Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

In the 1970s, the publications of Alvin Toffler and Jean Cloutier were essential for the emergence of two concepts, prosumer, and emirec, whose meanings have been mistakenly equated by numerous scholars and researchers. At the same time, the mercantilist theories linked to prosumption have made invisible the models of communication designed by Cloutier. In this article, configured as a review of the state of the art made from an exhaustive documentary analysis, we observe that, while the notion of prosumer represents vertical and hierarchical relations between companies and citizens, Cloutier's emirec evokes a horizontal relationship and an isonomy between professional and amateur media creators. The prosumption presents an alienated subject, which is integrated into the logic of the market under free work dynamics and from the extension of time and productive spaces, while the emirec is defined as a potentially empowered subject that establishes relations between equals. The theory of the prosumer reproduces the hegemonic economic model by seeking solutions from the field of marketing so that the media and entertainment industries must face the challenges they have to face in the digital world. On the contrary, the emirec theory connects with disruptive communicative models that introduce new relationships between media and audiences and the establishment of logic of affinity between communication participants.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Two opposing theories about communication were enunciated in the 70s of the 20th century, based on the ideas outlined by Marshall McLuhan and Barrington Nevitt in their book “Take Today: The Executive as a Dropout” (1972), in which they affirmed that with technology the consumer could become a producer at the same time. On the one hand, Jean Cloutier defines his emirec theory that focuses on communication, interaction, and creation in all fields. On the other, Alvin Toffler stated his prosumer theory for the first time, which is distinguishably economic and focused on the market, as we will show later on. A thorough re-reading of these two authors’ contributions is necessary to identify the true nature of both terms, mistakenly considered as equivalents or synonyms.

Emirec and prosumer do not evoke the same reality. Prosumption is a process that has economic roots, while the emirec theory focuses exclusively on the field of communication. Different scholars have analyzed the work of prosumers as a key element for the current economic model’s functioning. The following authors, among others, consider it to be a key word to characterize new market relationships between consumers and producers. Ritzer and Jurgenson (2010) defend the emergence of “prosumer capitalism” and the need for a “sociology of prosumption”. Fuchs (2010) introduced the concept of “labor of the media and Internet prosumer”, based on the notion of the work of Smythe’s audiences (1977). Huws (2003) affirms the existence of a “consumer work” that is enabled by new information and communication technologies. Bruns (2008) coined the term “produsage” which evokes the figure of the user who produces his goods and/or services. Kücklich (2005) was the first to mention the need to study the so-called “playbour” that proliferates on social networks and within the transmedia culture and media franchises. Hardt and Negri (2000) and Ritzer, Dean and Jurgenson (2012) link this producer as an essential actor for the “social factory”, which generates a huge immaterial production (Lazzarato, 1996) in the Web 2.0 context where users consume information and produce content through different platforms (Chia, 2012; Shaw & Benkler, 2012). In this model of informational capitalism, an ethical surplus is generated in content and messages (Arvidsson, 2005) constituting a model of informative consumption on demand (Sunstein, 2001) or pro-am (Leadbeater & Miller, 2004).

Unlike all these notions, which dialogue closely with the economic and mercantile dimension of Toffler’s prosumer, the emirec notion implicitly evokes questions related to the field of communication and, from its origin, focuses on dialogic, democratic communicative processes; not those that are hierarchical.

2. The economist view. The prosumer as a market support

The perspectives from which the study of prosumption has been addressed vary from the field of media convergence (Sánchez & Contreras, 2012), the world of marketing (Tapscott, Ticoll, & Lowy, 2001; Friedman, 2005; Tener & Weiss, 2004) and the analysis of citizen participation in the social structure (Fernández-Beaumont, 2010). Of all these approaches, those linked to the field of economics have occupied the space that would correspond to the theories and models that are derived from the emirec theory, so it becomes essential to review both concepts – prosumer and emirec; both apparently similar but substantially different.

The profound study of prosumption is inseparable from the use of categories of analysis embedded in the field of economics. Any approach to the prosumer notion takes us to the book “The Third Wave” (Toffler, 1980), where three key moments in the history of economic relations are differentiated. The first wave arises with the agricultural revolution and is established between the ninth and eighteenth centuries. In this period, most individuals were prosumers; they consumed what they produced. From the eighteenth century, the so-called second wave begins, when the industrial revolution modifies the means of production and establishes a separation between the functions of production and consumption, which has the birth of the market understood as a set of networks of commercial exchange as its main consequence. This second wave differentiates those who produce goods from those who acquire them. In this period, the individual is a consumer of the goods that others produce. The third wave –starting from the 40s of the twentieth century– entails the reappearance of the prosumer on a high technological basis that allows for the production of their goods for the market’s sustenance. This process is evident in the digital world.

After the initial contributions of Toffler, the prosumer concept was refined by Don Tapscott in his work “The digital economy” (1995). Tapscott updates the vision of prosumption at a time when technological advances enabled the convergence between producers and consumers more than during any previous time. The term’s economic dimension was renewed and strengthened by this author, who defined the fundamental characteristics of the prosumer 2.0: freedom, customization, scrutiny, and comparison before the purchase, search for integrity and coherence in the message of the brands, collaboration in the realization or the design of products and services, search for entertainment, demand for instant supply and constant product innovation (Tapscott, 2009). Prosumption would be a key element to understand the new marketing rules of the twenty-first century. This is based on the transition of products to experiences, from the sale’s physical space to the ubiquity provided by digital devices and traditional promotion and advertising processes to the dynamics of communication and dialogue between brands and users, setting forth an evolution that starts from the author as the sole producer to the user as a prosumer (Hernández, 2017). Two works by Tapscott contribute significantly to increasing the expansion of the term prosumer: “Wikinomics” (2001) and “Grown up digital. How the next generation is changing your world” (2009).

In connection with Tapscott’s ideas, it is evident that the production of user data constitutes a fundamental element of the market in an informational economy like the present one. In digital platforms and social networks, users constantly create and reproduce content and profiles that contain personal data, social relationships, affection, communications, and communities. In this model, all online activities are stored, evaluated and commercialized. Users not only produce content, but also a set of data that is sold to advertising companies that, in this way, can present personalized ads based on each’s interests. Users are, therefore, productive consumers that produce goods and benefits that are intensively exploited by capital (Fuchs, 2015: 108).

The digital prosumer, therefore, is not configured as an empowered individual but alienated by converting what would otherwise be necessary paid labor for the market into unpaid work. To do this, one of the techniques used is crowdsourcing, an essential strategy to achieve users’ involvement and emotional attachment (Aitamurto, 2013; Marchionni, 2013). Far from being configured as a democratizing engine of commerce (Howe, 2008:14), crowdsourcing can be defined as a mechanism that informational capitalism uses to create value and intensify exploitation (Fuchs, 2015: 156).

At the same time, digital prosumption is governed by processes of coercion. Large digital companies monopolize the provision of certain services -such as the creation of vast networks of social connectivity- and, therefore, are able to exert an invisible coercive force on users, who are reluctant to abandon such platforms in order to maintain their social relations and not be led to an evident impoverishment in communicative and social terms.

3. Application of the term prosumer in the field of communication

The arrival of Web 2.0 (O’Reilly, 2005) opens up new opportunities for communication and participation of audiences in public discourse, even for the development of cyber-activism activities (Tascón & Quintana, 2012); so that the former passive receiver has the possibility of becoming a message sender. Rublescki (2011), and Aguado and Martínez (2012) assert that we are in a liquid media ecosystem in which the roles of issuers and receivers are blurred. In this context, studies are beginning to proliferate on the uses that young people make of social media (Turkle, 2012; McCrindle & Wolfinger, 2011). The new configuration of the concept of responsible citizenship in the consumption of media (Dahlgren, 1995; 2002; 2009; 2010; 2011), the new possibilities of media participation (Couldry, Livingstone, & Markham, 2006; Lunt & Livingstone, 2012), and the use of virtual environments and social networks as platforms for citizen empowerment (Scolari, 2013; Jenkins, & al., 2009; Kahne, Lee, & Timpany, 2011; Jenkins, Ito, & Boyd, 2016; Jenkins, Ford, & Green, 2015). However, it was Tapscott in 2011 who explicitly incorporated prosumption in the analysis of communication when he described the Huffington Post model, based on a shared work between the producer and the consumer (Tapscott, 2011), a global conversation of active news ‘prodesigners’ (Hernández-Serrano, Renés-Arellano, Graham, & Greenhill, 2017).

On the other hand, the notion of prosumer jumped into the cultural field thanks to the contributions, among others, of Henry Jenkins (2003), who applies this concept to the field of transmedia narratives. Jenkins defines the transmedialization of stories as those processes that trigger narrations using multiple media and platforms and in which a part of the prosumers, users or fans do not limit themselves to consuming such cultural products without going further, but embark on the task of extending its narrative world with new textual pieces (Scolari, 2013). The proliferation of new devices and digital media products produces a scattering of the public, which is no longer behaving under homogeneous consumption principles.

The arrival of the Internet and the invention of new entertainment screens (especially smartphones and tablets) facilitate the disintegration of monolithic audiences of the past that happen to behave in a more heterogeneous way and distribute their media habits on different platforms. In this context, transmedia narratives are presented as a possible solution to address the atomization of audiences. The stories’ dispersion in different media that function as differentiated access points to the transmedia universes makes it easier for cultural franchises to locate their products where the consumer is located.

Despite the numerous references that we can academically find about the prosumer’s power as a significant participant in the stories’ narrative and the construction of the messages in digital media, the truth is that prosumption carries out communication processes clearly vertical and that it hardly modifies the unidirectionality and hierarchical structure manifested in the mass media. This was demonstrated by Berrocal, Campos-Domínguez and Redondo (2014) in a study on prosumption in political communication on YouTube collected in the journal “Comunicar” (43rd issue), in which they affirm that the prosumer of this type of content is characterized by exerting a very reduced prosumption in the creation of messages and is mainly a consumer. Similarly, much of the limited content generated by these prosumers only serves to reinforce the major communication actors’ message or to follow the majority’s tendencies, exerting a low level of empowerment and critical capacity. The majority of the opinions that consumers introduce in these videos is linked to what Sunstein (2010) calls “conformity cascades”, in which these comments are very brief messages that reaffirm the message of the majority (Berrocal, Campos-Dominguez, & Redondo, 2014:70). Similar results were obtained by Torrego and Gutiérrez (2016) in studies on the participation of young people on the social network Twitter.

As we have observed, the prosumption defined by Toffler as a characteristic of our time is configured as an idea of ??clear economic vision that in no way serves to define participative communication models since it contains an evident authoritarian burden from which, under the guise of freedom and empowerment, the cultural and media market finds a solution for its renewal and adaptation to the new technological framework. In this sense, unlike opinions such as those of Jackson (2013) that defend the breaking of the monopoly of information from conventional media after the arrival of Web 2.0 and new prosumption, authors such as Buckingham & Rodríguez (2013) affirm that spaces that define new technologies are far from being configured under the principles of freedom and democracy.

4. The view from the field of communication. Emirec as an empowered subject

In the previous sections, we have analyzed how the new digital economy that underlies the big social platforms’ functioning subjects the prosumer to new mercantilist laws that confine them to the realization of a free job that benefits large companies. Parallel to this logic, the new communication possibilities offered by the digital media as spaces of communication empowerment that dialogue closely with the notion of emirec defined in the seventies by Jean Cloutier are no less evident.

Cloutier (1973) proposes a communicative model in which all the participants have the possibility of being broadcasters (Aparici & García-Marín, 2017). He calls his theory emirec (émetteur/récepteur), in which the interlocutors maintain relations between equals and where all the subjects of communication are, at the same time, transmitters and receivers. While Cloutier (1973; 2001) in Canada thought about this type of horizontal communicative relations, in France Porcher (1976), Vallet (1977) and later his disciple Francisco Gutiérrez (1976) conceived the media as a parallel school to the educational system; its approach being autonomous and having the need for a total language, a clear antecedent to the current concept of transmedia narratives. There is a whole stream of authors who have criticized the role that has been assigned to the media users and audience, granting the subjects a more significant role in the communication process that exceeds that of the public or fans. In this line of thought we can place Martínez-Pandiani (2009), Vacas (2010), Piscitelli, Adaine y Binder (2010), Repoll (2010) and Jacks (2011). Kaplún (1998) and Martín-Barbero (2004) criticize the communication and education models and practices, adopting Cloutier’s emirec proposal. These authors defend the need for communication to be a basic pillar of education, focusing, more precisely, on dialogic communication (Flecha, 2008) and distinguishing between readers, viewers and Internet users (García-Canclini 2007). From the specific field of education, authors such as Silva (2005), Ferrés (2010), García-Matilla (2010), Aparici (2010) and Orozco, Navarro and García-Matilla (2012) advocate a horizontal communicative relationship in the classroom as a practice of citizenship and democracy that promotes true co-authorship practices and a collective construction of knowledge. In digital contexts, the works of Rheingold (2002), Scolari (2004; 2009), Santaella (2007) and Shirky (2011) defend the ideas of empowerment: participation, interactivity, collaboration and co-authorship; in short, the establishment and development of new connectivities in the field of communication. In the same vein, Dezuanni (2009), Burn (2009) and Jenkins (2009; 2011) bring us closer to an interconnected society reaffirming the need to design other communicative models to overcome the 20th century’s hierarchical practices. In the media model originated in our days, we can appreciate the fundamentals of communication between equals that support these theories. We analyze these essential principles below.

• Professional/amateur convergence. The digital social media present a model that converges both professional communicators and unpaid users in the same space. These platforms break the professional-amateur divide that prevailed in the old media’s model. In this sense, according to Burgess & Green (2009: 90), social platforms propose completely disruptive spaces in communicative terms.

• The isonomy principle. Digital social media outperforms the hierarchical broadcast model and propose an isonomy where the productions of traditional media and those made by citizens are presented in the same way in a space in which everyone –the media and those who were only receivers before– are communicators (Gabelas & Aparici, 2017). Stiegler (2009) states that digital platforms break the model based on the large media corporations’ hegemony that dominated the twentieth century, to privilege the personal choice of each member of the audience, enabled to access a greater volume of media choices possible and to empower themselves as a content producers. Not only are social media spaces for convergence (as we mentioned in the previous point), they are also environments for divergence that operate under the logic of the niche, the individualization of consumption and the fragmentation of audiences (Grusin, 2009).

• Freedom and negotiation. The “collaborative networks” (Cusot & Klein, 2015) and social media are configured as open platforms for the participation of any user trained to incorporate all kind of content, formats, ideologies and styles. In these services, there are no defined quality standards, but emirecs value the meaning of the content for their lives, hobbies and emotions with greater relevance. The creative freedom offered by these media opens up new possibilities for expressive experimentation and the creation of new formats. This communicative model feeds the establishment of constant negotiation processes where the ways of understanding the media, their identity, quality and aesthetics are widely debated horizontally within the communities of creators and users.

• Affinity media and horizontality. Lange (2009: 70) conceives the affinity media as those that do not distribute their contents for mass audiences, but for small niches of users that wish to take part in the message and remain connected with the producers in clear relations of horizontality. The closeness and permanent connection between YouTubers, Instagramers, podcasters and other digital media producers and their followers (and potential communicators participating in the programs that follow) is key to their messages’ success. These productions present a more personal and reflective nature; usually dealing with the day-to-day aspects of the creators and are likely to generate a greater level of response. The logic of affinity feeds an interaction that offers the user the feeling of being connected not to a media product, but to a person with whom he shares common beliefs and interests (Lange, 2009: 83).

• Challenge to the broadcast model. The participative, horizontal and dialogical culture typical of these media clashes directly with the strategies used by mass media stars when they want to enter into these platforms. This can be explained with the following example: The American television personality Oprah Winfrey launched her channel on YouTube in November 2007 through a movement that was criticized by the users of the service; since she ignored the cultural norms that had been developed within the community when eliminating the ability to embed and comment on the videos hosted on her channel. YouTube was treated [by Oprah] not as a participatory space, but as an extension platform for her brand (Burgess & Green, 2009: 103). The communicative model associated with the appearance of Oprah on YouTube reproduced the authoritarian unidirectional broadcast logic from which the television star came from, ignoring the basic principles on which the community is governed through this medium. Oprah treated YouTube users as prosumers who had to produce for her brand, not as emirecs with whom to dialogue as equals.

• Human-machine hybridization. The Web does not have the possibility of identifying the semantic content of media products built-in image and sound formats, that is why the metadata introduced by users are key to the functioning of the algorithms that operate through the creation of lists, rankings and the recommendations on social platforms. For this reason, these services facilitate acts of deliberate interaction (uploading files, viewing, marking with “likes” or favorites, labeling, commenting, etc.) that provide the necessary information for the system’s organization. Such contributions are fundamental for the platform’s operations, since they are essential to achieve the visibility of the files and affect the responses of the searches that the user performs. This hybrid model (Kessler & Schäfer, 2009) connects humans and machines for the management of information within the large database that is built around online services. These media and platforms are an example of what Kessler & Schäfer call Theory Actor-Network, which defends that human and mechanical agents should be considered equally important in the constitution of social interaction. In such platforms, the meta-information provided by creators and users is crucial. The subjects provide semantic input that the machine processes algorithmically producing different organization types of file and metadata. This mixture of technological devices and user action constructs new media practices that challenge our traditional conception of media use and that place the emirec in an interaction not only with other subjects, but also with algorithmic devices that influence their media experience.

• Collective Intelligence and library metaphor. These social media can be seen as large libraries or repositories full of cultural resources where a large number of emirecs create content on the topics they dominate, constituting sources of knowledge that can be used in many different ways; from the reappropriation of contents and their use for educational purposes to their own cultural enrichment.

As we have observed, networks and digital social media are potential spaces of action for emirec communicators. Their operating model fundamentally breaks the dynamics of the mass media by imposing a new configuration of the connections between traditional media and independent producers and a greater dialogical relationship between media creators and users.

However, the emirec concept must be revised starting with the arrival of Web 2.0. Cloutier enunciated his theory in an era of analog technologies that defined a media ecosystem that changed radically since the beginning of the 21st century. Digital technologies have opened the door to the arrival of new media and languages ??and renewed relationships between communication actors. On the one hand, the new digital media context activates the presence of new platforms that incorporate renewed communicative logic. These platforms, far from being static, change their languages ??and protocols over time; adapting to the use that users make of them. Social media platforms, far from being obsolete products, are dynamic objects that are transformed in response to user needs (Van-Dijck, 2016). This process also operates in reverse: new spaces and digital communication services affect the way in which subjects produce and distribute their messages and are affected by them (Finn, 2017). Therefore, a clear co-evolution process is established in which technologies and users influence each other, adding new nuances to the emirec notion; whose updating is essential.

5. Conclusion

The economic theories of prosumption have managed to make the communicative notions based on the emirec model that provides a liberalizing vision of the individual invisible. The prosumer notion has an economic origin and should not be used conceptually as a synonym and equivalent to the term emirec. Both concepts present radically opposed definition frameworks. The framework linked to the prosumer notion refers us to a creative subject of goods and services that are commercialized by large companies in the process of false participation that reconfigures and renews the forms of alienation and exploitation. Prosumption is essential for the extension of spaces and productive work times that were previously dedicated to leisure. In the digital economy, it is essential that this leisure time becomes a time of goods production that, unlike the processes that occur in offline prosumption, prosumers do not create for themselves, but for large digital companies.

Faced with these power relations –vertical and hierarchical– which prosumption offers as an economic category, we find the communicative theory of the emirec, which places its basics on the consideration of individuals as senders and receivers at the same time, acting under the principles of horizontality and with a total absence of hierarchy. The prosumer is an individual who works (for free) for the market and reproduces the existing model, while the emirec is an empowered subject that has the potential capacity to introduce critical discourses that question the system’s functioning. The prosumer produces and consumes to reproduce the economic order, while the emirec communicates from a position of freedom. Therefore, the separation and differentiation of both terms are essential.

At the same time, it is necessary to start thinking about theories that overcome the division between senders and receivers. In the digital context of communication, the relationship occurs between communicators (amateurs, popular, professionals, all have the voices of broadcasters) that move or are moved by different platforms or social networks. For this reason, the emirec concept must be studied from innovative perspectives according to new communicative logic. Cloutier’s post-functionalist theories were enunciated in an era that presented an exclusively analog media ecosystem that has nothing to do with the current context. The technological leap developed over the last decades and, above all, the generation of new practices and communication dynamics oblige us to review the emirec theory. It deserves to be analyzed from a dynamic point of view that addresses the profound changes that have occurred during the first decades of the 21st century in communicative and technological fields.

References

Aguado, J.M., & Martínez, I.J. (2012). El medio líquido: la comunicación móvil en la sociedad de la información. In F. Sierra, F.J. Moreno, & C. Valle (Coords.), Políticas de comunicación y ciudadanía cultural iberoamericana (pp. 119-175). Barcelona: Gedisa.

AIMC (2013). Estudio General de Medios (octubre 2012 a mayo 2013). (https://goo.gl/KYJmJl).

Aitamurto, T. (2013). Balancing between open and closed. Digital Journalism, 1(2), 229-251. https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2012.750150

Aparici, R. (Coord.) (2010). Conectados en el ciberespacio. Madrid: UNED.

Aparici, R., & García-Marín, D. (2017). Comunicar y educar en el mundo que viene. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Arvidsson, A. (2005). Brands: A critical perspective. Journal of Consumer Culture, 5(2), 235-258. https://doi.org/10.1177/1469540505053093

Aubert, A., Flecha, C., García, C., Flecha, R., & Racionero, S. (2008). Aprendizaje dialógico en la sociedad de la información. Barcelona: Hipatia.

Berrocal, S., Campos-Domínguez, E., & Redondo, M. (2014). Prosumidores mediáticos en la comunicación política: el “politainment” en YouTube. Comunicar, 43, 65-72. https://doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-06

Bruns, A. (2008). Blogs, Wikipedia, Second Life and beyond: From production to produsage. New York: Peter Lang.

Buckingham, D., & Rodríguez, C. (2013). Aprendiendo sobre el poder y la ciudadanía en un mundo virtual. Comunicar, 40, 49-58. https://doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-05

Burguess, J., & Green, J. (2009). The entrepreneurial blogger: participatory culture beyond the professional amateur divide. In P. Snickars, & P. Vonderau (Coords.), The YouTube Reader (pp. 89-107). Stockholm: National Library of Sweeden.

Burn, A. (2009). Making new media: Creative production and digital literacies. New York: Peter Lang.

Chia, A. (2012). Welcome to me-mart. American Behavioral Scientist, 56(4), 421-438. https://doi.org/10.1177%2F0002764211429359

Cloutier, J. (1973). La communication audio-scripto-visuelle à l’heure des self média. Montreal: Les Presses de l’Université de Montreal.

Cloutier, J. (2001). Petit traité de communication. Emerec à l´heure des technologies numériques. Montreal: Carte Blanche.

Collins, R. (2012). Accountability, citizenship and public media. In M. Price, S. Verhulst, & L. Morgan (Eds.), Handbook of media law (pp. 219-233). Abingdon: Routledge.

Couldry, N., LIivingstone, S., & Markham, T. (2006). Media Consumption and the Future of Public Connection. London: LSE Research Online Working Paper. (http://goo.gl/Te2Fu2).

Cusot, G., & Klein, C. (2015). Redes colaborativas: Wikipedia, ¿es confiable? Estrategas, 2, 9-20. (https://goo.gl/Lff5kz).

Dahlgren, P. (1995). Television and the public sphere. Citizenship, democracy and the media. London: Sage Publications.

Dahlgren, P. (2002). In search of the talkative media, deliberative democracy and civic culture. Barcelona: IAMCR.

Dahlgren, P. (2009). Media and political engagement. Citizens, communication, and democracy. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Dahlgren, P. (2010). Public spheres, societal shifts and media modulation. In J. Gripsrud, & L. Weibull (Eds.), European media at the crossroads. Bristol: IntellectBooks.

Dahlgren, P. (2011). Jóvenes y participación cívica. Los medios en la Red y la cultura cívica. Telos, 89, 12-22. (https://goo.gl/qfZ7Fw).

Dezuanni, M. (2009). Remixing media literacy education: Students writing’ with new media technologies. The Journal of Media Literacy, 56, 11-13. (https://goo.gl/u5sMcR).

Fernández-Beaumont, J. (2010). Medios de comunicación, difusión de valores y alfabetización. In J.M. Pérez-Tornero (Coord.), Alfabetización mediática y culturas digitales. Sevilla: Universidad de Sevilla. (https://goo.gl/de4gpL).

Ferrés, J. (2010). Educomunicación y cultura participativa. In R. Aparici (Coord.), Educomunicación: más allá del 2.0 (pp. 251-266). Barcelona: Gedisa.

Finn, E. (2017). What algorithms want. Cambridge: MIT Press.

Friedman, T. (2005). La Tierra es plana. Breve historia del mundo globalizado del siglo XXI. Barcelona: MR Ediciones.

Fuchs, C. (2010). Labor in informational capitalism and on the Internet. The Information Society 26(3), 179-196. https://doi.org/10.1080/01972241003712215

Gabelas, J.A., & Aparici, R. (2017). Youtubers en conexión. Otras claves narrativas, otras audiencias. In R. Aparici, & D. García-Marín (Coords.), ¡Sonríe, te están puntuando! Narrativa digital interactiva en la era de black mirror (pp. 113-127). Barcelona: Gedisa.

García-Canclini, N. (2007). Lectores, espectadores e internautas. Barcelona: Gedisa.

García-Matilla, A. (2010). Publicitar la educomunicación en la universidad del siglo XXI. In R. Aparici (Coord.), Educomunicación: más allá del 2.0 (pp. 151-168). Barcelona: Gedisa.

Grusin, R. (2009). YouTube at the end of the new media. In P. Snickars, & P. Vonderau (Coords.), The YouTube Reader (pp. 60-67). Estocolmo: National Library of Sweeden.

Gutiérrez, F. (1976). Pedagogía del lenguaje total. Buenos Aires: Humanitas.

Hardt, M., & Negri, A. (2000). Empire. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

Hernández, E. (2017). Facebook: del autor como productor al usuario como prosumidor. Virtuales, 8(15), 23-43. (https://goo.gl/JMp4fM).

Hernández-Serrano, M., Renés-Arellano, P., Graham, G., & Greenhill, A. (2017). From prosumer to prodesigner: Participatory news consumption. [Del prosumidor al prodiseñador: el consumo participativo de noticias]. Comunicar, 50, 77-88. https://doi.org/10.3916/C50-2017-07

Howe, J. (2008). Crowdsourcing: Why the power of the crowd is driving the future of business. New York: Three Rivers Press.

Huws, U. (2003). The making of cybertariat: Virtual work in a real world. New York: Monthly Review Press.

Jacks, N. (2011). Análisis de recepción en América Latina. Un recuento histórico con perspectivas al futuro. Quito: CIESPAL.

Jackson, G. (2013). El país que soñamos. Santiago: Debate.

Jenkins, H. (2009). Fans, blogueros y videojuegos. La cultura de la colaboración. Barcelona: Paidós.

Jenkins, H. (2011). From new media literacies to new media expertise: Confronting the challenges of a participatory culture (https://goo.gl/TUctYq).

Jenkins, H., Ford, S., & Green, J. (2015). Cultura transmedia. La creación de contenido y valor en una cultura en Red. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Jenkins, H., Ito, M., & Boyd, D. (2016). Participatory culture in a networked era. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Jenkins, H., Purushotma, R., Werigel, M., Clinton, K., & Robinson, A.J. (2009). Confronting the challenges of participatory culture. Media Education for the 21st century. Cambridge: The MIT Press.

Kahne, J., Lee, N., & Timpany, J. (2011). The civic and political significance of online participatory cultures and youth transitioning to adulthood. San Francisco: DML Central Working Papers.

Kaplún, M. (1998). Una pedagogía de la comunicación. Madrid: De la Torre.

Kessler, F., & Schäfer, M.T. (2009). Navigating YouTube: Constituting a hybrid information management system. In P. Snickars, & P. Vonderau (Coords.), The YouTube Reader (pp. 275-291). Stockholm: National Library of Sweeden.

Kücklich, J. (2005). Precarious playlabour. Modders and the digital games industry. (https://goo.gl/FoPHVR) (2017-07-12).

Lange, P. (2009). Videos of affinity on YouTube. In P. Snickars, & P. Vonderau (Coords.), The YouTube Reader (pp. 70-88). Stockholm: National Library of Sweeden.

Lazzarato, M. (1996). Immaterial Labour. In M. Hardt & P. Virno (Eds.), Radical thought in Italy: A potential politics (pp. 133-147). Minneapolis (USA): University of Minnesota Press.

Leadbeater, C., & Miller, P. (2004). The pro-am revolution: How enthusiasts are changing our economy and Society. London: Demos.

Lunt, P., & Livingstone, S. (2012). Media regulation. Governance and the interest of citizens and consumers. London: Sage Publications.

Marchionni, D. (2013). Conversational journalism in practice. Digital Journalism, 1(2), 252-269. https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2012.748513

Martín-Barbero, J. (2004). La educación desde la comunicación. Buenos Aires: Norma.

Martínez-Pandiani, G. (2008). La revancha del receptor. Política, medios y audiencias. Buenos Aires: Universidad del Salvador.

McCrindle, M., & Wolfinger, E. (2011). Word up. A lexicon and guide to communication in the 21st century. Sydney: Halstead Press.

McLuhan, M., & Nevitt, B. (1972). Take today. The executive as a dropout. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

Orozco, G., Navarro-Martínez, E, & García-Matilla, A (2012). Desafíos educativos en tiempos de autocomunicación masiva: la interlocución de las audiencias. Comunicar, 38(XIX), 67-74. https://doi.org/10.3916/C38-2012-02-07

O´Reilly, T. (2005). What Is Web 2.0. O’Reilly Media Inc. (http://goo.gl/HzTN3N).

Piscitelli, A., Adaine, I., & Binder, I. (2010). El proyecto Facebook y la posuniversidad. Sistemas operativos sociales y entornos abiertos de aprendizaje. Barcelona: Ariel.

Porcher, L. (1976). La escuela paralela. Buenos Aires: Kapelusz.

Repoll, J. (2010). Arqueología de los estudios culturales de audiencias. México: UAM.

Rheingold, H. (2002). Multitudes inteligentes. La próxima revolución social. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Ritzer, G., & Jurgenson, N. (2010). Production, consumption, presumption: The nature of capitalism in the age of the digital prosumer. Journal of Consumer Culture 10(1), 13-36. https://doi.org/10.1177%2F1469540509354673

Ritzer, G., Dean, P., & Jurgenson, N. (2012). The coming of age of the prosumer. American Behavioral Scientist, 56(4), 379-398.https://doi.org/10.1177%2F0002764211429368

Rublescki, A. (2011). Metamorfoses jornalísticas: leitores e fontes como instâncias co-produtoras de conteúdos no jornalismo líquido. Estudos em Comunicação, 10, 319-335 (http://goo.gl/IGdulV).

Sánchez, J., & Contreras, P. (2012). De cara al prosumidor. Producción y consumo empoderando a la ciudadanía 3.0. Icono 14, 10(3), 62-84. https://doi.org/10.7195/ri14.v10i3.210

Santaella, L. (2007). Navegar no ciberespaço. O perfil do leitor imersivo. São Paulo: Paulus.

Scolari, C. (2004). Hacer clic. Hacia una sociosemiótica de las interacciones digitales. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Scolari, C. (2009). Hipermediaciones. Elementos para una teoría de la comunicación digital interactiva. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Scolari, C. (2013). Narrativas transmedia. Cuando todos los medios cuentan. Barcelona: Deusto.

Shaw, A., & Benkler, Y. (2012). A tale of two blogospheres: Discursive practices of the left and right. American Behavioral Scientist, 56(4), 459-487. https://doi.org/10.1177/0002764211433793

Shirky, C. (2011). A cultura da participação. Río de Janeiro: Zahar.

Silva, M. (2005). Educación Interactiva: Enseñanza y aprendizaje presencial y online. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Smythe, D. (1977). Communications: Blindspot of western marxism. Canadian Journal of Political and Social Theory 1(3), 1-27. (https://goo.gl/TJcwPp).

Tapscott, D. (1995). The digital economy: Promise and peril in the age of networked intelligence. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Tapscott, D. (2009). Grown up digital. How the net generation is changing your world. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Tapscott, D., & Williams, A.D. (2011). Wikinomics. Nuevas formas para impulsar la economía mundial. Barcelona: Paidós.

Tapscott, D., Ticoll, D., & Lowy, A. (2001). Capital digital. El poder de las redes de negocios. Madrid: Taurus Digital.

Tascón, M., & Quintana, Y. (2012). Ciberactivismo. Las nuevas revoluciones de las multitudes conectadas. Madrid: Catarata.

Toffler, A. (1980). The third wave. New York: Bantam Books.

Torrego, A., & Gutiérrez, A. (2016). Ver y tuitear: Reacciones de los jóvenes ante la representación de la resistencia. Comunicar, 47, 9-17. https://doi.org/10.3916/C47-2016-01

Turkle, S. (2012). Alone together. Why we expect more from technology and less from each other. New York: Basic Books.

Vacas, F. (2010). La comunicación vertical. Medios personales y mercados de nicho. Buenos Aires: La Crujía.

Vallet, A. (1977). El lenguaje total. Zaragoza: Luis Vives

Van-Dijck, J. (2016). La cultura de la conectividad. Una historia crítica de las redes sociales. Buenos Aires: Siglo Veintiuno Editores.

Werner, K., & Weiss, H. (2006). El libro negro de las marcas. El lado oscuro de las empresas globales. Barcelona: Debolsillo.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

En los años 70, las publicaciones de Alvin Toffler y Jean Cloutier resultan esenciales para el surgimiento de dos conceptos, prosumidor y emirec, cuyos significados han sido equiparados de forma errónea por numerosos académicos e investigadores. De forma paralela, las teorías mercantilistas vinculadas a la prosumición han invisibilizado a los modelos de comunicación entre iguales de Cloutier. En este artículo, configurado como una revisión del estado de la cuestión realizada a partir de un exhaustivo análisis documental, observamos que, mientras que la noción de prosumidor representa unas relaciones verticales y jerárquicas entre las fuerzas del mercado y los ciudadanos, el emirec de Cloutier evoca a una relación horizontal y una isonomía entre comunicadores profesionales y amateurs. La prosumición presenta un sujeto alienado e integrado en la lógica del mercado bajo dinámicas de trabajo gratis y a partir de la extensión del tiempo y los espacios productivos, mientras que el emirec se define como un sujeto potencialmente empoderado que establece relaciones entre iguales. La teoría del prosumidor pretende la reproducción del modelo económico hegemónico buscando soluciones desde el ámbito del marketing a los constantes desafíos que la industria de los medios y el entretenimiento deben afrontar en el mundo digital. Por contra, la teoría del emirec conecta con modelos comunicativos disruptivos que introducen nuevas relaciones entre medios y audiencias y el establecimiento de la lógica de la afinidad entre los participantes de la comunicación.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

En los años 70 del siglo XX se enuncian dos teorías contrapuestas sobre la comunicación, a partir de las ideas esbozadas por Marshall McLuhan y Barrington Nevitt en su obra «Take today: The executive as a dropout» (1972), en la que afirmaban que con la tecnología el consumidor podría llegar a ser, al mismo tiempo, un productor. Por un lado, Jean Cloutier define su teoría del emirec que se centra en la comunicación, la interacción y la creación en todos los campos. Por otro, Alvin Toffler enuncia por primera vez su teoría del prosumidor, de raíz eminentemente económica y centrada en el mercado, como demostraremos más adelante. Resulta necesaria una relectura en profundidad de las aportaciones de estos dos autores para identificar la verdadera naturaleza de ambos términos, considerados erróneamente como equivalentes o sinónimos.

Emirec y prosumidor no evocan la misma realidad. La prosumición es un proceso de raigambre económica, mientras que la teoría del emirec se centra exclusivamente en el ámbito de la comunicación. Diferentes académicos han analizado la labor de los prosumidores como un elemento clave para el engranaje del modelo económico actual. Los siguientes autores, entre otros, lo consideran como una palabra clave para caracterizar nuevas relaciones de mercado entre consumidores y productores. Ritzer y Jurgenson (2010) defienden la emergencia de un «capitalismo del prosumidor» y la necesidad de una «sociología de la prosumición». Fuchs (2010), basándose en la noción del trabajo de las audiencias de Smythe (1977), introdujo el concepto de «trabajo del prosumidor mediático y de Internet». Huws (2003) afirma la existencia de un «trabajo de consumo» que es capacitado por las nuevas tecnologías de la información y la comunicación. Bruns (2008) acuñó el término «produsuario» que evoca la figura del usuario que produce sus propios bienes y/o servicios. Kücklich (2005) fue el primero en mencionar la necesidad de estudiar el llamado «trabajo lúdico» que prolifera en las redes sociales y en el seno de las franquicias mediáticas y culturales transmedia. Hardt y Negri (2000), y Ritzer, Dean y Jurgenson (2012) vinculan a este productor como actor imprescindible para la «fábrica social», que genera una ingente producción inmaterial (Lazzarato, 1996) en el contexto de la Web 2.0 donde los usuarios consumen información y producen contenidos a través de plataformas de diferente naturaleza (Chia, 2012; Shaw & Benkler, 2012). En este modelo de capitalismo informacional, se genera un excedente ético en los contenidos y los mensajes (Arvidsson, 2005) constituyéndose un modelo de consumo informativo a la carta (Sunstein, 2001) o pro-am (Leadbeater & Miller, 2004).

A diferencia de todas estas nociones, que dialogan de cerca con la dimensión claramente economicista y mercantil del prosumidor de Toffler, la noción de emirec evoca implícitamente cuestiones vinculadas al campo de la comunicación y, desde su origen, se centra en procesos comunicativos dialógicos, democráticos, no jerárquicos y horizontales.

2. La mirada economicista. El prosumidor como sustento del mercado

Las perspectivas desde las que se ha abordado el estudio de la prosumición varían desde el campo de la convergencia de medios (Sánchez & Contreras, 2012), el mundo del marketing (Tapscott, Ticoll, & Lowy, 2001; Friedman, 2005; Tener & Weiss, 2004) y el análisis de la participación del ciudadano en el entramado social (Fernández-Beaumont, 2010). De todas estas aproximaciones, las vinculadas al campo de la economía han ocupado el espacio que le correspondería a las teorías y modelos que se derivan del emirec, por lo que se hace imprescindible una revisión de ambos conceptos –prosumidor y emirec– aparentemente semejantes pero sustancialmente diferentes.

El estudio profundo de la prosumición resulta inseparable de la utilización de categorías de análisis insertas en el campo de la economía. Cualquier aproximación a la noción de prosumidor nos lleva al libro «La tercera ola» (Toffler, 1980), donde se diferencian tres momentos clave en la historia de las relaciones económicas. La primera ola surge con la revolución agrícola y se establece entre los siglos IX y XVIII. En este periodo, la mayoría de los individuos consumían lo que ellos mismos producían, eran prosumidores. A partir del siglo XVIII, se inicia la llamada segunda ola, cuando la revolución industrial modifica la forma de producción y establece una separación entre las funciones de producción y consumo, que tiene como principal consecuencia el nacimiento del mercado entendido como un conjunto de redes de intercambio comercial. Esta segunda ola diferencia a los que producen bienes de aquellos que los adquieren; el individuo tipo de este tiempo es consumidor de los bienes que otros producen. La tercera ola –a partir de los años 40 del siglo XX– conlleva la reaparición de un prosumidor sobre una base de alta tecnología que permite la producción de los propios bienes para el sustento del mercado. Este proceso se muestra de forma evidente en el mundo digital.

Tras las aportaciones iniciales de Toffler, el concepto de prosumidor fue refinado por Don Tapscott en su obra «The digital economy» (1995). Tapscott actualiza la visión de la prosumición en una época en la que los avances tecnológicos capacitaban más que en ningún momento anterior la convergencia entre productores y consumidores. La dimensión económica del término fue renovada y potenciada por este autor, quien definió las características fundamentales del prosumidor 2.0: libertad, customización, escrutinio y comparación antes de la compra, búsqueda de integridad y coherencia en el mensaje de las marcas, colaboración en la realización o el diseño de los productos y servicios, búsqueda del entretenimiento, demanda de suministro instantáneo e innovación constante de los productos (Tapscott, 2009). La prosumición resultaría un elemento clave para entender las nuevas normas del marketing del siglo XXI, basadas en la transición de los productos a las experiencias, del espacio físico de venta a la ubicuidad proporcionada por los dispositivos digitales y de los procesos tradicionales de promoción y publicidad a las dinámicas de comunicación y diálogo entre marcas y usuarios, originando una evolución que parte del autor como productor único al usuario como prosumidor (Hernández, 2017). Dos obras de Tapscott contribuyen notablemente a acrecentar la expansión del término prosumidor: «Wikinomics. Nuevas formas para impulsar la economía mundial» (2001) y «Grown up digital. How the net generation is changing your world» (2009).

En conexión con las ideas de Tapscott, resulta evidente que en una economía informacional como la actual, la producción de datos de los usuarios constituye un elemento fundamental para el mercado. En las plataformas digitales y las redes sociales, los usuarios constantemente crean y reproducen contenido y perfiles que contienen datos personales, relaciones sociales, afectos, comunicaciones y comunidades. En este modelo, todas las actividades online son almacenadas, evaluadas y mercantilizadas. Los usuarios no solo producen contenidos, sino también un conjunto de datos que son vendidos a las empresas de publicidad que, de este modo, son capaces de presentar anuncios personalizados en función de los intereses de los sujetos. Los usuarios son, por tanto, consumidores productivos que producen bienes y beneficios que son explotados de forma intensiva por el capital (Fuchs, 2015: 108).

El prosumidor digital, por tanto, no se configura como un individuo empoderado, sino alienado mediante la conversión de las labores pagadas necesarias para el mercado en trabajo no remunerado. Para ello, una de las técnicas utilizadas es el crowdsourcing, estrategia esencial para lograr la implicación y vinculación emocional de los usuarios (Aitamurto, 2013; Marchionni, 2013). Lejos de configurarse como un motor democratizador del comercio (Howe, 2008: 14), el crowdsourcing puede ser definido como un mecanismo que el capitalismo informacional utiliza para la creación de valor y la intensificación de la explotación (Fuchs, 2015: 156).

A la vez, la prosumición digital está gobernada por procesos de coerción. Las grandes compañías digitales monopolizan la provisión de determinados servicios -como la creación de vastas redes de conectividad social- y, por ello, son capaces de ejercer una invisible fuerza coercitiva sobre los usuarios, que se resisten a abandonar tales plataformas a fin de mantener sus relaciones sociales y no verse abocados a un evidente empobrecimiento en términos comunicativos y sociales.

3. Aplicación del término prosumidor al campo de la comunicación

La llegada de la Web 2.0 (O´Reilly, 2005) abre nuevas oportunidades de comunicación y participación de las audiencias en el discurso público, incluso para el desarrollo de actividades de ciberactivismo (Tascón & Quintana, 2012); de forma que el otrora receptor pasivo tiene la posibilidad de convertirse en emisor de mensajes. Rublescki (2011), y Aguado y Martínez (2012), defienden que nos encontramos en un ecosistema mediático líquido en el que se difuminan los papeles de los emisores y los receptores. En este contexto, comienzan a proliferar los estudios sobre los usos que los jóvenes hacen de los medios sociales (Turkle, 2012; McCrindle & Wolfinger, 2011), la nueva configuración del concepto de ciudadanía responsable en el consumo de los medios (Dahlgren, 1995; 2002; 2009; 2010; 2011), las nuevas posibilidades de participación mediática (Couldry, Livingstone, & Markham, 2006; Lunt & Livingstone, 2012) y sobre el uso de los entornos virtuales y las redes sociales como plataformas para el empoderamiento ciudadano (Scolari, 2013; Jenkins, & al., 2009; Kahne, Lee, & Timpany, 2011; Jenkins, Ito, & Boyd, 2016; Jenkins, Ford, & Green, 2015). Sin embargo, fue Tapscott en 2011 quien de forma explícita incorpora la prosumición al análisis de la comunicación cuando describe el modelo de funcionamiento del diario digital Huffington Post, basado en una labor compartida entre el productor y el consumidor (Tapscott, 2011), una conversación global de «prodiseñadores» activos de noticias (Hernández-Serrano, Renés-Arellano, Graham, & Greenhill, 2017).

Por otro lado, la noción de prosumidor saltó al ámbito cultural gracias a las aportaciones, entre otros, de Henry Jenkins (2003), quien aplica este concepto al campo de las narrativas transmedia. Jenkins define la transmedialización de los relatos como aquellos procesos que disparan narraciones utilizando múltiples medios y plataformas y en los que una parte de los prosumidores, usuarios o fans no se limita a consumir tales productos culturales sin más, sino que se embarcan en la tarea de extender su mundo narrativo con nuevas piezas textuales (Scolari, 2013). La proliferación de nuevos dispositivos y productos mediáticos digitales produce una dispersión de los públicos, que están dejando de comportarse bajo principios de consumo homogéneos. La llegada de Internet y la invención de nuevas pantallas para el entretenimiento (teléfonos inteligentes y tabletas, especialmente) facilitan la desintegración de los públicos monolíticos del pasado que pasan a comportarse de una manera más heterogénea y a distribuir su dieta mediática en diferentes plataformas. En este contexto las narrativas transmedia se presentan como una posible solución para afrontar la atomización de las audiencias. La dispersión de las historias en distintos soportes que funcionan como puntos de acceso diferenciados a los universos transmedia facilita que las franquicias culturales ubiquen sus productos allá donde se encuentra el consumidor.

A pesar de las numerosas referencias que podemos encontrar en la academia sobre el poder del prosumidor como participante significativo en la narrativa de los relatos y la construcción de los mensajes en los medios digitales, lo cierto es que la prosumición protagoniza procesos de comunicación claramente verticales y que modifican muy poco la unidireccionalidad y estructura jerárquica manifiesta en los mass media. Así lo demostraron Berrocal, Campos-Domínguez y Redondo (2014) en una investigación sobre la prosumición en la comunicación política en YouTube recogida en el número 43 de la revista «Comunicar», en la que afirman que el prosumidor de este tipo de contenidos se caracteriza por ejercer un prosumo muy reducido en la creación de mensajes y un consumo mayoritario. Del mismo modo, gran parte del escaso contenido generado por estos prosumidores solo sirve para reforzar el mensaje de los grandes actores de la comunicación o para seguir las tendencias de la mayoría, ejerciendo un escaso nivel de empoderamiento y capacidad crítica. La mayoría de las opiniones que los consumidores introducen en estos vídeos se vincula a lo que Sunstein (2010) denomina «cascada de conformismo», en cuanto a que estos comentarios son mensajes muy breves que reafirman el mensaje de la mayoría (Berrocal, Campos-Domínguez, & Redondo, 2014:70). Resultados similares obtuvieron Torrego y Gutiérrez (2016) en estudios sobre la participación de los jóvenes en la red social Twitter.

Como hemos observado, la prosumición definida por Toffler como característica de nuestro tiempo se configura como una idea de clara visión economicista que de ningún modo sirve para definir modelos comunicativos participativos ya que encierra una evidente carga autoritaria a partir de la que, bajo una apariencia de libertad y empoderamiento, el mercado cultural y mediático encuentra una solución para su renovación y adaptación al nuevo marco tecnológico. En este sentido, a diferencia de opiniones como las de Jackson (2013) que defienden la ruptura del monopolio informativo de los medios convencionales tras la llegada de la Web 2.0 y la nueva prosumición, autores como Buckingham & Rodríguez (2013) afirman que los espacios que definen las nuevas tecnologías están lejos de configurarse bajo principios de libertad y democracia.

4. La mirada desde el ámbito de la comunicación. El emirec como sujeto empoderado

En los apartados anteriores, hemos analizado cómo la nueva economía digital que subyace bajo el funcionamiento de las grandes plataformas sociales somete al prosumidor a nuevas leyes mercantilistas que lo confinan a la realización de un trabajo gratis del que se benefician las grandes compañías. De forma paralela a esta lógica economicista, no resultan menos evidentes las nuevas posibilidades comunicativas que los medios digitales ofrecen como espacios de empoderamiento comunicacional que dialogan de cerca con la noción del emirec definida en los años setenta por Jean Cloutier.

Cloutier (1973) propone un modelo comunicativo en el que todos los participantes tienen la posibilidad de ser emisores (Aparici & García-Marín, 2017). Denomina a su teoría emirec (émetteur/récepteur), en la que los interlocutores mantienen relaciones entre iguales y donde todos los sujetos de la comunicación son, a la vez, emisores y receptores. Mientras Cloutier (1973; 2001) en Canadá pensaba en este tipo de relaciones comunicativas horizontales, en Francia Porcher (1976), Vallet (1977) y posteriormente su discípulo Francisco Gutiérrez (1976) concebían los medios como una escuela paralela al sistema educativo, su abordaje de manera autónoma y la necesidad de un lenguaje total, claro antecedente del actual concepto de narrativas transmedia. Existe toda una corriente de autores que han criticado el papel que se le ha asignado a los usuarios y audiencia de los medios, otorgándoles a los sujetos un papel más significativo en el proceso de la comunicación que supere al de público o fans. En esta línea de pensamiento podemos situar a Martínez-Pandiani (2009), Vacas (2010), Piscitelli, Adaine y Binder (2010), Repoll (2010), Jacks (2011), y Kaplún (1998) y Martín-Barbero (2004), quienes critican los modelos y prácticas de comunicación y educación, adoptando la propuesta del emirec de Cloutier. Estos autores defienden la necesidad de que la comunicación sea un pilar básico de la educación, centrándose, de forma más precisa, en la comunicación dialógica (Flecha, 2008) y distinguiendo entre lectores, espectadores e internautas (García-Canclini 2007). Desde el campo específico de la educación, autores como Silva (2005), Ferrés (2010), García-Matilla (2010), Aparici (2010), y Orozco, Navarro y García-Matilla (2012) abogan por una relación horizontal de la comunicación en las aulas como una práctica de ciudadanía y de democracia que impulse verdaderas prácticas de coautoría y construcción colectiva del conocimiento. En los contextos digitales, los trabajos de Rheingold (2002), Scolari (2004; 2009), Santaella (2007) y Shirky (2011) defienden las ideas de empoderamiento, la participación, la interactividad, la colaboración y la coautoría; en síntesis, el establecimiento y desarrollo de nuevas conectividades en el campo de la comunicación. En la misma línea, Dezuanni (2009), Burn (2009) y Jenkins (2009; 2011) nos acercan a una sociedad interconectada reafirmando la necesidad de diseñar otros modelos comunicativos para superar las prácticas jerárquicas propias del siglo XX. En el modelo mediático originado en nuestros días, podemos apreciar los fundamentos de la comunicación entre iguales que sustentan estas teorías. Analizamos a continuación estos principios esenciales.

• Convergencia profesional/amateur. Los medios sociales digitales plantean un modelo que hace converger en el mismo espacio tanto a comunicadores profesionales como a usuarios no remunerados. Estas plataformas rompen la divisoria profesional-amateur que imperó en el modelo de los viejos medios. En este sentido, para Burgess y Green (2009: 90), las plataformas sociales proponen espacios completamente disruptivos en términos comunicativos.

• El principio de isonomía. Los medios sociales digitales superan el modelo broadcast jerárquico y proponen una isonomía donde las producciones de los medios tradicionales y la creación de los ciudadanos se presentan de la misma forma en un espacio en el que todos -los grandes medios y los otrora solamente receptores- son comunicadores (Gabelas & Aparici, 2017). Stiegler (2009) afirma que las plataformas digitales rompen el modelo basado en la hegemonía de las grandes corporaciones mediáticas que dominaron el siglo XX, para privilegiar la elección personal de cada miembro del público, capaz de acceder a un mayor volumen de elecciones mediáticas posibles y de empoderarse como productor de contenidos. No solo los medios sociales son espacios para la convergencia (como veíamos en el punto anterior), son también entornos de divergencias que operan bajo la lógica del nicho, la individualización del consumo y la fragmentación de las audiencias (Grusin, 2009).

• Libertad y negociación. Las «redes colaborativas» (Cusot & Klein, 2015) y medios sociales se configuran como plataformas abiertas a la participación de cualquier usuario capacitado para la incorporación de contenidos de todo tipo de temáticas, formatos, ideologías y estilos. En estos servicios, no existen estándares definidos de calidad, sino que los emirecs valoran con mayor relevancia lo significativo del contenido para sus vidas, aficiones y emociones. La libertad creadora que ofrecen estos medios abre nuevas posibilidades para la experimentación expresiva y la creación de nuevos formatos. Este modelo comunicativo alimenta el establecimiento de procesos constantes de negociación donde las formas de entender los medios, su identidad, calidad y estética son ampliamente debatidos de forma horizontal en el seno de las comunidades de creadores y usuarios.

• Medio de afinidad y horizontalidad. Lange (2009:70) concibe los medios de afinidad como aquellos que no distribuyen sus contenidos para audiencias masificadas, sino para pequeños nichos de usuarios que desean tomar parte del mensaje y permanecer conectados con los productores en claras relaciones de horizontalidad. La cercanía y la permanente conexión entre los youtubers, instagramers, podcasters y demás productores mediáticos digitales y sus seguidores (y potenciales comunicadores participantes en los programas que siguen) es clave para el éxito de sus mensajes. Estas producciones presentan un carácter más personal y reflexivo, suelen tratar sobre aspectos del día a día de los creadores y son susceptibles de generar un mayor grado de respuesta. La lógica de la afinidad alimenta una interacción que ofrece al usuario el sentimiento de estar conectado no a un producto mediático, sino a una persona con la que comparte creencias e intereses comunes (Lange, 2009:83).

• Impugnación del modelo «broadcast». La cultura participativa, horizontal y dialógica propia de estos medios choca frontalmente con las estrategias utilizadas por las estrellas de los mass media cuando quieren penetrar en estas plataformas. Veamos un ejemplo. La figura de la televisión norteamericana Oprah Winfrey lanzó su canal en YouTube en noviembre de 2007 a través de un movimiento que fue muy criticado por los usuarios del servicio, ya que ignoraba las normas culturales que se habían desarrollado en el seno de la comunidad al eliminar la posibilidad de embeber y comentar los vídeos alojados en su canal. YouTube fue tratado [por Oprah] no como un espacio participativo, sino como una plataforma de extensión de su marca (Burgess & Green, 2009:103). El modelo comunicativo asociado a la aparición de Oprah en YouTube reproducía la autoritaria lógica broadcast unidireccional de la que la estrella televisiva procedía, ignorando los principios básicos sobre los que se rige la comunidad en este medio. Oprah trató a los usuarios de YouTube como prosumidores que debían producir para su marca, no como emirecs con los que dialogar de igual a igual.

• Hibridación humano-máquina. La web no tiene posibilidad de identificar el contenido semántico de los productos mediáticos construidos en formatos de imagen y sonido, por eso los metadatos introducidos por los usuarios son clave para el funcionamiento de los algoritmos que operan en la creación de las listas, los rankings y las recomendaciones de las plataformas sociales. Por este motivo, estos servicios facilitan los actos de interacción deliberada (carga de archivos, visionado, marcado con «likes» o favoritos, etiquetado, comentado, etc.) que proveen la información necesaria para la organización del sistema. Tales contribuciones son fundamentales para el funcionamiento de la plataforma, ya que resultan esenciales para lograr la visibilidad de los archivos y afectan a las respuestas de las búsquedas que el usuario realiza. Este modelo de funcionamiento de interacción híbrida (Kessler & Schäfer, 2009) pone en conexión a humanos y máquinas para la gestión de la información en el seno de la gran base de datos que se construye alrededor de los servicios online. Estos medios y plataformas son un ejemplo de lo que Kessler y Schäfer denominan Teoría Actor-Red, que defiende que los agentes humanos y mecánicos deben ser considerados igualmente importantes en la constitución de la interacción social. En tales plataformas, la metainformación que proporcionan creadores y usuarios es crucial. Los sujetos proveen input semántico que la máquina procesa algorítmicamente produciendo diferentes tipos de organización de archivos y metadatos. Esta mezcla de ingenios tecnológicos y acción del usuario construye nuevas prácticas mediáticas que desafían nuestra concepción tradicional del uso de los medios y que colocan al emirec en una interacción no solo con otros sujetos, sino también con ingenios algorítmicos que influyen en su experiencia mediática.

• Inteligencia colectiva y metáfora de la biblioteca. Estos medios sociales pueden ser observados como grandes bibliotecas o repositorios repletos de recursos culturales donde un número elevado de emirecs crean contenidos sobre los temas que dominan, constituyendo fuentes de conocimiento que pueden ser utilizadas de muy diversas formas; desde la reapropiación de contenidos y su utilización para fines educativos hasta el propio enriquecimiento cultural.

Como hemos observado, las redes y medios sociales digitales son espacios potenciales de acción de los comunicadores emirecs. Su modelo de funcionamiento quiebra de forma radical la dinámica de los mass media imponiendo una nueva configuración de las conexiones entre medios tradicionales y productores independientes y una mayor relación dialógica entre creadores mediáticos y usuarios.

Sin embargo, el concepto de emirec debe ser revisado a partir de la llegada de la Web 2.0. Cloutier enunció su teoría en una época de tecnologías analógicas que definían un ecosistema de medios que cambió radicalmente desde inicios del siglo XXI. Las tecnologías digitales han abierto la puerta a la llegada de nuevos medios y lenguajes y renovadas relaciones entre los actores de la comunicación. Por un lado, el nuevo contexto mediático digital activa la presencia de nuevas plataformas que incorporan renovadas lógicas comunicativas. Estas plataformas, lejos de mantenerse estáticas, modifican con el paso del tiempo sus propios lenguajes y protocolos, adaptándose a la utilización que los usuarios hacen de ellas. Las plataformas de los medios sociales, lejos de ser productos acabados, son objetos dinámicos que son transformados en respuesta a las necesidades de los usuarios (Van-Dijck, 2016). Este proceso también opera a la inversa: los nuevos espacios y servicios de comunicación digitales afectan al modo en que los sujetos producen y distribuyen sus mensajes y son afectados por ellos (Finn, 2017). Se establece, por lo tanto, un claro proceso de coevolución en el que tecnologías y usuarios se influyen mutuamente, añadiendo nuevos matices a la noción de emirec, cuya actualización resulta imprescindible.

5. Conclusión

Las teorías económicas de la prosumición han logrado invisibilizar a las nociones comunicativas basadas en el modelo emirec que proveen una visión liberalizadora del individuo. La noción de prosumidor tiene un origen económico y no debe ser utilizada como un concepto sinónimo y homologable al término emirec. Ambos conceptos plantean marcos de significado radicalmente opuestos. El marco vinculado a la noción de prosumidor nos remite a un sujeto creador de bienes y servicios que son mercantilizados por las grandes empresas en un proceso de falsa participación que reconfigura las formas de alienación y explotación. La prosumición resulta fundamental para la extensión de los espacios y los tiempos de trabajo productivo que antes eran dedicados al ocio. En la economía digital, es imprescindible que este tiempo de ocio se convierta en tiempo de producción de bienes que, a diferencia de los procesos que se dan en la prosumición offline, los prosumidores no crean para sí mismos, sino para las grandes compañías digitales.

Frente a estas relaciones de poder –verticales y jerárquicas- que ofrece la prosumición como categoría económica, nos encontramos con la teoría comunicativa del emirec, que asienta sus bases en la consideración de los individuos como emisores y receptores al mismo tiempo, actuando bajo principios de horizontalidad, intercambio de mensajes de igual a igual y ausencia de jerarquización. El prosumidor es un individuo que trabaja (gratis) para el mercado y reproduce el modelo existente, mientras que el emirec es un sujeto empoderado que tiene la capacidad potencial de introducir discursos críticos que cuestionen el funcionamiento del sistema. El prosumidor produce y consume para reproducir el orden económico, mientras que el emirec comunica desde una posición de libertad. Por ello, resulta fundamental la separación de ambos términos.

A la vez, es necesario comenzar a pensar en teorías que superen la división entre emisores y receptores. En el contexto digital de la comunicación, la relación se da entre comunicadores (amateurs, populares, profesionales, todos y todas tienen voces de emisores) que se mueven o son movidos por diferentes plataformas o redes sociales; por ello, el concepto emirec debe ser estudiado desde perspectivas innovadoras acorde a las nuevas lógicas comunicativas. Las teorías post-funcionalistas de Cloutier fueron enunciadas en una época que presentaba un ecosistema mediático exclusivamente analógico que nada tiene que ver con el contexto actual. El salto tecnológico desarrollado en las últimas décadas y, sobre todo, la generación de nuevas prácticas y dinámicas comunicativas obligan a revisar la teoría del emirec, que merece ser analizada desde un punto de vista dinámico que atienda a los profundos cambios que se han producido durante las primeras décadas del siglo XXI en los ámbitos comunicativo y tecnológico.

Referencias

Aguado, J.M., & Martínez, I.J. (2012). El medio líquido: la comunicación móvil en la sociedad de la información. In F. Sierra, F.J. Moreno, & C. Valle (Coords.), Políticas de comunicación y ciudadanía cultural iberoamericana (pp. 119-175). Barcelona: Gedisa.

AIMC (2013). Estudio General de Medios (octubre 2012 a mayo 2013). (https://goo.gl/KYJmJl).

Aitamurto, T. (2013). Balancing between open and closed. Digital Journalism, 1(2), 229-251. https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2012.750150

Aparici, R. (Coord.) (2010). Conectados en el ciberespacio. Madrid: UNED.

Aparici, R., & García-Marín, D. (2017). Comunicar y educar en el mundo que viene. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Arvidsson, A. (2005). Brands: A critical perspective. Journal of Consumer Culture, 5(2), 235-258. https://doi.org/10.1177/1469540505053093

Aubert, A., Flecha, C., García, C., Flecha, R., & Racionero, S. (2008). Aprendizaje dialógico en la sociedad de la información. Barcelona: Hipatia.

Berrocal, S., Campos-Domínguez, E., & Redondo, M. (2014). Prosumidores mediáticos en la comunicación política: el “politainment” en YouTube. Comunicar, 43, 65-72. https://doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-06

Bruns, A. (2008). Blogs, Wikipedia, Second Life and beyond: From production to produsage. New York: Peter Lang.

Buckingham, D., & Rodríguez, C. (2013). Aprendiendo sobre el poder y la ciudadanía en un mundo virtual. Comunicar, 40, 49-58. https://doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-05

Burguess, J., & Green, J. (2009). The entrepreneurial blogger: participatory culture beyond the professional amateur divide. In P. Snickars, & P. Vonderau (Coords.), The YouTube Reader (pp. 89-107). Stockholm: National Library of Sweeden.

Burn, A. (2009). Making new media: Creative production and digital literacies. New York: Peter Lang.

Chia, A. (2012). Welcome to me-mart. American Behavioral Scientist, 56(4), 421-438. https://doi.org/10.1177%2F0002764211429359

Cloutier, J. (1973). La communication audio-scripto-visuelle à l’heure des self média. Montreal: Les Presses de l’Université de Montreal.

Cloutier, J. (2001). Petit traité de communication. Emerec à l´heure des technologies numériques. Montreal: Carte Blanche.

Collins, R. (2012). Accountability, citizenship and public media. In M. Price, S. Verhulst, & L. Morgan (Eds.), Handbook of media law (pp. 219-233). Abingdon: Routledge.

Couldry, N., LIivingstone, S., & Markham, T. (2006). Media Consumption and the Future of Public Connection. London: LSE Research Online Working Paper. (http://goo.gl/Te2Fu2).

Cusot, G., & Klein, C. (2015). Redes colaborativas: Wikipedia, ¿es confiable? Estrategas, 2, 9-20. (https://goo.gl/Lff5kz).

Dahlgren, P. (1995). Television and the public sphere. Citizenship, democracy and the media. London: Sage Publications.

Dahlgren, P. (2002). In search of the talkative media, deliberative democracy and civic culture. Barcelona: IAMCR.

Dahlgren, P. (2009). Media and political engagement. Citizens, communication, and democracy. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Dahlgren, P. (2010). Public spheres, societal shifts and media modulation. In J. Gripsrud, & L. Weibull (Eds.), European media at the crossroads. Bristol: IntellectBooks.

Dahlgren, P. (2011). Jóvenes y participación cívica. Los medios en la Red y la cultura cívica. Telos, 89, 12-22. (https://goo.gl/qfZ7Fw).

Dezuanni, M. (2009). Remixing media literacy education: Students writing’ with new media technologies. The Journal of Media Literacy, 56, 11-13. (https://goo.gl/u5sMcR).

Fernández-Beaumont, J. (2010). Medios de comunicación, difusión de valores y alfabetización. In J.M. Pérez-Tornero (Coord.), Alfabetización mediática y culturas digitales. Sevilla: Universidad de Sevilla. (https://goo.gl/de4gpL).

Ferrés, J. (2010). Educomunicación y cultura participativa. In R. Aparici (Coord.), Educomunicación: más allá del 2.0 (pp. 251-266). Barcelona: Gedisa.

Finn, E. (2017). What algorithms want. Cambridge: MIT Press.

Friedman, T. (2005). La Tierra es plana. Breve historia del mundo globalizado del siglo XXI. Barcelona: MR Ediciones.

Fuchs, C. (2010). Labor in informational capitalism and on the Internet. The Information Society 26(3), 179-196. https://doi.org/10.1080/01972241003712215

Gabelas, J.A., & Aparici, R. (2017). Youtubers en conexión. Otras claves narrativas, otras audiencias. In R. Aparici, & D. García-Marín (Coords.), ¡Sonríe, te están puntuando! Narrativa digital interactiva en la era de black mirror (pp. 113-127). Barcelona: Gedisa.

García-Canclini, N. (2007). Lectores, espectadores e internautas. Barcelona: Gedisa.

García-Matilla, A. (2010). Publicitar la educomunicación en la universidad del siglo XXI. In R. Aparici (Coord.), Educomunicación: más allá del 2.0 (pp. 151-168). Barcelona: Gedisa.

Grusin, R. (2009). YouTube at the end of the new media. In P. Snickars, & P. Vonderau (Coords.), The YouTube Reader (pp. 60-67). Estocolmo: National Library of Sweeden.

Gutiérrez, F. (1976). Pedagogía del lenguaje total. Buenos Aires: Humanitas.

Hardt, M., & Negri, A. (2000). Empire. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

Hernández, E. (2017). Facebook: del autor como productor al usuario como prosumidor. Virtuales, 8(15), 23-43. (https://goo.gl/JMp4fM).

Hernández-Serrano, M., Renés-Arellano, P., Graham, G., & Greenhill, A. (2017). From prosumer to prodesigner: Participatory news consumption. [Del prosumidor al prodiseñador: el consumo participativo de noticias]. Comunicar, 50, 77-88. https://doi.org/10.3916/C50-2017-07

Howe, J. (2008). Crowdsourcing: Why the power of the crowd is driving the future of business. New York: Three Rivers Press.

Huws, U. (2003). The making of cybertariat: Virtual work in a real world. New York: Monthly Review Press.

Jacks, N. (2011). Análisis de recepción en América Latina. Un recuento histórico con perspectivas al futuro. Quito: CIESPAL.

Jackson, G. (2013). El país que soñamos. Santiago: Debate.

Jenkins, H. (2009). Fans, blogueros y videojuegos. La cultura de la colaboración. Barcelona: Paidós.

Jenkins, H. (2011). From new media literacies to new media expertise: Confronting the challenges of a participatory culture (https://goo.gl/TUctYq).

Jenkins, H., Ford, S., & Green, J. (2015). Cultura transmedia. La creación de contenido y valor en una cultura en Red. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Jenkins, H., Ito, M., & Boyd, D. (2016). Participatory culture in a networked era. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Jenkins, H., Purushotma, R., Werigel, M., Clinton, K., & Robinson, A.J. (2009). Confronting the challenges of participatory culture. Media Education for the 21st century. Cambridge: The MIT Press.

Kahne, J., Lee, N., & Timpany, J. (2011). The civic and political significance of online participatory cultures and youth transitioning to adulthood. San Francisco: DML Central Working Papers.

Kaplún, M. (1998). Una pedagogía de la comunicación. Madrid: De la Torre.

Kessler, F., & Schäfer, M.T. (2009). Navigating YouTube: Constituting a hybrid information management system. In P. Snickars, & P. Vonderau (Coords.), The YouTube Reader (pp. 275-291). Stockholm: National Library of Sweeden.

Kücklich, J. (2005). Precarious playlabour. Modders and the digital games industry. (https://goo.gl/FoPHVR) (2017-07-12).

Lange, P. (2009). Videos of affinity on YouTube. In P. Snickars, & P. Vonderau (Coords.), The YouTube Reader (pp. 70-88). Stockholm: National Library of Sweeden.

Lazzarato, M. (1996). Immaterial Labour. In M. Hardt & P. Virno (Eds.), Radical thought in Italy: A potential politics (pp. 133-147). Minneapolis (USA): University of Minnesota Press.

Leadbeater, C., & Miller, P. (2004). The pro-am revolution: How enthusiasts are changing our economy and Society. London: Demos.

Lunt, P., & Livingstone, S. (2012). Media regulation. Governance and the interest of citizens and consumers. London: Sage Publications.

Marchionni, D. (2013). Conversational journalism in practice. Digital Journalism, 1(2), 252-269. https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2012.748513

Martín-Barbero, J. (2004). La educación desde la comunicación. Buenos Aires: Norma.

Martínez-Pandiani, G. (2008). La revancha del receptor. Política, medios y audiencias. Buenos Aires: Universidad del Salvador.

McCrindle, M., & Wolfinger, E. (2011). Word up. A lexicon and guide to communication in the 21st century. Sydney: Halstead Press.

McLuhan, M., & Nevitt, B. (1972). Take today. The executive as a dropout. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

Orozco, G., Navarro-Martínez, E, & García-Matilla, A (2012). Desafíos educativos en tiempos de autocomunicación masiva: la interlocución de las audiencias. Comunicar, 38(XIX), 67-74. https://doi.org/10.3916/C38-2012-02-07

O´Reilly, T. (2005). What Is Web 2.0. O’Reilly Media Inc. (http://goo.gl/HzTN3N).

Piscitelli, A., Adaine, I., & Binder, I. (2010). El proyecto Facebook y la posuniversidad. Sistemas operativos sociales y entornos abiertos de aprendizaje. Barcelona: Ariel.

Porcher, L. (1976). La escuela paralela. Buenos Aires: Kapelusz.

Repoll, J. (2010). Arqueología de los estudios culturales de audiencias. México: UAM.

Rheingold, H. (2002). Multitudes inteligentes. La próxima revolución social. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Ritzer, G., & Jurgenson, N. (2010). Production, consumption, presumption: The nature of capitalism in the age of the digital prosumer. Journal of Consumer Culture 10(1), 13-36. https://doi.org/10.1177%2F1469540509354673

Ritzer, G., Dean, P., & Jurgenson, N. (2012). The coming of age of the prosumer. American Behavioral Scientist, 56(4), 379-398.https://doi.org/10.1177%2F0002764211429368

Rublescki, A. (2011). Metamorfoses jornalísticas: leitores e fontes como instâncias co-produtoras de conteúdos no jornalismo líquido. Estudos em Comunicação, 10, 319-335 (http://goo.gl/IGdulV).

Sánchez, J., & Contreras, P. (2012). De cara al prosumidor. Producción y consumo empoderando a la ciudadanía 3.0. Icono 14, 10(3), 62-84. https://doi.org/10.7195/ri14.v10i3.210

Santaella, L. (2007). Navegar no ciberespaço. O perfil do leitor imersivo. São Paulo: Paulus.

Scolari, C. (2004). Hacer clic. Hacia una sociosemiótica de las interacciones digitales. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Scolari, C. (2009). Hipermediaciones. Elementos para una teoría de la comunicación digital interactiva. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Scolari, C. (2013). Narrativas transmedia. Cuando todos los medios cuentan. Barcelona: Deusto.

Shaw, A., & Benkler, Y. (2012). A tale of two blogospheres: Discursive practices of the left and right. American Behavioral Scientist, 56(4), 459-487. https://doi.org/10.1177/0002764211433793

Shirky, C. (2011). A cultura da participação. Río de Janeiro: Zahar.

Silva, M. (2005). Educación Interactiva: Enseñanza y aprendizaje presencial y online. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Smythe, D. (1977). Communications: Blindspot of western marxism. Canadian Journal of Political and Social Theory 1(3), 1-27. (https://goo.gl/TJcwPp).

Tapscott, D. (1995). The digital economy: Promise and peril in the age of networked intelligence. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Tapscott, D. (2009). Grown up digital. How the net generation is changing your world. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Tapscott, D., & Williams, A.D. (2011). Wikinomics. Nuevas formas para impulsar la economía mundial. Barcelona: Paidós.

Tapscott, D., Ticoll, D., & Lowy, A. (2001). Capital digital. El poder de las redes de negocios. Madrid: Taurus Digital.

Tascón, M., & Quintana, Y. (2012). Ciberactivismo. Las nuevas revoluciones de las multitudes conectadas. Madrid: Catarata.

Toffler, A. (1980). The third wave. New York: Bantam Books.

Torrego, A., & Gutiérrez, A. (2016). Ver y tuitear: Reacciones de los jóvenes ante la representación de la resistencia. Comunicar, 47, 9-17. https://doi.org/10.3916/C47-2016-01

Turkle, S. (2012). Alone together. Why we expect more from technology and less from each other. New York: Basic Books.

Vacas, F. (2010). La comunicación vertical. Medios personales y mercados de nicho. Buenos Aires: La Crujía.

Vallet, A. (1977). El lenguaje total. Zaragoza: Luis Vives

Van-Dijck, J. (2016). La cultura de la conectividad. Una historia crítica de las redes sociales. Buenos Aires: Siglo Veintiuno Editores.

Werner, K., & Weiss, H. (2006). El libro negro de las marcas. El lado oscuro de las empresas globales. Barcelona: Debolsillo.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/03/18
Accepted on 31/03/18
Submitted on 31/03/18

Volume 26, Issue 1, 2018
DOI: 10.3916/C55-2018-07
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 7
Views 2
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?