Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This study investigates the benefits of Mobile Mediated Communication (MMC) to develop oral skills in second-language learners. A total of 80 Spanish students taking a B1 English course at the University of Almería were studied in this research. According to treatment type, subjects were divided in two groups, experimental and control. A “Whatsapp” group was created where 40 of these students participated in a daily interaction during six months. The samples collected in the application as well as a speaking were used to measure the students’ degree of oral development and the type and triggers of the language related episodes (LRE) given rise to mobile chat-based oral interaction. This study focuses on such interaction and seeks to measure the students’ degree of oral development through a mixed analysis approach. A temporal axis is used to measure the differences between the groups studied. Significant improvements in term of oral proficiency were observed in the experimental group and negotiations were the LRE most common throughout the activity. It is worth mention that Mobile learning offers an environment where learners can ubiquitously negotiate meaning, reflect and evaluate on their own performance through authentic interaction and feedback, constituting a powerful tool for developing second language proficiency.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction and statement of the question

Mobile phones and, consequently, wireless computing devices have changed the e-learning landscape in many different ways due to widespread access to such inexpensive and sophisticated devices (Miangah & Nezarat, 2012). Kukulska-Hulme & Shield (2008) and Trifonova & Ronchetti (2004) place emphasis on the characteristics of mobile devices as small, autonomous and unobtrusive qualities that provide learners with easy access to all resources. Advances in mobile technologies give the chance to owners of mobile devices to access not just educational re­sources, but the possibility of engaging in many forms of social interaction and participation through mobile phones (Comas-Quinn, De-los-Arcos, & Mardomingo, 2012). This mobile social interaction and participation is becoming a powerful tool in L2 (second language) development and constitutes an educational resource yet to be exploited by L2 teachers. Many researchers agree on the effectiveness of language learning materials based on real-life interaction, therefore it is vital to take into consideration not only materials, but real-life interaction itself. Additionally, mobile phones provide an opportunity to escape from the traditional constraints of time and place that determine existing curricula and allow different skills to be practised “on the go”, giving the chance to orientate the foreign language curriculum towards more spoken communication (Demouy & Kukulska-Hulme, 2010; Kukulska-Hulme, 2012).

Narrowing the scope of this research, there will be a focus on the use of instant messaging applications to improve L2 oral skills. With regard to this field, it is defined as mobile instant messaging (MIM), an asynchronous, and in some occasions synchronous communication tool that operates through wireless connections and handhelds via the Internet, allowing students to hold a conversation in real time (Dourando, Parker, & De-la-Harpe, 2007; Rambe & Bere, 2013). Thanks to the growing number of applications providing Voice over Internet (VoiP), teacher-learner and learner-learner interaction is rapidly increasing. Some of these applications for language learning include voice search, voice email, and audio recording, audio capabilities which, as supported by other researchers in the field (Godwin-Jones, 2011), will play a crucial role in second language use and learning. Among the assets of these applications are: promoting contact between students and teachers; fostering interaction amongst students and promoting academic cooperation; encouraging active learning; providing instant feedback; and developing high communicative expectations (Desai & Graves, 2006; Farmer, 2003; Rambe & Bere, 2013).

Several applications providing conversation in real time have appeared recently and have spread worldwide within just a few years, as can be seen with the case of “Whatsapp” and its competitors “Line”, “Kik Messenger”, “Telegram”, “Wechat”, “Tango”, “Text free”, all which provide free text, voice, and image messaging via the Internet. This tremendous growth needs to be taken into consideration by L2 teachers who now have access to a new field in which second language learning may take place.

Many studies (Andujar, 2016; Bouhnik & Deshen, 2014; Vazquez-Cano & al., 2015; Parejo, 2016) have focus­ed on the possibilities that mobile devices offer, and in particular “Whatsapp”, to improve the vocabulary and writing skills of the learners. Nevertheless, it is necessary to overcome this tendency in order to explore other aspects of language learning such as oral interaction (Kukulska-Hulme, 2009), which in many cases is a problematic area for L2 students. Several exceptions to text-based learning patterns can be found in studies such as in the case of audioblogs (Hsu, Wang, & Comac, 2008), in which answers were recorded thanks to mobile phones used to manage and store oral assignments. Further examples are Tai (2012) where multimedia capabilities of smartphones are exploited in different ways, using either calls, SMS or MSN. In this task-based learning approach, participants need to read several tasks and cooperate in order to formulate responses in spoken or written form.

In addition, software developments in voice recognition systems are leading to studies such as Stewart & File’s (2007) system called “Let's Chat”, where students can chat with a human partner which comprises pre-stored phrases or “Candle Talk” (Chiu, Liuo, & Yeh, 2007) where a conversational environment is provided and speech interactions are enhanced thanks to speech recognition. As claimed by Levy (2009) these developments are also leading to the use of “chatterbots”, although psychological studies such as Atkinson, Mayer, & Merrill (2005) and Mayer & al. (2003) regarding the use of a social agent in multimedia learning showed that students participating in human voice groups significantly outscored those groups in which the “chatterbot” was used on learning performance tests. Thus, interaction and learning are fostered by the use of visual and social cues.

It is also worth noting that several researchers in mobile-assisted language learning (MALL) have made notable observations regarding the speech aspect of mobile learning. Jolliet (2007) pointed out the fact that these devices allowed students to record and listen to their own utterances, which helped them to compare and repair mispronunciations and mistakes in their speeches. In terms of assessment, proonunciation could be easily evaluated as language performance was recorded in the device, thus teachers could focus on particular aspects of speech (Miangah & Nezarat, 2012). Similarly, Kukulska-Hulme, & Shield (2008) emphasized the need for developing learning activities regarding voice discussions to take advantage of this mobile technology in second language learning.

2. Method

2.1. Study

In order to accomplish its aims, this study used four groups, each consisting of 20 participants. According to experiment type, learners were divided into two main groups with 40 students each. The study involved Spanish students from the University of Almeria who were taking a B1 English course at the UAL Language School. The materials and contents provided in the course met the parameters established by CEFR for a B1 level. The expected entry level was A2+ a placement test which was administered to the students at the beginning of the course in order to ensure they were able to take it. Ages ranging from 18 to 31 were found in both groups. 32 participants were male and 48 female. The length of the course was six months from November to April where learners met for 3 hours per week. The researcher participated actively in the process, as he was the teacher of the groups studied, following concerns of researchers in the field regarding the need for guidance when using mobile devices (Ku­kulska-Hulme, 2009). Never­theless, the researcher did not take part in the evaluation of the subjects studied in order to avoid compromising the results. Students in the experimental group join a “Whatsapp” group consisting of 40 students where the interactions took place.

The study focuses on determining the potential of mobile instant messaging services like “WhatsApp” in order to develop ESL speaking. The “WhatsApp” application is proposed as a tool to encourage participation and interaction during the course through the creation of groups in which different users can interact through text, voice, images and video-sharing. Exchanges between users can be produced in a synchronous or asynchronous manner, thanks to the voice recording system provided by the application and are received on phones as alerts. The application did not substitute educational explanations but was used as tool to improve speaking skills and keep communication active outside the classroom on a daily basis, becoming a constant support for language use. All the students participated in the activity, as they all had smartphones as well as the previously downloaded “WhatsApp” application. After the creation of the “WhatsApp” group, the activity was carried out taking into account a series of premises established by the teacher: writing was forbidden in order to force learners to speak; English language use was compulsory; a different question had to be formulated by a different student every day, 7 days per week; the choice of topic for the question was open; each student had to provide at least one answer per question; image-sharing was allowed; the teacher also participated as a student, responding to the questions. The teacher participated actively in the activity and errors were not corrected in an explicit manner during interaction. If necessary, students’ answers were reformulated, and following Hanaoka and Izumi’s (2012) recommendation for lower proficiency learners, reformulated parts were emphasized helping participants to notice them.

Two groups, a control and an experimental one, were set up and although the control group did not receive any treatment apart from the traditional instruction, it was used for studying the differences between the groups after implementation. In this manner, we were able to perceive the effect of the action on the experimental group subjects. Regarding tuition, students in both groups attended the same number of classes where the same teaching materials were used. A lesson plan was set up in order to guarantee the same tuition in both groups. After implementation of the programme for the experimental group, we verified its effect through the comparison of the results obtained. The identities of the participants have been changed so they remain disguised in this investigation, meeting ethical guidelines set by the American Psychological Association (2002).

Regarding participants in the activity, initial differences were determined by the tests given at the beginning of the course to both groups. Internal threats to validity (Campbell & Stanley, 1963: 55) and effects such as the Hawthorne effect (Mayo, 1933), the halo effect (Thorndike, 1911) and participant expectancy were minimized as the students were not aware that they were being observed and the teacher did not participate in the correction of the tests given. An external examiner was used in this process. Other threats to validity such as socio-economic and educational metadata were tackled at the beginning of the activity in order to guarantee students’ participation, no matter what background they came from. Furthermore, the timetable of the groups was different, the experimental group had classes in the morning and the control in the evening, therefore students could not talk about the activities carried out in both groups as they did not know each other.

2.2. Research method

The aim of this study is to investigate speaking development in ESL learners, through analysing interactions in a mobile voice-based teacher-led chat and seeks to answer the following questions: 1) Has the implementation of MMC in the experimental group brought about important changes in speaking skills of the subjects?; 2) What are the main triggers and types of LREs in MMC?; 3) Is the use of mobile chat applications useful for this development? Regarding the last question, the study tries to answer aspects related to the potential value of the applications in ESL speaking, as well as how this MMC provides opportunities for interaction and consequently, second language development.

Alpha level was set at .05 under a non-directional (two-tailed) hypothesis. Regarding the research design, Creswell (2003) fixed mixed methods were followed as the use of qualitative and quantitative methods was predetermined and planned at the start of the research process, hence contrasting with the experimental paradigm. Null and alternative hypotheses were posed and tested in order to reveal significant differences between two pre-existing groups (control and experimental group):

Alternative hypothesis: At the end of the study, the speaking proficiency level of the students in the voice-based chat will be higher than those in the control group.

Null hypothesis: No significant differences will be found between the speaking proficiency of both groups.

Ex post facto criterion groups are observed in the design (Hatch & Lazaraton, 1991; Shavelson, 1981) as descriptive measures (central tendency and variability) are analysed. With regard to data collection, which was categorized in the tradition of discourse analysis, a naturalistic inquiry was used (Nunan, 1992). In terms of design, a sequential quantitative-qualitative approach was used, first conducting the quantitative phase and then the subsequent qualitative phase. More specifically, a qualitative follow-up interaction analysis was carried out where an analysis of variance and later qualitative analysis of the data pertaining to the participants is studied (Onwuegbuzie & Teddlie, 2003).

2.3. Data collection instruments 2.3.1. Speaking test

A spoken English test at the beginning and end of the course was administered in class. Both tests were conducted using two students at a time and interaction was recorded for later scoring. The length of each test was 15-20 minutes for each pair. Regarding the design of the test, it was conceived to provide participants with enough opportunities to speak, following Hughes (2003) study regarding test creation. It consisted of 1) Students being asked about personal information such as their name, origin, family, work and studies. This first part lasted 5 minutes serving as a way for learners to adapt to the examiner’s voice and accent as well as to reduce their anxiety; 2) Two pictures were given to each student who had to describe and compare the elements appearing in both for 1-2 minutes; 3) A question surrounded by different images was given to each pair. Students needed to interact and talk about all the different elements while answering the question, asking for opinions and expressing agreement and disagreement. The activity lasted 5 minutes and students were asked to reach a conclusion by the end of the exercise, and 4) Students were given two cards, one per person, and a role-play was performed by each participant following the ideas in each card. The time of the activity was 5 minutes and students got involved in a debate regarding the different cards.

Practical considerations included arranging a specific room for the test in order to guarantee clarity of the recordings, recording all students’ oral productions in order to later check their performance, and allowing students to choose their partner, reducing anxiety (Norton, 2005; Satar & Özdener, 2008).

Assessment was carried out using Hughes’ (2003) general proficiency speaking scale which consisted of comprehension, grammar, vocabulary, fluency and pronunciation. A marking guide 1 to 6 in each of the parts is also presented in the scale. Students of both the control and experimental groups were given this exam.

2.3.2. Samples in the application

The language samples obtained in the mobile voice chat were used to measure the quantity and type of LRE elicited from participants. Following Bueno-Alastuey’s (2013) division, LREs were divided into negotiation and negative feedback. The first one was operationalized by instances where participants showed misunderstanding by using questions or by repeating a previous question with rising intonation (Bueno-Alastuey, 2011; Lai & Zhao, 2006; Williams, 1999). Negative feedback was operationalized as an interlocutor’s move where a non-target-like feature was indicated whether explicitly or implicitly (Iwashita, 2003). This last LRE was further subdivided into: 1) Recasts: restatement of a non-target-like in a more target-like way (Long, 1996); 2) Elicitation: a response to a previous utterance aiming at a more target-like form without providing any metalinguistic information. Explicit correction was not considered necessary in this study, as the aim of the activity was to build a synthetic environment where interaction could play a fundamental part. Furthermore the kind of triggers -whether lexical, morphosyntactic or phonetic- leading to these LREs were analysed. (Nakahama & al., 2001).

3. Analysis and results

3.1. Quantitative procedures

The ANOVA related samples repeated measures test was conducted to confirm that these differences were statistically significant and the Bonferroni adjustment was used to counteract multiple comparisons. The pre-test results of the speaking test only yielded major differences between the experimental and control group in vocabulary (X=2.1; p<.05), the mean points for pronunciation (X=.12; p>.05), grammar (X=0.7; p>.05), fluency (X=.17; p>.05) and comprehension (X=.25; p>.05) showed no statistical significance as presented in table 1.


Draft Content 700264574-54552-en014.jpg

Statistically significant differences were found between groups in the post-test, as presented in table 2. The ratios within the subjects for pronunciation (F(1,78)=16.70; p=.00), grammar (F(1,78)=4.21; p=.04), vocabulary (F(1,78)=24.35; p=.00), fluency (F(1,78)=221.4; p=.00) and comprehension (F (1,78) = 37.46; p=.00) showed a greater improvement in the experimental group students, thus confirming the hypothesis that through the use of the mobile voice-based chat, the speaking proficiency of experimental group students is higher than those in the control group.

Post hoc tests were used to measure these differences between pre-test and post-test in both groups and the Bonferroni adjustment showed statistically significant differences in the speaking skills of the experimental group, with a greater improvement in the mean points for pronunciation (X=.45; p<.05), grammar (X=2.4; p<.05), vocabulary (X=4.4; p=<.05), fluency (X=3.2; p=<.05) and comprehension (X =2.57; p=<.05).


Draft Content 700264574-54552-en015.jpg

These findings confirm a strong correlation between the use of mobile voice-based chat and speaking proficiency development, suggesting some speaking abilities which have undergone a greater improvement than others, as can be seen in the case of fluency, pronunciation and vocabulary. Notwithstanding that grammar and comprehension also showed statistically significant differences, considerably greater effects are observed in the skills previously mentioned.

Regarding the type of LREs found in the mobile voice chat, as shown in table 3, the number of negotiations made by participants was considerably higher than the number of recasts and elicitations. Similarly, studies such as Bueno-Alastuey (2013) and Jepson (2005) in synchronous voice-based computer-mediated communication (SVCMC) also found a higher number of negotiations and tried to explain that the student may simply feel uncomfortable giving negative feedback or may not see the need for accuracy. Nevertheless, the number of recasts was also significant and could be explained by the conditions established by the teacher at the beginning of the activity and the interactive approach used throughout the process. Furthermore, as shown in figure 1, the data collected show a decrease in the number of negotiations, recasts and elicitations over time which could mean that the proficiency of the students was significantly higher at the end of the course and therefore, the number of LREs was diminished. Such increase in proficiency was later corroborated by the pre and post-test.


Draft Content 700264574-54552-en016.jpg

Negotiations were the most abundant with percentages per month ranging from 58% to 67% of the total LREs, which highlights the use of the application as a rich environment for negotiations. Regarding negative feedback, recasts were more frequent than elicitations with percentages from 23% to 30%, which indicates that students collaborate on constructing learning and helping their partners in oral production.

Regarding the type of LRE depending on the trigger, as shown in table 4, phonetic triggers were the most abundant, which may be due to the fact that students sometimes struggle to understand their partners because of mispronunciation of certain words. In line with previous studies such as Bueno-Alastuey (2013) or Williams (1999), the number of negotiations due to phonetic triggers was remarkable. Nevertheless and as opposed to the studies previously mentioned, the amount of negative feedback was of considerable significance.

Lexical triggers were also found in a high proportion as can be seen in both LREs: negotiation (30% to 37% of the total negotiations) and negative feedback (35% to 40% of the total negative feedback). Possible explanations for these figures could be the higher level of proficiency of the teacher who, due to wider lexical variety, pushed the students towards unknown vocabulary. Furthermore, the varied lexical richness of the participants also caused a high number of LREs. Global triggers (13% to 21% of the negotiations and 9% to17% of the negative feedback) and morphosyntactic triggers (12% to 23% of the negotiations and 14% to 24% of the negative feedback) were found in a lower proportion, although the latter show an increase in both LREs during the last month which may be due to the proximity of the end-of-course exam where a Use of English part was included.

3.2. Qualitative procedures

Negotiations and negative feedback utterances taking place in the application can be also observed from a qualitative perspective. Thus, some examples can be examined in order to exemplify the different LREs and how such processes led to modified output.


Draft Content 700264574-54552-en017.jpg


Draft Content 700264574-54552-en018.jpg

3.2.1 Negotiations

• Example 1: Student A: “I went to the /dinin/ room”; Student B: “To the /dinin/ room?”; Student A: “mm…to the /'da?n??/ room”; Student B: “Oh! Did you eat something special?”.

• Example 2: Student A: “Yesterday the football match was /grit/”; Student B: “I don´t understand you, can you repeat it again please?”; Student A: “The match was /gre?t/”; Student B: “Ok, I thought you mean it was bad”.

Examples 1 and 2 show how students negotiate the meaning of certain words. In these cases due to mispronunciation of particular words that made it difficult for the listeners to understand the utterance, negotiations were required. In both cases, without an explicit correction or a recast, students repair communication that may be due to the fact that: “Student A” played the recording another time and noticed the mistake; “Student B” forced “Student A” to check his/her oral production which leaded to the repair. In both cases modified output was brought about as students were able to determine the source of the error as well as the solution to achieve understanding. This phonetic trigger that led to the LRE was observed by the end of the activity in order to see if such student kept mispronouncing the word. Positive results were found in most of the words tracked and this correlates with a decrease in the number of LREs during the last months of the activity as shown in figure 1. Consequently, and in line with previous studies regarding SVCMC (Bueno-Alastuey, 2013; Satar & Özdener, 2008; Jepson, 2005; Volle, 2005), this medium provides learners with a higher number of occasions to notice non-target items. Thus, the awareness of the difficulties and “gaps” in students’ interlanguage also increased. That said, it is necessary to take into consideration that the possibilities of noticing such difficulties are considerably higher in asynchronous voice-based mobile-mediated communication (AVMMC) than SVMMC because of the inherent characteristics of these devices, al­though further studies regarding differences between both environments are needed.

3.2.2. Negative feedback

• Recasts:

– Example 3: Student A: “There are many place in Spain where you can go to the beach?”; Student B: “Many places in Spain to go to the beach?”; Student A: “Yes, places sorry”.

– Example 4: Student A: “I like drinking /d?uis/ in the morning”; Student B: “Drinking /d?u?s/ is the best!”; Student A: “I love /d?u?s/ with toasts and tomato”.

• Elicitations:

– Example 5: Student A: “I meet with my friends twice a week”; Student B: “Meet with your friends?”.

In examples 3 and 4 students provided recasts to their partner when a mispronunciation was noticed. In some cases, in order not to generalize mispronunciation when participants were unaware of the correction or simply di not want to repair communication because the message was understood, the teacher took part in the conversation as another participant, acting as a source of target language input. Providing corrections to the utterances was not only a role of the teacher but of the rest of participants that were encouraged to help their partners to improve. Example 5 shows elicitations that took place when non-target-like items appeared where “Student B”, simply by repeating the previous utterance with rising intonation, made “Student A” aware of the error. In this type of negative feedback, “gaps” were not as salient as in recasts and students needed a minimum of one extra correction apart from the elicitation in order to acquire the appropriate form. This was due to the fact that students in this last case emphasized reformulated parts. Several examples of recasts were observed and tracked throughout the conversation in order to see students’ L2 development by the end of the activity. In this case, those examples which were more salient showed positive results in utterances observed later in the interaction. Notwithstanding that acquisition in LRE was higher than in negative feedback, as shown in the statistical figures, the work done by the rest of the participants was outstanding, becoming a source of L2 input even when the teacher was not participating in the conversation.

4. Discussion and conclusions

Mobile learning offers an environment where learners can ubiquitously negotiate meaning, reflect and evaluate on their own performance through authentic interaction and feedback. Voice-based MMC constitutes a powerful tool for developing second language speaking proficiency as shown throughout this investigation where the treatment group outperformed the control in every aspect of the speaking proficiency scale. Furthermore, as found in the MALL Research Project Report (2009), teachers can listen to the recordings several times in order to identify student’s difficulties and computerized recordings provide the possibility of creating a media board for subsequent evaluation of the participants. Students make use of their spare time for language practice and together with the considerable use of this type of application, teachers are able to avoid the time restrictions of traditional classroom environments.

Apart from the findings in terms of proficiency, very positive results can be seen, as NSs-NSs conversations form a source of LREs, phonetic ones being the most common throughout the interactions in line with Bueno-Alastuey (2013) and Jepson’s (2005) findings in SVCMC. In a similar vein, negotiations were the most abundant LRE observed in this research. Nevertheless, remarkable results have been found in terms of recasts, which contrasts with the traditional pattern in computer-mediated communication (CMC). As explained earlier in this query, this might be due to the previous considerations stated by the teacher, but further studies regarding the differences between CMC and MMC are required.

Fundamental factors in the language learning process are observed thanks to the use of MMC. It is widely agreed that autonomy and authenticity play a relevant role in second language acquisition and thus, need to be taken into consideration (Farmer & Nucamendi, 2012). However, in studies such Al-Jarf (2012), regarding mobile technology and learners’ autonomy in oral skill acquisition, learners struggle to recognize the value of MP3 audios as a step towards real communication. Throughout this investigation, students were involved in real interaction and thus could notice the advantages of the chat conversation from the beginning. In addition, mobile phones seem to have a positive influence on learners’ attributes such as motivation, (Al-Jarf, 2012; Kessler, 2010; Satar & Özdener, 2008) and confidence (Shih, Chu, Hwang, & Kinshuk, 2011).

Previous limitations regarding mobile learning such as those in relation to screen size and audio-visual quality (Chinnery, 2006; Jones, 2012) are being minimized as mobile technology is fast-evolving, as is evident in the race amongst top mobile companies, competing to release the most technologically advanced devices. MMC becomes an available resource where dynamic interactions between learner, task, and virtual environment, together with the inherent ubiquitous, spontaneous and personalized characteristics of these devices constitute a solid framework for second language acquisition.

References

Al-Jarf, R. (2012). Mobile Technology and Student Autonomy in Oral Skill Acquisition. In Left to My Own Devices: Learner Autonomy and Mobile-Assisted Language Learning (pp.105-130). Bingley: Emerald Group.

American Psychological Association. (2002). Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct. (http://goo.gl/IqjPR0) (2016-01-22).

Andujar, A. (2016). Benefits of Mobile Instant Messaging to Develop ESL Writing (in Press). System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.­2016.07.004

Atkinson, R.K., Mayer, R.E., & Merrill, M.M. (2005). Fostering Social Agency in Multimedia Learning: Examining the Impact of an Animated Agent’s Voice. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 30(1), 117-139. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cedpsych.2004.07.001

Bouhnik, D., & Deshen, M. (2014). WhatsApp Goes to School: Mobile Instant Messaging between Teachers and Students. Journal of Information Technology Education Research, 13, 217-231. (http://goo.gl/0RzAmi) (2016-08-06).

Bueno-Alastuey, M.C. (2011). Perceived Benefits and Drawbacks of Synchronous Voice-based Computer-mediated Communication in the Foreign Language Classroom. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 24(5), 419-432. https://doi.org/10.1080/09588221.2011.574639

Bueno-Alastuey, M.C. (2013). Interactional Feedback in Synchronous Voice-based Computer Mediated Communication: Effect of Dyad. System, 41(3), 543-559. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2013.05.005

Campbell, D., & Stanley, J. (1963). Experimental and Quasi-experimental Designs for Research . In N.L. Gage (Ed.), Handbook of Research on Teaching (pp. 171-246). Chicago: Rand-McNally.

Chinnery, G.M. (2006). Going to the MALL: Mobile Assisted Language Learning. Language Learning & Technology, 10(1), 9-16. (https://goo.gl/y1d89A) (2016-02-03).

Chiu, T., Liou, H., & Yeh, Y. (2007). A Study of Web-based Oral Activities Enhanced by Automatic Speech Recognition for EFL College Learning. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 20(3), 209-233. https://doi.org/10.1080/09588220701489374

Comas-Quinn, A., De-los-Arcos, B., & Mardomingo, R. (2012). Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) for Distance Language Learning: Shifting Tutor Roles in a Contested Space for Interaction. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 25(2), 129-143. https://doi.org/10.1080/09588221.2011.636055

Creswell, J.W. (2003). Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative and Mixed Method Approaches. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Demouy, V., & Kukulska-Hulme, A. (2010). On the Spot: Using Mobile Devices for Listening and Speaking Practice on a French Language Programme. The Journal of Open, Distance and e-Learning, 25(3), 217-232. (http://goo.gl/2vkjo4) (2016-02-03).

Desai, C.M., & Graves, S.J. (2006). Instruction Via Instant Messaging Reference: What’s Happening? The Electronic Library, 24(2), 174-189. https://doi.org/10.1108/02640470610660369

Dourando, D., Parker, M., & De-la-Harpe, R. (2007). Investigation into the Usage of Mobile Instant Messaging in Tertiary Education. Proceedings of Annual Conference of World Wide Web Application. https://doi.org/10.4018/jictrda.2012070102

Farmer, F., & Nucamendi, M.E.L. (2012). Towards a Rationale for Mobile Learning. Left to My Own Devices: Learner Autonomy and Mobile-Assisted Language Learning. In J.E. Diaz-Vera (Ed.), Left to my own. (pp- 21-44). Bingley: Emerald Group.

Farmer, R. (2003). Instant Messaging - Collaborative Tool or Educator’s Nightmare. The North American Web-Based Learning Conference (NAWeb 2003). (https://goo.gl/jkaga5) (2015-09-02).

Godwin-Jones, R. (2011). Emerging Technologies: Mobile Apps for Language Learning. Language Learning & Technology, 15(2), 2-11. (http://goo.gl/VRBkLq) (2016-04-08).

Hanaoka, O., & Izumi, S. (2012). Noticing and Uptake: Addressing Pre-articulated Covert Problems in L2 Writing. Journal of Second Language Writing, 21(4), 332-347. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jslw.2012.09.008

Hatch, E.M., & Lazaraton, A. (1991). The Research Manual: Design and Statistics for Applied Linguistics. New York: Newbury House Publishers.

Hsu, H., Wang, S., & Comac, L. (2008). Using Audioblogs to Assist English-language Learning: An Investigation into Student Perception. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 21(2), 181-198. https://doi.org/10.1080/09588220801943775

Hughes, A. (2003). Testing for Language Teachers. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511732980

Iwashita, N. (2003). Negative Feedback and Positive Evidence in Task-based Interaction. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 25(01), 1-36. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0272263103000019

Jepson, K. (2005). Conversations –and Negotiated Interaction– in Text and Voice Chat Rooms. Language Learning & Technology, 9(3), 79-98. (http://goo.gl/GPh5GG) (2015-09-24).

Jolliet, Y. (2007). M-learning: A Pedagogical and Technological Model for Language Learning on Mobile Phones. Proceedings Workshop on Blended Learning, 2007 (pp. 327-339. (https://goo.gl/or9aqZ) (2016-02-03).

Jones, C. (2012). Networked Learning, Stepping Beyond the Net Generation and Digital Natives. In L. Dirckinck-Holmfeld, V. Hodgson & D. McConnell (Eds.), Exploring the Theory, Pedagogy and Practice of Networked Learning (pp. 27-41). New York: Springer.

Kessler, G. (2010). Fluency and Anxiety in Self-access Speaking Tasks: The Influence of Environment. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 23(4), 361-375. https://doi.org/10.1080/09588221.2010.512551

Kukulska-Hulme, A. (2009). Will Mobile Learning Change Language Learning? ReCALL, 21(2), 157-165. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0958344009000202

Kukulska-Hulme, A. (2012). How Should the Higher Education Workforce Adapt to Advancements in Technology for Teaching and Learning? The Internet and Higher Education, 15(4), 247-254. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.iheduc.2011.12.002

Kukulska-Hulme, A., & Shield, L. (2008). An Overview of Mobile Assisted Language Learning: From Content Delivery to Supported Collaboration and Interaction. ReCALL, 20(3), 271-289. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0958344008000335

Lai, C., & Zhao, Y. (2006). Noticing and Text-based Chat. Language Learning & Technology, 10(3), 102-120. (http://goo.gl/sxKZDZ) (2016-03-21).

Levy, M. (2009). Technologies in Use for Second Language Learning. The Modern Language Journal, 93(1), 769-782. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1540-4781.2009.00972.x

Long, M.H. (1996). The Role of the Linguistic Environment in Second Language Acquisition. In W. Ritchie, & T. Bathia (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Second Language Acquistion (pp. 413-469). New York: Academic Press.

MALL (Research Project Report) (2009). Mobile Application for Language Learning. Curriculum Corporation: The Learning Federation. (http://goo.gl/2elR23) (2015-12-09).

Mayer, R.E., Sobko, K., & Mautone, P.D. (2003). Social Cues in Multimedia Learning: Role of Speaker’s Voice. Journal of Educational Psychology, 95, 419-425. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-0663.95.2.419

Mayo, E. (1933). The Human Problems of and Industrial Civilization. New York: Macmillan.

Miangah, T.M., & Nezarat, A. (2012). Mobile-assisted Language Learning. LJDPS, 3(1), 309-319. (http://goo.gl/Mw9PO9) (2016-03-06).

Nakahama, Y., Tyler, A., & Van Lier, L. (2001). Negotiation of Meaning in Conversational and Information Gap Activities: A Comparative Discourse Analysis. TESOL Quarterly, 35, 377-404. https://doi.org/10.2307/3588028

Norton, J. (2005). The Paired Format in the Cambridge Speaking Tests. ELT Journal, 59, 287-297. https://doi.org/10.1093/elt/cci057

Nunan, D. (1992). Research Methods in Language Learning. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Onwuegbuzie, A.J., & Teddlie, C. (2003). A Framework for Analyzing Data in Mixed Methods Research. In A. Tashakkori & C. Teddlie (Eds.), Handbook of Mixed Methods in Social and Behavioral Research (pp. 351-383). Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Parejo, R.M. (2016). Development of Writing Skills Using Mobile Devices for the Teaching of Foreign Languages. Revista Complutense de Educación, 27(2), 779. https://doi.org/10.5209/rev_RCED.2016.v27.n2.48317

Rambe, P., & Bere, A. (2013). Using Mobile Instant Messaging to Leverage Learner Participation and Transform Pedagogy at a South African University of Technology. British Journal of Educational Technology, 44, 544-549. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.12057

Satar, H., & Özdener, N. (2008). The Effects of Synchronous CMC on Speaking Proficiency and Anxiety: Text versus Voice Chat. The Modern Language Journal, 92(4), 595-613. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1540-4781.2008.00789.x

Shavelson, R.J. (1981). Statistical Reasoning for the Behavioral Sciences. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Shih, J., Chu, H., & Hwang, G. (2011). An Investigation of Attitudes of Students and Teachers about Participating in a Context-ware Ubiquitous Learning Activity. British Journal of Educational Technology, 42(3), 373-394. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8535.2009.01020.x

Stewart, I.A., & File, P. (2007). Let’s Chat: A Conversational Dialogue System for Second Language Practice. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 20(2), 97-116. (http://goo.gl/MVYtz8) (2016-02-08).

Tai, Y. (2012). Contextualizing a MALL: Practice Design and Evaluation. Educational Technology & Society, 15(2), 220–230. (http://goo.gl/bRQnho) (2016-01-07).

Thorndike, E.L. (1911). Animal Intelligence: Experimental Studies. New York: Macmillan.

Trifonova, A., & Ronchetti, M. (2004). A General Architecture to Support Mobility in Learning. Advanced Learning Technologies, 2004. Proceedings. IEEE International Conference, 26-30. (https://goo.gl/8N1nES) (2016-02-01).

Vázquez-Cano, E., Mengual-Andrés, S., & Roig-Vila, R. (2015). Lexicometric Analysis of the Specifity of Teenagers’ Digital Writing in WhatsApp. Revista de Lingüística Teórica y Aplicada, 53(1), 83-106. https://doi.org/10.4067/S0718-48832015000100005

Volle, L.M. (2005). Analyzing Oral Skills in Voice E-mail and Online Interviews. Language Learning & Technology, 9(3), 146-163. (http://goo.gl/i3Uaoi) (2016-02-03).

Williams, J. (1999). Learner Generated Attention to Form. Language Learning, 49(4), 583-625. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-1770.2001.tb00020.x



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

La presente investigación analiza los beneficios de la comunicación mediante teléfonos móviles para desarrollar las destrezas orales de los estudiantes en la segunda lengua. Un total de 80 estudiantes españoles que realizaban un curso de inglés nivel B1 en la Universidad de Almería participaron en el estudio. De acuerdo con el tipo de tratamiento, los sujetos fueron divididos en dos grupos, experimental y control. Mediante la creación de un grupo de «Whatsapp», 40 de dichos sujetos participaron en una interacción oral diaria durante 6 meses. Las muestras recogidas en la aplicación, así como un examen oral, fueron utilizados para analizar el grado en que los estudiantes desarrollan la destreza oral y los tipos y desencadenantes que dan lugar a episodios relacionados con el lenguaje en los chats orales. Este estudio se centra en la interacción utilizando un análisis mixto y un eje temporal con el fin de medir las diferencias entre los grupos analizados. Los resultados demuestran mejoras significativas en cuanto a la competencia oral en los alumnos del grupo en el que se implementó la actividad, siendo las negociaciones de significado el episodio relacionado con el lenguaje más común durante la interacción. Cabe destacar la accesibilidad que la mensajería móvil confiere a los alumnos, pues son capaces de negociar el significado, reflexionar y evaluar sus propias actuaciones mediante interacción real y feed-back.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

Los teléfonos móviles y, consecuentemente, los dispositivos inalámbricos han cambiado el panorama en lo relativo al aprendizaje electrónico de diferentes formas a causa del acceso generalizado a estos sofisticados y asequibles dispositivos (Miangah & Nezarat, 2012). Kukulska-Hulme y Shield (2008), y Trifonova y Ronchetti (2004) han resaltado características de estos dispositivos como su tamaño, autonomía y discreción, cualidades que confieren a los alumnos un acceso fácil a todos los recursos. Los avances en la tecnología móvil dan la oportunidad a los propietarios de estos dispositivos de acceder no solo a recursos educacionales, sino también a que se involucren en distintas formas de interacción social y participación a través del teléfono móvil (Comas-Quinn, De-los-Arcos, & Mardomingo, 2012). Esta interacción y participación social móvil se convierte en una potente herramienta en el desarrollo de la segunda lengua (L2) y constituye un recurso educacional que todavía continúa sin ser explotado por los profesores de L2. Muchos investigadores apoyan la efectividad de materiales para el aprendizaje de lenguas basados en la interacción de la vida real, de modo que es fundamental tener en consideración no solo los materiales, sino la interacción real en sí misma. Además, los teléfonos móviles suponen una oportunidad para escapar de las restricciones de tiempo y espacio que determina el currículum existente y permite que diferentes destrezas sean practicadas en movimiento, ofreciendo la posibilidad de orientar el currículum de lenguas extranjeras hacia una mayor comunicación oral (Demouy & Kukulska-Hulme, 2010; Kukulska-Hulme, 2012).

Circunscribiéndonos al ámbito de este estudio, nos centramos en el uso de aplicaciones de mensajería instantánea para mejorar las destrezas orales de la segunda lengua. En lo referido a este campo, se define como mensajería instantánea móvil (mobile instant messaging), una herramienta de comunicación asincrónica, y en algunos casos sincrónica, que opera a través de conexiones inalámbricas y dispositivos mediante Internet, permitiendo a los estudiantes mantener una conversación en tiempo real (Dourando, Parker, & De-la-Harpe, 2007; Rambe & Bere, 2013). Gracias al creciente número de aplicaciones que confieren voz a través de Internet, existe un rápido incremento de la interacción profesor-alumno y alumno-alumno. Algunas de estas aplicaciones para el aprendizaje de lenguas incluyen búsqueda por voz, mensajes de voz y grabación de audio, capacidades de audio que, como ya han sido formuladas por otros investigadores en este campo (Godwin-Jones, 2011), jugarán un papel crucial en el uso de la segunda lengua y su aprendizaje. Entre las ventajas de estas aplicaciones están: promover el contacto entre estudiantes y profesores; fomentar la interacción entre estudiantes y promover la cooperación académica; motivar el aprendizaje activo; proporcionar un feed-back instantáneo; y desarrollar altas expectativas (Desai & Graves, 2006; Farmer, 2003; Rambe & Bere, 2013).

Recientemente, distintas aplicaciones que proporcionan conversación en tiempo real han surgido y se han extendido en todo el mundo en solo unos pocos años como es el caso de «Whatsapp» y sus competidores «Line», «Kik Messenger», «Telegram», «Wechat», «Tango» y «Text free», todos ellos ofreciendo de forma gratuita mensajería de texto, voz e imágenes a través de Internet. Este tremendo crecimiento necesita ser tenido en consideración por los profesores de lenguas extranjeras que ahora tienen acceso a un nuevo campo en el que el aprendizaje de la segunda lengua podría tener lugar.

Diferentes estudios (Andujar, 2016; Bouhnik & Deshen, 2014; Vázquez-Cano & al., 2015; Parejo, 2016) se han centrado en las posibilidades que estos dispositivos móviles ofrecen, particularmente «Whatsapp», para mejorar el vocabulario y las destrezas escritas de los alumnos. Sin embargo, es necesario superar esta tendencia para explorar otros aspectos del aprendizaje de lenguas como la interacción oral (Kukulska-Hulme, 2009), que en muchos casos supone un área problemática para los estudiantes de la segunda lengua. Varias excepciones a este patrón de aprendizaje mediante texto se pueden encontrar en estudios, como el caso de los audioblogs (Hsu, Wang, & Comac, 2008), en el que las respuestas se grabaron gracias a teléfono móviles usados para gestionar y almacenar tareas orales. Otro ejemplo es Tai (2012) donde las capacidades multimedia de los teléfonos inteligentes son explotadas de diferentes maneras, usando llamadas, SMS o MSN. En este enfoque de aprendizaje basado en tareas, los participantes necesitan leer diferentes tareas y cooperar para formular respuestas de manera oral o escrita.

Además, el desarrollo en software de sistemas de reconocimiento de voz ha llevado a estudios como el sistema de Stewart y Files (2007), llamado «Let’s Chat», donde los estudiantes pueden chatear con un compañero humano que se compone de frases pre-almacenadas o «Candle Talk» (Chiu, Liuo, & Yeh, 2007) donde se proporciona un ambiente coloquial y las interacciones orales mejoran gracias al uso del reconocimiento de voz. Como afirma Levy (2009), este desarrollo está llevando al uso de «chatterbots», aunque estudios psicológicos como los de Atkinson, Mayer y Merrill (2005), y Mayer y otros (2003), en lo referido al uso de un agente social en el aprendizaje multimedia, muestran que los estudiantes que participaban en grupos de voz con sujetos humanos de manera significativa tuvieron una mejor puntuación en test de aprendizaje que aquellos en los que se utilizó el «chatterbot». Por tanto, interacción y aprendizaje son promovidos por señales de tipo visual y social.

También merecen consideración las notables observaciones realizadas por varios investigadores en el aprendizaje de lenguas mediante teléfonos móviles (Mobile-assisted language learning) en lo que concierne al aspecto oral del aprendizaje móvil. Jolliet (2007) señalaba el hecho de que estos dispositivos permitían a los estudiantes grabar y escuchar sus propias producciones de lenguaje, lo que les ayudaba a comparar y reparar pronunciaciones erróneas y fallos en sus discursos. En cuanto a la evaluación, las pronunciaciones podían ser fácilmente valoradas ya que el lenguaje se encontraba grabado en el dispositivo, por tanto los profesores podían centrarse en aspectos específicos del discurso (Miangah & Nezarat, 2012). De manera similar, Kukulska-Hulme y Shield (2008) han resaltado la necesidad de desarrollar actividades de aprendizaje que in­cluyesen debates por voz para aprovechar esta tecnología móvil en el aprendizaje de segundas lenguas.

2. Método

2.1. Estudio

Para alcanzar sus objetivos, este estudio usó cuatro grupos, estando formados cada uno de ellos por 20 participantes. De acuerdo con el tipo de experimento, los estudiantes fueron divididos en dos grupos principales con 40 participantes cada uno. El estudio involucró a estudiantes españoles de la Universidad de Almería (UAL) que realizaron un curso de inglés B1 en el centro de lenguas de la UAL. Los materiales y contenidos proporcionados en el curso cumplían los parámetros establecidos por el Marco Común Europeo de Referencia para las lenguas (MCER) para nivel B1. El nivel de entrada esperado fue delimitado por una prueba de nivel A2+ que se entregó a los estudiantes al principio del curso para garantizar que podían cursar el mismo. La duración del curso fue de seis meses desde noviembre a abril, donde los estudiantes asistían un total de 3 horas a la semana. El investigador participó de manera activa en el proceso, ya que era el profesor de los grupos estudiados, siguiendo pautas de investigadores en este campo en lo referido a la necesidad de un guía al usar estos dispositivos móviles (Kukulska-Hulme, 2009). Sin embargo, el investigador no tomó parte en la evaluación de los sujetos a estudiar con el fin de evitar comprometer los resultados. Los estudiantes del grupo experimental se unieron a un grupo de «Whatsapp» que estaba formado por 40 estudiantes donde las interacciones tenían lugar.

Nuestro estudio se centró en determinar el potencial de los servicios de mensajería instantánea móvil como «Whatsapp» para desarrollar el habla en la segunda lengua. La aplicación «WhatsApp» se propone como una herramienta para promover la participación e interacción durante el curso, permitiendo la creación de grupos en los que diferentes usuarios pueden interactuar mediante texto, voz, imágenes y compartición de vídeo. Los intercambios entre los usuarios, que son recibidos como alertas en los teléfonos, se pueden producir de manera sincrónica o asincrónica, gracias al sistema de grabación de voz proporcionado por la aplicación. Esta no sustituyó las explicaciones pero se usó como herramienta para mejorar el habla y mantener una comunicación activa fuera de clase de manera diaria, constituyendo un apoyo constante para el uso del lenguaje. Todos los estudiantes participaron en la actividad ya que todos poseían un teléfono móvil así como la aplicación «WhatsApp» previamente descargada. Tras la creación del grupo de «WhatsApp», la actividad se llevó a cabo teniendo en cuenta una serie de premisas establecidas por el profesor: escribir en el grupo estaba prohibido con el fin de forzar a los alumnos a hablar; el uso del inglés era obligatorio; una pregunta diaria debía ser formulada por un estudiante diferente en los 7 días de la semana; la elección del tema de la pregunta era abierta; cada estudiante debía proporcionar al menos una respuesta por pregunta; se podían compartir imágenes; el profesor también participó respondiendo a las preguntas como otro estudiante más. Los errores no fueron corregidos de forma explícita durante la interacción y las respuestas de los estudiantes en los casos en que fuese necesario fueron reformuladas, siguiendo recomendaciones de Hanaoka e Izumi’s (2012) para estudiantes con una competencia baja, donde las partes reformuladas se resaltaron para ayudar a los participantes a percibir el error.

Se establecieron dos grupos, uno de control y otro experimental. El grupo control no recibió ningún tratamiento aparte de la instrucción tradicional y fue utilizado para estudiar las diferencias entre ambos grupos después de la implementación. De este modo, fuimos capaces de percibir el efecto de la acción sobre los sujetos del grupo experimental. En lo referido a la instrucción, los estudiantes de ambos grupos asistieron al mismo número de clases donde se utilizaron los mismos materiales. Tras la implementación del programa en el grupo experimental, comprobamos el efecto del tratamiento a través del análisis de los resultados obtenidos. Las identidades de los participantes han sido cambiadas en esta investigación de acuerdo con las directrices éticas establecidas por la American Psychological Association (2002).

En cuanto a los participantes en la actividad, las diferencias iniciales fueron determinadas por las pruebas proporcionadas al principio del curso a ambos grupos. Las amenazas a la validez interna (Campbell & Stanley, 1963: 55) y efectos como el de Hawthorne (acuñado en mayo, 1933), el efecto halo (Thorndike, 1911) y las expectativa de los participantes, fueron minimizadas ya que los estudiantes no eran conscientes de que estaban siendo observados y el profesor no participó en la corrección de las pruebas suministradas. Otras amenazas a la validez de tipo económico, así como los metadatos educacionales, se afrontaron al comienzo de la actividad para garantizar la participación de los estudiantes, sin importar su procedencia u origen. Además, el horario de ambos grupos era diferente, teniendo lugar el experimental por la mañana y el control por la tarde, de modo que los estudiantes no podían hablar de las actividades desarrolladas en ambos grupos ya que no se conocían.

2.2. Método de investigación

El objetivo de este estudio era investigar el desarrollo del habla en los estudiantes de inglés como segunda lengua, a través del análisis de las interacciones en un chat de voz guiado por un profesor para tratar de responder las siguientes cuestiones: 1) ¿Comporta la implementación de la mensajería instantánea móvil importantes cambios en la destreza oral en los sujetos?; 2) ¿Cuáles son los principales desencadenantes y tipos de episodios relacionados con el lenguaje (ERL)?; 3) ¿Es el uso de los servicios de mensajería instantánea beneficioso para este desarrollo? En lo referido a esta última cuestión, el estudio trata de contestar preguntas relacionadas con el valor potencial de estas aplicaciones en la destreza oral del inglés como segunda lengua, así como las oportunidades que la mensajería instantánea móvil proporciona para la interacción y, por tanto, el desarrollo de la segunda lengua.

• El nivel alfa fue establecido en .05 bajo una hipótesis no direccional (dos colas). En cuanto al diseño del estudio, se ha seguido el método mixto de Creswell (2003), ya que el uso de métodos cualitativos y cuantitativos fue predeterminado y previsto al comienzo del proceso de investigación, contrastando, por tanto, con el paradigma experimental. Las hipótesis nula y alterna se establecieron y testaron para revelar diferencias significativas entre los grupos preexistentes (experimental y control).

• Hipótesis alterna: Al finalizar el estudio la competencia en la destreza oral de los estudiantes en el grupo de chat mediante voz será mayor que la de aquellos en el grupo control.

• Hipótesis nula: No se encontrarán diferencias significativas entre la competencia oral de ambos grupos.

Se observan los resultados ex post facto (Hatch & Lazaraton, 1991; Shavelson, 1981) ya que el estudio tiene en cuenta medidas descriptivas (tendencia central y variabilidad). En lo referido a la recogida de datos, que se encuentra categorizada en la tradición de análisis del discurso, se usó una investigación naturalista (Nunan, 1992). En términos de diseño, utilizamos un enfoque secuencial cuantitativo-cualitativo, primero llevando a cabo la fase cuantitativa y luego la subsecuente fase cualitativa. Más específicamente, se hizo un análisis cualitativo tras la interacción, donde se estudió la varianza y la valoración cualitativa de la información perteneciente a los intervinientes (Onwuegbuzie & Teddlie, 2003).

2.3. Instrumentos para la recolección de datos2.3.1. Test de habla

Un test de habla en inglés se entregó al principio y al final del curso en clase. Ambas pruebas fueron realizadas usando dos estudiantes al mismo tiempo, y la interacción se grabó para una posterior evaluación. La duración de cada test fue de entre 15 y 20 minutos por cada pareja. En lo referido al diseño del test, se concibió para proporcionar a los estudiantes suficientes oportunidades para hablar, siguiendo el estudio de Hughes (2003) en lo referente a la creación de test. Consistía en: 1) Una serie de preguntas relacionadas con información personal del estudiante como nombre, origen, familia, trabajo y estudios. Esta primera parte duraba cinco minutos, de modo que era utilizada para que los estudiantes se adaptasen a la voz y al acento del examinador con el fin de reducir la ansiedad; 2) Se proporcionaban dos fotos a cada estudiante, los cuales tenían que describir y comparar los elementos que aparecían en ambas durante dos minutos como máximo; 3) Una pregunta rodeada de diferentes imágenes se entregó a cada pareja. Los estudiantes tenían que interactuar y hablar de los diferentes elementos en las imágenes mientras respondían a la pregunta, pidiendo opinión y expresando acuerdo y desacuerdo. Esta actividad duraba cinco minutos y al final de la misma los estudiantes eran preguntados por su conclusión al respecto; y 4) A los estudiantes se les daban dos cartas, una por persona, cada carta indicaba al alumno el rol que debía asumir, desarrollando así cada uno diferentes roles en la conversación. El tiempo de la actividad era de cinco minutos y los estudiantes se involucraban en un debate al seguir los diferentes roles en las tarjetas.

Consideraciones de tipo práctico incluían la reserva de un aula específica para el test con el fin de garantizar la claridad de las grabaciones, así como grabar las producciones orales de todos los estudiantes para posteriormente comprobar su actuación y permitirles elegir a un compañero con el fin de reducir la ansiedad (Norton, 2005; Satar & Özdener, 2008).

La evaluación se llevó a cabo usando la escala para medir la competencia en el habla desarrollada por Hughes (2003) que consistía en comprensión, gramática, vocabulario, fluidez y pronunciación. Una guía de calificación del 1 al 6 también se presentó en esta escala. Los estudiantes de ambos grupos, experimental y control, realizaron este test.

2.3.2. Muestras en la aplicación

Las muestras de lenguaje obtenidas en el chat de voz se usaron para medir la cantidad y el tipo de ERL que los participantes produjeron durante la interacción. Siguiendo la división de Bueno-Alastuey (2013), estos episodios fueron divididos en negociación y feed-back. En cuanto al primero, se obtuvo en muestras donde los participantes mostraban confusión de modo que usaban preguntas o repetían una pregunta previa con entonación ascendente (Bueno-Alastuey, 2011; Lai & Zhao, 2006; Williams, 1999). Respecto al feed-back negativo, tenía lugar cuando el interlocutor indicaba de forma explícita o implícita una producción que no era correcta en la segunda lengua (Iwashita, 2003). Este último episodio relacionado con el lenguaje fue subdividido en: 1) Reestructuración: restablecimiento de una producción que no se asemejaba al lenguaje objetivo en otra con una semejanza mayor (Long, 1996); 2) Estimulación: una respuesta a un ejemplo previo tratando de alcanzar una forma de mayor semejanza al lenguaje objetivo sin proporcionar ningún tipo de información metalingüística. La corrección explícita no ha sido tenida en cuenta en este estudio ya que el objetivo de la actividad era construir un entorno sintético donde la interacción jugara un papel fundamental. Además, se analizaron los desencadenantess de tipo léxico, morfosintáctico, o fonético que daban lugar a estos ERL (Nakahama & al., 2001).

3. Análisis y resultados

3.1. Procedimiento cuantitativo

El test ANOVA de medidas repetidas para muestras relacionadas se empleó para confirmar que la diferencias entre ambos grupos eran estadísticamente significativas, y el ajuste de Bonferroni se usó para contrarrestar las comparaciones múltiples. Los resultados del pre-test de habla no cosecharon grandes diferencias entre el grupo experimental y control en cuanto a vocabulario (X=2.1; p<.05), la media de los puntos para pronunciación (X=.12; p>.05), gramática (X =0.7; p>.05), fluidez (X=.17; p>.05) y comprensión (X=.25; p>.05) no mostró ninguna diferencia significativa como se presenta en la ta­bla 1.


Draft Content 700264574-54552 ov-es014.jpg

Se encontraron diferencias es­tadísticamente significativas entre los grupos en el post-test, como se presenta en la tabla 2. Los ratios en los sujetos en cuanto a pronunciación (F(1,78)=16.70; p=.00), gramática (F(1,78)=4.21; p=.04), vocabulario (F(1,78)=24.35; p=.00), fluidez (F(1,78)=221.4; p=.00) y comprensión (F(1,78)=37.46; p=.00) mostraban una mejora sustancial en los estudiantes del grupo experimental, confirmando, por tanto, la hipótesis de que a través del uso del chat de voz en teléfonos móviles la competencia oral de los estudiantes en el grupo experimental era mayor que la de aquellos en el grupo control.

Utilizamos test post hoc para medir estas diferencias entre el pre-test y el post-test en ambos grupos, y el ajuste de Bonferroni mostró diferencias estadísticamente significativas en la destreza oral del grupo experimental, con una mejora substancial en los puntos de media de pronunciación (X=.45; p<.05), gramática (X=2.4; p<.05), vocabulario (X=4.4; p=<.05), fluidez (X=3.2; p=<.05) y comprensión (X=2.57; p=<.05).


Draft Content 700264574-54552 ov-es015.jpg

Estos resultados confirman una correlación fuerte entre el uso de chat de voz en teléfonos móviles y el desarrollo de la competencia oral, sugiriendo algunas habilidades en el habla que han experimentado una mejora superior a otras, como es el caso de la fluidez, pronunciación y vocabulario. A pesar de que la gramática y el vocabulario también experimentaron mejoras estadísticamente significativas, constatamos efectos considerablemente superiores en las destrezas anteriormente mencionadas.

En lo referido al tipo de ERL en el chat de voz, como muestra la tabla 3, el número de negociaciones realizadas por los participantes fue considerablemente mayor que el número de reestructuraciones y estimulaciones. De manera similar, estudios como el de Bueno-Alastuey (2013) y Jepson (2005) en comunicación oral sincrónica mediante ordenador también encontraron un mayor número de negociaciones y explicaron que los estudiantes podrían simplemente sentirse incómodos proporcionando feed-back negativo o podrían no ver la necesidad de ser precisos. Sin embargo, el número de reestructuraciones también fue significativo, lo que podría explicarse debido a las condiciones que el profesor estableció al comienzo de la actividad y el enfoque interactivo usado durante el proceso. Además, como se muestra en la figura 1, lo datos recogidos indican una disminución en el número de negociaciones, reestructuraciones y estimulaciones a lo largo del tiempo, lo que podría significar que la competencia de los estudiantes era significativamente mayor al final del curso y, por tanto, el número de ERL fue reducido. Ese aumento en la competencia fue posteriormente corroborado por el pre y post-test.


Draft Content 700264574-54552 ov-es016.jpg

Las negociaciones fueron los ERL más abundantes, con porcentajes oscilando desde el 58% al 67% del total ERL por mes, lo que enfatiza el uso de la aplicación como un entorno rico para las negociaciones. En cuanto al feed-back negativo, las reestructuraciones fueron más frecuentes que las estimulaciones con porcentajes desde el 23% al 30%, lo que indica que los estudiantes colaboraron construyendo aprendizaje y ayudando a sus compañeros en la producción oral.

En cuanto al tipo de ERL dependiendo del desencadenante, como se muestra en la tabla 4, los desencadenantes fonéticos fueron los más abundantes, lo que podría estar causado por el hecho de que los alumnos tuvieron algunas dificultades para entender a sus compañeros debido a errores en la pronunciación de ciertas palabras. En línea con estudios anteriores como los de Bueno-Alastuey (2013) o Williams (1999), el número de negociaciones debidas a desencadenantes fonéticos fue notable. Sin embargo, al contrario que los estudios previamente mencionados, la cantidad de feed-back negativo fue de una relevancia considerable.

Los desencadenantes léxicos se encontraron en una proporción alta, como se puede observar en ambos ERL: negociación (30% a 37% del total de negociaciones) y feed-back negativo (35% a 40% del total de feed-back negativo). Posibles explicaciones a estas cifras podrían ser el mayor nivel de competencia del profesor que, debido a una variedad léxica más amplia, empujó a los estudiantes hacia vocabulario desconocido. Además, la variedad de riqueza léxica de los participantes también causó un alto número de ERL. Los desencadenantes globales (13% a 21% de las negociaciones y 9% a 17% del feed-back) y desencadenantes morfosintácticos (12% a 23% de las negociaciones y 14% a 24% del feed-back negativo) se encontraron en una proporción menor, aunque estos últimos mostraron un incremento en ambos ERL durante el último mes, lo que podría deberse a la proximidad del examen de final de curso donde se incluía una parte de gramática.

3.2. Procedimiento cualitativo

Las muestras de negociaciones y feed-back negativo que tuvieron lugar en la aplicación también pueden ser observadas desde una perspectiva cualitativa. Por tanto, algunos ejemplos se puede examinar para ejemplificar los diferentes ERL y cómo estos procesos llevan a output modificado.


Draft Content 700264574-54552 ov-es017.jpg


Draft Content 700264574-54552 ov-es018.jpg

3.2.1. Negociaciones

• Ejemplo 1: Estudiante A: «I went to the /dinin/ room»; Estudiante B: «To the /dinin/ room?»; Estudiante A: «mm… to the /'da?n??/ room»; Estudiante B: «Oh! Did you eat something special?».

• Ejemplo 2: Estudiante A: «Yesterday the football match was /grit/»; Estudiante B: «I don´t understand you, can you repeat it again please?»; Estudiante A: «The match was /gre?t/»; Estudiante B: «Ok, I thought you mean it was bad».

Los ejemplos 1 y 2 muestran cómo los estudiantes negocian el significado de ciertas palabras. En estos casos, debido a errores en la pronunciación de ciertas palabras que hacían difícil a los oyentes entender la conversación, se requería de negociaciones. En ambos casos, sin corrección explícita o reconstrucción, los estudiantes reparaban la comunicación, lo cual podía deberse al hecho de que: el «Estudiante A» pusiese la grabación una segunda vez y se diese cuenta del error; el «Estudiante B» forzara al «Estudiante A» a revisar su producción oral, lo que llevaba a reparar la conversación. En ambos casos, los estudiantes produjeron output modificado ya que fueron capaces de determinar la fuente del error así como la solución al mismo para llegar a entenderse. Este ERL producido por un desencadenante fonético se observó al final de la actividad para comprobar si el estudiante seguía cometiendo ese error en la pronunciación de la palabra. Se encontraron resultados positivos en la mayoría de palabras monitorizadas, lo cual tiene correlación con la disminución en el número de ERL durante los últimos meses de actividad, como indicaba la figura 1. Por consiguiente, y en línea con estudios anteriores referidos a la comunicación de voz sincrónica mediante ordenador (Bueno-Alastuey, 2013; Satar & Özdener, 2008; Jepson, 2005; Volle, 2005) este medio proporciona a los alumnos un mayor número de ocasiones para percibir aspectos que no pertenecen a la segunda lengua. Por tanto, los estudiantes incrementaron la consciencia de las dificultades y espacios vacíos en su interlengua. Dicho esto, es necesario tener en cuenta que las posibilidades de percibir estas dificultades es considerablemente mayor en los chats asincrónicos mediante teléfono móvil que en los sincrónicos debido a las características inherentes a estos dispositivos, aunque son necesarios más estudios en lo referido a las diferencias entre ambos entornos.

3.2.2. Feed-back negativo

• Reestructuración:

— Ejemplo 3: Estudiante A: «There are many place in Spain where you can go to the beach?»; Estudiante B: «Many places in Spain to go to the beach?»; Estudiante A: «Yes, places sorry».

— Ejemplo 4: Estudiante A: «I like drinking /d?uis/ in the morning»; Estudiante B: «Drinking /d?u?s/ is the best!»; Estudiante A: «I love /d?u?s/ with toasts and tomato».

• Estimulación:

— Ejemplo 5: Estudiante A: «I meet with my friends twice a week»; Estudiante B: «Meet with your friends?».

En los ejemplos 3 y 4 los estudiantes reestructuraron los errores cometidos por sus compañeros al ser percibidos. En algunos casos para no generalizar una pronunciación incorrecta cuando los participantes desconocían la forma apropiada o simplemente no querían corregir dicha pronunciación ya que se entendía el mensaje, el profesor tomaba parte en la conversación como otro participante, actuando como fuente de input del lenguaje objetivo. Proporcionar correcciones en la conversación no era únicamente responsabilidad del profesor sino de todos los participantes que eran alentados a ayudar a sus compañeros. El ejemplo 5 muestra una estimulación que tenía lugar cuando elementos que no eran del lenguaje objetivo aparecían donde el «Estudiante B» simplemente repitiendo el ejemplo anterior con entonación ascendente hacía al «Estudiante A» consciente de su error. En este tipo de feed-back negativo, los «vacíos» no eran tan prominentes como en las reestructuraciones y los estudiantes necesitaron como mínimo una corrección extra aparte de la estimulación para adquirir la forma apropiada. Esto se debía al hecho de que los estudiantes en este último caso enfatizaban las partes reformuladas. Diferentes ejemplos de reestructuración fueron observados y monitorizados durante la conversación para ver el desarrollo de los estudiantes en la segunda lengua al final de la actividad. En este caso, aquellos ejemplos que eran más prominentes mostraron resultados positivos en las muestras observadas posteriormente en la interacción. A pesar de que la adquisición en los ERL fue mayor que en el feed-back negativo, como muestran las cifras estadísticas, el trabajo realizado por el resto de participantes fue excepcional, constituyendo una fuente de input en la segunda lengua incluso cuando el profesor no participaba en la conversación.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

El aprendizaje móvil ofrece un entorno donde los estudiantes pueden negociar el significado de manera ubicua, reflexionando y evaluando sus propias actuaciones a través de interacción real y feed-back. La comunicación oral mediante teléfonos móviles constituye una herramienta poderosa para el desarrollo de la competencia oral en la segunda lengua como demuestra esta investigación, donde el grupo en el que se implementó el tratamiento superó al grupo control en cada uno de los aspectos de la escala de competencia oral. Además, como se concluyó en el MALL Research Project Report (2009), los profesores tienen la posibilidad de escuchar las grabaciones varias veces para identificar las dificultades de los estudiantes así como crear una plataforma multimedia para la posterior evaluación de los participantes. Mediante el uso de la aplicación, los estudiantes pueden hacer uso de su tiempo libre para la práctica de la segunda lengua mientras los profesores son capaces de evitar las restricciones de tiempo que caracterizan a los entornos de clase tradicionales.

Aparte de los hallazgos en términos de competencia lingüística, se pueden observar ya resultados muy positivos de las conversaciones entre hablantes no nativos, que constituyeron una fuente de ERL, siendo los fonéticos los más comunes durante la interacción, en línea con lo señalado por Bueno-Alastuey (2013) y Jepson (2005) sobre la comunicación sincrónica mediante ordenador. De forma similar, las negociaciones de significado fueron el ERL más numeroso en esta investigación. Sin embargo, encontramos resultados notables en lo que a reestructuración se refiere, lo que contrasta con el patrón tradicional de la comunicación mediante ordenador. Como se explicó previamente en esta investigación, esto podría ser debido a las consideraciones previas establecidas por el profesor; no obstante, es necesario realizar más estudios sobre las diferencias entre la comunicación mediante ordenador y la comunicación mediante teléfonos móviles.

Factores fundamentales en el proceso de aprendizaje se han observado gracias al uso de la comunicación mediante teléfonos móviles y es ampliamente aceptado que la autonomía y autenticidad juegan un papel relevante en la adquisición de la segunda lengua, por tanto, esta comunicación necesita ser tenida en consideración (Farmer & Nucamendi, 2012). Por otro lado, en estudios como el de Al-Jarf (2012), referidos a la tecnología móvil y la autonomía de los estudiantes en la destreza oral, los alumnos encontraron dificultad en reconocer el valor de los audios MP3 como un paso hacia la comunicación real. A lo largo de esta investigación, los estudiantes estuvieron involucrados en una interacción real y, por tanto, pudieron apreciar las ventajas del chat desde el principio. Además, los teléfonos móviles parecen tener una influencia positiva en atributos de los estudiantes como la motivación (Al-Jarf, 2012; Kessler, 2010; Satar & Özdener, 2008) y la confianza (Shih, Chu, Hwang, & Kinshuk, 2011).

Limitaciones previas en cuanto al aprendizaje móvil como el tamaño de la pantalla o la calidad audiovisual (Chinnery, 2006; Jones, 2012) están siendo minimizadas ya que la tecnología evoluciona rápidamente, como es evidente en la carrera de las grandes compañías de telefonía compitiendo por lanzar los dispositivos tecnológicos más avanzados. La comunicación mediante teléfonos móviles supone un recurso disponible donde las interacciones entre alumno, tarea y entorno virtual, junto con las características ubicuas, espontáneas y personalizadas de estos dispositivos, constituyen un marco sólido para la adquisición de la segunda lengua.

Referencias

Al-Jarf, R. (2012). Mobile Technology and Student Autonomy in Oral Skill Acquisition. In Left to My Own Devices: Learner Autonomy and Mobile-Assisted Language Learning (pp.105-130). Bingley: Emerald Group.

American Psychological Association. (2002). Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct. (http://goo.gl/IqjPR0) (2016-01-22).

Andujar, A. (2016). Benefits of Mobile Instant Messaging to Develop ESL Writing (in Press). System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.­2016.07.004

Atkinson, R.K., Mayer, R.E., & Merrill, M.M. (2005). Fostering Social Agency in Multimedia Learning: Examining the Impact of an Animated Agent’s Voice. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 30(1), 117-139. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cedpsych.2004.07.001

Bouhnik, D., & Deshen, M. (2014). WhatsApp Goes to School: Mobile Instant Messaging between Teachers and Students. Journal of Information Technology Education Research, 13, 217-231. (http://goo.gl/0RzAmi) (2016-08-06).

Bueno-Alastuey, M.C. (2011). Perceived Benefits and Drawbacks of Synchronous Voice-based Computer-mediated Communication in the Foreign Language Classroom. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 24(5), 419-432. https://doi.org/10.1080/09588221.2011.574639

Bueno-Alastuey, M.C. (2013). Interactional Feedback in Synchronous Voice-based Computer Mediated Communication: Effect of Dyad. System, 41(3), 543-559. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2013.05.005

Campbell, D., & Stanley, J. (1963). Experimental and Quasi-experimental Designs for Research . In N.L. Gage (Ed.), Handbook of Research on Teaching (pp. 171-246). Chicago: Rand-McNally.

Chinnery, G.M. (2006). Going to the MALL: Mobile Assisted Language Learning. Language Learning & Technology, 10(1), 9-16. (https://goo.gl/y1d89A) (2016-02-03).

Chiu, T., Liou, H., & Yeh, Y. (2007). A Study of Web-based Oral Activities Enhanced by Automatic Speech Recognition for EFL College Learning. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 20(3), 209-233. https://doi.org/10.1080/09588220701489374

Comas-Quinn, A., De-los-Arcos, B., & Mardomingo, R. (2012). Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) for Distance Language Learning: Shifting Tutor Roles in a Contested Space for Interaction. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 25(2), 129-143. https://doi.org/10.1080/09588221.2011.636055

Creswell, J.W. (2003). Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative and Mixed Method Approaches. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Demouy, V., & Kukulska-Hulme, A. (2010). On the Spot: Using Mobile Devices for Listening and Speaking Practice on a French Language Programme. The Journal of Open, Distance and e-Learning, 25(3), 217-232. (http://goo.gl/2vkjo4) (2016-02-03).

Desai, C.M., & Graves, S.J. (2006). Instruction Via Instant Messaging Reference: What’s Happening? The Electronic Library, 24(2), 174-189. https://doi.org/10.1108/02640470610660369

Dourando, D., Parker, M., & De-la-Harpe, R. (2007). Investigation into the Usage of Mobile Instant Messaging in Tertiary Education. Proceedings of Annual Conference of World Wide Web Application. https://doi.org/10.4018/jictrda.2012070102

Farmer, F., & Nucamendi, M.E.L. (2012). Towards a Rationale for Mobile Learning. Left to My Own Devices: Learner Autonomy and Mobile-Assisted Language Learning. In J.E. Diaz-Vera (Ed.), Left to my own. (pp- 21-44). Bingley: Emerald Group.

Farmer, R. (2003). Instant Messaging - Collaborative Tool or Educator’s Nightmare. The North American Web-Based Learning Conference (NAWeb 2003). (https://goo.gl/jkaga5) (2015-09-02).

Godwin-Jones, R. (2011). Emerging Technologies: Mobile Apps for Language Learning. Language Learning & Technology, 15(2), 2-11. (http://goo.gl/VRBkLq) (2016-04-08).

Hanaoka, O., & Izumi, S. (2012). Noticing and Uptake: Addressing Pre-articulated Covert Problems in L2 Writing. Journal of Second Language Writing, 21(4), 332-347. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jslw.2012.09.008

Hatch, E.M., & Lazaraton, A. (1991). The Research Manual: Design and Statistics for Applied Linguistics. New York: Newbury House Publishers.

Hsu, H., Wang, S., & Comac, L. (2008). Using Audioblogs to Assist English-language Learning: An Investigation into Student Perception. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 21(2), 181-198. https://doi.org/10.1080/09588220801943775

Hughes, A. (2003). Testing for Language Teachers. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511732980

Iwashita, N. (2003). Negative Feedback and Positive Evidence in Task-based Interaction. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 25(01), 1-36. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0272263103000019

Jepson, K. (2005). Conversations –and Negotiated Interaction– in Text and Voice Chat Rooms. Language Learning & Technology, 9(3), 79-98. (http://goo.gl/GPh5GG) (2015-09-24).

Jolliet, Y. (2007). M-learning: A Pedagogical and Technological Model for Language Learning on Mobile Phones. Proceedings Workshop on Blended Learning, 2007 (pp. 327-339. (https://goo.gl/or9aqZ) (2016-02-03).

Jones, C. (2012). Networked Learning, Stepping Beyond the Net Generation and Digital Natives. In L. Dirckinck-Holmfeld, V. Hodgson & D. McConnell (Eds.), Exploring the Theory, Pedagogy and Practice of Networked Learning (pp. 27-41). New York: Springer.

Kessler, G. (2010). Fluency and Anxiety in Self-access Speaking Tasks: The Influence of Environment. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 23(4), 361-375. https://doi.org/10.1080/09588221.2010.512551

Kukulska-Hulme, A. (2009). Will Mobile Learning Change Language Learning? ReCALL, 21(2), 157-165. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0958344009000202

Kukulska-Hulme, A. (2012). How Should the Higher Education Workforce Adapt to Advancements in Technology for Teaching and Learning? The Internet and Higher Education, 15(4), 247-254. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.iheduc.2011.12.002

Kukulska-Hulme, A., & Shield, L. (2008). An Overview of Mobile Assisted Language Learning: From Content Delivery to Supported Collaboration and Interaction. ReCALL, 20(3), 271-289. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0958344008000335

Lai, C., & Zhao, Y. (2006). Noticing and Text-based Chat. Language Learning & Technology, 10(3), 102-120. (http://goo.gl/sxKZDZ) (2016-03-21).

Levy, M. (2009). Technologies in Use for Second Language Learning. The Modern Language Journal, 93(1), 769-782. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1540-4781.2009.00972.x

Long, M.H. (1996). The Role of the Linguistic Environment in Second Language Acquisition. In W. Ritchie, & T. Bathia (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Second Language Acquistion (pp. 413-469). New York: Academic Press.

MALL (Research Project Report) (2009). Mobile Application for Language Learning. Curriculum Corporation: The Learning Federation. (http://goo.gl/2elR23) (2015-12-09).

Mayer, R.E., Sobko, K., & Mautone, P.D. (2003). Social Cues in Multimedia Learning: Role of Speaker’s Voice. Journal of Educational Psychology, 95, 419-425. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-0663.95.2.419

Mayo, E. (1933). The Human Problems of and Industrial Civilization. New York: Macmillan.

Miangah, T.M., & Nezarat, A. (2012). Mobile-assisted Language Learning. LJDPS, 3(1), 309-319. (http://goo.gl/Mw9PO9) (2016-03-06).

Nakahama, Y., Tyler, A., & Van Lier, L. (2001). Negotiation of Meaning in Conversational and Information Gap Activities: A Comparative Discourse Analysis. TESOL Quarterly, 35, 377-404. https://doi.org/10.2307/3588028

Norton, J. (2005). The Paired Format in the Cambridge Speaking Tests. ELT Journal, 59, 287-297. https://doi.org/10.1093/elt/cci057

Nunan, D. (1992). Research Methods in Language Learning. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Onwuegbuzie, A.J., & Teddlie, C. (2003). A Framework for Analyzing Data in Mixed Methods Research. In A. Tashakkori & C. Teddlie (Eds.), Handbook of Mixed Methods in Social and Behavioral Research (pp. 351-383). Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Parejo, R.M. (2016). Development of Writing Skills Using Mobile Devices for the Teaching of Foreign Languages. Revista Complutense de Educación, 27(2), 779. https://doi.org/10.5209/rev_RCED.2016.v27.n2.48317

Rambe, P., & Bere, A. (2013). Using Mobile Instant Messaging to Leverage Learner Participation and Transform Pedagogy at a South African University of Technology. British Journal of Educational Technology, 44, 544-549. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.12057

Satar, H., & Özdener, N. (2008). The Effects of Synchronous CMC on Speaking Proficiency and Anxiety: Text versus Voice Chat. The Modern Language Journal, 92(4), 595-613. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1540-4781.2008.00789.x

Shavelson, R.J. (1981). Statistical Reasoning for the Behavioral Sciences. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Shih, J., Chu, H., & Hwang, G. (2011). An Investigation of Attitudes of Students and Teachers about Participating in a Context-ware Ubiquitous Learning Activity. British Journal of Educational Technology, 42(3), 373-394. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8535.2009.01020.x

Stewart, I.A., & File, P. (2007). Let’s Chat: A Conversational Dialogue System for Second Language Practice. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 20(2), 97-116. (http://goo.gl/MVYtz8) (2016-02-08).

Tai, Y. (2012). Contextualizing a MALL: Practice Design and Evaluation. Educational Technology & Society, 15(2), 220–230. (http://goo.gl/bRQnho) (2016-01-07).

Thorndike, E.L. (1911). Animal Intelligence: Experimental Studies. New York: Macmillan.

Trifonova, A., & Ronchetti, M. (2004). A General Architecture to Support Mobility in Learning. Advanced Learning Technologies, 2004. Proceedings. IEEE International Conference, 26-30. (https://goo.gl/8N1nES) (2016-02-01).

Vázquez-Cano, E., Mengual-Andrés, S., & Roig-Vila, R. (2015). Lexicometric Analysis of the Specifity of Teenagers’ Digital Writing in WhatsApp. Revista de Lingüística Teórica y Aplicada, 53(1), 83-106. https://doi.org/10.4067/S0718-48832015000100005

Volle, L.M. (2005). Analyzing Oral Skills in Voice E-mail and Online Interviews. Language Learning & Technology, 9(3), 146-163. (http://goo.gl/i3Uaoi) (2016-02-03).

Williams, J. (1999). Learner Generated Attention to Form. Language Learning, 49(4), 583-625. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-1770.2001.tb00020.x

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/16
Accepted on 31/12/16
Submitted on 31/12/16

Volume 25, Issue 1, 2017
DOI: 10.3916/C50-2017-04
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 7
Views 1
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?