Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This paper proposes a model for developing new literacies of citizenship in the digital society. Using Baumman’s metaphor, we contrast the 'solid' culture of the 19th and 20th centuries to the ‘liquid’ information culture of the 21st century in which Web 2.0 plays a fundamental role and affects many aspects of our culture. We first review the main features of Web 2.0 through six major dimensions: as a universal library, global market, as a giant hypertext jigsaw puzzle, a public space for social communities, a territory for multimedia and audiovisual expression, and as a space for multiple virtual interactive environments. In the second part, we propose an integrated theoretical model of literacy for the citizen. This model is based on two pillars: the areas or dimensions of literacy, and the competences (instrumental, cognitive-intellectual, socio-communicative, emotional and axiological) to be developed in citizens. Finally we contend that the new literacies amount to a civic right and a necessary condition for social development and a more democratic society in the 21st century.

Download the PDF version

==== 1. Introduction: From solid culture to liquid information

The solid and the liquid is a metaphor (Bauman, 2000) that characterizes today’s processes of sociocultural change propelled by the information and communication technologies (ICT) that are now everywhere. This metaphor suggests that the age in which we live –its digital culture- is an unstable flow of manufactured knowledge and information in a state of permanent change and constant transformation, and stands as a counterpoint to the mainly Western products of the 19th and 20th century in which the stability and inalterability of the physical, material and the solid predominated.

Internet, and particularly Web 2.0, has changed the traditional rules of the game that determined the production, distribution and consumption of culture. Cultural objects created in the 20th century (printed material, cinemas, vinyl records and cassettes, photographs, etc) are disappearing. The ICT have sparked or at least speeded up a far-reaching revolution in our civilization that turns on the transformation of the mechanisms of production, storage, dissemination of and access to information; on the communicative forms and flows between people; and on the expressive languages and the representation of culture and knowledge. The new age has generated new actors (Internet, the mobile phone, videogames and other digital devices) that influence us across a broad range of experiences: in leisure, personal communications, in learning and at work, etc. The digital is a liquid experience very different from solid culture’s experience of consumption and acquisition, and so requires new approaches and new learning and literacy models.

2. Web 2.0: liquid information invades our experience

Many investigators have attempted to define Web 2.0 and describe its effects on the various strands of our culture, largely identifying it as a reality that is too diffuse, changeable and unstable to fit into a tidy definition. In a seminal article on Web 2.0, O’Reilly (2005) described some of its important features: a platform for software services, participative architecture, cost-benefit scalability, transformations and remixes of data and their sources, software not exclusively linked to a single device, and making optimum use of collective intelligence.

From our viewpoint the Net, that is the current state of development of telecommunications and the World Wide Web known generically as Web 2.0, can be defined according to six major parameters or dimensions of production, consumption and dissemination of culture which coexist, cross over and develop alongside each other. Web 2.0 is a universal library, a global market, a giant jigsaw puzzle of hypertextually interconnected pieces, a public meeting place where people communicate and form social communities, a territory in which multimedia and audiovisual communication take precedence, and a diversity of virtual, interactive environments. The information available on the Internet is vast, multimedia, fragmented and socially constructed within technological environments. The digital is liquid, and the 21st century citizen needs new literacies that enable him to act as an independent, critical and cultured subject within cyberspace.


Draft Content 522069223-26604-en001.jpg

- The web as universal library: the overabundance of information generates «infoxication». One of the most remarkable phenomena marking the start of this century is the excess of information generated by the exponential increase of that information which is amplified and massively disseminated by the many and varied media and technologies available. This has been dubbed «infoxication» (Benito-Ruiz, 2009), in that the accumulation and excess of data inevitably lead to saturation, or information intoxication, that leaves the subject with a confused, unintelligible and opaque vision of reality (be it local, national or global). This is one of the cultural paradoxes of our age: we have the resources and media to access a lot of information, but the human brain’s limited capacity to process it all means that our understanding of events is clouded by the excess of data we receive. Many different authors state that the information society is not necessarily better informed. One thing is to have access to data, and quite another is the ability to interpret them, make sense of them and put them to good use, that is, to transform data into knowledge, knowing how to put that information to use to suit a purpose or solve a problem. This is a crucial objective for any literate subject in the digital culture.

- The web as a market or digital souk information as the raw material of the new economy. Information is now the raw material of important sectors of the so-called new economy or digital capitalism. On-line purchasing, use of public sector services, communication via Internet with companies, associations, government bodies, the daily checking and handling of our finances and other commercial activities…are habits that are now a regular part of our daily lives. Data and online service industries in their various forms are now a strategic sector in any nation’s efforts to create wealth. Web 2.0 is increasingly becoming a virtual space for financial transactions. Companies or service institutions that operate in this space need qualified personnel, workers who are literate in the competencies required to produce, manage and consume products based on data management. Equally important is enabling the client, the user and consumer of online products to become literate, aware of his rights and with a sound knowledge of how to use the Web. Media literacy means training workers of the digital industry and citizens to become responsible consumers.

- The fragmentation of culture: the triumph of microcontent. Web 2.0 culture is fragmented, like a jigsaw puzzle of microcontent in which the individual must write his own account of experiences in the digital environments. Network-driven culture consists of short, brief slices individually separate but linked together for rapid consumption. Each unit or cultural object (a song, a post, a comment sent to a discussion room, a video, a text, a photo…) can be consumed by the subject and taken in isolation from the author’s context, transforming its original meaning, remixing it with other pieces from other authors, enabling the subject to produce an entirely unique and individual experience for himself. Creating a webpage, a blog or a wiki seems more like collage than the production of a closed cohesive piece of work.

Web 2.0 communication is leading to an extension and consolidation of the «telegram culture» boosted by characteristics of mobile phone social interaction, blogs and social networks. The epistolary culture of the past has been replaced by the economical use of the word and the urgency to get it to the intended receiver. This means that we are atrophying as subjects who manage forms of expression in the writing of long coherently argued texts that contain a start, middle and end (Carr, 2010). By contrast, most social network texts are short and spontaneous with little thought given to their elaboration. This is the triumph of communicative immediacy over intellectual reflection; the triumph of SMS writing over narrative text. Literacy must cultivate competencies in a subject so that he can control different types of language (text, audiovisual, iconic and sound) in various expressive forms (microcontent, narrations or hypertext).

- The web as a public meeting place for communication: the social networks. Web 2.0 is often referred to as the social network in the sense that it allows us to be in permanent contact with other users and so construct communities or horizontal communication groups (Flores, 2009; Aced, 2010; Haro, 2010). These networks or virtual communities, Tuenti, Hi5, NIng, Flickr, Twitter, Facebook, etc., enable any individual to interact and share information easily and directly with others and without going through an intermediary. The Internet is not only a global network of machines and tools; it is a public meeting place for exchanges between people who share the same interests, problems and outlooks. The social networks can generate strong emotional ties that come with belonging to the specific collective or social group with which we interact.

The social networks not only show their potential in leisure activities and informal communication, they are also useful for professional training and education, as seen in the creation of online practical work communities. This social network duality manifests itself in many spaces that are often divergent and seemingly contradictory. They are used for political and social mobilization, as has occurred recently in North Africa and Spain. On the other hand, social networks are also a space for exhibitionists and juvenile behaviour, and it is common for certain types to use Facebook, Tuenti or Twitter to divulge their opinions, photos, songs and webpages, etc, to everyone else (supposedly their «friends»). So, literacy has to incorporate this duality in forming subjects for socialization in virtual communities and by developing communication competencies in which empathy, democratic values and cooperation are uppermost, as well as an awareness of what is public and / or private.

- The web as an expanding territory of multimedia and audiovisual expression. The web is increasingly full of images, sounds, animations, films and audiovisual material. Internet is not only a cyberspace of text and documents to be read. With Web 2.0, it is now a place to publish and communicate through photos, videoclips, presentations or any other kind of multimedia file. Iconographic audiovisual language is invading the Net’s communicative processes, and this requires subjects to be literate both as consumers of this type of product and as individual broadcasters with the expressive competencies to articulate with multimedia format and audiovisual languages. An important tradition based on audiovisual education and media literacy already in place has much to contribute to these processes to create literate subjects (Gutiérrez, 2003; 2010; Aparici, 2010).

- The web as an artificial ecosystem for human experience. Internet and other digital technologies are being used to construct an artificial environment that enables users to enjoy sensory experiences in three dimensions or as a mix between the empirical and the digital, as in augmented reality (Cawood & Fiala, 2008). This technology mediates between our individual perception as subjects and the reality as represented by the technology itself, to the point where the virtual and empirical come together to generate «virtual worlds» via online platforms such as Secondlife, Torque or OpenSim (Cherbakov, 2009). These artificially constructed worlds not only create an avatar or personage that represents us but also enables us to experience intense emotions through communication and social interaction. The narrative and interactive human-machine experience that comes with videogames provides a new type of cultural experience that requires training and specific literacy skills (Sedeño, 2010).

3. New literacies for the citizen of the Web 2.0 culture

Hypertext, 3D graphics, virtual worlds, videoclips, simulations, real time and simultaneous computer-based communication between subjects, virtual human communities or social networks, videoconferencing, messaging via mobile phones or Internet, navigating the World Wide Web and multimedia presentations are all part of a kaleidoscope of expressive codes and communicative actions that are manifestly different from communication via reading and writing on paper.

For almost a decade now the literature on literacy, while acknowledging the tradition represented by Freire’s liberating and dialogical approach and Dewey’s focus on the democratic preparation of the citizen, as well as the contribution of critical media education, has been attempting to formulate a theory of literacy for the digital culture. Some highly influential proposals have emerged such as the concept of «multiliteracy» (Cope & Kalantzis, 2009), «new literacies» (Lankshear & Knobel, 2009) and from «Alfin» information literacy (Bawden, 2001), all of which come from the library and documentation fields. Likewise, new concepts appear that add adjectives to digital age literacy: «technological literacy», «media literacy», «digital literacy», «multimedia literacy» or «information literacy». Gutierrez (2010) states that literacy for digital technology is a more complex process than the ability to operate hardware and software. It means being literate in the new codes and communicative forms of digital culture. Several authors (Gutiérrez, 2003; Snyder, 2004; Monereo & al., 2005; Tyner, 2008; Merchant, 2009; Leahy & Dolan, 2010) have tackled this question and affirmed that the acquisition of skills for the intelligent use of new technologies requires at least an instrumental control of the same, together with the acquisition of competencies related to the search for, and the analysis, selection and communication of data and information so that the subject can transform this information into knowledge and become a «prosumer», an active producer and consumer of information, and develop competencies for communicative interaction in digital environments. The subject has the ability to appropriate and confer meaning on the dense array of information on the Net which is represented in multiple expressive languages. The appropriation of meaning and multimodal expression would be new terms for the old concepts of reading and writing that are a traditional part of producing literate citizens. Our viewpoint requires us to go further and add new elements to those already mentioned in the formulation of a theoretical proposal for the literacy to match the new cultural changes that have appeared with the development of Web 2.0.

Figure 1 shows the main lines or basic architecture of an integrated literacy model for the training of citizens in the digital society. We have combined what would be the learning environments or dimensions within the various planes or settings that represent Web 2.0, as identified in the previous section. We have also combined what would be the competencies and skills involved in the entire literacy process, such as the acquisition of instrumental, cognitive-intellectual, socio-communicative, axiological and emotional competencies. The literacy process means the fusion of learning competencies and the action dimensions or content within Web 2.0, to develop in the subject –or facilitate the construction of- a digital identity that enables the citizen to act as a person with culture and independence, with critical abilities and democratic values. Figure 1 is the representation of this integrated literacy model.


Draft Content 522069223-26604-en002.jpg

3.1. Learning environments and dimensions for Web 2.0

The first element or pillar of this literacy model refers to what a literate subject must know to be able to use the Web 2.0. Our chart identifies the six Web 2.0 dimensions mentioned previously (Universal Library, Global Market, Hypertextually linked Microcontent, Multimedia Communication, Social Networks and Virtual Environments) and describe the learning environments that each literacy plan, project or programme must provide for the digital age. These six environments or dimensions represent the «content» of literacy. A fully integrated 21st century education must instruct the citizen how to act and participate on the multiple planes that converge in Web 2.0 (Table 1).

The literacy dimensions or environments for the new cultural forms of the Web 2.0


Draft Content 522069223-26604-en003.jpg

3.2. The competences in the literacy for digital cultural

The second element or pillar of this theoretical model of literacy is the identification of the subject’s learning competence environments. We have tackled this problem before (Area, 2001; Area et al., 2008), identifying four competence environments: instrumental, cognitive, socio-communicative and axiological. This integral, educational and global model for literacy in the use of ICT requires the simultaneous development of five areas of competence in the subject in order to learn:

- Instrumental competence: technical control over each technology and its logical use procedures. This refers to the acquisition of practical knowledge and skills for using hardware (set-up, installation and use of various peripheral devices and computing machines) and software or computer programs (the operative system, applications and Internet navigation and communication, etc).

- Cognitive-intellectual competence: the acquisition of specific cognitive knowledge and skills that enable the subject to search for, select, analyse, interpret and recreate the vast amount of information to which he has access through new technologies and communicate with others via digital resources. The subject learns to utilize data intelligently to be able to access information, give it meaning, analyse it critically and reconstruct it to his liking.

- Socio-communicative competence: the development of a set of skills related to the creation of various text types (hypertextual, audiovisual, iconic, three-dimensional, etc), and their dissemination in different languages, establishing fluid communication with other subjects through the technologies available. This also assumes the acquisition and development of behavioural norms with an inherently positive social attitude towards others that could take the form of collaborative work, respect and empathy within the social network of choice.

- Axiological competence: referring to the awareness that ICT are not aseptic or neutral from the social viewpoint but exert a significant influence on the cultural and political environment in our society; the acquisition of ethical and democratic values engendered by the correct use of information and technology should help to avoid the diffusion of socially negative communication.

- Emotional competence: this deals with the affections, feelings and emotional sentiment aroused by the experience of acting in digital environments. These can occur during actions that take place in virtual settings, such as videogames, or during interpersonal communication in social networks. Literacy in this dimension is related to learning how to control negative emotions, with the development of empathy and the construction of a digital identity characterized by an affective-personal balance in the use of ICT.

4. Conclusion

The aim of making citizens literate is to help the subject to build a digital identity as an independent, cultured citizen with a democratic outlook on the Net. Literacy in general, and digital literacy in particular, must be treated as a sociocultural problem linked to civic education, and as one of the most important challenges for educational policy makers attempting to create equal opportunities for all in the access to culture. Education, be it in formal settings such as schools or in informal settings like libraries, youth clubs, cultural centres or associations, must not only provide equal access to technology but also instruct (make literate) citizens so that they can become cultured, responsible and critical subjects; knowledge is a necessary condition for the conscious exercise of individual freedom and democracy. Equal access and empowering critical knowledge are two facets of literacy related to the use of digital technologies. Literacy must not be taken just as a problem of formal education; it must also be applied to informal education.

The literacy of digital or liquid culture in Web 2.0 is more complex than just learning how to use social software instruments (blogs, wikis, networks and other cloud computing resources). Literacy must be a process of development of an identity as a subject operating within the digital territory, characterized by the appropriation of intellectual, social and ethical competences that enable him to interact with information and transform it in a critical and emancipating form. The goal of literacy is to develop each subject’s ability to act and participate in an independent, cultured and critical way in cyberspace. This is an essential universal right of all citizens of the information society. Without literacy, the development of social harmony in 21st century society will be impossible. Without a population with culture, that is, a citizenry without a solid cultural base, there will be no liquid society, no democratic society and no intelligent society.

====

References====

Alexander (2008). Web 2.0 and Emergent Multiliteracies. Theory Into Practice, 47; 150-160.

Aparici, R. (Coord.). Educomunicación: más allá del 2.0. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Area, M. (2001). La alfabetización en la cultura y tecnología digital: La tensión entre mercado y democracia. In Area, M. (Coord.). Educar en la sociedad de la información. Bilbao: Descleé de Brouwer.

Area, M.; Gros, B. & Marzal, M.A. (2008). Alfabetizaciones y tecnologías de la información y comunicación. Madrid: Síntesis.

Bauman, Z. (2006). Modernidad líquida. Buenos Aires: Fondo de Cultura Económica.

Bawden, D. (2001). Information and Digital Literacies: A Review of Concepts. Journal of Documentation, 57, 2; 218-259. Versión castellana en Anales de Documentación. (www.um.es/fccd/anales/ad05/ad0521.pdf) (09-08-2011).

Benito-Ruiz, E. (2009). Infoxication 2.0. In Thomas, M. (Ed.). Handbook of Research on Web 2.0 and Second. Language Learning. Pennsylvania: IGI-InfoSci; 60-79. (http://storage.vuzit.com/public/a7l/Draft2ok_Ruiz.pdf) (08-03-2011).

Carr, N. (2010). ¿Qué está haciendo Internet con nuestras mentes superficiales? Madrid: Taurus.

Cawood, S. & Fiala, M. (2008). Augmented Reality. A Practical Guide. O´Reilly (http://oreilly.com/catalog/9781934356036) (06-02-2011).

Cherbakov, L. & al. (2009). Virtual Spaces: Enabling Immersive Collaborative Enterprise, Part 1: Introduction to the opportunities and technologies. USA: developerWorks (www.ibm.com/developerworks/webservices/library/ws-virtualspaces/index.html?S_TACT=105AGX04&S_CMP=EDU#rate) (06-04-2011).

Cope, B. & Kalantzis, M. (2009). Multiliteracies: New Literacies, New Learning, Pedagogies: An International Journal, 4; 3; 164-195. (www.aab.es/aab/images/stories/Boletin/98_99/3.pdf) (09-08-2011).

Flores, J.M. (2009). Nuevos modelos de comunicación, perfiles y tendencias en las redes sociales. Comunicar, 33; 73-81 (http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/c33-2009-02-007).

Gutiérrez, A. (2003). Alfabetización digital. Algo más que ratones y teclas. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Gutiérrez, A. (2010). Creación multimedia y alfabetización en la era digital. In Aparici. R. (Coord.). Educomunicación: más allá del 2.0. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Haro, J.J. (2010). Redes sociales en educación. Madrid: Anaya.

Ibarrola, S. & Iriarte, C. (2010). Las emociones y la mejora del proceso comunicativo en la mediación. En Educar para la comunicación y la cooperación social. Pamplona: Consejo Audiovisual de Navarra. (wwww.consejoaudiovisualdenavarra.es/publicaciones/documents/sextapublicacion.pdf#page=203) (11-5-2011).

Kellner, D. & Share, J. (2007). Critical Media Literacy is Not an Option. Learn Inquiry 1; 59-69.

Lankshear, C. & Knobel, M. (2009). Nuevos alfabetismos. Su práctica cotidiana y su aprendizaje en el aula. Morata: Madrid.

Leahy, D. & Dolan, D. (2010). Digital Literacy: A Vital Competence for 2010? N. en Reynolds and M. Turcsányi-Szabó (Eds.). Key Competencies in the Knowledge Society. Berlin: Springer, IFIP AICT 324; 210-221. (www.springerlink.com/content/b2q8814521274838/fulltext.pdf) (01-09-2011).

Merchant, G. (2009). Web 2.0, New Literacies, and the Idea of Learning through Participation English Teaching: Practice and Critique. December, 2009, 8, 3; 107-122.

Monereo, C. & al. (2005). Internet y competencias básicas. Aprender a colaborar, a comunicarse, a participar, a aprender. Barcelona: Graó.

O’Reilly, T. (2005). What Is Web 2.0: Design Patterns and Business Models for the Next Generation of Software. (ww.oreillynet.com/pub/a/oreilly/tim/news/2005/09/30/what-is-web-20.html).

Sedeño, A.M. (2010). Videojuegos como dispositivos culturales: las competencias espaciales en educación. Comunicar 34; 183-189 (http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C34-2010-03-18).

Snyder, I. (Comp.) (2004). Alfabetismos digitales. Comunicación, innovación y educación en la era electrónica. Málaga: Aljibe.

Tyner, K. (2008). Audiencias, intertextualidad y nueva alfabetización en medios. Comunicar, 30, XV; 79-85.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

En este artículo se propone un modelo de nuevas alfabetizaciones para la formación de la ciudadanía de la sociedad digital. Usando la metáfora de Baumman se hace referencia a la oposición entre la cultura «sólida» predominante en los siglos XIX y XX con la cultura de la información «líquida» en la que la Web 2.0 tiene efectos muy relevantes sobre múltiples planos de nuestra cultura actual. En un primer momento, se examinan las principales características de la Web 2.0 definiéndola en relación a seis grandes dimensiones o planos que se entrecruzan y son simultáneos: la Web 2.0 como la biblioteca universal, como mercado global, como un puzzle gigante de hipertextos, como una plaza pública de comunicación e interacción social, como un territorio de expresión multimedia y audiovisual, y como múltiples entornos virtuales interactivos. En una segunda parte, se propone un modelo teórico de la alfabetización del ciudadano ante esta cultura digital que consta de dos ejes o planos básicos: el primero referido a los ámbitos o dimensiones de la alfabetización, y el segundo a las competencias de aprendizaje (instrumentales, cognitivo-intelectuales, sociocomunicacionales, emocionales y axiológicas) a desarrollar en los sujetos. Por último, se defiende que las nuevas alfabetizaciones son un derecho de los individuos y una condición necesaria para un desarrollo social y democrático de la sociedad en el siglo XXI.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

==== 1. Introducción: De la cultura sólida a la información líquida

Hablar de lo sólido y lo líquido es una metáfora (Bauman, 2006), para caracterizar los procesos de cambio sociocultural actuales, impulsados por la omnipresencia de las tecnologías de la información y comunicación. La metáfora nos sugiere que el tiempo actual –su cultura digital– es un fluido de producción de información y conocimiento inestable, en permanente cambio, en constante transformación, como contraposición a la producción cultural desarrollada –principalmente en Occidente a lo largo de los siglos XIX y XX– donde primó la estabilidad e inalterabilidad de lo físico, de lo material, de lo sólido.

Internet, y especialmente la denominada Web 2.0, ha trastocado las reglas de juego tradicionales de elaboración, distribución y consumo de la cultura. Por ello, los objetos culturales que fueron creados a lo largo del siglo XX (las publicaciones impresas, las salas cinematográficas, los discos y cassettes, las fotografías, etc.) están desapareciendo. Las TIC han provocado, o al menos han acelerado, una revolución de amplio alcance en nuestra civilización que gira en torno a la transformación de los mecanismos de producción, almacenamiento, difusión y acceso a la información; en las formas y los flujos comunicativos entre las personas; así como en los lenguajes expresivos y de representación de la cultura y el conocimiento. Los nuevos tiempos han generado nuevos actores (Internet, la telefonía móvil, los videojuegos y demás artilugios digitales) que están cambiando nuestra experiencia en múltiples aspectos: en el ocio, en las comunicaciones personales, en el aprendizaje, en el trabajo, etc. Lo digital es una experiencia líquida bien diferenciada de la experiencia de consumo y adquisición de la cultura sólida y, en consecuencia, precisa de nuevos enfoques y modelos de alfabetización y aprendizaje.

2. La Web 2.0: la información líquida invade nuestra existencia

Existe una amplia literatura que ha intentado definir y caracterizar qué es la Web 2.0 y sus efectos en múltiples planos de nuestra cultura señalándose que es una realidad excesivamente difusa, cambiante e inestable como para ser acotada en una definición precisa. En el artículo primigenio sobre la Web 2.0, O´Réilly (2005) ya enunció algunas de sus características más destacables: la Web 2.0 es más una plataforma de servicios que de software; es una arquitectura de participación, escalabilidad del coste-beneficio, transformaciones y remezclas de datos y de sus fuentes; software no atado a un único dispositivo, y aprovechamiento de la inteligencia colectiva.

Desde nuestro punto de vista, la Red, es decir, el estadio actual de desarrollo de las telecomunicaciones y de la WWW, conocida genéricamente como la Web 2.0, pudiéramos caracterizarla en función de seis grandes parámetros o dimensiones de producción, consumo y difusión de la cultura que son coexistentes, se entrecruzan y se desarrollan de forma paralela. Es decir, la Web 2.0 es, simultáneamente, una biblioteca universal, un mercado global, un gigantesco puzzle de piezas informativas conectadas hipertextualmente, una plaza pública de encuentro y comunicación de personas que forman comunidades sociales, es un territorio donde prima la comunicación multimedia y audiovisual, así como la diversidad de entornos virtuales interactivos. La información en la Red es abundante, multimedia, fragmentada y construida socialmente en entornos tecnológicos. Lo digital es líquido y, en consecuencia, requiere nuevas alfabetizaciones a los ciudadanos del siglo XXI que les capaciten para actuar como sujetos autónomos, críticos y cultos en el ciberespacio.


Draft Content 522069223-26604 ov-es001.jpg

- La web como biblioteca universal: la sobreabundancia de información genera «infoxicación». Uno de los fenómenos más destacables de este comienzo del siglo XXI es la sobreabundancia de información generada por el incremento exponencial de la misma, que es amplificada y difundida a gran escala por los múltiples y variados medios y tecnologías. Es lo que se conoce como «infoxicación» (Benito-Ruiz, 2009), en el sentido de que el cúmulo y excesiva cantidad de datos genera, inevitablemente, una saturación o intoxicación informacional que provoca que muchos sujetos tengan una visión confusa, ininteligible y de densa opacidad sobre la realidad que les rodea (sea local, nacional o mundial). Ésta es una de las paradojas culturales más representativas de nuestra época: disponemos de los recursos y medios para la accesibilidad a la información, pero la limitada capacidad de procesamiento de la mente humana provoca que el umbral de comprensibilidad de los acontecimientos se vea sobrepasado por la excesiva cantidad de información que recibimos. Por ello, distintos autores afirman que la sociedad de la información no significa necesariamente una sociedad de mayor conocimiento. Una cosa son los datos y otra bien distinta es la capacidad de interpretarlos, darles sentido y significado útil para ciertos propósitos. Esto último es transformar los datos informativos en conocimiento, en saber emplear la información al servicio de la resolución de un problema. Aquí reside una de las metas más relevantes de lo que significa ser un sujeto alfabetizado en la cultura digital.

- La web como mercado o zoco digital: la información como materia prima de la nueva economía. La infor-mación ha pasado a convertirse en la materia prima de importantes sectores económicos de la denominada nueva economía o capitalismo digital. Las compras on-line, la gestión de servicios con las administraciones pú-blicas, la comunicación vía Internet con empresas, asociaciones, entidades gubernamentales, el chequeo y gestión de nuestras finanzas o actividades comerciales… son ya una realidad en nuestra existencia. Las industrias de la información y de servicios on-line en sus múltiples formas se están convirtiendo en uno de los sectores estratégicos en la producción de la riqueza de un país. La Web 2.0 es cada vez más un espacio virtual de transacciones económicas. Por ello, este tipo de empresas o instituciones de servicios requieren de recursos humanos cualificados, o si se prefiere alfabetizados, de modo que posean las competencias adecuadas para producir, gestionar y consumir productos basados en la gestión de información. Pero, también es muy relevante la formación o alfabetización del cliente, del usuario, del consumidor de los productos on-line de modo que conozca sus derechos y formas de actuar en las web. En consecuencia, la alfabetización también es la formación de los trabajadores de la industria digital y de los ciudadanos como consumidores responsables.

- La fragmentación de la cultura: el triunfo del microcontenido. La cultura de la Web 2.0 es fragmentada, es como un puzzle de microcontenidos, donde el individuo debe construir su propio relato de experiencia en los entornos digitales. La cultura vehiculada a través de las redes son piezas cortas, breves, separadas unas de otras, pero entrelazadas mediante vínculos para su consumo rápido. Cada unidad u objeto cultural (una canción, un post, un comentario en un foro, un vídeo, un texto, una foto…) puede ser consumida por el usuario de forma aislada del contexto en el que lo produjo el autor, otorgándole, en consecuencia, otro significado diferente del original, puede ser remezclada con otras piezas generadas por otros autores configurando de este modo una experiencia única y personal por parte del sujeto que navega. Componer una página web, un blog, una wiki, se parece más al proceso de armar un collage que al de elaborar una obra cohesionada y cerrada en sí misma.

La comunicación en la Web 2.0 está provocando la extensión y consolidación de la «cultura del telegrama» que son potenciados por las características de interacción social de la telefonía móvil, de los blogs y de las redes sociales. Frente a la cultura epistolar del pasado hoy prima la economía de las palabras, y la urgencia en hacerlas llegar pronto al destinatario. Esto significa que nos estamos atrofiando como sujetos que dominan las formas expresivas para la redacción de textos prolongados y extensos, coherentemente argumentados y que estén construidos siguiendo una secuencia de inicio, desarrollo y conclusión (Carr, 2010). La mayoría de los textos de las redes sociales, por el contrario son breves, espontáneos, cortos y poco meditados. Es el triunfo de la inmediatez comunicativa frente a la reflexión intelectual. Es el triunfo de la escritura del SMS, y no del texto narrativo. La alfabetización por tanto debe cultivar las competencias para que un sujeto domine distintos lenguajes (sean textuales, audiovisuales, icónicos o sonoros) en diversas formas expresivas (microcontenidos, narraciones o hipertextos)

- La web como ágora pública de comunicación: las redes sociales. La Web 2.0 muchos la denominan como la red social en el sentido de que nos permite estar en contacto permanente con otros usuarios y de este modo, construir comunidades o grupos de comunicación horizontal (Flores, 2009; Haro, 2010). Estas redes o comunidades virtuales –tipo Tuenti, Hi5, NIng, Flirck, Twitter o Facebook– tienen el potencial de que cualquier individuo pueda interaccionar y compartir información con muchas personas, de forma fácil, en directo y sin intermediarios. Internet no es solo un entramado global de máquinas o herramientas tecnológicas, es sobre todo un espacio de comunicación social, es una plaza pública de encuentro e intercambio de seres humanos que comparten unas mismas aficiones, intereses, problemáticas, o afectos. Las redes sociales generan lazos emocionales de pertenencia a un determinado colectivo o grupo social con el que interaccionamos.

Las redes sociales, además de tener un poderoso potencial para el ocio y la comunicación informal también tienen utilidades profesionales, formativas o de aprendizaje ya que configuran comunidades de práctica. Esta dualidad del potencial de las redes sociales se manifiesta en múltiples planos, a veces divergentes y aparentemente contradictorios. Por una parte, generan fenómenos de movilización política y social, como ha ocurrido en las revoluciones del norte de África, o recientemente en España. Por otra, las redes también responden a una tendencia hacia un cierto exhibicionismo a través de la tecnología como es el caso de comportamientos juveniles en Facebook, Tuenti o Twitter donde es habitual una exhibición de las opiniones, fotografías, canciones, páginas web, etc. a los demás (que en lenguaje correcto se dice que son «amigos»). La alfabetización, en consecuencia, tiene que plantearse esta dualidad, de modo que forme a los sujetos para su socialización en comunidades virtuales, mediante el desarrollo de competencias de comunicación, donde primen la empatía, los valores democráticos y la cooperación con los otros, así como la conciencia de lo que debe ser público y/o privado.

- La web es un territorio creciente de expresión multimedia y audiovisual. Cada vez más, la web se llena de imágenes, sonidos, animaciones, películas, audiovisuales. Internet ya no es solo un ciberespacio de textos o documentos para leer. Ahora, de forma más creciente la Web 2.0 es un lugar donde publicar y comunicarse mediante fotos, videoclips, presentaciones o cualquier otro archivo multimedia. El lenguaje iconográfico y audiovisual está inundando los procesos comunicativos de la Red y ello requiere la alfabetización de los sujetos tanto como consumidores de este tipo de productos como en su formación como emisores de forma que posean las competencias expresivas para expresarse con los formatos multimedia y los lenguajes audiovisuales. Al respecto existe una importante tradición derivada de la denominada educación audiovisual y de la educación mediática que tiene mucho que aportar a este tipo de procesos alfabetizadores (Gutiérrez, 2003; 2010; Aparici, 2010).

- La web como ecosistema artificial para la experiencia humana. Internet y demás tecnologías digitales están permitiendo construir un medio ambiente artificial que posibilita tener experiencias sensoriales en entornos tridimensionales o de mezcla entre lo empírico y lo digital, como es el caso de la denominada realidad aumentada (Cawood & Fiala, 2008). La tecnología media entre nuestra percepción individual como sujetos y la realidad representada en la misma, hasta tal punto que llega a mezclarse lo virtual y lo empírico generando «mundos virtuales» a través de plataformas on-line como Secondlife, Torque o OpenSim (Cherbakov, 2009). Estos mundos artificialmente construidos no solo permiten generar un avatar o personaje que nos representa, sino también vivenciar intensas emociones de comunicación e interacción social. La narrativa y experiencia interactiva humano-máquina que han propiciado los videojuegos están favoreciendo un nuevo tipo de experiencia cultural que requiere una formación o alfabetización específica (Sedeño, 2010).

3. Nuevas alfabetizaciones para la ciudadanía de la cultura de la Web 2.0

Como estamos sugiriendo los hipertextos, los gráficos en 3D, los mundos virtuales, los videoclips, las simulaciones, la comunicación en tiempo real y simultánea entre varios sujetos a través de un ordenador, las comunidades humanas virtuales o redes sociales, la videoconferencia, los mensajes y correos escritos a través de telefonía móvil o de Internet, la navegación a través de la WWW, las presentaciones multimedia, entre otras, representan un caleidoscopio de códigos expresivos y acciones comunicativas bien diferenciadas de lo que es la comunicación a través de la escritura y lectura en documentos de papel.

Al respecto, desde hace casi una década, viene produciéndose una literatura sobre la alfabetización que, recogiendo por una parte, la tradición representada por el enfoque liberador y dialógico de Freire, y el enfoque de formación democrática del ciudadano de Dewey, y, por otra, las aportaciones de la educación mediática crítica (critical media education) están pretendiendo elaborar una teoría de la alfabetización para la cultura digital. Al respecto, existen propuestas altamente influyentes, como el concepto de «multialfabetización» (Cope & Kalantzis, 2009), de «nuevas alfabetizaciones» (Lankshear & Knobel, 2009) o de Alfin –alfabetización informacional (Bawden, 2001)– impulsadas desde los ámbitos bibliotecarios y de documentación. Asimismo, también han aparecido distintos conceptos que adjetivizan la alfabetización del tiempo digital como «alfabetización tecnológica», «alfabetización mediática», «alfabetización digital», «alfabetización multimedia», o «alfabetización informacional» puede verse en Gutiérrez (2010), donde coinciden que la alfabetización ante la tecnología digital es un proceso más complejo que la mera capacitación en el manejo del hardware y el software y que lo relevante es la alfabetización ante los nuevos códigos y formas comunicativas de la cultura digital. Distintos autores (Gutiérrez, 2003; Snyder, 2004; Monereo & al., 2005; Tyner, 2008; Merchant, 2009; Leahy & Dolan, 2010) han abordado esta cuestión poniendo de manifiesto que la adquisición de destrezas de uso inteligente de las nuevas tecnologías pasa, al menos, por el dominio instrumental de las mismas junto con la adquisición de competencias relacionadas con la búsqueda, análisis, selección y comunicación de datos e informaciones cara a que el alumno transforme la información en conocimiento, que se convierta en un «prosumer» –productor y consumidor activo de información, así como que desarrolle las competencias de interacción comunicativa en entornos digitales. O dicho de otro modo, que tenga la competencia de apropiarse y otorgar significado a la densa información disponible en la red y representada a través de múltiples lenguajes expresivos. Apropiación del significado y expresión multimodal serían los nuevos términos de los viejos conceptos de leer y escribir tradicionales en todo proceso alfabetizador. Pero, desde nuestra visión, hace falta ir más allá e incorporar nuevos elementos a los señalados en la formulación de una propuesta teórica para la alfabetización ante los cambios culturales derivados del desarrollo de la Web 2.0.

A continuación ofrecemos las líneas maestras o arquitectura básica de un modelo de alfabetización integrado para la formación del ciudadano de la sociedad digital. Hemos conjugado por una parte, los ámbitos o dimensiones de aprendizaje sobre los distintos planos o escenarios que representa la Web 2.0 y que hemos identificado en el apartado anterior. Y por otra, las competencias y habilidades implicadas en todo proceso alfabetizador como son la adquisición de competencias instrumentales, cognitivo-intelectuales, sociocomunicacionales, axiológicas y emocionales. El proceso alfabetizador implica, en consecuencia, el cruce de las competencias de aprendizaje con las dimensiones o contenidos de acción sobre la Web 2.0 con la finalidad de desarrollar –o facilitar la construcción– en el sujeto de una identidad digital como ciudadano que es capaz de actuar como persona culta, autónoma, crítica y con valores democráticos. La representación de este modelo integrador de la alfabetización puede verse en la figura siguiente.


Draft Content 522069223-26604 ov-es002.jpg

3.1. Los ámbitos o dimensiones de aprendizaje ante la Web 2.0

El primer elemento o pilar de este modelo de alfabetización se refiere a qué es lo que debe saber hacer un sujeto alfabetizado con relación al uso de la Web 2.0. Para ello, ofrecemos un cuadro resumen en el que hemos identificado las seis dimensiones de la Web 2.0 anteriormente expuestas (biblioteca universal, mercado global, microcontenidos enlazados hipertextualmente, comunicación multimedia, redes sociales y entornos virtuales) describiendo los ámbitos de aprendizaje que debe propiciar cualquier plan, proyecto o programa alfabetizador del tiempo actual. Estos seis ámbitos o dimensiones representan los «contenidos» de la alfabetización ya que la formación plena e integrada de un ciudadano del siglo XXI requiere que éste sepa actuar y participar de forma activa en los múltiples planos que se entrecruzan en la Web 2.0 (ver tabla 1).

Las dimensiones o ámbitos alfabetizadores ante las nuevas formas culturales de la Web 2.0


Draft Content 522069223-26604 ov-es003.jpg

3.2. Las competencias implicadas en la alfabetización ante la cultura digital

El segundo elemento o pilar de este modelo teórico de la alfabetización se refiere a la identificación de los ámbitos competenciales del aprendizaje del sujeto. En ocasiones anteriores hemos abordado esta cuestión (Area, 2001; Area & al., 2008) identificando cuatro ámbitos competenciales: instrumental, cognitivo, sociocomunicacional y axiológico. En el modelo que presentamos en este artículo hemos añadido una nueva competencia al proceso alfabetizador: la referida al ámbito emocional (Ibarrola e Iriarte, 2010). De este modo, el modelo educativo integral y globalizador para la alfabetización en el uso de las tecnologías de la información y comunicación requiere el desarrollo de cinco ámbitos competenciales que se desarrollan simultáneamente en el sujeto que aprende:

- Competencia instrumental: relativa al dominio técnico de cada tecnología y de sus procedimientos lógicos de uso. Es decir, adquirir el conocimiento práctico y habilidades para el uso del hardware (montar, instalar y utilizar los distintos periféricos y aparatos informáticos) y del software o programas informáticos (bien del sistema operativo, de aplicaciones, de navegación por Internet, de comunicación, etc.)

- Competencia cognitivo-intelectual: relativa a la adquisición de los conocimientos y habilidades cognitivas específicas que permitan buscar, seleccionar, analizar, interpretar y recrear la enorme cantidad de información a la que se accede a través de las nuevas tecnologías así como comunicarse con otras personas mediante los recursos digitales. Es decir, aprender a utilizar de forma inteligente la información tanto para acceder a la misma, otorgarle significado, analizarla críticamente y reconstruirla personalmente.

- Competencia sociocomunicacional: relativa al desarrollo de un conjunto de habilidades relacionadas con la creación de textos de naturaleza diversa (hipertextuales, audiovisuales, icónicos, tridimensionales, etc.), difundirlos a través de diversos lenguajes y poder establecer comunicaciones fluidas con otros sujetos a través de las tecnologías. Asimismo supone adquirir y desarrollar normas de comportamiento que impliquen una actitud social positiva hacia los demás como puede ser el trabajo colaborativo, el respeto y la empatía en redes sociales.

- Competencia axiológica: relativa a la toma de conciencia de que las tecnologías de la información y comunicación no son asépticas ni neutrales desde un punto de vista social, sino que las mismas inciden significativamente en el entorno cultural y político de nuestra sociedad, así como a la adquisición de valores éticos y democráticos con relación al uso de la información y de la tecnología evitando conductas de comunicación socialmente negativas.

- Competencia emocional: relativa al conjunto de afectos, sentimientos y pulsiones emocionales provocadas por la experiencia en los entornos digitales. Éstas tienen lugar bien con las acciones desarrolladas en escenarios virtuales, como pueden ser los videojuegos, o bien con la comunicación interpersonal en redes sociales. La alfabetización de esta dimensión tiene que ver con el aprendizaje del control de emociones negativas, con el desarrollo de la empatía y con la construcción de una identidad digital caracterizada por el equilibrio afectivo-personal en el uso de las TIC.

4. Conclusión

La finalidad de la alfabetización es ayudar al sujeto a construirse una identidad digital como ciudadano autónomo, culto y democrático en la Red. La alfabetización en general, y de modo particular la denominada alfabetización digital, debemos analizarla como un problema sociocultural vinculado con la formación de la ciudadanía, y debiera plantearse como uno de los retos más relevantes para las políticas de las instituciones educativas destinadas a la igualdad de oportunidades en el acceso a la cultura. La educación, sea en escenarios formales como las escuelas, o no formales como las bibliotecas, los centros juveniles, los culturales o el asociacionismo, además de ofrecer un acceso igualitario a la tecnología debiera formar –o alfabetizar– a los ciudadanos para que sean sujetos más cultos, responsables y críticos, ya que el conocimiento es una condición necesaria para el ejercicio consciente de la libertad individual y para el desarrollo pleno de la democracia. Equidad en el acceso y capacitación para el conocimiento crítico son las dos caras de la alfabetización en el uso de las tecnologías digitales. Por ello, la alfabetización no debemos entenderla solamente como un problema de educación formal, sino también de aprendizaje informal.

En definitiva, la alfabetización en la cultura digital o líquida de la Web 2.0 es algo más complejo que el mero aprendizaje del uso de las herramientas de software social (blogs, wikis, redes, y demás recursos del «cloud computing»). La alfabetización, desde esta perspectiva, debe representar un proceso de desarrollo de una identidad como sujeto en el territorio digital, que se caracterice por la apropiación significativa de las competencias intelectuales, sociales y éticas necesarias para interactuar con la información y para recrearla de un modo crítico y emancipador. La meta de la alfabetización será desarrollar en cada sujeto la capacidad para que pueda actuar y participar de forma autónoma, culta y crítica en la cultura del ciberespacio, y en consecuencia, es un derecho y una necesidad de todos y de cada uno de los ciudadanos de la sociedad informacional. Sin alfabetización no podrá existir desarrollo social armonioso en la sociedad del siglo XXI. Sin población culta –es decir, que posea una cultura sólida– no habrá una sociedad líquida que sea democrática e inteligente.

====

Referencias====

Alexander (2008). Web 2.0 and Emergent Multiliteracies. Theory Into Practice, 47; 150-160.

Aparici, R. (Coord.). Educomunicación: más allá del 2.0. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Area, M. (2001). La alfabetización en la cultura y tecnología digital: La tensión entre mercado y democracia. In Area, M. (Coord.). Educar en la sociedad de la información. Bilbao: Descleé de Brouwer.

Area, M.; Gros, B. & Marzal, M.A. (2008). Alfabetizaciones y tecnologías de la información y comunicación. Madrid: Síntesis.

Bauman, Z. (2006). Modernidad líquida. Buenos Aires: Fondo de Cultura Económica.

Bawden, D. (2001). Information and Digital Literacies: A Review of Concepts. Journal of Documentation, 57, 2; 218-259. Versión castellana en Anales de Documentación. (www.um.es/fccd/anales/ad05/ad0521.pdf) (09-08-2011).

Benito-Ruiz, E. (2009). Infoxication 2.0. In Thomas, M. (Ed.). Handbook of Research on Web 2.0 and Second. Language Learning. Pennsylvania: IGI-InfoSci; 60-79. (http://storage.vuzit.com/public/a7l/Draft2ok_Ruiz.pdf) (08-03-2011).

Carr, N. (2010). ¿Qué está haciendo Internet con nuestras mentes superficiales? Madrid: Taurus.

Cawood, S. & Fiala, M. (2008). Augmented Reality. A Practical Guide. O´Reilly (http://oreilly.com/catalog/9781934356036) (06-02-2011).

Cherbakov, L. & al. (2009). Virtual Spaces: Enabling Immersive Collaborative Enterprise, Part 1: Introduction to the opportunities and technologies. USA: developerWorks (www.ibm.com/developerworks/webservices/library/ws-virtualspaces/index.html?S_TACT=105AGX04&S_CMP=EDU#rate) (06-04-2011).

Cope, B. & Kalantzis, M. (2009). Multiliteracies: New Literacies, New Learning, Pedagogies: An International Journal, 4; 3; 164-195. (www.aab.es/aab/images/stories/Boletin/98_99/3.pdf) (09-08-2011).

Flores, J.M. (2009). Nuevos modelos de comunicación, perfiles y tendencias en las redes sociales. Comunicar, 33; 73-81 (http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/c33-2009-02-007).

Gutiérrez, A. (2003). Alfabetización digital. Algo más que ratones y teclas. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Gutiérrez, A. (2010). Creación multimedia y alfabetización en la era digital. In Aparici. R. (Coord.). Educomunicación: más allá del 2.0. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Haro, J.J. (2010). Redes sociales en educación. Madrid: Anaya.

Ibarrola, S. & Iriarte, C. (2010). Las emociones y la mejora del proceso comunicativo en la mediación. En Educar para la comunicación y la cooperación social. Pamplona: Consejo Audiovisual de Navarra. (wwww.consejoaudiovisualdenavarra.es/publicaciones/documents/sextapublicacion.pdf#page=203) (11-5-2011).

Kellner, D. & Share, J. (2007). Critical Media Literacy is Not an Option. Learn Inquiry 1; 59-69.

Lankshear, C. & Knobel, M. (2009). Nuevos alfabetismos. Su práctica cotidiana y su aprendizaje en el aula. Morata: Madrid.

Leahy, D. & Dolan, D. (2010). Digital Literacy: A Vital Competence for 2010? N. en Reynolds and M. Turcsányi-Szabó (Eds.). Key Competencies in the Knowledge Society. Berlin: Springer, IFIP AICT 324; 210-221. (www.springerlink.com/content/b2q8814521274838/fulltext.pdf) (01-09-2011).

Merchant, G. (2009). Web 2.0, New Literacies, and the Idea of Learning through Participation English Teaching: Practice and Critique. December, 2009, 8, 3; 107-122.

Monereo, C. & al. (2005). Internet y competencias básicas. Aprender a colaborar, a comunicarse, a participar, a aprender. Barcelona: Graó.

O’Reilly, T. (2005). What Is Web 2.0: Design Patterns and Business Models for the Next Generation of Software. (ww.oreillynet.com/pub/a/oreilly/tim/news/2005/09/30/what-is-web-20.html).

Sedeño, A.M. (2010). Videojuegos como dispositivos culturales: las competencias espaciales en educación. Comunicar 34; 183-189 (http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C34-2010-03-18).

Snyder, I. (Comp.) (2004). Alfabetismos digitales. Comunicación, innovación y educación en la era electrónica. Málaga: Aljibe.

Tyner, K. (2008). Audiencias, intertextualidad y nueva alfabetización en medios. Comunicar, 30, XV; 79-85.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 29/02/12
Accepted on 29/02/12
Submitted on 29/02/12

Volume 20, Issue 1, 2012
DOI: 10.3916/C38-2012-02-01
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 90
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?