de Twitter parece estar cambiando las prácticas informativas. De ahí que bastantes investigaciones recientes partan de su popularidad entre los comunicadores para concluir que sirve para aumentar la interactividad con los lectores. Pero ¿hasta qué punto es cierta su contribución a un periodismo más abierto a la ciudadanía? Este trabajo busca sobre todo contribuir a clarificar dos cuestiones principales: qué usos concretos dan a Twitter los periodistas y hasta qué punto se mantiene esa interacción ?de ida y vuelta? con la ciudadanía gracias a este medio. Se basa en el análisis cuantitativo de una muestra de casi cinco millones de tuits correspondientes a 1.504 comunicadores de medios españoles; probablemente, la mayor muestra estudiada hasta ahora. El análisis constata la existencia de un Twitter a dos velocidades (con una minoría de comunicadores muy influyente y una mayoría con escaso impacto), pero una interacción con los seguidores prácticamente nula. Salvo excepciones, los comunicadores establecen en Twitter relaciones muy endogámicas, respondiendo, retuiteando y mencionando a colegas, desaprovechando así las potencialidades multidireccionales que ofrece esta plataforma. Esta investigación amplía la base empírica con la que pensar y discutir el alcance y los límites de la participación de los usuarios en los fenómenos informativos, que tantos autores han teorizado, quizá, con demasiado entusiasmo y, sin duda, con una perspectiva en cierta medida utópica.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

En marzo de 2006 nació Twitter, una voz singular en el concierto polisémico de las redes sociales. Desde entonces, aunque en ningún momento ha podido competir con Facebook, muchos consideran que es mucho más influyente que ésta. Se dice que no gana elecciones, pero no hay político en el mundo que no le dedique tiempo, energía y recursos a esta herramienta, sobre todo en periodos de campaña (Conway, Kenski, & Wang, 2015); ni «celebrity» que se precie, algunos con más de 50 millones de seguidores. Algo tendrá cuando varios Gobiernos han llegado a bloquearla, como Egipto, Irán o Turquía.

Su particular forma de interactuar ha sido muy bien acogida por los comunicadores, quienes se sienten especialmente cómodos en Twitter: por su formato, próximo a los titulares o breves (Carrera, Sainz-de-Baranda, Herrero, & Limón, 2012); por la facilidad para interactuar con las fuentes, con los protagonistas e incluso con los lectores (Posetti, 2009); por su utilidad para identificar tendencias y noticias, guardarlas, indexarlas y recuperarlas (Martínez, 2014); por el perfil adulto de sus usuarios, «más serio» que el de otras redes y más interesado en las noticias (Miller, 2009; González, Fanjul, & Cabezuelo, 2015); por ser veloz y breve, ideal para lanzar primicias a los lectores y seguir a firmas interesantes (Hermida, 2010).

De hecho, los medios de comunicación crearon potentes perfiles con millones de seguidores, haciendo que poco a poco Twitter cambiara la manera de hacer comunicación: no hay programa de televisión de máxima audiencia que no indique el «hashtag» que pueden usar los tuiteros para interactuar entre sí, con el programa o con los patrocinadores; no hay tertulia de radio que no recoja las impresiones de los oyentes a través de los cortos mensajes de Twitter; las arrobas aparecen junto al nombre firmando columnas y artículos (Farhi, 2013); no hay medio de comunicación que no tenga una cuenta oficial de Twitter desde la que está permanentemente emitiendo mensajes; en las redacciones se crean puestos que antes no existían para generar contenidos para esta y otras redes y monitorizar cuanto sucede en ellas.

Pero también Twitter tiene sus debilidades. Muchos se preguntan qué hay de verdad en sus mensajes y si estos no recogen rumores sin fundamento (Sutter, 2009). Algunos creen que acudir a Twitter para buscar información significativa es como buscar un consejo médico en un concilio de curanderos (Goodman, 2009), pues hay que sortear toneladas de basura entre tuits absolutamente irrelevantes. El corsé de los 140 caracteres de Twitter es otra gran limitación junto a la propia estructura del «timeline»: se desconoce la eficacia real de los tuits publicados ya que parece que nadie vuelve atrás para leer lo publicado antes. La interfaz es también muy poco intuitiva y hay muchos que abandonan la plataforma antes de entenderla. Incluso algunas de las claves, abreviaturas y lenguajes que usan los tuiteros expertos parecen propias de una secta. También la presencia de perfiles anónimos que publican tuits ofensivos y amenazantes genera deserciones. Y preocupa hasta la continuidad del servicio: no es rentable y podría ser inviable; la compañía aún no sabe cómo convertir a sus millones de usuarios en clientes. Además, está el reto de la fidelización, otra de las asignaturas pendientes de esta red: diversos estudios han concluido que el 60% de la gente que abre una cuenta en Twitter no regresa al mes siguiente.

A pesar de todas estas debilidades y de algunos desencuentros (Lee, 2015), Twitter y comunicadores, como decíamos, sienten mutua simpatía. Si aceptamos que la agenda oculta de esta plataforma no es competir con el periodismo profesional, como algunos amantes de las teorías de la conspiración han llegado a aventurar (Winer, 2012), hay que reconocer que hoy la literatura académica parece estar de acuerdo en que los beneficios de Twitter para la comunicación son mayores que las amenazas. Twitter es una de las herramientas periodísticas más poderosa que ha aparecido en los últimos diez años, cree Alan Rusbridger, de «The Guardian» (Elola, 2010). Orihuela (2011) opina también que Twitter es una herramienta «imprescindible» para hacer periodismo y que los comunicadores deberían escuchar las conversaciones que afectan a la información, a su marca, a su medio, además de tener un contacto permanente con sus fuentes, monitorizar tendencias, descubrir exclusivas, publicar noticias e interactuar con la audiencia. Algunos subrayan la compatibilidad de esta plataforma con el cada vez más valorado «periodismo de datos», en la recolección, filtrado y visualización de lo que está sucediendo (Lorenz, 2013), con la credibilidad que aportan los números (Gillmor, 2012).

Hay incluso una parte de esta literatura que reflexiona sobre las habilidades que tendrán que desarrollar los futuros comunicadores en este nuevo ámbito de «hiperconexión compulsiva y sobreinformación global» (Aguaded, 2014: 7). Hay quienes piensan que los criterios de comprobación de fuentes e informaciones suministradas por los prosumidores serán los mismos de toda la vida, pero tendrá que haber un aumento importante de la cautela (Hernández, 2013). También se especula sobre el futuro de las escuelas de periodismo, concluyendo que deberán reorientar sus enfoques hacia la creación de contenidos en todo tipo de aplicaciones, incluidas las móviles y preparar a los futuros profesionales con las nuevas capacitaciones que requiere un mercado que ha sido dinamitado por la celeridad de Twitter (Franco, 2008): saber titular, seleccionar correctamente los contenidos y adaptarlos a cada plataforma (De-Aguilera, 2009).

Se cree que Twitter, sobre todo, ofrece una inmejorable capacidad de interactuar con la audiencia, de generar conversaciones con los usuarios y de conducirlas inteligentemente (Carrera, Herrero, Limón, Sainz, & Ocaña, 2012), y que es especialmente útil para confirmar las noticias con testigos directos, contrastar enfoques, debatir puntos de vista, preparar líneas futuras y elaborar historias de la mano de los mismos destinatarios de la información (Soria, 2015; Watson, 2015).

Pero ¿realmente Twitter ha cambiado tanto las prácticas de la profesión? Algunas investigaciones académicas han intentado describir esta relación.

2. Estado de la cuestión

Más allá de las numerosas investigaciones relativas al uso por los ciudadanos de la información publicada en esta red, se ha realizado un número importante de trabajos que estudian directamente el uso de Twitter por los profesionales de la comunicación. La mayoría de ellos confirma el uso preferente de Twitter por parte de los comunicadores frente a otras plataformas. En Estados Unidos, un estudio realizado por PR Week / PR Newswire (2010) entre 1.300 profesionales de la comunicación concluía que más del 50% de los periodistas profesionales utilizan las búsquedas en Twitter como herramienta de investigación para redactar las noticias. Según este análisis, uno de cada tres periodistas reconoce haber entrecomillado algún post de Twitter dentro de la noticia que estaba escribiendo.

A una conclusión parecida llegó el estudio «How Spanish Journalists Are Using Twitter» (Carrera, Sainz-de-Baranda, Herrero, & Limón, 2012), que también confirmó que la red más usada por los periodistas es Twitter (el 95% de los 50 periodistas entrevistados la usa con mucha frecuencia) y no solo para difundir informaciones propias (82%), sino también para hacerlo con informaciones de otras fuentes y de la competencia (67%). Twitter es la preferida por la rapidez y variedad, y se usa como mecanismo de viralización. Eso mismo confirmaron los investigadores de las diez universidades hispanoamericanas que analizaron 5.010 mensajes de medios de comunicación (García, Yezers’Ka, & al., 2011): el flujo informativo es superior en la plataforma de microblogging; en ella se valora la rapidez en la difusión de noticias y la posibilidad de contactar rápidamente con los testigos de los hechos. En el mismo sentido, Martínez defendió en 2014 la tesis doctoral «Los nuevos medios y el periodismo de medios sociales» en la que concluía, después de entrevistar a 50 directivos de medios españoles, que Twitter era su herramienta preferida. A esta misma conclusión llegó la filial de PR Newswire en Brasil (2011), constatando que también ésta es la red preferida por el 73,4% de los casi 400 periodistas brasileños encuestados.

Volviendo al ámbito estrictamente estadounidense, en 2013 se publicó «The State of the News Media 2013», el informe anual sobre el estado del periodismo que publica The Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism. Según este informe, Twitter había consolidado su reputación en EEUU como un espacio donde tanto los lectores como los periodistas acudían para definir las últimas actualizaciones de las noticias. Una investigación más reciente confirmaba los mismos datos: Oriella publicó en 2014 una encuesta a 550 periodistas de 15 países y subraya el aumento de cuentas en Twitter entre los entrevistados.

El espíritu de pertenencia a los propios medios también ha sido analizado por algunas investigaciones, como la de los profesores chilenos López-Hermida y Claro (2011), así como la relación entre información y opinión (Lasorsa, Lewis, & Holton, 2012).

Muchos estudios se han preocupado de investigar la interactividad que facilita esta plataforma. En el ámbito de la radio, Herrera y José Luis Requejo publicaron en 2012 un interesante estudio sobre cómo usan Twitter las emisoras españolas y concluyeron que infrautilizan el potencial que ofrece esta plataforma. Sin embargo, estos datos contrastan paradójicamente con la mayoría de las investigaciones, que concluyen que la interactividad es lo que más valoran los profesionales de la comunicación. Véase el estudio «¿Quién soy yo y quién eres tú?» (Carrera, Herrero, Limón, Sainz, & Ocaña, 2012), en el que el 91,24% de los encuestados asegura que retuitearía los comentarios de cualquier usuario, o la investigación «¿Qué está sucediendo? La ‘twitteración’ de los medios colombianos» (Duque & Zúñiga, 2012), que resalta el uso de Twitter como espacio de debate con los lectores y profundización de noticias. En la misma dirección parecen ir las conclusiones de Noguera (2013) y Diezhandino (2012), que confirman la autopercepción de los comunicadores de no haber perdido contacto con la ciudadanía.

3. Material y métodos

Este estudio ha analizado el comportamiento en Twitter de 1.504 comunicadores en España. La selección de la muestra se hizo de forma aleatoria partiendo de la prensa escrita: se eligieron 16 cabeceras y se incluyeron a todos los periodistas o colaboradores habituales que hubieran publicado alguna nota en dichos periódicos. Después de tres barridas, en días elegidos al azar, con la condición de que alguno de ellos fuera domingo, se alcanzó la cifra inicial de 1.560 comunicadores que, luego de sucesivas purgas para evitar duplicidades y posibles errores, se cerró en 1.504 comunicadores, autores de 4.687.215 tuits, casi cinco millones de mensajes. Hasta el momento no se conoce ningún otro estudio que haya trabajado con una muestra tan voluminosa.

Los periódicos incluidos en la muestra fueron, en primer lugar, los ocho diarios españoles con mayor número de lectores según el EGM (Estudio General de Medios): «Marca», «El País», «As», «El Mundo», «La Vanguardia», «El Periódico», «Sport» y «El Mundo Deportivo». A estos se añadieron las dos cabeceras de medios nacionales, no regionales, más leídas: «ABC» y «La Razón». Además, se les sumaron los dos periódicos económicos de mayor tirada: «Expansión» y «Cinco Días». Además, los tres diarios de mayor difusión en Málaga, lugar donde se realizó la investigación: «SUR», «Málaga Hoy» y «La Opinión de Málaga». Y, por último, «20 Minutos», diario online que supera el millón de lectores diarios.

La codificación de la información se realizó mediante hoja de cálculo del programa Excel de Microsoft para Apple, interrelacionando más de 166.000 celdas de datos. Para el análisis estadístico de los datos se recurrió a medidas de tendencia central (moda, media y mediana), medidas de dispersión (desviación típica y varianza), tablas (distribución simple de datos, distribución de frecuencias, distribución de frecuencias por intervalo y distribuciones de frecuencias con porcentajes) y gráficos (histogramas, gráficos circulares, nubes de palabras, polígonos de frecuencia y curvas de frecuencia).

El estudio analizó el comportamiento de 40 variables, relacionadas con la identidad y la actividad de la cuenta, y con el texto publicado en prensa.

4. Análisis y resultados

4.1. Sexo, antigüedad de las cuentas y frecuencia

La investigación definió seis hipótesis de partida. En la primera, se contemplaban algunos aspectos generales de los perfiles y se afirmaba que los comunicadores españoles que usan Twitter eran en su mayoría varones, tenían cuenta con antigüedad superior a dos años y escribían al menos tres mensajes al día. El análisis de los perfiles concluyó que esta hipótesis solo se cumplía en parte.

Respecto al uso de Twitter, no todos los comunicadores lo usan. Sí la mayoría, esto es, el 61% de la muestra. Más de la mitad del grupo analizado, pero mucho menos de lo que podría esperarse de un medio que se supone por las investigaciones mencionadas que ha calado entre los comunicadores. Los medios que aparecen proporcionalmente con más cuentas en la muestra son «20 Minutos» (76,92%) y «As» (76,19%); los medios con menos, «La Opinión de Málaga» (46,88%) y «La Razón» (37,50%).

Con respecto al sexo, el primer dato es paradójico y llamativo: sin considerar todavía el uso de Twitter, el 73,17% de la muestra son hombres, es decir, la mayoría. De 1.504 comunicadores, con cuenta de Twitter o no, las mujeres representan solo el 26,83%. Es decir, quienes escriben en los medios impresos, único criterio para integrar la muestra, son en su mayoría varones. La paradoja es que a pesar de que los medios se han convertido en los últimos años en los primeros defensores de la paridad entre sexos, en sus redacciones, en cambio, parece que las mujeres son minoría. Ningún medio se acerca a las cifras de la Encuesta de Población Activa, que calcula que las mujeres representan el 46,15% del total de los trabajadores.

Sin embargo, respecto al uso de Twitter, si atendemos a valores relativos, es decir, al número de cuentas de Twitter sobre el número de congéneres, las mujeres ganan a los hombres, pues el 67,09% de ellas tienen cuenta de Twitter frente al 61,37% de ellos. Aunque esto contradice la hipótesis mencionada, sin embargo, el promedio de tuits publicados desde la apertura de la cuenta por los hombres de la muestra (5.638 tuits) es superior al promedio de las mujeres (3.800 tuits). Dato que se confirma cuando se atiende al promedio de tuits diarios: las mujeres, 4,11; los hombres, 5,52. Es decir, aunque hay más cuentas activas de Twitter entre las mujeres, la actividad en esta plataforma se desplaza ligeramente hacia los hombres: ellos son algo más activos que ellas. En este sentido, se cumple lo previsto en la hipótesis. También lo relativo a la antigüedad de las cuentas se cumple: el 68,81% de las cuentas analizadas se abrieron entre los años 2010 y 2011.

4.2. Sentido de pertenencia

La segunda hipótesis de la investigación afirmaba que los comunicadores se presentan en Twitter como tales, indicando su pertenencia al medio para el que trabajan. De entrada, el 89,77% de las cuentas incluyen una «descripción» o «bio». Y el 94,30% de estas descripciones indican que su propietario tiene una profesión relacionada con la comunicación, ya que explícitamente se define como «periodista», «reportero», «columnista», «redactor», etc. Esta cifra es elevadísima y, sin duda, refleja un alto sentido de pertenencia a la profesión, lo que supone para sus seguidores una buena fuente de confianza.

Respecto a las referencias al medio, hay notables diferencias en la muestra: los más identificados con su casa parecen ser los comunicadores de «Cinco Días» y de «20 Minutos», que citan a su medio en más del 90% de las descripciones de sus cuentas; los menos identificados, los de «La Razón» (40%) y «Sur» (53,33%).

4.3. Influencia de las cuentas

En la tercera hipótesis se afirma que los comunicadores estudiados alcanzan altos índices de influencia, y que ésta se expresa en el número de seguidores, el retuiteo de sus mensajes, la inclusión en listas o la marcación como favoritos de sus mensajes.

Efectivamente, los datos demuestran que los comunicadores presentan índices de influencia por encima de la media, situada en los 40 puntos, pues el promedio de la muestra estudiada es de 44,99. Aunque esos casi 5 puntos podrían parecer muy poco para hablar de «perfiles influyentes», la verdad es que el 73,51% del total de cuentas analizadas están bastante por encima del 40, pero las cuentas con poca o nula actividad hacen que la media aritmética descienda de forma importante.

Es más, el índice de «Klout» indica que los índices superiores a 60 están reservados para un selecto grupo de cuentas «muy influyentes» que representa solo el 5% de los usuarios de Internet; sin embargo, en el caso de esta muestra, ese porcentaje crece significativamente, pues las cuentas con índices superior a 60 son el 10,21% de la muestra. Es decir, el doble de lo que se encontraría en cualquier otro grupo de usuarios. En el total analizado, los perfiles con mayor «Klout» son los de Risto Mejide, Elvira Lindo, Guillem Balagué, Enrique Dans y Míster Chip.

Otra de las variables estudiadas, que repercute directamente en la influencia de una cuenta, es el número de «seguidores». El promedio de la muestra es de 12.959 seguidores por cuenta. La realidad es un poco más baja, pues algunas cuentas muy seguidas suben artificialmente este promedio ya que la mediana se sitúa en 991 seguidores. En cualquier caso, la media de seguidores está muy por encima de la media del usuario medio de Twitter, que se calcula en 61 seguidores. Solo Mejide, por ejemplo, tiene más de dos millones de seguidores; Jordi Évole, casi dos millones; cerca de él, Alexis Martín Tamayo, Míster Chip.

El número de mensajes que son retuiteados por el resto de usuarios es otro indicador de influencia. El retuiteo puede ser interpretado de múltiples maneras, pero en cualquier caso implica una relativa adhesión al mensaje reenviado. El 23,51% de los mensajes de la muestra fueron retuiteados por otros. Esta cifra es elevadísima, pero insignificante si se la compara con el 93,84% de los mensajes emitidos por Míster Chip que fueron retuiteados por otros. Pero es más, si atendemos no al porcentaje de tuits retuiteados por otros, sino al número de veces que lo han sido, las cifras se disparan asombrosamente alcanzando guarismos de «celebrities»: Míster Chip, más de un millón de veces; Tomás Roncero y Mejide, más de medio millón de veces (ojo, analizando solo los 3.200 tuits que Twitter permite recuperar de cada cuenta).

Otra variable relativa a la influencia es el número de listas creadas por los usuarios que incluyen esa cuenta. El promedio de la muestra es de 217,85 listas por cuenta, una cifra realmente extraordinaria. Las dos cuentas incluidas en más listas de la muestra son la de Évole y la de Ignacio Escolar, presentes en más de 10.000 listas. Quien presenta un mayor ratio respecto a la relación «en listas por cada 1.000 seguidores» es el profesor Dans, con casi 40 listas por cada 1.000 seguidores.

Y por último, el que un tuit se haga «favorito» por otro usuario es también un factor que afecta a la influencia que un usuario tiene sobre otros, pues es un termómetro del interés que despiertan sus mensajes. Los datos se repiten: el promedio de la muestra es de 288 tuits hechos favoritos. El 92,3% de los mensajes de Míster Chip fueron hechos favoritos. Los tuits analizados de Mejide se han hecho favoritos 178.198 veces; cifras, sin duda, espectaculares.

4.4. Comunicadores mediáticos

La cuarta hipótesis afirmaba que los comunicadores con mayor influencia en Twitter son aquellos que combinan su presencia en los medios impresos con presencias en otros medios, como la radio o la televisión.

Esta investigación interrelacionó varias variables para seleccionar los perfiles con mayor influencia de la muestra, como aquellos con mayores índices Klout, mayor número de seguidores y mayor número de veces que han sido retuiteados sus mensajes. Una vez que se identificaron las 15 cuentas más influyentes, se constató que la hipótesis se cumplía sin excepción, pues todos ellos ejercen su actividad profesional en diversos medios audiovisuales, no solo en la prensa escrita.

4.5. Interactividad

La quinta hipótesis se ocupaba de uno de los aspectos que más ha interesado a las investigaciones académicas más recientes: se afirmaba que los comunicadores utilizan Twitter para interactuar con sus fuentes, detectar nuevas historias por contar, contrastar sus informaciones, dialogar con sus lectores y solicitar la colaboración de estos en la construcción de las noticias; es decir, Twitter facilita la interactividad.

Para verificar esta hipótesis, era importante conocer a quiénes retuitean los comunicadores, a quiénes responden, qué textos retuitean o a quiénes mencionan. Teniendo en cuenta el tamaño de la muestra y la fecundidad de la misma, este trabajo revistió una especial laboriosidad.

Lo primero era identificar qué cuentas retuitean los comunicadores de la muestra. Para ello, el estudio registró las diez cuentas más retuiteadas por todos y cada uno de los perfiles de la muestra sin excepción, y seleccionó aquellas cuentas que hubieran sido retuiteadas por al menos dos perfiles de cada medio. Las sucesivas decantaciones arrojaron un dato asombroso e inesperado: el 82% de esos mensajes tenían su origen en cuentas del propio medio o del propio grupo empresarial y menos del 1% de estas cuentas más retuiteadas eran ajenas a la profesión.

La segunda variable estudiada fueron las menciones. Estas son también un indicador significativo de interactividad pues se usan para que el usuario mencionado sepa que se está hablando de él, para reconocerle algo o para dirigirse a él preguntando o comentando algo. Interesaba, pues, saber a quiénes mencionan los comunicadores de la muestra. Se siguió el mismo procedimiento y se descubrió, de nuevo, algo llamativo: solo el 2,52% de las menciones se refieren a cuentas de personas ajenas a la profesión.

Por último, se analizaron las respuestas, pues también ellas son un valioso indicador de interactividad. Interesaba saber a quiénes respondían los comunicadores, por lo que se siguió el mismo procedimiento. De nuevo, sorpresivamente, se concluyó que la mayoría son respuestas a colegas, ya que solo el 3,68% de las respuestas van dirigidas a usuarios que no tienen relación con la profesión.

El análisis de los indicadores de interactividad, por tanto, no confirmaba la deseada bidireccionalidad de los mensajes y contradecía los supuestos que se plantean en buena parte de la bibliografía sobre la relación entre Twitter y periodismo.

4.6. Prensa y Twitter

La sexta y última hipótesis afirmaba que los comunicadores usan Twitter para comentar las informaciones publicadas en prensa, enriqueciéndolas con nuevas perspectivas mediante enlaces hacia fuentes plurales.

El análisis de los tuits, sin embargo, parece negar esta hipótesis, pues el 70% de los hipervínculos dirigen hacia las propias páginas del grupo o hacia los blogs personales de los comunicadores. Ni mucha pluralidad ni mucho enriquecimiento.

Tampoco parece usarse Twitter para enriquecer las historias en las que trabajan los comunicadores pues la investigación no encontró ningún tuit en el que algún comunicador solicitara información sobre los temas que estaba trabajando. Por tanto, el uso de Twitter como herramienta de participación en la fabricación de las noticias no resultó evidente.

5. Discusión y conclusiones

El análisis cuantitativo de las 40 variables incluidas en esta investigación permite tener una visión de conjunto sobre cómo usan Twitter los comunicadores españoles, mucho más allá de la simple autopercepción de investigaciones cualitativas anteriores. El tamaño de la muestra, sin precedentes hasta el momento, permite extraer conclusiones con una notable significatividad.

En primer lugar, se puede concluir que los comunicadores españoles usan Twitter (61%), aunque quizá menos de lo que se esperaba, sobre todo si se tienen en cuenta algunos de los estudios precedentes que aseguraban, como hemos mencionado anteriormente, una adopción de esta plataforma del 95%. Teniendo en cuenta que la mayoría de estos estudios se han concentrado en perfiles directivos o en perfiles de comunicadores especialmente relacionados con las nuevas tecnologías, podría afirmarse que el uso de Twitter por la gran masa de periodistas es inferior al uso esperado.

De lo que no hay duda es que los comunicadores han conseguido en Twitter una influencia que está por encima de la media, sobre todo quienes desarrollan su actividad compaginando medios escritos con medios audiovisuales. Estos datos nos podrían llevar a pensar que la influencia no les viene de su actividad en las redes sino de su presencia en los medios tradicionales. En cualquier caso, es cierto que el conjunto de la muestra pone de manifiesto promedios de influencia y de presencia en Twitter ligeramente superiores a los que presentan los usuarios medios en esta plataforma.

Y aunque esta influencia por encima de la media sea evidente, se percibe también la existencia de dos «divisiones» entre los comunicadores, algo así como un «Twitter a dos velocidades». Las referencias continuas que hace la investigación a la mediana como medida estadística de tendencia central se justifican porque en casi todas las variables el promedio se ha percibido como un indicador engañoso, ya que un grupo de cabeza ofrecía valores extremos que distorsionaban la realidad, valores con cifras de vértigo, propias de celebridades, contra una mayoría que presentaba cifras solo algo por encima de la media de Twitter.

Este primer grupo de cabeza, que representa solo el 5% de la muestra, se ha revelado como especialmente fecundo, pues produce el 35% de los tuits que se publican diariamente en la muestra. Y es más, si estrecháramos aún más el espectro y nos quedáramos solo con el 1% de la muestra, descubriríamos que esas pocas cuentas absorben el 52% del total de veces que los mensajes de la muestra han sido retuiteados, es decir, que ellas solas han producido la mitad de los mensajes retuiteados en la muestra.

El segundo grupo de comunicadores, el integrado por el 95% de la muestra, presenta cifras mucho más modestas. De todas formas, aunque no alcanza las cifras de estrellas del rock del primer grupo, está por encima de la media de los usuarios de Twitter en variables importantes como índice Klout, número de seguidores, número de tuits diarios, tuits hechos favoritos, retuiteos, presencia en listas, etc.

Sin embargo, hay un denominador común en ambos grupos, en el grupo de cabeza y en el pelotón: tanto unos como otros, tanto los tuiteros más influyentes como los menos, establecen relaciones endogámicas: responden a colegas, retuitean a colegas y mencionan a colegas. De esta constatación no se salvan ni siquiera la mayoría de las cuentas más influyentes de la muestra, donde solo se libra la cuenta del profesor Dans y, parcialmente, la del colaborador de Onda Cero Míster Chip.

Esta constatación permite concluir que, para la mayoría de los comunicadores, Twitter es un medio tradicional más, bastante unidireccional. Y que, por tanto, pensar que su uso ha modificado el paradigma de la comunicación o sus prácticas es una falacia, o la expresión de un deseo ideal, por más que se abunde en la literatura académica sobre esto y que la autopercepción de los propios comunicadores sea justo esa, como ponen de manifiesto algunas de las investigaciones citadas. Y es que se ha escrito mucho sobre la participación de los usuarios en los procesos informativos y las consecuencias de esa participación en los modelos comunicativos y en, general, en nuestra vida en sociedad, así como sobre otros fenómenos semejantes y, sin duda, muy interesantes y significativos; pero esas reflexiones no siempre se apoyan en suficientes evidencias empíricas y con alguna frecuencia responden a una perspectiva que cabe calificar como ciber-utópica.

Más bien podría deducirse de los datos que aporta nuestra investigación que, al parecer, la nueva adopción de esta plataforma ha afectado solamente al medio, al ropaje, a la extensión de los mensajes, pero no al origen ni al destino de la información, y menos a los procesos de su fabricación.

Aunque la nueva herramienta ofrece indudables atractivos por ser veloz, detectar tendencias, ser fuente de información, no hay indicios de que haya pasado a convertirse en un instrumento de comunicación ciudadana, en la que profesionales y no profesionales participen en la fabricación de las noticias. La realidad es esa: salvo excepciones, no se está aprovechando la interactividad que permite Twitter.

Estas afirmaciones, obviamente, no deberían generalizarse ya que la investigación también ha constatado que algunos perfiles denotan altos niveles de interactividad, aunque sean minoritarios y estadísticamente no significativos. Tampoco estas conclusiones deberían cuestionar el uso y los beneficios de esta plataforma, que ha sintonizado muy bien con las prácticas de la profesión. Pero los datos son contundentes.

Referencias

Aguaded, I. (2014). Desde la infoxicación al derecho a la comunica­ción. Comunicar, 42, 07-08. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C­42-2014-a1

Carrera, P., Herrero, E., Limón, N., Sainz, C., & Ocaña E. (2012). ¿Quién soy yo y quién eres tú? ¿Están transformando las redes sociales la imagen que los periodistas radiofónicos españoles tienen del público? Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico, 18, 223-231. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5209/rev_ESMP.2012.v18.40976

Carrera, P., Sainz-de-Baranda, C., Herrero, E., & Limón, N. (2012). Journalism and SocialMedia : How Spanish Journalists Are Using Twitter. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Perio­dístico, 18, 31-53. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5209/rev_­eSMP.2012.v18.n1.39353

Conway, B. A., Kenski, K. & Wang, D. (2015). The Rise of Twitter in the Political Campaign: Searching for Intermedia Agenda-Setting Effects in the Presidential Primary. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 20, 363-380. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcc­4.12124

De-Aguilera, M. (2009). Innovación, prácticas culturales y contenidos audiovisuales. Una introducción. In M. De-Aguilera, & M. Meere (2009), Una tele en el bolsillo. Málaga: Círculo de Estudios Visuales AdHoc.

Diezhandino, M.P., & al. (2012). El periodista en la encrucijada. Madrid: Fundación Telefónica.

Duque, Á., & Zúñiga, D. (2012). ¿Qué está sucediendo? La ‘twitte­ración’ de los medios colombianos. Bogotá: Universidad del Rosa­rio. (http://goo.gl/UbsfpM) (08-08-2014).

Elola, J. (2010). Debo ser más radical en lo digital. El País, 12-09-2010. (http://goo.gl/YOf9dI) (12-01-2015).

Farhi, P. (2013). El boom de Twitter. Cuadrivio. (http://goo.gl/XRMY1I) (21-04-2014).

Franco, G. (2008). Cómo escribir para la web. Austin: Universidad de Texas, Centro Knight para Periodismo en las Américas.

García, E., Yezers’Ka, L., & al. (2011). Uso de Twitter y Facebook por los medios iberoamericanos. El Profesional de la Información, 20(6), 611-620. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3145/epi.2011.nov.02. (http://goo.gl/49Iu5U) (09-02-2015).

Gillmor, D. (2012). Hagan números. Nieman Journalism Lab, Pre­dicciones para el Periodismo en 2013. Universidad de Harvard. (http://goo.gl/9tZGxL) (09-02-2015).

González, C., Fanjul, C., & Cabezuelo, F. (2015). Uso, consumo y conocimiento de las nuevas tecnologías en personas mayores en Francia, Reino Unido y España. Comunicar, 45, 19-28. doi: ht­tp://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C45-2015-02

Goodman, E. (2009). Journalism Needed in Twitter Era. Columbia Daily Tribune, 05-07-2009. (http://goo.gl/DHDsaV) (07-02-2015).

Hermida, A. (2010). From TV to Twitter: How Ambient News Be­came Ambient Journalism. M/C Journal, 13, 2. (http://goo.gl/v73­eDG) (09-02-2015).

Hernández, C. (2013). El desafío periodístico en tiempos 2.0. Cla­sesdeperiodismo.com. (http://goo.gl/1Z2Pye) (01-02-2015).

Herrera, S., & Requejo J.L. (2012). Difundir información, principal uso que las emisoras generalistas españolas están haciendo de Twitter. Observatorio Journal, 6(3), 193-227.

Lasorsa, D.L., Lewis, S.C., & Holton, A.E. (2012). Normalizing Twitter: Journalism Practice in an Emerging Communication Space. Journalism Studies, 13(1), 19-36. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/­1461670X.2011.571825

Lee, J. (2015). The Double-Edged Sword: The Effects of Journalists’ Social Media Activities on Audience Perceptions of Journalists and Their News Products. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 20, 312-329. doi: http://dx.doi.org/­10.1111/jcc4.12113

López-Hermida, A., & Claro, C. (2011). Medios y periodistas en Twitter: el caso chileno. Correspondencias & Análisis, 1, 17-33.

Lorenz, M. (2013). Data Journalism Handbook (http://goo.gl/­PTDZdM) (08-02-2015).

Martínez, F. (2014). Los nuevos medios y el periodismo de medios sociales. Tesis doctoral. Madrid: Universidad Complutense (http://eprints.ucm.es/24592/1/T35106.pdf) (08-02-2015).

Miller, C. (2009). Twitter es más atractivo para los adultos que para los adolescentes. La Nación, 27-08-2009. (http://goo.gl/L51hHy) (28-8-2014).

Noguera, J.M. (2013). How Open Are Journalists on Twitter? Trends towards the End-user Journalism. Comunicación & Socie­dad, 26(1), 95-116.

Oriella (2014). The New Normal for News. Have Global Media Changed Forever? Oriella PR Network Global Digital Journalism Study 2013. (http://goo.gl/5EiQOM) (12-05-2014).

Orihuela, J.L. (2011). Twitter: una guía para comprender y dominar la plataforma que cambió la Red. Barcelona: Alienta.

Posetti, J. (2009). Twitter’s Difficult Gift to Journalism. NewMa­tilda.com. (http://goo.gl/j6jucM) (29-12-2014).

PR Newswire Brasil (2011). Brazilian Journalists and Social Net­works. Brasil: PR Newswire. (http://goo.gl/O3opbS) (22-01-2015).

PR Week / PR Newswire (2010). 2010 PR Week / PR Newswire Media Survey: Longer Hours, Heavier Workloads Persist; but Fears Over Further Job Erosion Moderate. New York. (http://goo.gl/UCSYFa) (13-06-2014).

Soria, M. (2015). El uso de Twitter para analizar el activismo ciudadano: las noticias económicas de los principales periódicos de referencia nacional. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico. 21, 59­9­-614. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5209/rev_ESMP.2015.v21.n1.­49­113

Sutter, J.D. (2009). Celebrity Death Rumors Spread Online. CNN.­com. (http://goo.gl/BsglA1) (15-06-2014).

The Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism (2013). The State of the News Media, 2013. Annual Report on the Status of American Journalism. The Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism. (http://goo.gl/rKIRm8) (12-01-2015).

Watson, B.R. (2015). Is Twitter an Alternative Medium? Comparing Gulf Coast Twitter and Newspaper Coverage of the 2010 BP Oil Spill. Communication Research. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1­177/0093650214565896

Winer, D. (2012). News Guys, Twitter is not your Friend. Scripting News, 07-06-2012. (http://goo.gl/cyvCda) (22-01-2015).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/15
Accepted on 31/12/15
Submitted on 31/12/15

Volume 24, Issue 1, 2016
DOI: 10.3916/C46-2016-01
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 8
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?