Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Information Literacy is one of the dimensions of digital competence and, in today’s information and media-based society, it should be a skill that everyone develops, especially secondary school teachers due to their influence on this crucial stage of student development. In this investigation we aim to determine the current level of information literacy of secondary school teachers in Spain. For this purpose we have designed a questionnaire (n=2,656) which is divided into two parts: the first asks questions related to belief and self-perception of information literacy indicators, and the second presents practical cases in which the teachers have to demonstrate their skills in information literacy. The results confirm that the beliefs of secondary school teachers show rather high values but that, even if the level of information literacy that the teachers have is acceptable, there are certain aspects of the indicators related to assessment, management and transformation of information in which the teachers display serious shortcomings. This highlights the need to establish a training plan for information literacy for the secondary school teachers in Spain.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Secondary Education is located on the border between compulsory education and university education or on the threshold of a specialised technical profession. In our education system, Secondary Education is one of the fundamental pillars on which the education of our students is based, and Secondary Education school teachers play a key role in the educational process. In this paper we focus on the competence of these school teachers. In particular we aim to determine what level of information literacy (a component of digital literacy) Spanish Secondary Education school teachers have. A profession such as teaching must have identity and competence (Sarramona, 2007). Competent teachers must have the ability to use Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) skilfully in the classroom (Fernández, 2003). We currently speak about Secondary Education school teachers being immersed in a new role (Espuny & al., 2010; Gisbert, 2002; Tejada, 1999) that compels them to develop skills and abilities in the world of ICTs. Numerous public and private international institutions and organizations have attempted to define indicators to describe teachers’ digital competence. These attempts have included efforts by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO, 2008) to set ICT standards for school teachers and work by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE, 2008). Numerous authors have also conducted research into the digital competences that contemporary school teachers must possess (Tejedor & García-Valcárcel, 2006; Suárez-Rodríguez & al., 2013). Some of these studies have focused on initial teacher-training (Ruiz & al., 2010; Roig & Pascual, 2012) while others have focused on continuous training (Cabero & al., 1999; Aznar & al., 2003). Other studies have analysed the beliefs and self-perceptions of Secondary Education school teachers regarding their use of the Internet in their classes (Ramírez & al., 2012) or their use of computers (Peinado & al., 2011). Digital competence comprises a series of dimensions (Vivancos, 2008). One dimension that recurs in every analysis of this basic competence is «information literacy» (IL).

Since the term «information literacy» was coined by Paul Zurkowski in 1974, several definitions of IL have been proposed. It is currently understood as the ability to treat information and to use this information to construct knowledge and lifelong learning in order to solve any problems we may encounter. This assumes the ability to recognise the need for information and know how to find it, analyse it, manage it and convert it into knowledge. Today, UNESCO is the international organization that most promotes information literacy in teaching institutions. It has established a curriculum for teachers (Wilson & al., 2011), attempted to establish indicators for this kind of literacy (Catts & Lau, 2008), and made numerous resources available for disseminating and studying it (UNESCO, 2013). Since possessing a certain level of IL is a fundamental need for both teachers and students (Wilson, 2012), we are interested in determining what level of IL Spanish Secondary Education school teachers have. Even though, as we mentioned earlier, previous studies have attempted to determine their level of digital competence, and even though studies on the information literacy of university students (Egaña & al., 2013) and the perceived information competence of future Secondary Education school teachers (Rodríguez & al., 2012) are available, no studies in Spain have been conducted on the level of information literacy of Spanish secondary school teachers. Although in different contexts to ours (Spain), the research on the IL of Secondary Education school teachers in other countries can provide examples and be useful for the purposes of comparison. Merchant and Hepworth (2002) compared the differences in the self-perceptions of IL levels between teachers and students in the United Kingdom. Smith (2013) analysed the self-perception of Canadian secondary school teachers with regard to their IL levels and the IL experiments they conduct in their classrooms. Williams and Wavell (2007) studied the perceptions that English secondary school teachers have of the IL levels of their pupils. Several studies on the IL levels of Secondary Education school teachers have also been conducted in South America. In Chile, for example, the Ministry of Education has established ICT competences and standards for the teaching profession in order to evaluate, among other things, how much their teachers have learned about strategies for searching, localizing, selecting and storing information resources available in electronic and online systems (Enlaces, 2011). The Colombian Ministry of Education has established five ITC competences for the professional development of teachers. With regard to IL, all of these competences, and in particular, research competence, emphasise the need for teachers to be able to: search, order, filter, connect and analyse the information available on the Internet; compare and analyse information from digital sources; and use information from the Internet critically and reflexively (MEN, 2013). In Spain, the National Institute of Educational Technology and Teacher Training (INTEF, 2014) has recently published a draft report for a Common Framework for the Digital Competence of Teachers aimed at helping teachers to determine, develop, empower and evaluate their own digital competence as well as that of their pupils.

2. Material and methods

Having defined IL and discussed previous studies of IL in Spain and elsewhere, we now establish several IL indicators that will enable us to measure the extent to which secondary school teachers in Spain have acquired informational literacy. We have taken into account the above studies on indicators of digital competence as well as other indicators of IL: the UNESCO study, the study by Wen and Shih (2008), who sought to establish indicators of IL for primary school teachers and university lecturers in Taiwan, and the rules on IL indicators for future primary and secondary school teachers in the United States produced by the Instruction for Educators Committee of the Education and Behavioral Sciences Section (EBSS) (2011). Finally, to meet our objectives we also took as reference for our IL indicators those described by Larraz (2012) in the author’s rubric for digital competence: recognize the need for information, locate it, evaluate it, organise it and transform it. We also analysed the various data collection instruments used in the numerous studies conducted so far in this area both in the general field of digital literacy (Covello, 2010) and in the specific field of IL. Since these instruments didn’t fully convince us, we decided to construct and validate our own instrument, which is a questionnaire for measuring the level of information literacy of Secondary Education school teachers. In the following sections we present the first results of our research. We begin by assuming that, although the results for recognizing the need for information and locating information will be high, those for evaluating, organizing and transforming information will not.

2.1. Population and sample

The latest statistical data available from the Spanish Ministry of Education, corresponding to the 2011-12 academic year, shows that there were of 287,027 Secondary Education school teachers in Spain. Invitations to participate in the study were sent to every Secondary Education institution in the country and the questionnaire was available for online completion in 2013. A total of 2,656 valid responses were recorded. For this sample of 2,656 participants, the confidence interval was 1.9678, the sample error was 0.019, and the variability was 0.5. The characteristics of the sample are shown in table 1.

2.2. Instrument

To collect the data we used our self-compiled Secondary Education schoolteacher information literacy questionnaire (AIPS2013). This was based on the one used by Williams and Coles (2003) to measure the use and attitudes to IL of secondary school teachers in the United Kingdom, and the one used by the Digital Competence Assessment (DCA) research group of professor Calvani and al. (2010) to investigate the level of digital competence of secondary school pupils. We consider the interesting approach provided by the situation and practical case items of the latter questionnaire to be crucially important. Indeed, one of the objectives of our research was to investigate beyond the self-perceptions of teachers in order to obtain objective results for the true IL level of these teachers. Calvani also recognises that all Secondary Education school teachers should be able to meet the IL competency standards established in the suggested indicators for secondary schoolchildren, while Campbell (2004) concludes that the IL indicators are valid for all stages of human development.


Draft Content 926790166-36831-en097.jpg

The questionnaire is divided into two clearly distinct parts. In addition to questions aimed at identifying and describing the sample, the first part contains a series of closed questions on self-perception (Likert-scale questions), beliefs and attitudes regarding the indicators and the level of IL the teachers taking the questionnaire believe they have. The second part comprises questions on simulations or practical cases that test the teachers in order to obtain objective results for the indicators that will provide a more reliable estimate of IL levels. The questionnaire contains 13 descriptive questions and 32 questions on self-perception in the first part and 10 simulation/situation questions in the second part. The questionnaire can be found at http://goo.gl/57nst4.

Validation of this questionnaire involved an initial assessment by a committee of 10 experts comprising university professors of Educational Technology from several Spanish universities and Secondary Education school teachers. After relevant revisions and modifications had been made to the questionnaire, it was given to a pilot sample of 50 secondary school teachers in order to test reliability and detect any problems in understanding, accessing or using it. This first sample provided a Cronbach’s Alpha reliability coefficient of 0.834 in the Likert-scale questions. According to Bisquerra (1987), values between 0.8 and 1 are considered excellent reliability indices. When the questionnaire was administered to our full sample of teachers, another excellent Chronbach’s reliability coefficient of 0.811 was obtained. This demonstrates that our questionnaire was highly reliable. The data obtained from the questionnaire was codified and treated with version 21.0 of the SPSS statistical software package.

3. Results: Self-perceived information literacy (IL) level

Given the breadth of our questionnaire and the high number of responses recorded, in this first paper we will concentrate on the results from the questions on self-perception and the IL indicators. We will leave the evaluation and analysis of the practical questions for a future paper.

Teachers in Spanish Secondary Education have a high self-perception of their ability to recognize the need for information (indicator A). As we can see from table 2, the average percentage was 87.8% and in all cases the average scores exceeded 4.5. This means that Spanish secondary school teachers feel capable of searching for information on the Internet for work-related issues and locating the information they are seeking quickly and efficiently, and have no difficulty in identifying the objective, problem or reason for their search. Of these three concepts, the highest scores (mean=5.48; mode=6; and percentage=93.8) and least spread in the results (standard deviation=0.949) were obtained for finds information on the Internet for work-related issues. As we shall see later, these were also the highest scores of any question of any IL indicator. Table 2 shows the results for the questions for indicator A, on recognizing the need for information.


Draft Content 926790166-36831-en098.jpg

In the results for the next indicator (indicator B) on locating information, we begin to observe several important variations (see table 3). Although the results were still high (averages above 4, an average percentage of 80.2, and medians and modes of 5), there is a clear difference between, on the one hand, comparing information from several sources and visiting several types of information sources, and, on the other hand, quoting the source and author of the information obtained. While the averages for the first two items were high and similar (4.71 and 4.79), we can see that Spanish secondary school teachers did not agree on the third item, recording a wide range of scores (high standard deviation of 1.519) and an exceptionally low percentage (69.5%) compared to their scores for all the other items from the first two IL indicators.

The results for the third indicator (indicator C), on evaluating information, were similar to those for indicator B (table 4). While the average percentage for the responses was considerably lower (64.3%), we also find the lowest range of responses for one item and the widest range of those for another in the same indicator. For example, the responses of the secondary school teachers with regard to their ability to distinguish between important and non-important incoming email messages varied widely (with one of the highest standard deviations of the whole questionnaire (1.760), a median of 4 and a mode of 1). On the other hand, the same Spanish secondary school teachers agreed on their ability to distinguish between important information and non-important information, recording one of the highest percentages on this item (89.3%) and the lowest standard deviations of the whole questionnaire (0.941). On the other hand, they failed to agree on whether to afford greater reliability and veracity to digital or analogical resources: just over half of those surveyed were in favour of information from digital sources, while the rest were in favour of information from analogical sources.


Draft Content 926790166-36831-en099.jpg

For the next indicator (indicator D), the results on self-perception were the lowest of all (table 5). Although the range of responses was wide (with standard deviations of 1.839 and 1.476), for the two questions on ability to organize information, the percentages (49.0% and 14.75%) and means (3.50 and 2.31) were the lowest results of the entire questionnaire. Less than half the teachers use a system for classifying and managing email and very few know or use any type of content reader or aggregator.

The results for the final indicator (Indicator E), on transforming information, show that only 74% of secondary school teachers in Spain are able to convert the information obtained from their Internet searches into their own content (table 6, see in next page).


Draft Content 926790166-36831-en100.jpg

After the teachers had answered all the questions from the five IL indicators, and after they had read our definition of IL, we added another question in order to obtain an overall assessment of the self-perception of the IL level of Spanish secondary school teachers. The results obtained from this question are shown in table 7.

Here we observe a certain tendency towards central scores, with an average of 3.70 and a percentage of 59.6%, which is slightly lower than would be expected from the results from each indicator individually. As we can see in table 8, the average self-perceived IL level from all the indicators (76.6%) was eight points lower than the estimated self-perceived IL level from the overall assessment.

4. Discussion and conclusions

Both the average score for the indicators used to define IL (67.6%) and the self-perception score recorded by the school teachers after reading a definition of IL (59.6%) show that these school teachers have a high self-perception of their information literacy. Our results also show that, although the IL level of the teachers seems to be high, some IL indicators are more indicative than others. The standard deviations for the various questions of these indicators are fairly homogeneous. This confirms that the range of responses is fairly narrow and reaffirms the validity of the responses.


Draft Content 926790166-36831-en101.jpg

A more detailed analysis of the IL indicators shows that although indicator A (on recognising the need for information) and indicator B (on locating information) obtain high teacher self-perception scores (87.8% and 80.2%, respectively), the other three indicators do not. Indicator E (on converting information) and indicator C (on evaluating information) obtain acceptable scores of 74% and 64.3%, respectively. However, indicator D (on organising information) obtains a worryingly average score of 31.8% and a score of less than 50% on both of the questions that make up this indicator (49% and 14.7%, respectively).

Secondary school teachers do recognise the need to search for information on the Internet for work-related issues (93.8%), find this information quickly and efficiently (83.8%), and identify the objective, problem or need precisely (85.9%).

They are also proficient at locating information, comparing it with information from other sources (83.9%) and visiting numerous sources to locate information (87.1%). However, only 69.5% of the school teachers who completed the questionnaire quote the source or author of the information. This figure is very low figure considering the importance attached to doing so.

The school teachers in the study present major deficiencies when it comes to evaluating the information they find. Although they distinguish fairly well between important and non-important information (89%), they find it extremely difficult to distinguish between truly important incoming emails and those that are not so important (51.3%). They also have severe doubts about whether to describe information they have obtained from the Internet as reliable and true in comparison with information they obtain from analogical sources (only 52.4% do).


Draft Content 926790166-36831-en102.jpg

The biggest problem school teachers have with regard to their self-perceived IL level undoubtedly concerns their ability to organise information. For example, only 49% of teachers use some form of system to classify and manage their email while, more worryingly, only 14.7% know and use a content reader, aggregator or indexer. Spanish school teachers, therefore, recognise that they are bad administrators of information: although they know they need information and they know how to find it, they are unable to organise or classify it.

Finally, it is worrying that 26% of the teachers surveyed admit that they still use the information they obtain from the Internet without modifying it or identifying its author, especially when the percentages for knowing how to localise and identify the object of their information search are, as we have seen, 83.8% and 85.9%, respectively. The quality of the information converted and later communicated is considerably diminished by these results.

In conclusion, Spanish secondary school teachers are less competent at producing and communicating information than one would think. When added to the other difficulties they have in evaluating and organising information, this leads us to suggest that our teachers require training both in producing and disseminating information (this has already been proposed by Area and Guarro (2012), in their analysis of information and digital literacy) and in evaluating and managing information. Clearly, teachers are not only better trained in digital competence nowadays but they are also more interested in it (Pérez & Delgado, 2012). However, the training they receive is often not of the best quality and it is not offered to every teacher who wishes to receive it. This presents us with an important challenge with regard to the promotion of learning and greater knowledge for all concerned. Other countries, even those with fewer deficiencies in the IL levels of their teachers, are affording IL the importance it deserves and implementing improvement plans and training schemes in this area. In South Africa, for example (Fourie & Krauss, 2010), such programmes have become part of social education policy involving not just teaching institutions but whole cities. The United Kingdom has a programme to detect deficiencies in the IL levels of its teachers based on the already mentioned study conducted by Williams & Coles in 2003. And some states in the United States even provide specific IL information and courses for both teachers and pupils one month every year. These examples ought to encourage our country to also implement quality training measures aimed at improving the IL levels of our secondary school teachers and creating a correspondingly beneficial impact on the IL levels of our pupils at such a vitally important stage in their education, especially if we take into account observations over several years from the various educational computing programmes of the Spanish autonomous communities (Martín-Hernández, 2010) and the contents of the latest proposal from the Spanish Ministry of Education (INTEF, 2014).

In light of these results and our analysis of them, our final conclusion is that Spanish education authorities need to be alerted to the fact that secondary school teachers require training to improve their information literacy. Such training should focus on the specific aspects and indicators we have mentioned in this study regarding the evaluation, organization, management and transformation of information.


Draft Content 926790166-36831-en103.jpg


Draft Content 926790166-36831-en104.jpg

References

Area, M., & Guarro, A. (2012). La alfabetización informacional y digital: fundamentos pedagógicos para la enseñanza y el aprendizaje competente. Revista Española de Documentación Científica, 46, 74. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3989/redc.2012.mono.977

Aznar, I., Fernández, F., & Hinojo, F.J. (2003). Formación docente y TIC: elaboración de un instrumento de evaluación de actitudes profesionales. Etic@net, 2, 1-9.

Bisquerra, R. (1987). Introducción a la estadística aplicada a la investigación educativa: un enfoque informático con los paquetes BMDP y SPSSX. Barcelona: Promociones y Publicaciones Universitarias, PPU.

Cabero, J., Duarte, A., & Barroso, J. (1999). La formación y el perfeccionamiento del profesorado en nuevas tecnologías: retos hacia el futuro. In J. Ferrés, & P. Marquès (Eds.), Comunicación educativa y nuevas tecnologías. (pp. 21-32). Barcelona: Praxis.

Calvani, A., Fini, A., & Ranieri, M. (2010). Digital Competence in K-12. Theoretical Models, Assessment Tools and Empirical Research. Anàlisi, 40, 157-171.

Campbell, S. (2004). Defining Information Literacy in the 21st Century. World Library and Information Congress: 70th IFLA General Conference and Council, 22-27 August. Buenos Aires. (http://goo.gl/uTmleh) (12-06-2014).

Catts, R., & Lau, J. (2008). Towards Information Literacy Indicators. Paris: UNESCO.

Covello, S. (2010). A Review of Digital Literacy Assessment Instruments. IDE-712 Front-end Analysis Research: Analysis for Human Performance Technology Decisions. Syracuse University, School of Education. (http://goo.gl/L4qzHW) (12-06-2014).

EBSS Instruction for Educators Committee (2011). Information Literacy Standards for Teacher Education. College & Research Libraries News, 72(7), 420-436. (http://goo.gl/aN4YQk) (12-06-2014).

Egaña, T., Bidegain, E., & Zuberogoitia, A. (2013). ¿Cómo buscan información académica en Internet los estudiantes universitarios? Lo que dicen los estudiantes y sus profesores. Edutec, 43. (http://goo.gl/xhxzH9) (12-06-2014).

Enlaces–Ministerio de Educación de Chile (2011). Competencias y estándares TIC para la profesión docente. (http://goo.gl/hwZmh4).

Espuny, C., Gisbert, M., & Coiduras, J. (2010). La dinamización de las TIC en las escuelas. Edutec, 32. (http://goo.gl/vgfgEK) (12-06-2014).

Fernández, R. (2003). Competencias profesionales del docente en la sociedad del siglo XXI. OGE, 11(1), 4-8.

Fourie, I., & Krauss, K. (2010). Information Literacy Training for Teachers in a Developing South African Context: Suggestions for a Multi-disciplinary Planning Approach. Innovation, 41, 107-122.

Gisbert, M. (2002). El nuevo rol del profesor en entornos tecnológicos. Acción Pedagógica, 11(1), 48-59.

INTEF (2014). Marco Común de Competencia Digital Docente. V. 2.0. (http://goo.gl/xr4BN4) (12-06-2014).

ISTE (2008). ISTE Standards for Teachers Resources (NETS·T). (http://goo.gl/8F5Eu0).

Larraz, V. (2012). La competència digital a la Universitat. (Tesis doctoral). Universitat d’Andorra.

Martín-Hernández, S. (2010). Escuela 2.0: Estado de la cuestión. Scopeo Extraordinario, Escuela 2.0. (http://goo.gl/kDzv6l) (12-06-2014).

MEN (2013). Competencias TIC para el desarrollo profesional docente. (http://goo.gl/xhMj6w) (12-06-2014).

Merchant, L., & Hepworth, M. (2002). Information Literacy of Teachers and Pupils in Secondary Schools. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, 34(2), 81-89. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/096100060203400203

Peinado, S., Bolívar, J.M., & Briceño, L.A. (2011). Actitud hacia el uso de la computadora en docentes de Educación Secundaria. Revista Universitaria Arbitrada de Investigación y Diálogo Académico, 7(1), 86-105.

Pérez, M.A., & Delgado, A. (2012). De la competencia digital y audiovisual a la competencia mediática: dimensiones e indicadores. Comunicar, 39, 25-34. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C39-2012-02-02

Ramírez, E., Cañedo, I., & Clemente, M. (2012). Las actitudes y creencias de los profesores de Secundaria sobre el uso de Internet en sus clases. Comunicar, 38, 147-155. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C38-2012-03-06

Rodríguez, M.J., Olmos, S. & Martínez, F. (2012). Propiedades métricas y estructura dimensional de la adaptación española de una escala de evaluación de competencia informacional autopercibida (IL-HUMASS). Revista de Investigación Educativa, 30(2), 347-365. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.6018/rie.30.2.120231

Roig, R., & Pascual, A.M. (2012). Las competencias digitales de los futuros docentes. Un análisis con estudiantes de Magisterio de Educación Infantil de la Universidad de Alicante. @tic, 53-60. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7203/attic.9.1958

Ruiz, I., Rubia, B., Anguita, R., & Fernández, E. (2010). Formar al profesorado inicialmente en habilidades y competencias en TIC: perfiles de una experiencia colaborativa. Revista de Educación, 352, 149-178.

Sarramona, J. (2007). Las competencias profesionales del profesorado de Secundaria. Estudios sobre Educación, 12, 31-40.

Smith, J.K. (2013). Secondary teachers and information literacy (IL): Teacher Understanding and Perceptions of IL in the Classroom. Library & Information Science Research, 35, 216-222. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lisr.2013.03.003

Suárez-Rodríguez, J.M., Almerich, G., Gargallo, B., & Aliaga, F.M. (2013). Las competencias del profesorado en TIC: estructura básica. Educación XX1, 16(1), 39-62. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5944/educXX1.16.1.716

Tejada, J. (1999). El formador ante las TIC: nuevos roles y competencias profesionales. Comunicación y Pedagogía, 158, 17-26.

Tejedor, F.J., & García-Valcárcel, A. (2006). Competencias de los profesores para el uso de las TIC en la enseñanza: análisis de conocimientos y actitudes. Revista Española de Pedagogía, 233, 21-43.

UNESCO (2008). Estándares de competencia en TIC para docentes. Paris: UNESCO. (http://goo.gl/aAQ5GJ) (12-06-2014).

UNESCO (2013). Overview of Information Literacy Resources Worldwide. Paris: UNESCO.

Vivancos, J. (2008). Tratamiento de la información y competencia digital. Madrid: Alianza.

Wen, J.R., & Shih, W.L. (2008). Exploring the Information Literacy Competence Standars for Elementary and High School Teachers. Computers & Education, 50, 787-806. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2006.08.011

Williams, A., & Wavell, C. (2007). Secondary School Teachers’ Conceptions of Student Information literacy. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, 39(4), 199-212. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0961000607083211

Williams, D., & Coles, L. (2003). The Use of Research by Teachers: Information Literacy, Acces and Attitudes. Final Report on a Study funded by the ESRC. The Robert Gordon University, Scotland. (http://goo.gl/BBvrGl) (12-06-2014).

Wilson, C. (2012). Media and Information Literacy: Pedagogy and Possibilities. Comunicar, 39, 15-22. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C39-2012-02-01

Wilson, C., Grizzle, A., & al. (2011). Alfabetización mediática e informacional: Currículum para profesores. Paris: UNESCO.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

La alfabetización informacional es una de las dimensiones de la competencia digital y, como tal, debe ser tenida muy en cuenta dentro de las competencias asumibles por cualquier persona en nuestros días, inmersa en la sociedad de la información y la comunicación, pero más concretamente por el profesorado de Educación Secundaria dada la gran importancia que tiene esta etapa en la formación de los alumnos. En este estudio hemos querido conocer cuál es el grado de alfabetización informacional del profesorado de Secundaria del estado español. Para ello hemos construido y aplicado un cuestionario (n=2.656). En dicho instrumento hemos sometido al profesorado a dos partes bien diferenciadas, una con cuestiones de creencia y autopercepción sobre los indicadores de la alfabetización informacional, y por otra, con cuestiones de situación, casos prácticos en los que el profesorado ha tenido que poner en práctica las habilidades y destrezas que tiene sobre la alfabetización informacional. Los resultados obtenidos confirman que las creencias del profesorado de Educación Secundaria dan valores bastante elevados pero también nos muestran que si bien el grado de alfabetización informacional del profesorado consigue el aprobado, hay ciertos aspectos de los indicadores relativos a la evaluación, gestión y transformación de la información donde los docentes tienen graves carencias. Todo ello pone de manifiesto la necesidad de plantear un plan formativo en alfabetización informacional del profesorado de Educación Secundaria de España.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

En el umbral de la educación obligatoria y a las puertas de una formación universitaria o al desempeño de una profesión técnica especializada, se encuentra la Educación Secundaria. Por todo ello, en nuestro sistema educativo, la Educación Secundaria representa uno de los pilares fundamentales sobre los que se sustenta el aprendizaje de nuestros alumnos, y su profesorado tiene un papel clave en todo este proceso. Justamente, en la competencia del profesorado de Secundaria es donde queremos centrar nuestra investigación; concretamente, nuestro objetivo es conocer el grado de alfabetización informacional que poseen los docentes de Educación Secundaria de este país, una cualidad presente dentro de la competencia digital. Una profesión como la de docente, debe tener identidad y competencia (Sarramona, 2007) y dentro de lo que serían las competencias profesionales del docente se hace indispensable hablar de una necesaria capacidad y destreza en la utilización de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación (TIC) en el aula (Fernández, 2003). Hablamos de un profesor de Educación Secundaria inmerso en un nuevo rol (Espuny & al., 2010; Gisbert, 2002; Tejada, 1999) que le exige desarrollar destrezas y habilidades en el mundo de las TIC. En el panorama internacional, desde diversas organizaciones e instituciones públicas y privadas se ha tratado de definir una serie de indicadores que describan la competencia digital de los docentes, destacamos los esfuerzos de la Organización de las Naciones Unidas para la Educación, la Ciencia y la Cultura (UNESCO, 2008) por fijar unos estándares en TIC para docentes así como los de la International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE, 2008). También diversos autores han realizado diversas investigaciones acerca de las competencias digitales que debe poseer el profesor de nuestros días (Tejedor & García-Valcárcel, 2006; Suárez-Rodríguez & al., 2013), desde la formación inicial del docente (Ruiz & al., 2010; Roig & Pascual, 2012), la formación permanente (Cabero & al., 1999; Aznar & al., 2003) o incluso desde el punto de vista de las autopercepciones y creencias que tiene el profesorado de Educación Secundaria acerca del uso de Internet en sus clases (Ramírez & al., 2012) o del uso de ordenadores (Peinado & al., 2011). La competencia digital está compuesta por una serie de dimensiones (Vivancos, 2008), y una de ellas, recurrente en todos los análisis de esta competencia básica, es la llamada «alfabetización informacional» (AI).

Desde que en 1974 fuera utilizado por primera vez el término de «alfabetización informacional» (AI) por Paul Zurkowski, la AI ha tenido diferentes definiciones. La entendemos como la habilidad para tratar la información y aprovecharse de ella para construir conocimiento y aprendizaje a lo largo de toda la vida dando respuesta a los problemas que se nos plantean, lo que supone reconocer la necesidad de información, saber localizarla, analizarla, gestionarla y transformarla en conocimiento. La UNESCO es, hoy por hoy, la organización internacional que más está velando por la promoción de la AI en los centros docentes, estableciendo un currículum para profesores (Wilson & al., 2011), buscando unos indicadores de la misma (Catts & Lau, 2008), y ofreciendo todo tipo de recursos para su difusión y estudio (UNESCO, 2013). Poseer cierto grado de AI es una necesidad básica y fundamental para profesores y alumnos (Wilson, 2012) y de ahí nuestro interés en conocer cuál es el grado de alfabetización informacional del profesorado de Secundaria del estado español. Si bien sí disponemos de precedentes de investigaciones acerca de conocer el grado de alfabetización digital del profesorado de Secundaria, como ya hemos mencionado, así como también hemos encontrado estudios sobre la alfabetización informacional de estudiantes universitarios (Egaña & al., 2013) o incluso de la competencia informacional autopercibida de futuros profesores de Secundaria (Rodríguez & al., 2012), no existe ningún estudio anterior en nuestro país acerca del grado de AI del profesorado de Secundaria. Somos conscientes de que aunque de contextos diferentes al del objeto de nuestro estudio (España), pueden resultar ejemplificadores y de contraste necesario los estudios e investigaciones acerca de la AI entre el profesorado de Secundaria en el panorama internacional que hemos encontrado. Merchant y Hepworth (2002) comparan la diferencia existente entre la autopercepción que tienen de la AI, alumnos y profesores en el Reino Unido. Smith (2013) analiza la autopercepción que, sobre la AI y sobre las experiencias que llevan a cabo sobre la misma en clase, tienen los profesores de Secundaria canadienses. Y Williams y Wavell (2007) estudian las percepciones que tienen los profesores de Secundaria ingleses sobre el grado de AI de sus alumnos. Destacan también los esfuerzos realizados desde Sudamérica en el ámbito de la AI del profesorado. En Chile, el Ministerio de Educación, ha establecido unas competencias y estándares TIC para la profesión docente que tratan de evaluar entre otras cosas, el grado de aprendizaje de los profesores en estrategias de búsqueda, localización, selección y almacenamiento de recursos de información disponibles en sistemas electrónicos y a través de sistemas en línea (Enlaces, 2011). Y en Colombia, también el Ministerio de Educación de dicho país, establece cinco competencias TIC para el desarrollo profesional docente, donde en todas ellas y especialmente en la competencia investigativa, se habla de la AI en los términos de que todo docente debe saber: buscar, ordenar, filtrar, conectar y analizar información disponible en Internet; contrastar y analizar información proveniente de fuentes digitales; y utilizar dicha información proveniente de Internet, con una actitud crítica y reflexiva (MEN, 2013). En España, el Instituto Nacional de Tecnologías Educativas y de Formación del Profesorado (INTEF, 2014) acaba de publicar un borrador del Marco Común de Competencia Digital Docente que pretende ayudar al docente a conocer, desarrollar, empoderar y evaluar la competencia digital propia y de sus alumnos.

2. Material y métodos

Una vez definida la AI y conocidos los antecedentes existentes sobre el estudio de la misma tanto a nivel nacional como internacional, nuestra investigación nos lleva a fijar unos indicadores de la AI que nos permitan medir su grado de consecución entre el profesorado de Secundaria. En nuestra investigación hemos tenido en cuenta los estudios que sobre los indicadores de la competencia digital ya hemos mencionado, así como otros particulares sobre AI: el estudio de la UNESCO ya citado, o también a Wen y Shih (2008) en su exploración por encontrar estándares de AI para profesores de la escuela elemental y universitaria taiwanesa, y a la Education and Behavioral Sciences Section (EBSS) (2011), en sus normas acerca de los indicadores de AI para futuros maestros y profesores de los Estados Unidos (Instruction for Educators Committee). Para conseguir nuestro objetivo tomamos finalmente como referencia para los indicadores o componentes de la AI los descritos por Larraz (2012) en su rúbrica de la competencia digital: reconocer la necesidad de información, localizarla, evaluarla, organizarla y transformarla. Por otro lado, analizamos los diversos instrumentos de recogida de datos utilizados en las diferentes investigaciones llevadas a cabo hasta la fecha, bien en un ámbito más general de contemplar la alfabetización digital (Covello, 2010), bien en un ámbito más local de la AI. Y no convencidos con ninguno de ellos, decidimos construir y validar nuestro propio instrumento, un cuestionario para medir el grado de AI del profesorado de Educación Secundaria. En los próximos apartados mostraremos una primera aproximación de los resultados obtenidos en nuestra investigación tras la recogida de datos y las conclusiones que de ellos se derivan. Partimos con la presuposición de que si bien en los indicadores de reconocer la necesidad o localizar la información vamos a obtener resultados considerablemente elevados, no va a ser así en los de evaluar, organizar y transformar la información.

2.1. Población y muestra

La población total de profesorado de Educación Secundaria del estado español según los últimos datos estadísticos desglosados y disponibles del Ministerio de Educación son los del curso escolar 2011-12 y en ellos se constata que el total asciende a 289.027 docentes. Tras haberse enviado invitaciones a la participación en este estudio a todos los centros de Educación Secundaria del país el cuestionario estuvo disponible on-line para su cumplimentación en 2013, obteniéndose 2.656 respuestas válidas. La muestra de 2.656 sujetos cuenta con un intervalo de confianza del 1.9678, un error muestral del 0.019 y una variabilidad del 0.5. Las características de la muestra se detallan en la tabla 1.

2.2. Instrumento

Para la recogida de datos se utilizó un cuestionario de elaboración propia: alfabetización informacional del Profesorado de Secundaria (AIPS2013). Dicho cuestionario lo elaboramos basándonos en los cuestionarios utilizados por Williams y Coles (2003) para medir el uso y las actitudes del profesorado de Secundaria del Reino Unido hacia la AI y el utilizado por el grupo de investigación «Digital Competence Assessment» (DCA) del profesor Calvani para investigar el grado de competencia digital de alumnos de Educación Secundaria. Este último lo consideramos crucial ante el interesante planteamiento que hace con cuestiones de situación o los casos prácticos que utiliza. No en vano, una de las metas que nos propusimos en nuestra investigación era llegar más allá de las autopercepciones del profesorado y tratar de encontrar resultados objetivos del verdadero grado de AI que poseen. El mismo Calvani y otros (2010) reconocen que los indicadores a superar por un alumno de Secundaria para ser competente en AI, debe superarlos todo profesor de Secundaria, y en sus conclusiones, Campbell (2004) afirma que los indicadores de AI son válidos en todas las etapas del desarrollo humano.


Draft Content 926790166-36831 ov-es097.jpg

El cuestionario muestra dos partes bien diferenciadas. En una primera recoge además de las preguntas identificativas y descriptivas de la muestra, una serie de preguntas cerradas de autopercepción (preguntas con escala de tipo Likert), creencias y actitudes frente a los indicadores y al grado de AI que consideran tener los docentes encuestados. Y una segunda formada por preguntas de simulación o casos prácticos donde se pone a prueba al docente para tratar de obtener resultados objetivos sobre los indicadores que nos darán un valor más fiable del grado de AI del docente: 13 preguntas descriptivas y 32 de autopercepción en AI; 10 preguntas de simulación/situación. El cuestionario se puede consultar en la siguiente url: http://goo.gl/57nst4.

Para su validación, dicho cuestionario fue sometido inicialmente a juicio por un comité de 10 expertos, entre los que se encontraba profesorado universitario de Tecnología Educativa de diferentes universidades del país y también profesorado de Educación Secundaria. Tras las revisiones y modificaciones pertinentes, se pasó el cuestionario a una muestra piloto de 50 docentes de Educación Secundaria para comprobar su fiabilidad así como detectar posibles problemas en su comprensión, puesta en marcha y funcionamiento. Obtuvimos en esta primera muestra un coeficiente Alfa de Cronbach de fiabilidad del 0.834 en las preguntas con escala de tipo Likert, lo que atendiendo a las premisas de Bisquerra (1987), valores situados entre 0.8 y 1 se consideran índices de fiabilidad excelentes. Finalmente, con la muestra obtenida, se volvió a obtener un elevado índice de fiabilidad, un Alfa de Cronbach del 0.811, con lo que pudimos afirmar que nuestro cuestionario era altamente fiable. Recogidos los datos, se codificaron y se trataron con el programa estadístico SPSS versión 21.0.

3. Resultados: Autopercepción del grado de alfabetización informacional (AI)

Dada la amplitud de nuestro cuestionario así como el elevado número de respuestas recogidas del mismo, nos centraremos aquí en aquellos resultados que pertenecen a las preguntas autoperceptivas y que hacen referencia a los distintos indicadores de la AI. Dejamos pues la evaluación y análisis de las preguntas prácticas para un próximo estudio. Como podemos comprobar, el profesorado de Secundaria del estado español, tiene una elevada autopercepción de su capacidad a la hora de reconocer la necesidad de información (indicador A). Con un porcentaje promedio del 87,8% y unas medias que en todos los casos son superiores a 4,5; podemos afirmar que el profesorado se siente capaz de buscar información en la Red para su actividad laboral, que la localiza de forma rápida y eficaz y que identifica sin dificultad el objetivo, problema o necesidad objeto de su investigación. De estos tres conceptos, el que mayor valoración recibe y menos disperso en sus respuestas, con una desviación típica del 0,949, es la búsqueda de información en la Red para su actividad laboral que llega a alcanzar el valor máximo de media (5,18), moda (6), y porcentaje (93,8%), incluso como veremos a continuación, de todas las preguntas analizadas para todos los indicadores de AI.

En la tabla 2 mostramos los resultados obtenidos para las preguntas relacionadas con el indicador A: Reconocer la necesidad de información.


Draft Content 926790166-36831 ov-es098.jpg

En el siguiente indicador, B: Localizar la información, cuyos resultados podemos ver en la tabla 3, ya se empiezan a observar algunas variaciones dignas de reseñar. Aunque sigue presentando valores elevados (medias por encima de 4, un porcentaje promedio de 80,2% y medianas y modas de 5), muestra una clara diferencia entre lo que es el contraste de la información con diferentes fuentes y el recurrir a diferentes formatos de fuentes de información, con el citar la procedencia o autoría de la información que se obtiene. Si bien en lo primero se obtienen unas medias muy parecidas y altas (4,71 y 4,79), vemos cómo en el citar la procedencia o autoría de la información el profesorado de Secundaria no se pone de acuerdo y muestra un rango de respuestas ampliamente disperso (con una desviación típica elevada, del 1,519) con un porcentaje excepcionalmente bajo, del 69,5%, frente a lo que se ha obtenido en los otros ítems de estos dos primeros indicadores de la AI.

En el siguiente indicador, C: Evaluar la información, cuyos resultados se muestran en la tabla 4, encontramos unas circunstancias singulares. Si bien el porcentaje promedio de las respuestas dadas ha bajado ya considerablemente, con un 64,3%, también observamos cómo encontramos las respuestas más dispersas a una pregunta y las menos dispersas a otra en un mismo indicador. Efectivamente, el profesorado de Secundaria se muestra muy disperso en sus respuestas a si se considera capaz de discriminar o no entre el correo electrónico entrante importante y el que no lo es (con una de las desviaciones típicas más elevadas de todo el cuestionario, 1,760, una mediana de 4 y una moda de 1). Por otro lado, el profesorado de Secundaria del estado español considera que tiene bastante claro el saber identificar la información relevante de la que no lo es, con uno de los porcentajes más elevados de los obtenidos, un 89,3% y una desviación típica que es la más baja de las obtenidas en todo el cuestionario: 0,941. Además, no consigue ponerse de acuerdo en si dar mayor fiabilidad y veracidad a los recursos digitales o a los analógicos. El profesorado se muestra dividido ante este planteamiento, un poco más de la mitad, un 52,4% se muestra más a favor de la información digital, frente a la otra mitad que prefiere los recursos analógicos.


Draft Content 926790166-36831 ov-es099.jpg

En el siguiente indicador, D: Organizar la información, encontramos los resultados de autopercepción más bajos de todos, tal y como se puede apreciar en la tabla 5 de la página siguiente.

Aunque con un rango de dispersión entre sus respuestas elevado, con desviaciones típicas de 1,839 y 1,476, en las dos preguntas que nos certifican el indicador de saber organizar la información, encontramos los porcentajes (49,0% y 14,75%) y las medias (3,50 y 2,31) más bajas de todo el cuestionario. Menos de la mitad del profesorado utiliza algún sistema de clasificación y gestión del correo electrónico, y son muy pocos los que conocen y utilizan algún lector o agregador de contenidos.


Draft Content 926790166-36831 ov-es100.jpg

Por último, en el indicador E: Transformar la información, las respuestas obtenidas nos muestran que solo un 74% del profesorado de Secundaria es capaz de transformar esa información en contenido propio, creado a partir de lo aprendido en sus búsquedas de información por la Red tal y como podemos observar en la tabla 6.

Tras las diferentes preguntas asociadas a los cinco indicadores de la AI, quisimos recoger en una pregunta final de autopercepción, una valoración global del grado de AI autopercibido por el profesorado de Educación Secundaria del estado español tras haberles mostrado en el cuestionario una definición de lo que entendemos por AI. Los resultados obtenidos en dicha pregunta se muestran en la tabla 7.En sus respuestas a esta pregunta global encontramos cierta tendencia hacia los valores centrales, resultando una media de 3,70 y un porcentaje del 59,6%, ligeramente inferior a lo que cabría esperar tras haber ido observando los resultados obtenidos para cada uno de los indicadores. Tal y como podemos observar en la Tabla 8 el grado de AI autopercibido obtenido del promedio de todos los indicadores, 67,6%, disminuye ocho puntos respecto al grado de AI autopercibido y estimado en la pregunta global.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Los resultados nos dejan constancia de que el profesorado de Educación Secundaria del estado español considera tener un buen grado de alfabetización informacional autopercibida. Bien como resultado del promedio de los indicadores que hemos utilizado para definir la AI, con un porcentaje del 67,6%, bien como resultado de que tras una definición mostrasen su autopercepción de la misma, con un 59,6%. A raíz de estos resultados, comprobamos que el nivel de AI del profesorado de Secundaria del estado español es bueno, hay indicadores de la misma que destacan más que otros. Las desviaciones típicas obtenidas en las diferentes preguntas que marcan los diferentes indicadores de la AI son bastante homogéneas entre sí, lo que nos confirma que no hay dispersión entre las respuestas obtenidas, reafirmando la validez de las mismas.


Draft Content 926790166-36831 ov-es101.jpg

Un análisis más detallado de los indicadores que conforman la AI nos muestra que si bien los indicadores A: Reconocer la necesidad de información y B: Localizar la información, obtienen una autopercepción por parte del profesorado elevada, con porcentajes del 87,8% y 80,2% respectivamente, no ocurre así con los otros tres indicadores. Los indicadores E: Transformar la información y C: Evaluar la información, obtienen porcentajes admisibles del 74% y 64,3% respectivamente, pero no ocurre lo mismo con el indicador D: Organizar la información donde se obtiene un preocupante 31,8% y no se consigue el 50% en ninguna de las dos preguntas que nos marcan este indicador, con valores del 49% y 14,7% respectivamente.

El profesorado de Secundaria reconoce la necesidad de buscar información en la Red para su actividad laboral (93,8%), la localiza de forma rápida y eficaz (83,8%) e incluso identifica el objetivo problema o necesidad de forma precisa (85,9%).

También domina la localización de la información, la contrasta con diferentes fuentes (83,9%) o incluso recurre a diferentes formatos de la misma (87,1%). Sin embargo, al docente le cuesta bastante citar la procedencia o autoría de la información que utiliza, solo lo hace un 69,5%, un porcentaje muy bajo si tenemos en cuenta la importancia de dicho cometido.

En la evaluación de la información, el docente de Secundaria presenta importantes deficiencias. Si bien identifica bastante bien (89%) la información relevante de la que no lo es, tiene dificultades muy graves para discriminar en su correo electrónico entrante lo verdaderamente importante de lo que no lo es (51,3%) así como sustanciales dudas a la hora de dar fiabilidad y veracidad a la información que obtiene por la Red frente a la que puede obtener por recursos analógicos (solo un 52,4% lo hace).


Draft Content 926790166-36831 ov-es102.jpg

Sin duda, el mayor problema que reconoce el docente en su percepción del grado de AI radica en saber organizar la información. Solo un 49% utiliza algún sistema de clasificación y gestión de su correo electrónico y lo que aún es más preocupante, tan solo un 14,7% conoce y utiliza algún lector/agregador/indexador de contenidos. El docente de Educación Secundaria reconoce de esta manera que es un mal gestor de la información, que sí sabe qué necesitaba y localiza, pero que no sabe organizar y clasificar.

Por último, resaltar que resulta preocupante ver cómo sigue habiendo un 26% del profesorado que reconoce como práctica habitual el realizar un uso de la información que obtiene de la Red sin una transformación y sin indicar la autoría de la misma, máxime cuando los porcentajes que se obtienen de saber localizar e identificar el objetivo de su búsqueda de información se encuentran en valores del 83,8% y el 85,9% como ya hemos comentado. La calidad de la información transformada y a su vez comunicada se ve mermada considerablemente a raíz de este resultado.

Llegamos a la conclusión de que el docente de Educación Secundaria es menos competente de lo que cabría esperar en producir y comunicar información y ello, junto con las otras deficiencias observadas en las dificultades que presentan también los docentes a la hora de evaluar y organizar la información, nos lleva a sugerir la necesidad de formación en saber producir información y difundirla como ya adelantaban en su análisis sobre la alfabetización informacional y digital Area y Guarro (2012), y en una mejora de la evaluación y gestión de la información. Es evidente que en nuestros días constatamos que hay una mayor formación en competencia digital de los docentes, incluso se comprueba en estos un mayor interés por esta (Pérez & Delgado, 2012), pero muchas veces esta formación no es de calidad ni consigue llegar a todos los docentes interesados en ella, de ahí que estemos ante un importante reto por el bien del aprendizaje y el conocimiento de unos y otros. En otros países, incluso con menores deficiencias entre el profesorado en cuanto a su grado de AI, se están llevando a cabo planes de mejora y formación en este sentido, dándole la importancia que requiere a la AI. Casos como los de Sudáfrica (Fourie & Krauss, 2010) donde se implica no solo a los centros educativos sino a toda una ciudad convirtiéndose así en un plan de formación social, el del Reino Unido derivado del estudio realizado y ya aquí mencionado (Williams & Coles, 2003) para detectar las deficiencias del profesorado en AI, o el de algunos estados de los Estados Unidos donde incluso llegan a tener un mes al año monográfico en la formación y fomento de la AI tanto entre profesores como alumnos, deberían de servir para que en nuestro país se tomaran medidas formativas de calidad. Unas medidas que permitiesen mejorar el grado de AI del profesorado de Educación Secundaria para de esta forma repercutir positivamente en el de sus alumnos, presentes en una etapa educativa de vital importancia para el desarrollo de su aprendizaje y conocimiento. Máxime cuando coincide con lo que desde hace años se ha constatado en los diferentes programas de informática educativa de las diferentes comunidades autónomas de España (Martín-Hernández, 2010) y que de nuevo surge en la actual propuesta del Ministerio de Educación (INTEF, 2014).

Como conclusión final y a la vista de los resultados y el análisis que hemos realizado de los mismos, se hace necesario alertar a las autoridades competentes en materia educativa de este país de una necesaria acción formativa sobre el profesorado de Educación Secundaria acerca de su AI, incidiendo sobre todo en aquellos indicadores y aspectos concretos en los que hemos hecho mención en esta investigación y que fundamentalmente inciden sobre la evaluación, organización y gestión y en la transformación de la información.


Draft Content 926790166-36831 ov-es103.jpg


Draft Content 926790166-36831 ov-es104.jpg

Referencias

Area, M., & Guarro, A. (2012). La alfabetización informacional y digital: fundamentos pedagógicos para la enseñanza y el aprendizaje competente. Revista Española de Documentación Científica, 46, 74. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3989/redc.2012.mono.977

Aznar, I., Fernández, F., & Hinojo, F.J. (2003). Formación docente y TIC: elaboración de un instrumento de evaluación de actitudes profesionales. Etic@net, 2, 1-9.

Bisquerra, R. (1987). Introducción a la estadística aplicada a la investigación educativa: un enfoque informático con los paquetes BMDP y SPSSX. Barcelona: Promociones y Publicaciones Universitarias, PPU.

Cabero, J., Duarte, A., & Barroso, J. (1999). La formación y el perfeccionamiento del profesorado en nuevas tecnologías: retos hacia el futuro. In J. Ferrés, & P. Marquès (Eds.), Comunicación educativa y nuevas tecnologías. (pp. 21-32). Barcelona: Praxis.

Calvani, A., Fini, A., & Ranieri, M. (2010). Digital Competence in K-12. Theoretical Models, Assessment Tools and Empirical Research. Anàlisi, 40, 157-171.

Campbell, S. (2004). Defining Information Literacy in the 21st Century. World Library and Information Congress: 70th IFLA General Conference and Council, 22-27 August. Buenos Aires. (http://goo.gl/uTmleh) (12-06-2014).

Catts, R., & Lau, J. (2008). Towards Information Literacy Indicators. Paris: UNESCO.

Covello, S. (2010). A Review of Digital Literacy Assessment Instruments. IDE-712 Front-end Analysis Research: Analysis for Human Performance Technology Decisions. Syracuse University, School of Education. (http://goo.gl/L4qzHW) (12-06-2014).

EBSS Instruction for Educators Committee (2011). Information Literacy Standards for Teacher Education. College & Research Libraries News, 72(7), 420-436. (http://goo.gl/aN4YQk) (12-06-2014).

Egaña, T., Bidegain, E., & Zuberogoitia, A. (2013). ¿Cómo buscan información académica en Internet los estudiantes universitarios? Lo que dicen los estudiantes y sus profesores. Edutec, 43. (http://goo.gl/xhxzH9) (12-06-2014).

Enlaces–Ministerio de Educación de Chile (2011). Competencias y estándares TIC para la profesión docente. (http://goo.gl/hwZmh4).

Espuny, C., Gisbert, M., & Coiduras, J. (2010). La dinamización de las TIC en las escuelas. Edutec, 32. (http://goo.gl/vgfgEK) (12-06-2014).

Fernández, R. (2003). Competencias profesionales del docente en la sociedad del siglo XXI. OGE, 11(1), 4-8.

Fourie, I., & Krauss, K. (2010). Information Literacy Training for Teachers in a Developing South African Context: Suggestions for a Multi-disciplinary Planning Approach. Innovation, 41, 107-122.

Gisbert, M. (2002). El nuevo rol del profesor en entornos tecnológicos. Acción Pedagógica, 11(1), 48-59.

INTEF (2014). Marco Común de Competencia Digital Docente. V. 2.0. (http://goo.gl/xr4BN4) (12-06-2014).

ISTE (2008). ISTE Standards for Teachers Resources (NETS·T). (http://goo.gl/8F5Eu0).

Larraz, V. (2012). La competència digital a la Universitat. (Tesis doctoral). Universitat d’Andorra.

Martín-Hernández, S. (2010). Escuela 2.0: Estado de la cuestión. Scopeo Extraordinario, Escuela 2.0. (http://goo.gl/kDzv6l) (12-06-2014).

MEN (2013). Competencias TIC para el desarrollo profesional docente. (http://goo.gl/xhMj6w) (12-06-2014).

Merchant, L., & Hepworth, M. (2002). Information Literacy of Teachers and Pupils in Secondary Schools. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, 34(2), 81-89. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/096100060203400203

Peinado, S., Bolívar, J.M., & Briceño, L.A. (2011). Actitud hacia el uso de la computadora en docentes de Educación Secundaria. Revista Universitaria Arbitrada de Investigación y Diálogo Académico, 7(1), 86-105.

Pérez, M.A., & Delgado, A. (2012). De la competencia digital y audiovisual a la competencia mediática: dimensiones e indicadores. Comunicar, 39, 25-34. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C39-2012-02-02

Ramírez, E., Cañedo, I., & Clemente, M. (2012). Las actitudes y creencias de los profesores de Secundaria sobre el uso de Internet en sus clases. Comunicar, 38, 147-155. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C38-2012-03-06

Rodríguez, M.J., Olmos, S. & Martínez, F. (2012). Propiedades métricas y estructura dimensional de la adaptación española de una escala de evaluación de competencia informacional autopercibida (IL-HUMASS). Revista de Investigación Educativa, 30(2), 347-365. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.6018/rie.30.2.120231

Roig, R., & Pascual, A.M. (2012). Las competencias digitales de los futuros docentes. Un análisis con estudiantes de Magisterio de Educación Infantil de la Universidad de Alicante. @tic, 53-60. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7203/attic.9.1958

Ruiz, I., Rubia, B., Anguita, R., & Fernández, E. (2010). Formar al profesorado inicialmente en habilidades y competencias en TIC: perfiles de una experiencia colaborativa. Revista de Educación, 352, 149-178.

Sarramona, J. (2007). Las competencias profesionales del profesorado de Secundaria. Estudios sobre Educación, 12, 31-40.

Smith, J.K. (2013). Secondary teachers and information literacy (IL): Teacher Understanding and Perceptions of IL in the Classroom. Library & Information Science Research, 35, 216-222. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lisr.2013.03.003

Suárez-Rodríguez, J.M., Almerich, G., Gargallo, B., & Aliaga, F.M. (2013). Las competencias del profesorado en TIC: estructura básica. Educación XX1, 16(1), 39-62. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5944/educXX1.16.1.716

Tejada, J. (1999). El formador ante las TIC: nuevos roles y competencias profesionales. Comunicación y Pedagogía, 158, 17-26.

Tejedor, F.J., & García-Valcárcel, A. (2006). Competencias de los profesores para el uso de las TIC en la enseñanza: análisis de conocimientos y actitudes. Revista Española de Pedagogía, 233, 21-43.

UNESCO (2008). Estándares de competencia en TIC para docentes. Paris: UNESCO. (http://goo.gl/aAQ5GJ) (12-06-2014).

UNESCO (2013). Overview of Information Literacy Resources Worldwide. Paris: UNESCO.

Vivancos, J. (2008). Tratamiento de la información y competencia digital. Madrid: Alianza.

Wen, J.R., & Shih, W.L. (2008). Exploring the Information Literacy Competence Standars for Elementary and High School Teachers. Computers & Education, 50, 787-806. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2006.08.011

Williams, A., & Wavell, C. (2007). Secondary School Teachers’ Conceptions of Student Information literacy. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, 39(4), 199-212. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0961000607083211

Williams, D., & Coles, L. (2003). The Use of Research by Teachers: Information Literacy, Acces and Attitudes. Final Report on a Study funded by the ESRC. The Robert Gordon University, Scotland. (http://goo.gl/BBvrGl) (12-06-2014).

Wilson, C. (2012). Media and Information Literacy: Pedagogy and Possibilities. Comunicar, 39, 15-22. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C39-2012-02-01

Wilson, C., Grizzle, A., & al. (2011). Alfabetización mediática e informacional: Currículum para profesores. Paris: UNESCO.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/06/15
Accepted on 30/06/15
Submitted on 30/06/15

Volume 23, Issue 2, 2015
DOI: 10.3916/C45-2015-20
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 7
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?