Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Download the PDF version

Resumen

The discipline Structural Considerations of Information explores the interests underlying communicational dynamics and information strategies, as well as the ways in which they correlate with messages. Considering this knowledge to be key in Communication Education, and having confirmed its close relationship with the dimensions of media competence, its presence is analyzed in the Media and Information Literacy (MIL) curriculum for teachers, whose training is crucial for the success of the process, developed by UNESCO, an organization that is a global referent in the field. A semantic content analysis reveals, from a quantitative perspective, a strong presence of thematic areas covered by the Structural Considerations of Information subject within the competencies and contents of the curriculum. However, at a qualitative level, there are fundamental weaknesses in its relationship with the structural approach to information. This occurs when the critical spirit of the text declines, starting with a definition of the media as sources of reliable information. The ubiquity of disinformation, and the key role played by stakeholders’ knowledge, as well as the development of critical thinking to address it requires an update of this curriculum–the present review contributes to this development– highlighting the current necessity to address it from a structural vantage that fosters critical citizenship and a democratic process.

Resumen

La disciplina Estructura de la Información estudia los intereses que subyacen a la dinámica comunicacional y a las estrategias de información, y su correlación con los mensajes. Considerando clave este conocimiento para la Educación en Comunicación, y una vez confirmada su estrecha relación con las dimensiones de la competencia mediática, se analiza su presencia en el currículo de Alfabetización Mediática e Informacional (AMI) del profesorado, cuya formación es crucial para el éxito del proceso elaborado por la UNESCO, órgano de referencia mundial en el área. El análisis de contenido semántico desvela, desde un punto de vista cuantitativo, la fuerte presencia de las áreas temáticas de la Estructura de la Información en las competencias y contenidos del currículo. No obstante, aplicado cualitativamente, se detectan debilidades de fondo en la relación con el enfoque estructural de la información. Ocurre cuando decae el declarado espíritu crítico del texto, empezando por definir a los medios como fuentes de información fiable. La ubicuidad de la desinformación y el papel crucial del conocimiento de los agentes envueltos en la misma y del desarrollo del pensamiento crítico para afrontarla, obliga a la actualización de este currículo –a cuyo desarrollo se contribuye con esta revisión–, haciendo, además, más necesario que nunca el afrontarla desde un enfoque estructural que favorezca una ciudadanía crítica y el proceso democrático.

Keywords

Media literacy, critical thinking, structural considerations of information, media competence, teacher training, media systems, media production, disinformation

Palabras clave

Alfabetización mediática, pensamiento crítico, estructura de la información, competencia mediática, formación del profesorado, sistema de medios, producción mediática, desinformación

Introduction and state of the art

The present study arises from the consideration of the key role that the knowledge of Structural Considerations of Information, that is, the “web of interests of all kinds that lie beneath journalism [...] and the correlation with its messages” (Reig, 2017: 25), has for Education in Communication. A network that Masterman (1993) qualifies as determining factors of media documents, among which are ownership and control of the media, media institutions, the state and the law, economic determinants, advertisers and audiences. Buckingham (2005) points to production, language, representation and audience as key concepts in media literacy, the same as those adopted by UNESCO (Frau-Meigs, 2006). Production implies recognizing the economic interests at stake, profit-making processes, the globalization of media industries and the balance between global and local media (Buckingham, 2005) and, rather than grasping the details of ownership, understanding “global models of media ownership and control while recognizing other important sources of power and influence” (Masterman, 1993: 87).

The purpose of this approach is to find out the importance of learning the Structural Considerations of Information (from here referred to as SI) within UNESCO's Media and Information Literacy (MIL) Curriculum for teachers, as an international reference organization in the development of this curriculum and in teacher training, supporting it in “the design, implementation and evaluation of Media and Information Literacy programs for secondary school students” (Wilson, 2012: 17). Teacher training has been addressed through the analysis of university curricula (Masanet & Ferrés, 2013; Ferrés & Masanet, 2015; López & Aguaded, 2015) and the media skills of non-university teachers (González-Fernández, Gozálvez-Pérez, & Ramírez-García, 2015; Tiede, Grafe, & Hobbs, 2015) as well as those of university professors (Pérez-Escoda, García-Ruiz, & Aguaded, 2018), and in many of these cases the development of assessment tools and the proposal of specific actions. It has received extensive attention grounded in the crucial role that teacher training plays in the media literacy process (Osuna-Acedo, Frau-Meigs, & Marta-Lazo, 2018).

This document, which arrived shortly after the European Parliament’s proposal (12/2008) for the creation of the course “Media Education,” is conceived as a flexible curriculum and, since its publication, many countries have developed their own adaptations (Perez-Tornero & Tayie, 2012), coexisting with a multiple and diverse environment of media literacy policies, supporting models and effective situations (Pérez-Tornero, Paredes, Baena, Giraldo, Tejedor, & Fernández, 2010; Tulodziecki & Grafe, 2012; Frau-Meigs, Flores, & Vélez, 2014; Flores, Frau-Meigs, & Vélez, 2015; Wallis & Buckingham, 2016; De-Pablos-Pons & Ballesta-Pagán, 2018). UNESCO's proposal contemplates its revision by educators, “in a collective process to shape and enrich the curriculum as a living document” (Wilson, Grizzle, Tuazon, Akyempong, & Cheung, 2011: 19), a task in which this study is framed, revising it in order to contribute to its development.

Definition and content scope for Structural Considerations of Information

Structure refers to the “disposition or way in which different parts of a set are related” (Real Academia Española, 2014). From this it can be deduced, firstly, that by Structure we are referring to the form that this set takes. In second place, to the relations between the parts, establishing a position for them and assigning them a function (Rangel-Contla, 1975). Finally, the existence of an aggregate of several elements; therefore, when referring to Structure we are simultaneously including the elements that comprise it and the totality. All this taking into account the existence of supra-structures, namely, structuring elements, relations, and superior sets that are above the structure itself.

In this context, Structure is paired with the term information and not with communication because information –understood as a strategy for conveying messages from ancestral-mercantile transmitters, once the receivers have been studied (Benito, 1973)– takes precedence over communication –which includes this strategy and the reaction of receivers– despite the fact that it might seem otherwise. Although nowadays receivers are simultaneously transmitters that influence and interact with the media, their participation is based on established guidelines (Mancinas-Chávez, 2016). In addition, when the digital media are independent from the major corporate groups and the commercial and financial world (Almirón & Segovia, 2012; Almirón, 2009), we cannot ignore the fact that the Web itself belongs to large corporations and that these media have not been consolidated nor are they profitable, that is to say: they are neither totally outside the Structure, nor are they instituted as a force that substantially modifies the structural order.

On the other hand, since information is a structuring factor (Sánchez-Bravo, 1992), it acts by articulating the parts of the whole to preserve what is established, prioritizing economic benefit and the survival of the structure itself over the human right to information. In short, when we refer to SI we are referring both to the grouping of the media in structures called media groups or conglomerates, as well as to the relations that connect them to other structures and superstructures.

Behind communication messages there is a comprehensive information strategy that pursues both the logic of commercial gain and, in many cases, its influence on present and future behavior.

The ubiquity of disinformation, the need for critical thinking to address it, and the pivotal role of understanding the agents involved, require an update to UNESCO’s MIL curriculum for teachers. It is necessary to seek cohesion between the critical nature stated in writing, in order to reinforce the structural approach.

Macro-commercial activity may exceed its legitimate and necessary functions, in such a way that they may violate legal norms such as laws for the protection of female imagery and dignity or the right to accurate information and basic knowledge to strengthen the involvement of media education in the democratic process and social development (Pfaff-Rüdiger & Riesmeyer, 2016).

It is essential to approach information from a structural stance (Reig, Mancinas-Chávez, & Nogales-Bocio, 2017) and, as far as media education is concerned, the focus should go beyond the details of media ownership towards how this ownership affects their products. This need, now more than ever, is reaffirmed in the face of the omnipresence of disinformation, which threatens society and democracy and whose dependence on post-Internet technologies “has modified the very nature of collective interpersonal communication” (Del-Fresno-García, 2019: 2). The analysis of the originating agents of disinformation, and others involved –the one who creates the message may be different from the one who produces it and the one who distributes it (Wardle & Derakhshan, 2017)–as well as their implicit or explicit connection, is a fundamental aspect for a complete study of online disinformation (Alaphilippe, Gizikis, Hanot, & Bontcheva, 2019).

SI studies the underlying factors of communicational dynamics and those behind information strategies, leading to an inquiry into the types of institutions and people who dominate media ownership and to an analysis of the content they project. It is what Bourdieu (1997) already called invisible structure of power, which offers explicit messages (conveyed through news, series, etc.), and whose emitters are scarcely known.

The studies and lines of work of the current SI (Birkinbine, Gómez, & Wasko, 2017; Reig & Labio, 2017; García-Santamaría, 2016; Martínez-Vallvey & Núñez-Fernández, 2016), have focused mainly on the alliance and merger processes of corporate communication, telecommunications and technology companies, with a common purpose: developing entertainment spaces to unimaginable levels in order to enable receivers to generate their own means of information, distraction or escape through digital tools of their choice. The visualization of this whole relational dynamic between media and corporate power, as well as the messages, is a central point of the rationale behind SI, which seeks to train critical citizens.

Preliminary approach to UNESCO's MIL curriculum for teachers

The document “Media and Information Literacy: Curriculum for teachers” (Wilson & al., 2011) includes the conceptual framework and pedagogical guidelines proposed by UNESCO for their training. It highlights the fundamental role of having a critical understanding of the communicative phenomenon, so that citizens can exercise their fundamental freedoms and rights, thanks to MIL processes in all phases of education and life, becoming key among teachers.

The curriculum is based on three main areas concerning media : knowledge and understanding for social participation, the evaluation of texts presents in the media, as well as their production and use. Many of the subjects that cover them, fundamentally the first two, have a direct relationship with media ownership, market rationale and power, which illustrates, beforehand, the presence of SI in UNESCO's theoretical approach to MIL content and the attempt to foster a critical understanding of communication.

Structural Considerations of Information and the critical nature of Media Education

UNESCO's active commitment to the promotion of media education dates back to the early 1960s. As early as 1969, it states that “schools must assist students in acquiring a critical attitude towards the media” (Aguaded, 2001: 122). This spirit characterizes the UNESCO-sponsored MIL international conferences. Much of the reference literature considers critical thinking as an underlying element of media literacy, both to confront it and to provoke it (Pérez-Tornero, 2000a; González-Yuste, 2000; Aguaded, 2001; Frau-Meigs, 2006), to the point that it is “a form of critical literacy” (Buckingham, 2005: 73). The MIL curriculum also pursues critical thinking, as a general framework, understood as “the ability to examine and analyze information and ideas in order to understand and evaluate their values and assumptions, rather than simply accepting proposals at their nominal value” (Wilson & al., 2011: 194).

The spread of misinformation and fake news poses a severe challenge to education systems, with the development of critical thinking and analytical skills as the keys to successful educational intervention and numerous initiatives in Europe addressing this education (McDougall, Zezulkova, Van-Driel, & Sternadel, 2018). Likewise, a response to digital competence focused on critical skills and digital citizenship is underway (Redecker, 2017), enabling “the interaction with culture on the web, as well as its recreation in a critical and emancipatory way” (Area, Borrás, & San-Nicolas, 2015: 31).

The main objective of critical pedagogy, which is the approach to media education, is to learn how institutions and audiences “construct meanings” (Fecé, 2000: 136). Some authors advocate against the adoption of the term because it presupposes the existence of a correct and a confused perception, although they understand that it is necessary to adopt a social theory of literacy, which “means enabling learners to understand these contexts, and to recognize how they are shaped and how their own responses are produced” (Buckingham, 2005: 192). Critical training begins with a model of critical school and active teaching trends, and it is also grounded in reception research (Aguaded, 1999). It enables transcending a simplistic approach that only looks at the message and leaves aside the receiver and how he/she conditions the process, since, although the text reproduces mostly the dominant ideology, it is necessary to take into account the dialectics with the public (Fecé, 2000). This is particularly the case when the user is faced with a wide range of possibilities for choosing and managing self-consumption, at least apparently, since the path leads both “towards personalization and interactivity, and towards the hegemony of a few” (Pérez-Tornero, 2000b: 27) in a concentrating and globalizing process that has never been experienced before.

From SI the focus is placed on how institutions build or can build meanings. This is the most problematic aspect given that openly approaching it raises the silence of the media and ideological critics, although the structural approach itself is situated in critical thinking, which does not necessarily have to be Marxist or left-wing and is critical not only with the market and the capitalist system but also with “classical” critical thinking itself and its socio-economic and political alternatives (Reig, 2011).

Material and methods

The material used as primary source and object of study was UNESCO’s MIL Curriculum for teachers (Wilson et al., 2011), which includes information providers such as libraries or archives. This required limiting the text to the media and their products. The method used was semantic field content analysis, both quantitative and qualitative. Specific free software was used, incorporating the “Keyword in context” (KWIC)technique, applying filter stop words, lemmatization, groupings and concordances. Given that the terms included are common when dealing with media, journalism or information from a variety of approaches, part of the process involved verifying whether their presence in the text was related to the structural approach. Once each term was detected, it was analyzed within the sentence, as the first unit of context. Since the number of terms per field varies, we assessed the frequencies of occurrence and applied probability calculations to detect representativeness. A unit of external context was also used: UNESCO, as the source of the text, and its historical positioning, fundamentally the one emanating from the 1989 Paris General Conference, which closes the schism and debate that emerged in the 1970s around the “MacBride Report” and the New World Information and Communication Order (Quirós & Sierra, 2016).

The work was organized in two successive phases. During Phase 1, a preliminarily content analysis was conducted, with the aim of finding the links between SI and Media Education, to the dimensions of media competence established by Ferrés and Piscitelli (2012), promoters of “a line of research to improve media education for citizens” (Pérez-Escoda, García-Ruiz, & Aguaded, 2018: 3), and providing a methodological basis for numerous referential studies in the area. Likewise, MIL competencies specified in the curriculum were examined to identify a first relationship with SI and to delimit the units of analysis within the document. During Phase 2, it was applied to the content within the previously delimited modules and units of the curriculum.

Setting indicators for content analysis

The semantic fields were conceived considering the contents and approaches of the SI in Spanish public universities. The review of the curricula for Journalism Degree programs from all public departments of Information Sciences/Communication –where this discipline is taught under various designations– made it possible to locate the subjects and analyze their teaching guides, achieving a definition of SI as an academic subject. This implies the study of media systems, from the point of view of ownership, organization and operations (mainly the dynamics influenced by the economy, politics and technology), and the consequences of their existence, addressing the various theories underlying their study and, largely, following a critical approach and through a contextual analysis.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/36b7c435-633e-4d0c-be88-9c098f326f6a/image/3a80648b-9aea-429b-a711-b33900370ee1-ueng-09-01.png


The examination of the descriptors for these areas and the review of texts for some fields (Gozálvez, 2013; Ferrés, Masanet, & Marta-Lazo, 2013), together with the reflection and teaching experience in SI, has led to the development of a repertoire of terms distributed in semantic fields by areas of study within SI (Figure 1), without repetition, making reasoned decisions when they could be in more than one location. The terms under “Relationship with Economics, Politics and Technology” are presented together by specifying, in many cases, their classification into dimensions of reiteration. With “Liberal Approach”, we simplify the Economy of Communication, and with “Critical Approach”, we simplify the Political Economy of Communication.

Content analysis application to media competence indicators

The semantic content analysis for the six dimensions of media competence indicators (Ferrés & Piscitelli, 2012) confirmed the close connection between SI and Media Education (Figure 2). Except for “Languages" and "Aesthetics”, the other dimensions, as a whole, are linked to all the fields of SI areas through 29 unique terms with a joint frequency of 44, especially with those in “Consequences” (12 terms and the highest representativeness after the probability study) and “Relationship with Economics, Politics and Technology”. The closest relationship exists with the “Ideology and Values” dimension (92% of its indicators are related to the structural approach), in which references to the “Consequences” field prevail (10 terms and the highest representativeness), followed by those assigned to the “Critical Positioning” field.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/36b7c435-633e-4d0c-be88-9c098f326f6a/image/31fb5306-a24b-4d0b-8847-f500d60b807c-ueng-09-02.png


Content analysis applied to MIL competencies in the curriculum and definition of units of analysis

The curriculum under study proposes seven competencies that should be acquired through training and relates them to the modules and units in which content is structured. A connection is established with SI (Figure 3) through the skills and abilities of five of its competences (except C3 and C5) and, specifically, with the field “Consequences” (19 terms). The competencies most directly related to the structural approach are present in all modules except one (M6) out of the 11 that comprise the curriculum.

Analysis and results

The content analysis of the MIL curriculum reveals a link with SI (Figure 4) through 62 unique terms (T), which appear 568 times (frequency, F). The majority come from the field “Consequences” (27 terms, frequency 264 and the highest representativeness) and “Relationship with Economy, Politics, and Technology”. It should be noted that the number of terms appearing and the frequencies of “Liberal Approach” and “Critical Approach” have been practically identical, although, after the study of probabilities, the former is more representative. Of all the modules (M) of content analyzed, in three of them (M4, M8 and M9) there is no single term related to the structural approach. The rest offer a non-uniform link, weaker in the case of modules M7 and M10 and stronger in the case of modules M1 and M11. The cross-reference of terms and frequencies by modules with MIL (C) competencies that they seek to develop yields C1 and C6 as fundamentally related to SI.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/36b7c435-633e-4d0c-be88-9c098f326f6a/image/6aabd080-65b2-4cb5-aef4-97f6ce76cb1c-ueng-09-03.png


In order to correctly assess the link between the curriculum under study and the structural approach, it is necessary to consider its definition of the media as a source of reliable and up-to-date information, created through an editorial process guided by journalistic values, which can be attributed to a specific organization. The final glossary replaces the adjective reliable with credible.

The document lists truth, independence or accountability as key factors in journalistic practice –a window to the world. It specifies that, according to some critics –exact quotation– such freedom and independence for journalists is influenced by the financial and political motivations of both employees and media owners. And editorial independence is explained as the professional freedom of publishers to make their editorial decisions without any interference from media owners or any other actor.

It attributes an oversight function to the media with regard to the government and the power of any significant public or private entity. It considers that, although the media have great power over society and can direct and challenge it, they also reflect it, since the stories and representations they provide are what society demands and accepts. It understands that, if the state regulates the media, it interferes with the independence of journalists, and advocates for their self-determination from state or government control, as a guarantee for effective freedom of expression and the exchange of information and ideas. The effects of media consolidation are linked to pluralism, which is defined by the existence of media diversity in relation to media ownership and support. It relates the pressure of advertising to the possible silencing of issues and the use of entertainment to attract audiences that, at the same time, are presented as active. It addresses the challenges and risks posed by the virtual world to young people by relegating the knowledge of who the owners are. It highlights the increased access to information and knowledge afforded by the new digital and electronic media, as well as the greater possibilities for freedom of expression and good governance which favor democratic participation.

With regard to globalization, it is worth noting its potential for bringing development issues with a global impact to public awareness and debate, and its positive impact on policy by increasing the flow of information within and beyond national borders and platforms for public discourse.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/36b7c435-633e-4d0c-be88-9c098f326f6a/image/9150d3cb-d110-4807-bad3-0ef41f7cedec-ueng-09-04.png


From the first content module, in which the key MIL themes and concepts are presented, it is stated as essential to know the media market, its ownership and control, since it defines contents and processes. The last module, catalogued as optional, is dedicated almost completely to the market and the media industry: knowledge of ownership, analysis of the socio-cultural and political dimensions of globalized media and the emergence of alternative media.

Discussion and conclusions

Having established the close connection of SI with education in communication through the dimensions of media competence (Ferrés & Piscitelli, 2012), it is worth noting its interrelation with the “Ideology and values” dimension, a result that is emphasized by corroborating that teachers of Education and Communication in Spanish universities consider this dimension to be “one of the most relevant to approach media education teaching” (López & Aguaded, 2015: 193). The relationship of SI with MIL competencies in UNESCO's curriculum for teachers is determined fundamentally through those that include an understanding of the roles that the media and information have in democracy, the analysis of the socio-cultural context of content and its critical evaluation. In all cases, the strongest connection is through the field of SI that we have called “Consequences”, with terms coming from the context of the rights to freedom of expression and information. The content analysis also confirms, from a quantitative standpoint, that many of the key themes addressed by the MIL curriculum for teachers are related to those of the SI. Moreover, through a qualitative analysis, a series of fundamental weaknesses in this connection are detected. The rupture with the structural approach occurs mainly when the curriculum loses its stated critical spirit, contradicting itself, the result of certain tensions in a struggle for the politically correct, in many cases only understandable in light of historical processes (Quirós & Sierra, 2016). It contradicts the conceptualization of the media, asserting that one can trust what they say and, at the same time, address them in a critical way, a key to educational success in the current context, where skills for ascertaining the credibility of information are crucial (Kahne & Bowyer, 2017). The same happens when mentioning the existence of editorial processes–implying the selection and production of contents– but which, when assumed to be determined by journalistic values, are relieved from any interest outside journalism. Similarly, it decays when journalistic activity is portrayed as a window to the world and its functions are explained: the idea of the media as the fourth power is still an idealization, ignoring the fact that the major media are themselves immense corporations.

Another point under review is UNESCO's emphasis on the key factors of journalistic practice, such as the organization of knowledge, truth or independence, in relation to the journalist rather than the businessperson. Other divergences are found in the conceptualization of pluralism that is skewed towards the market, without questioning the fact that multiple media and even numerous owners do not necessarily imply a diversity of voices. Added to this index of weaknesses is its stance on globalization–although the UN has already lowered the level of optimism (Puddephatt, 2016; UN, 2017)–including technology and new media, by not stressing the crucial role of understanding Internet ownership. In fact, the study module entitled “Opportunities and Challenges on the Internet” is the one that, of those related to SI, has the weakest link to it. In the MIL curriculum, an awareness of media ownership, basic to all other aspects of SI, is considered crucial as it implies knowing who is delivering the message. Even more so when, at present, the promoters of disinformation and “fake news” have created “pseudo-media, which, with professional presentations and a legitimate appearance, have extinguished the limits between information, opinion and ideology” (Del-Fresno-García, 2019: 6). And since disinformation agents do not act independently but use a network of apparently autonomous sites and accounts to replicate content (Alaphilippe & al., 2019) and increase trust. The placement of the module dedicated almost exclusively to the ownership and control of the media at the end of the curriculum and its classification as optional is incongruous. Despite the degree of flexibility and adaptability in the application of its modules, the document offers an organization and structure, implicit in the evaluation of the themes and prioritization of the contents.

The curriculum fails to provide valid tools to gain knowledge about the media market, given that information about the ownership and ultimate control of companies is not always easily accessible. In addition, it involves more than just knowing which groups have which media, it requires delving deeper into questions like who the owners are, relationships with other industries, the degree of dependence on the financial environment, its implications as advertising media or the degree of concentration of information and advertising in a given market, some of which are subsequently pointed out by UNESCO itself (Mendel, García-Castillejo, & Gómez, 2017). This underscores the need to update some of the fundamental approaches of UNESCO's MIL curriculum for teachers, aligning more closely with the spirit stated in writing. It is a challenge to confront the power of the media and to assume the rejection that the existence of a real critical vision can generate within the media. However, rapid technological change, the ubiquity of disinformation and the pivotal role of understanding the agents involved, as well as the development of critical thinking to address it, require an updated curriculum and its periodic revision, making it more necessary than ever to approach it from a structural perspective that favors critical citizenship and the democratic process.

References

  1. AguadedI, . 1999.con la televisión: familia, educación y recepción televisiva&author=&publication_year= Convivir con la televisión: familia, educación y recepción televisiva. Barcelona: Paidós.
  2. AguadedI, . 2001.educación en medios de comunicación: Panorama y perspectivas&author=&publication_year= La educación en medios de comunicación: Panorama y perspectivas. Murcia: KR.
  3. AlaphilippeA, GizikisA, HanotC, BontchevaK, . 2019. , ed. tackling of disinformation. Major challenges ahead&author=&publication_year= Automated tackling of disinformation. Major challenges ahead.
  4. AlmirónN, . 2009.Private owners of media corporations in Spain: Main structural and financial data.Communication & Society 22(1):243-263
  5. AlmirónN, SegoviaA, . 2012.Financialization, economic crisis, and corporate strategies in top media companies: The case of Grupo Prisa.International Journal of Communication 6:2894-2917
  6. AreaM, BorrásF, San-NicolásB, . 2015.Educar a la generación de los millenials como ciudadanos cultos del ciberespacio. Apuntes para la alfabetización digital.Revista de Estudios de Juventud 109:13-32
  7. BenitoA, . 1973. , ed. a la teoría general de la información&author=&publication_year= Introducción a la teoría general de la información.Madrid: Guadiana.
  8. BirkinbineB, GómezR, WaskoJ, . 2017. , ed. media giants&author=&publication_year= Global media giants.London: Routledge.
  9. BourdieuP, . 1997.la televisión&author=&publication_year= Sobre la televisión. Barcelona: Anagrama.
  10. BuckinghamD, . 2005.en medios: Alfabetización, aprendizaje y cultura contemporánea&author=&publication_year= Educación en medios: Alfabetización, aprendizaje y cultura contemporánea. Barcelona: Paidós.
  11. Del-Fresno-GarcíaM, . 2019.informativos: Sobreexpuestos e infrainformados en la era de la posverdad&author=Del-Fresno-García&publication_year= Desórdenes informativos: Sobreexpuestos e infrainformados en la era de la posverdad.El Profesional de la Información (28)3
  12. De-Pablos-PonsJ, Ballesta-PagánJ, . 2018.La educación mediática en nuestro entorno: Realidades y posibles mejoras.Revista Interuniversitaria de Formación del Profesorado 91(32)
  13. FecéJ L, . 2000.crítica de los medios audiovisuales&author=Fecé&publication_year= Lectura crítica de los medios audiovisuales.Comunicación y educación en la sociedad de la información: Nuevos lenguajes y conciencia crítica.
  14. FerrésJ, PiscitelliA, . 2012.competence. Articulated proposal of dimensions and indicators. [La competencia mediática: Propuesta articulada de dimensiones e indicadores&author=Ferrés&publication_year= Media competence. Articulated proposal of dimensions and indicators. [La competencia mediática: Propuesta articulada de dimensiones e indicadores]]Comunicar 38:75-82
  15. FerrésJ, MasanetM J, Marta-LazoC, . 2013.y educación mediática: Carencias en el caso español&author=Ferrés&publication_year= Neurociencia y educación mediática: Carencias en el caso español.Historia y Comunicación Social 18:129-144
  16. FerrésJ, MasanetM J, . 2015.educación mediática en la universidad española&author=&publication_year= La educación mediática en la universidad española. Barcelona: Gedisa.
  17. FloresJ, Frau-MeigsD, VélezI, . 2015.Educación a medias. Un problema mundial.Ciencia UANL. Tendencias Educativas 74:33-37
  18. Frau-MeigsD, . 2006. , ed. education. A kit forteachers, students, parents and professionals&author=&publication_year= Media education. A kit forteachers, students, parents and professionals.Paris: UNESCO.
  19. Frau-MeigsD, FloresJ, VélezI, . 2014.Políticas públicas de alfabetización mediática e informacional en Europa: Formación y fortalecimiento de competencias en la era digital. In: Ramírez-PradoF., RamaC., eds. recursos de aprendizaje en la educación a distancia&author=Ramírez-Prado&publication_year= Los recursos de aprendizaje en la educación a distancia.Perú: Universidad Alas Peruanas y Virtual Educa. 79-90
  20. García-SantamaríaJ V, . 2016.grupos multimedia españoles. Análisis y estrategias&author=&publication_year= Los grupos multimedia españoles. Análisis y estrategias. Barcelona: UOC.
  21. González-FernándezN, Gozálvez-PérezV, Ramírez-GarcíaA, . 2015.La competencia mediática en el profesorado no universitario. Diagnóstico y propuestas formativas.Revista de Educación 367:117-146
  22. González-YusteJ L, . 2000.de la educación en comunicación&author=González-Yuste&publication_year= Variables de la educación en comunicación.Comunicación y educación en la sociedad de la información: Nuevos lenguajes y conciencia crítica.
  23. GozálvezV, . 2013. , ed. mediática. Una mirada educativa&author=&publication_year= Ciudadanía mediática. Una mirada educativa.Madrid: Dykinson.
  24. KahneJ, BowyerB, . 2017.for democracy in a partisan age: Confronting the challenges of motivated reasoning and misinformation&author=Kahne&publication_year= Educating for democracy in a partisan age: Confronting the challenges of motivated reasoning and misinformation.American Educational Research Journal 54(1):3-34
  25. LópezL, AguadedM L, . 2015.media literacy in colleges of education and communication. [La docencia sobre alfabetización mediática en las Facultades de Educación y Comunicación&author=López&publication_year= Teaching media literacy in colleges of education and communication. [La docencia sobre alfabetización mediática en las Facultades de Educación y Comunicación]]Comunicar 44:187-195
  26. Mancinas-ChávezR, . 2016.teóricos de Estructura de la Información&author=&publication_year= Fundamentos teóricos de Estructura de la Información. La Laguna: Cuadernos Artesanos de Comunicación.
  27. Martínez-VallveyF, Núñez-FernándezV, . 2016.comunicación y su estructura en la era digital&author=&publication_year= La comunicación y su estructura en la era digital. Madrid: Ediciones CEF.
  28. MasanetM, FerrésJ, . 2013.enseñanza universitaria española en materia de educación mediática&author=Masanet&publication_year= La enseñanza universitaria española en materia de educación mediática.Communication Papers 2:83-90
  29. MastermanL, . 1993.enseñanza de los medios de comunicación&author=&publication_year= La enseñanza de los medios de comunicación.
  30. McdougallJ, ZezulkovaM, Van-DrielB, SternadelD, . 2018.media literacy in Europe: Evidence of effective school practices in primary and secondary education&author=Mcdougall&publication_year= Teaching media literacy in Europe: Evidence of effective school practices in primary and secondary education.NESET II Report
  31. MendelT, García-CastillejoA, GómezG, . 2017.Concentración de medios y libertad de expresión: Normas globales y consecuencias para las Américas. Cuadernos de Discusión de Comunicación e Información UNESCO 7.
  32. ONU (Ed.). 2017.Informe del Relator Especial sobre la promoción y protección del derecho a la libertad de opinión y de expresión.
  33. Osuna-AcedoS, Frau-MeigsD, Marta-LazoC, . 2018.Educación mediática y formación del profesorado. Educomunicación más allá de la alfabetización digital.Revista Interuniversitaria de Formación del Profesorado 91(32):29-42
  34. Pérez-EscodaA, García-RuizR, AguadedI, . 2018.competencia mediática en el profesorado universitario. Validación de un instrumento de evaluación&author=Pérez-Escoda&publication_year= La competencia mediática en el profesorado universitario. Validación de un instrumento de evaluación.@tic 21:1-9
  35. Pérez-TorneroJ M, . 2000.Introducción. In: Pérez-TorneroJ.M., ed. y educación en la sociedad de la información: Nuevos lenguajes y conciencia crítica&author=Pérez-Tornero&publication_year= Comunicación y educación en la sociedad de la información: Nuevos lenguajes y conciencia crítica.Barcelona: Paidós.
  36. Pérez-TorneroJ M, . 2000.desarrollo de la sociedad de la información: Del paradigma de la cultura de masas al de la cultura multimedia&author=Pérez-Tornero&publication_year= El desarrollo de la sociedad de la información: Del paradigma de la cultura de masas al de la cultura multimedia.Comunicación y educación en la sociedad de la información: Nuevos lenguajes y conciencia crítica.
  37. Pérez-TorneroJ M, ParedesO, BaenaG, GiraldoS, TejedorS, FernándezN, . 2010.and models of Media Literacy in Europe: Between digital competence and critical understanding&author=Pérez-Tornero&publication_year= Trends and models of Media Literacy in Europe: Between digital competence and critical understanding.Anàlisi 40:85-100
  38. Pérez-TorneroJ M, TayieS, . 2012.training in media education: Curriculum and international experiences. [La formación de profesores en educación en medios: Currículo y experiencias internacionales&author=Pérez-Tornero&publication_year= Teacher training in media education: Curriculum and international experiences. [La formación de profesores en educación en medios: Currículo y experiencias internacionales]]Comunicar 39:10-14
  39. Pfaff-RüdigerS, RiesmeyerC, . 2016.into action. Media literacy as social process&author=Pfaff-Rüdiger&publication_year= Moved into action. Media literacy as social process.Journal of Children and Media 10(2):164-172
  40. PuddephattA, . 2016.Internet y la libertad de expresión. Cuadernos de Discusión de Comunicación e Información UNESCO 6.
  41. QuirósF, Sierra-CaballeroF, . 2016.espíritu MacBride. Neocolonialismo, comunicación-mundo y alternativas democráticas&author=&publication_year= El espíritu MacBride. Neocolonialismo, comunicación-mundo y alternativas democráticas. Quito: Ciespal.
  42. Rangel-ContlaJ C, . 1975.Estructura y orden de la sociedad.Nueva Antropología 1(1):5-30
  43. Real Academia Española (Ed.). 2014.Diccionario de la lengua española (23ª ed.). Actualización 2018.
  44. RedeckerC, . 2017.framework for the digital competence of educators: DigCompEdu&author=Redecker&publication_year= European framework for the digital competence of educators: DigCompEdu.Luxenbourg: Publications Office of the European Union.
  45. ReigR, . 2011.mercado. Contra la simplicidad del pensamiento crítico&author=&publication_year= Todo mercado. Contra la simplicidad del pensamiento crítico. Barcelona: Anthropos.
  46. ReigR, . 2017.para el estudio de la estructura mundial de la información&author=Reig&publication_year= Metodología para el estudio de la estructura mundial de la información.Estructura mediática y poder.
  47. ReigR, LabioA, . 2017.laberinto mundial de la información. Estructura mediática y poder&author=&publication_year= El laberinto mundial de la información. Estructura mediática y poder. Barcelona: Anthropos.
  48. ReigR, Mancinas-ChávezR, BocioA I, . 2017.estructural complejo: Propuesta metodológica desde el periodismo&author=Reig&publication_year= Enfoque estructural complejo: Propuesta metodológica desde el periodismo.Estudio del Mensaje Periodístico 23:191-208
  49. Sánchez-BravoA, . 1992. , ed. de estructura de la información&author=&publication_year= Manual de estructura de la información.Madrid: Fundación Ramón Areces.
  50. TiedeJ, GrafeS, HobbsR, . 2015.media competencies of preservice teachers in Germany and the United States: A comparative analysis of theory and practice&author=Tiede&publication_year= Pedagogical media competencies of preservice teachers in Germany and the United States: A comparative analysis of theory and practice.Peabody Journal of Education 90(4):533-545
  51. TulodzieckiG, GrafeS, . 2012.Approaches to learning with media and media literacy education-trends and current situation in Germany.Journal of Media Literacy Education 4(1)
  52. WallisR, BuckinghamD, . 2016.literacy: The UK’s undead cultural policy&author=Wallis&publication_year= Media literacy: The UK’s undead cultural policy.International Journal of Cultural Policy 25:1-16
  53. WardleC, DerakhshanH, . 2017.Information disorder. Toward an interdisciplinary framework for research and policymaking. Council of Europe Report.
  54. WilsonC, GrizzleA, TuazonR, AkyempongK, CheungC K, . 2011. , ed. mediática e informacional: Curriculum para profesores&author=&publication_year= Alfabetización mediática e informacional: Curriculum para profesores.París: UNESCO.
  55. WilsonC, . 2012.and Information literacy: Pedagogy and possibilities. [Alfabetización mediática e informacional: Proyecciones didácticas&author=Wilson&publication_year= Media and Information literacy: Pedagogy and possibilities. [Alfabetización mediática e informacional: Proyecciones didácticas]]Comunicar 39:15-24



Click to see the English version (EN)

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

Resumen

La disciplina Estructura de la Información estudia los intereses que subyacen a la dinámica comunicacional y a las estrategias de información, y su correlación con los mensajes. Considerando clave este conocimiento para la Educación en Comunicación, y una vez confirmada su estrecha relación con las dimensiones de la competencia mediática, se analiza su presencia en el currículo de Alfabetización Mediática e Informacional (AMI) del profesorado, cuya formación es crucial para el éxito del proceso, elaborado por la UNESCO, órgano de referencia mundial en el área. El análisis de contenido semántico desvela, desde un punto de vista cuantitativo, la fuerte presencia de las áreas temáticas de la Estructura de la Información en las competencias y contenidos del currículo. No obstante, aplicado cualitativamente, se detectan debilidades de fondo en la relación con el enfoque estructural de la información. Ocurre cuando decae el declarado espíritu crítico del texto, empezando por definir a los medios como fuentes de información fiable. La ubicuidad de la desinformación y el papel crucial del conocimiento de los agentes envueltos en la misma y del desarrollo del pensamiento crítico para afrontarla, obliga a la actualización de este currículo –a cuyo desarrollo se contribuye con esta revisión–, haciendo, además, más necesario que nunca el afrontarla desde un enfoque estructural que favorezca una ciudadanía crítica y el proceso democrático.

ABSTRACT

The discipline Structural Considerations of Information explores the interests underlying communicational dynamics and information strategies, as well as the ways in which they correlate with messages. Considering this knowledge to be key in Communication Education, and having confirmed its close relationship with the dimensions of media competence, its presence is analyzed in the Media and Information Literacy (MIL) curriculum for teachers, whose training is crucial for the success of the process, developed by UNESCO, an organization that is a global referent in the field. A semantic content analysis reveals, from a quantitative perspective, a strong presence of thematic areas covered by the Structural Considerations of Information subject within the competencies and contents of the curriculum. However, at a qualitative level, there are fundamental weaknesses in its relationship with the structural approach to information. This occurs when the critical spirit of the text declines, starting with a definition of the media as sources of reliable information. The ubiquity of disinformation, and the key role played by stakeholders’ knowledge, as well as the development of critical thinking to address it requires an update of this curriculum–the present review contributes to this development– highlighting the current necessity to address it from a structural vantage that fosters critical citizenship and a democratic process.

Palabras clave

Alfabetización mediática, pensamiento crítico, estructura de la información, competencia mediática, formación del profesorado, sistema de medios, producción mediática, desinformación

Keywords

Media literacy, critical thinking, structural considerations of information, media competence, teacher training, media systems, media production, disinformation

Introducción y estado de la cuestión

El presente trabajo parte de la consideración del papel clave que el conocimiento de la Estructura de la Información, es decir, la «telaraña de intereses de todo tipo que están tras del periodismo […] y la correlación con sus mensajes» (Reig, 2017: 25) tiene para la Educación en Comunicación. Una red que Masterman (1993) califica como factores determinantes de los documentos de los medios, entre los que se encuentran la propiedad y el control de los mismos, las instituciones de los medios, el estado y la ley, los determinantes económicos, los anunciantes y las audiencias. Buckingham (2005) indica como conceptos clave en la Alfabetización Mediática la producción, el lenguaje, la representación y la audiencia, los mismos asumidos por la UNESCO (Frau-Meigs, 2006). La producción implica reconocer los intereses económicos en juego, las formas de generar beneficios, la globalización de las industrias mediáticas y el equilibrio entre medios globales y locales (Buckingham, 2005) y, más que conocer el detalle de la propiedad, comprender «los modelos globales de propiedad y control de los medios en el contexto del conocimiento de otras fuentes importantes de poder e influencia» (Masterman, 1993: 87).

Con este planteamiento, se persigue como objetivo conocer el peso que el aprendizaje de la Estructura de la Información (referenciada como EI) tiene en el Currículo de Alfabetización Mediática e Informacional (AMI) para profesores de la UNESCO, al ser un órgano internacional de referencia mundial en la conformación de dicho currículo y al dirigirse a la formación del profesorado, apoyándole en «el diseño, la implementación y la evaluación de los programas de Alfabetización Mediática e Informacional de estudiantes de secundaria» (Wilson, 2012: 17). La formación del profesorado se ha abordado a través del análisis de planes de estudios universitarios (Masanet & Ferrés, 2013; Ferrés & Masanet, 2015; López & Aguaded, 2015) y competencias mediáticas –del profesorado no universitario (González-Fernández, Gozálvez-Pérez, & Ramírez-García, 2015; Tiede, Grafe, & Hobbs, 2015) y universitario (Pérez-Escoda, García-Ruiz, & Aguaded, 2018)–, pasando en muchos de estos casos por el desarrollo de herramientas para su medición y la propuesta de actuaciones concretas. Una amplia atención fundada en el papel crucial que la formación del profesorado tiene en el proceso de Alfabetización Mediática (Osuna-Acedo, Frau-Meigs, & Marta-Lazo, 2018).

Este documento, que llegó poco después de la propuesta del Parlamento Europeo (12/2008) de creación de la asignatura «Educación Mediática», está concebido a modo de plan de estudios flexible y, desde su publicación, numerosos países han desarrollado sus propias adaptaciones (Pérez-Tornero & Tayie, 2012), conviviendo con un entorno múltiple y variado de políticas de Alfabetización Mediática, de modelos que las sustentan y de situaciones efectivas (Pérez-Tornero, Paredes, Baena, Giraldo, Tejedor, & Fernández, 2010; Tulodziecki & Grafe, 2012; Frau-Meigs, Flores, & Vélez, 2014; Flores, Frau-Meigs, & Vélez, 2015; Wallis & Buckingham, 2016; De-Pablos-Pons & Ballesta-Pagán, 2018). La propuesta de la UNESCO contempla su revisión por los educadores, «en un proceso colectivo para dar forma y enriquecer el currículo como un documento viviente» (Wilson, Grizzle, Tuazon, Akyempong, & Cheung, 2011: 19), labor en la que se enmarca este trabajo, que lo revisa para colaborar en su desarrollo.

Definición de Estructura de la Información y alcance de su conocimiento

Estructura se refiere a la «disposición o modo de estar relacionadas las distintas partes de un conjunto» (Real Academia Española, 2014). De ello se extrae, primero, que con Estructura nos referimos a la forma que adquiere ese conjunto. En segundo lugar, a las relaciones entre las partes, fijándoles una posición y asignándoles una función (Rangel-Contla, 1975). Finalmente, la existencia de un agregado de varios elementos, por lo que al referirnos a Estructura lo hacemos, al mismo tiempo, a los elementos que la componen y a la totalidad. Todo ello teniendo en cuenta, además, la existencia de supraestructuras, es decir, tanto de elementos y relaciones estructurantes como de conjuntos superiores que están por encima de la propia estructura.

Sustantivamos aquí Estructura con el término información y no con comunicación debido a que la información –entendida como una estrategia de proyección de mensajes de los emisores ancestrales-mercantiles, una vez estudiados los receptores (Benito, 1973)–, prima sobre la comunicación –que encierra esta estrategia y la reacción de los receptores–, a pesar de que pudiera parecer lo contrario. Aunque en la actualidad los receptores son a la vez emisores que influyen e interactúan con los medios de comunicación, su participación se asienta sobre pautas establecidas (Mancinas-Chávez, 2016). A ello se une que cuando los medios digitales son independientes de los grandes grupos y del mundo mercantil y financiero (Almirón & Segovia, 2012; Almirón, 2009), no podemos obviar que la propia Red pertenece a grandes corporaciones y que estos medios no se han consolidado ni son rentables, es decir: ni quedan totalmente fuera de la Estructura, ni se instituyen como una fuerza que modifique sustancialmente el orden estructural.

Por otro lado, al ser la información un factor estructurante (Sánchez-Bravo, 1992), actúa articulando las partes del conjunto para conservar lo instituido, primando el beneficio económico y la supervivencia de la propia estructura, frente al derecho humano de la información. En definitiva, cuando nos referimos a la EI lo hacemos tanto al agrupamiento de los medios en estructuras denominadas grupos o conglomerados mediáticos, como a las relaciones que los unen con otras estructuras y superestructuras.

La ubicuidad de la desinformación, la necesidad del pensamiento crítico para afrontarla y el papel crucial de conocer los agentes envueltos en la misma aconseja actualizar el currrículum AMI para profesores de la UNESCO. Es preciso buscar la cohesión entre el declarado espíritu crítico con la letra, reforzando el enfoque estructural.

Detrás de los mensajes comunicacionales existe toda una estrategia informacional que persigue tanto la lógica ganancia mercantil como, en no pocas ocasiones, la influencia sobre comportamientos y conductas presentes y futuras. La actividad macro-mercantil puede extralimitarse en su legítima y necesaria labor, de tal forma que puede llegar a vulnerar normas legales como leyes de protección de la imagen y dignidad de la mujer o el derecho a una información veraz. Un conocimiento básico para reforzar la implicación de la educación mediática en el proceso democrático y el desarrollo social (Pfaff-Rüdiger & Riesmeyer, 2016).

Es esencial abordar la información desde un enfoque estructural (Reig, Mancinas-Chávez, & Nogales-Bocio, 2017) y, en cuanto a la educación mediática, poner el foco no tanto en el detalle de la propiedad de los medios sino en cómo su pertenencia a dicha Estructura afecta a sus productos. Necesidad que, hoy más que nunca, se reafirma ante la omnipresencia de la desinformación, que amenaza a la sociedad y la democracia y cuya dependencia de las tecnologías post Internet «ha modificado la naturaleza misma de la comunicación interpersonal colectiva» (Del-Fresno-García, 2019: 2). El análisis de los agentes originadores de la desinformación, de otros envueltos –el que crea el mensaje puede ser diferente del que lo produce y del que lo distribuye (Wardle & Derakhshan, 2017)– y su conexión implícita o explícita, es un aspecto fundamental para un estudio completo de la desinformación online (Alaphilippe, Gizikis, Hanot, & Bontcheva, 2019). La EI estudia lo que subyace a la dinámica comunicacional y aquello que está detrás de las estrategias de información, lo que lleva a indagar tanto en las índoles de las instituciones y personas que protagonizan la propiedad de los medios como a analizar los contenidos que proyectan. Es lo que ya Bourdieu (1997) llamó estructura invisible de poder, que ofrece mensajes explícitos (vehiculados a través de informativos, series, etc.), cuyos emisores son escasamente conocidos.

Los estudios y las líneas de trabajo de la EI en la actualidad (Birkinbine, Gómez, & Wasko, 2017; Reig & Labio, 2017; García-Santamaría, 2016; Martínez-Vallvey & Núñez-Fernández, 2016) se han fijado muy especialmente en los procesos de alianzas y fusiones que protagonizan corporaciones de comunicación, de telecomunicaciones y tecnológicas, con una finalidad común: desarrollar hasta puntos insospechados los espacios de entretenimiento para que el receptor se fabrique aún más intensamente su propia forma de informarse, distraerse o evadirse a través de la herramienta digital que prefiera. La observación de toda esta dinámica de relaciones entre poder mediático-empresarial y mensajes es un punto central de la razón de ser de la EI que busca formar ciudadanos críticos.

Planteamiento previo sobre el currículo AMI para profesores de la UNESCO

El documento «Alfabetización Mediática e Informacional: Curriculum para profesores» (Wilson & al., 2011) recoge el marco conceptual y orientaciones pedagógicas propuesto por la UNESCO para su formación. Considera necesario un entendimiento crítico del fenómeno comunicativo para que la ciudadanía pueda ejercer sus libertades y derechos fundamentales, gracias a un proceso de AMI en todas las fases de la educación y de la vida, siendo clave entre los profesores.

El currículo se fundamenta en tres grandes áreas respecto a los medios: su conocimiento y entendimiento para la participación social, la evaluación de sus textos y su producción y uso. Muchas de las materias que las abarcan, fundamentalmente de las dos primeras, tienen una relación directa con la propiedad de los medios, sus lógicas de mercado y con el poder, lo cual pone de manifiesto, de forma previa, la presencia de la EI en el planteamiento teórico que la UNESCO hace de los contenidos para la AMI y la pretensión de fomentar un entendimiento crítico de la comunicación.

La Estructura de la Información y el espíritu crítico en la Educación Mediática

El compromiso activo de la UNESCO en la promoción de la Educación Mediática se remonta a los primeros años sesenta. Ya en 1969 se indica que «las escuelas deben ayudar a los alumnos a adquirir un espíritu crítico respecto a los medios de comunicación» (Aguaded, 2001: 122). Con este espíritu se abordan las conferencias internacionales auspiciadas por la UNESCO sobre AMI.

Gran parte de la literatura de referencia considera el espíritu crítico como subyacente a la Alfabetización Mediática, tanto para afrontarla como el que pretende suscitar (Pérez-Tornero, 2000a; González-Yuste, 2000; Aguaded, 2001; Frau-Meigs, 2006), hasta señalarse que es «una forma de alfabetización crítica» (Buckingham, 2005: 73). También el currículo AMI persigue el pensamiento crítico, como marco general, entendido como «habilidad de examinar y analizar la información e ideas con el fin de entender y evaluar sus valores y supuestos, en lugar de simplemente aceptar las propuestas por su valor nominal» (Wilson & al., 2011: 194). La propagación de la desinformación y las «fake news» plantea un severo desafío a los sistemas educativos, siendo claves el desarrollo del pensamiento crítico y las competencias analíticas para una intervención educativa exitosa y, en Europa, múltiples iniciativas están afrontando esta educación (McDougall, Zezulkova, Van-Driel, & Sternadel, 2018). Asimismo, se está dando respuesta a la competencia digital centrada en habilidades críticas y la ciudadanía digital (Redecker, 2017), capacitando «para interactuar tanto con la cultura en la red, como para recrearla de un modo crítico y emancipador» (Area, Borrás, & San-Nicolás, 2015: 31).

El objetivo principal de la pedagogía crítica, que es el modo de abordar la educación en medios, es el aprendizaje de cómo las instituciones y los públicos «construyen los significados» (Fecé, 2000: 136). Algunos autores proponen superar la adopción del término porque presupone la existencia de una visión acertada y otra confundida, aunque entienden que es necesario adoptar una teoría social de la alfabetización, lo que «significa capacitar a los alumnos para que comprendan esos contextos, y para que reconozcan cómo se forman y cómo se producen sus propias respuestas» (Buckingham, 2005: 192). La formación crítica parte de un modelo de escuela crítica y de las corrientes activas de la enseñanza, a la vez que está también fundamentada en la investigación de la recepción (Aguaded, 1999). Permite superar un planteamiento simplista que solo mira al mensaje y deja de lado al receptor y a cómo condiciona el proceso, puesto que, aunque el texto reproduce mayoritariamente la ideología dominante, es preciso tener en cuenta la dialéctica con el público (Fecé, 2000). Más aún cuando ante el usuario se abre un amplio abanico de posibilidades para elegir y gestionar el autoconsumo, al menos aparentemente, puesto que se camina a la vez «hacia la personalización y la interactividad, y hacia la hegemonía de unos pocos» (Pérez-Tornero, 2000b: 27) en un proceso concentrador y globalizador nunca antes experimentado.

Desde la EI se coloca el foco sobre cómo las instituciones construyen o pueden construir los significados. Es este el aspecto más problemático dado que el abordarlo abiertamente suscita el silencio de los medios y críticas ideológicas, si bien el propio enfoque estructural se sitúa en el pensamiento crítico, que no tiene por qué ser necesariamente marxista o de izquierdas y es crítico no solo con el mercado y el sistema capitalista sino también con el propio pensamiento crítico «clásico» y sus alternativas socioeconómicas y políticas (Reig, 2011).

Material y métodos

El material usado como fuente primaria y objeto de estudio es el currículo AMI para profesores de la UNESCO (Wilson & al., 2011), que incluye proveedores de información como bibliotecas o archivos, lo que ha exigido acotar el texto a los medios y sus productos. El método utilizado es el análisis de contenido por campos semánticos, cuantitativo y cualitativo. Se ha utilizado software libre específico, incorporando la técnica «Keyword in context» (KWIC), aplicando filtro «stopwords», lematización, agrupamientos y concordancias. Dado que los términos incluidos son comunes al tratar sobre medios, periodismo o información desde los más variados enfoques, para su recuento e interpretación se ha comprobado que su aparición en el texto tenga relación con el enfoque estructural. Una vez detectado el término, se ha analizado dentro de la oración, como primera unidad de contexto. Como la cantidad de términos por campos varía, hemos valorado las frecuencias de aparición y se ha aplicado cálculo de probabilidades para detectar la representatividad. También se ha recurrido a una unidad de contexto externo: la UNESCO, como fuente de la que surge el texto, y su posicionamiento histórico, fundamentalmente el que emana de su Conferencia General de París de 1989 con la que se cierra el cisma y el debate surgido en la década de 1970 en torno al «Informe MacBride» y el Nuevo Orden Mundial de la Información y la Comunicación (Quirós & Sierra, 2016).

El trabajo se organiza en dos fases sucesivas. En la Fase 1, con un carácter previo y cuyos resultados recogemos en este apartado metodológico, se ha aplicado el análisis de contenido, con el objetivo de encontrar los nexos de la EI con la Educación Mediática, a las dimensiones de la competencia mediática establecidas por Ferrés y Piscitelli (2012), impulsoras «de una línea de investigación para mejorar la educación mediática de la ciudadanía» (Pérez-Escoda, García-Ruiz, & Aguaded, 2018: 3) y base metodológica en numerosos estudios de referencia en el área. Igualmente, se ha procedido sobre las competencias AMI explicitadas en el currículo, para detectar una primera relación con la EI y delimitar las unidades de análisis dentro del documento. En la Fase 2 se ha aplicado al contenido de los módulos y unidades del currículo previamente delimitadas.

Establecimiento de indicadores para el análisis de contenido

Los campos semánticos se han generado teniendo en cuenta los contenidos y planteamientos de la EI en la universidad pública española.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/104f5ed1-55e4-4db5-9318-887b23d8db22/image/7f51c74c-1143-40ed-b1d5-1f7548ed21cc-u09-01.png


La revisión de los planes de estudio del Grado de Periodismo de todas las facultades públicas de Ciencias de la Información/Comunicación, donde se imparte esta disciplina bajo varias denominaciones, permitió localizar las asignaturas y analizar sus guías docentes, logrando una definición de la EI como materia académica. Esta supone el estudio del sistema de medios, desde el punto de vista de la propiedad, organización y funcionamiento (principalmente de las dinámicas influidas por la economía, la política y la tecnología), y de las consecuencias de su existencia; abordando las distintas teorías en las que se fundamenta su estudio y, en gran parte, con un enfoque crítico y a través del análisis del contexto.

El estudio de los descriptores de estas áreas y la revisión de textos para algunos campos (Gozálvez, 2013; Ferrés, Masanet, & Marta-Lazo, 2013), unidos a la reflexión y experiencia personal docente en EI, ha llevado a generar un repertorio de términos distribuidos en campos semánticos por áreas de estudio dentro de la EI (Figura 1), sin repeticiones, tomando decisiones razonadas cuando podían estar en más de una ubicación. Los términos bajo «Relación con la Economía, Política y Tecnología» se presentan unidos al precisar, en muchos casos, su división en dimensiones la reiteración. Con «Enfoque liberal», reducimos la Economía de la Comunicación, y con «Enfoque crítico», simplificamos la Economía Política de la Comunicación.

Aplicación del análisis de contenido a los indicadores de la competencia mediática

El análisis de contenido semántico aplicado a los indicadores de las seis dimensiones de la competencia mediática (Ferrés & Piscitelli, 2012) confirma la estrecha conexión entre la EI y la Educación Mediática (Figura 2). Salvo «Lenguajes» y «Estética», las demás dimensiones, en su conjunto, se vinculan con todos los campos de las áreas de la EI a través de 29 términos únicos con una frecuencia conjunta de 44, especialmente con los de «Consecuencias» (12 términos y la mayor representatividad tras el estudio de probabilidades) y «Relación con la Economía, Política y Tecnología». La relación más estrecha es con la dimensión «Ideología y Valores» (el 92% de sus indicadores se relacionan con el enfoque estructural), en la que predominan las referencias al campo «Consecuencias» (10 términos y la mayor representatividad), seguidas de las adscritas al campo «Posicionamiento crítico».


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/104f5ed1-55e4-4db5-9318-887b23d8db22/image/8e96936e-f0b3-48e4-abd0-ba3b13ebea5f-u09-02.png


Aplicación del análisis de contenido a las competencias AMI y delimitación de las unidades de análisis

El currículo objeto de estudio plantea siete competencias que se prevén adquirir con la formación y las relaciona con los módulos y unidades en los que se estructura el contenido. Se establece una conexión con la EI (Figura 3) a través de las destrezas y habilidades de cinco de sus competencias (salvo C3 y C5) y, muy especialmente, con el campo «Consecuencias» (19 términos). Las competencias con referencia más directa al enfoque estructural están presentes en todos los módulos salvo uno (M6), de los 11 que componen el currículo.

Análisis y resultados

El análisis de contenido del currículo AMI desvela una vinculación con la EI (Figura 4) a través de 62 términos (T) únicos, que aparecen 568 veces (frecuencia, F). La mayoría provienen del campo «Consecuencias» (27 términos, frecuencia 264 y la mayor representatividad) y «Relación con Economía, Política, Tecnología». Cabe manifestar que el número de términos aparecidos y las frecuencias del «Enfoque liberal» y del «Enfoque crítico» han sido prácticamente idénticos, si bien, tras el estudio de probabilidades, es más representativo el primero.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/104f5ed1-55e4-4db5-9318-887b23d8db22/image/22196802-66aa-4bd7-827f-526c03942e41-u09-03.png


De todos los módulos (M) de contenido analizados, en tres de ellos (M4, M8 y M9) no aparece ni un solo término de forma relacionada con el enfoque estructural. El resto ofrece una vinculación no uniforme, siendo más débil en el caso de los módulos M7 y M10 y la más fuerte con los módulos M1 y M11. El cruce de los términos y frecuencias por módulos con las competencias (C) AMI que buscan desarrollar, arroja las C1 y C6 como fundamentalmente relacionadas con la EI. Para valorar correctamente la vinculación del currículo objeto de estudio con el enfoque estructural, hay que tener en cuenta su definición de los medios como fuentes de información confiable y actualizada, creada mediante un proceso editorial guiado por valores periodísticos, pudiendo atribuir dicha confiabilidad editorial a una organización concreta. En el glosario final se sustituye el adjetivo confiable por creíble. El documento enumera como factores claves de la práctica periodística –una ventana al mundo–, la verdad, la independencia o la rendición de cuentas. Precisa que, de acuerdo con algunos críticos –apostilla textual–, dicha libertad e independencia de los periodistas es impactada por motivaciones financieras y políticas tanto de los empleados como de los dueños de los medios. Y la independencia editorial se explica como la libertad profesional de los editores para tomar sus decisiones editoriales sin recibir interferencia alguna por parte de los propietarios del medio o cualquier otro actor.

Atribuye a los medios una función fiscalizadora del gobierno y del poder de cualquier entidad pública o privada de importancia. Considera que, aunque los medios tienen gran poder sobre la sociedad pudiendo dirigirla y desafiarla, también la reflejan, puesto que las historias y representaciones que proveen, son las que la sociedad exige y acepta. Entiende que, si el estado regula los medios, interfiere en la independencia de los periodistas, y aboga por su independencia del control del estado o del gobierno como garantía de una eficaz libertad de expresión y del intercambio de información e ideas.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/104f5ed1-55e4-4db5-9318-887b23d8db22/image/5ae6fcfa-4b94-480c-b1c7-615480c82bbe-u09-04.png


Los efectos de la concentración se ligan con el pluralismo, que se define por la existencia de diversidad de medios en relación con la propiedad y el soporte de los medios. Relaciona la presión de la publicidad con el posible silenciamiento de temas y el uso del entretenimiento para la atracción de audiencias que, sin embargo, se presentan como activas. Trata los retos y riesgos del mundo virtual para los jóvenes relegando el conocimiento de quiénes son los propietarios. Y resalta de los nuevos medios digitales y electrónicos el mayor acceso a la información y al conocimiento, las mayores posibilidades para la libertad de expresión y el buen gobierno, y que favorecen la participación democrática. De la globalización destaca su posible utilidad para llevar al conocimiento y debate público cuestiones de desarrollo con impacto mundial y valora positivamente su efecto en la política, al aumentar el flujo de información dentro y fuera de las fronteras nacionales y las plataformas para el discurso público. Desde el primer módulo de contenido, en el que se presentan los temas y conceptos clave de la AMI, se manifiesta como fundamental conocer el mercado de medios, su propiedad y control, puesto que define el contenido y los procesos. El último módulo, catalogado como opcional, se dedica casi de modo temático al mercado y la empresa mediática: conocimiento de la propiedad, análisis de las dimensiones socio-culturales y políticas de los medios globalizados y de la irrupción de los medios alternativos.

Discusión y conclusiones

Confirmada la consideración de partida de la estrecha conexión de la EI con la educación en comunicación a través de las dimensiones de la competencia mediática (Ferrés & Piscitelli, 2012), destacamos su interrelación con la dimensión «Ideología y valores», resultado que se pone en valor al confirmar que los docentes de Educación y Comunicación en las universidades españolas, consideran esta dimensión como «una de las más relevantes para enfocar la enseñanza en materia de educación mediática» (López & Aguaded, 2015: 193). La relación de la EI con las competencias AMI del currículo para profesores de la UNESCO se determina fundamentalmente a través de aquellas que incluyen el conocimiento del papel de los medios y la información en la democracia, el análisis del contexto sociocultural del contenido y su evaluación crítica. En todos los casos, la conexión más fuerte es a través del campo de la EI que hemos denominado «Consecuencias», con términos provenientes del entorno de los derechos a la libertad de expresión e información.

El análisis de contenido confirma, asimismo, desde un punto de vista cuantitativo, que muchas de las temáticas fundamentales abordadas por el currículo AMI para profesores se relacionan con las de la EI. Sin embargo, a través del análisis cualitativo, se detectan una serie de debilidades de fondo en dicha vinculación. La ruptura con el enfoque estructural se produce principalmente cuando en el currículo decae su declarado espíritu crítico, con el que entra en contradicciones, resultado de ciertas tensiones en una lucha por lo políticamente correcto, en muchos casos solo entendibles a la luz de procesos históricos (Quirós & Sierra, 2016). Se contradice con la conceptualización que se hace de los medios, al señalar que se puede confiar en lo que dicen y, a la vez, pedir que se aborden de forma crítica, clave para el éxito educativo en el actual contexto en el que son cruciales las habilidades para juzgar la credibilidad de la información (Kahne & Bowyer, 2017). Lo mismo ocurre al indicar que existe un proceso editorial –implica selección y producción de los contenidos– pero que, al entender que es determinado por valores periodísticos, se descarga de cualquier interés ajeno al periodismo. Igualmente, decae al mostrar la actividad periodística como una ventana al mundo y explicar sus funciones: la idea de los medios como cuarto poder no deja de ser una idealización, obviando que los grandes medios son en sí inmensas corporaciones.

Otro punto de revisión es la sustantivación que la UNESCO realiza de los factores clave de la práctica periodística, como la organización del conocimiento, la verdad o la independencia, sobre el periodista y no tanto sobre el empresario. Otras divergencias se encuentran al conceptualizar el pluralismo con un claro posicionamiento a favor del mercado, sin cuestionar que múltiples medios e, incluso, propietarios, no tiene que significar diversidad de voces. Se suma a este índice de debilidades el posicionamiento ante la globalización –aunque la ONU ha rebajado ya el nivel de optimismo (Puddephatt, 2016; ONU, 2017)–, la tecnología y los nuevos medios, al no plantear como crucial el conocimiento de la propiedad de la Red. De hecho, el módulo de estudio de las «Oportunidades y retos en Internet» es el que, de los relacionados con la EI, presenta una vinculación más débil con la misma. En el currículo AMI se considera crucial el conocimiento de la propiedad de los medios, básico para todos los demás aspectos de la EI, puesto que implica saber quién emite el mensaje. Más aún cuando, en la actualidad, los promotores de la desinformación y «fake news» han creado «pseudomedios, que, con presentaciones profesionales y apariencia de legítimos, han extinguido la frontera entre información, opinión e ideología» (Del-Fresno-García, 2019: 6). Y toda vez que los agentes de la desinformación con frecuencia no actúan independientemente, sino que utilizan una red de sitios y cuentas con apariencia de autónomas, para replicar el contenido (Alaphilippe & al., 2019) y aumentar la confianza. Es incongruente la ubicación del módulo dedicado de forma temática, casi en exclusiva, a la propiedad y el control de los medios al final del currículo y su clasificación como opcional. A pesar del grado de flexibilidad y adaptabilidad en la aplicación de sus módulos, el documento ofrece una organización y estructura, con lo que lleva implícito de valoración de las temáticas y priorización de los contenidos. El currículo tampoco aporta herramientas totalmente válidas para el conocimiento del mercado de medios, ya que la información sobre la propiedad y el control último de las empresas no es siempre fácilmente accesible. A ello se añade que no se trata solo de conocer qué grupos tienen qué medios, sino de profundizar en cuestiones como quiénes son los dueños, las relaciones con otras industrias, el nivel de dependencia con el entorno financiero, sus implicaciones como soporte publicitario o el nivel de concentración informativa y publicitaria en un determinado mercado, cuestiones algunas de ellas señaladas por la propia UNESCO posteriormente (Mendel, García-Castillejo, & Gómez, 2017).

Se pone así de manifiesto la necesidad de actualizar algunos de los planteamientos de fondo del currículo AMI para profesores de la UNESCO, que cohesione más el espíritu declarado con la letra, lo que se lograría reforzando en el mismo el enfoque estructural. Supone un reto enfrentar el poder de los medios y asumir el rechazo que en su propio seno puede generar la existencia de una visión crítica real. Sin embargo, el vertiginoso cambio tecnológico, la ubicuidad de la desinformación y el papel crucial del conocimiento de los agentes envueltos en la misma y del desarrollo del pensamiento crítico para afrontarla, obliga a la actualización de este currículo, y a su revisión periódica, haciendo además más necesario que nunca abordarla desde un enfoque estructural que favorezca una ciudadanía crítica y el proceso democrático.

References

  1. AguadedI, . 1999.con la televisión: familia, educación y recepción televisiva&author=&publication_year= Convivir con la televisión: familia, educación y recepción televisiva. Barcelona: Paidós.
  2. AguadedI, . 2001.educación en medios de comunicación: Panorama y perspectivas&author=&publication_year= La educación en medios de comunicación: Panorama y perspectivas. Murcia: KR.
  3. AlaphilippeA, GizikisA, HanotC, BontchevaK, . 2019. , ed. tackling of disinformation. Major challenges ahead&author=&publication_year= Automated tackling of disinformation. Major challenges ahead.
  4. AlmirónN, . 2009.Private owners of media corporations in Spain: Main structural and financial data.Communication & Society 22(1):243-263
  5. AlmirónN, SegoviaA, . 2012.Financialization, economic crisis, and corporate strategies in top media companies: The case of Grupo Prisa.International Journal of Communication 6:2894-2917
  6. AreaM, BorrásF, San-NicolásB, . 2015.Educar a la generación de los millenials como ciudadanos cultos del ciberespacio. Apuntes para la alfabetización digital.Revista de Estudios de Juventud 109:13-32
  7. BenitoA, . 1973. , ed. a la teoría general de la información&author=&publication_year= Introducción a la teoría general de la información.Madrid: Guadiana.
  8. BirkinbineB, GómezR, WaskoJ, . 2017. , ed. Media Giants&author=&publication_year= Global Media Giants.London: Routledge.
  9. BourdieuP, . 1997.la televisión&author=&publication_year= Sobre la televisión. Barcelona: Anagrama.
  10. BuckinghamD, . 2005.en medios: Alfabetización, aprendizaje y cultura contemporánea&author=&publication_year= Educación en medios: Alfabetización, aprendizaje y cultura contemporánea. Barcelona: Paidós.
  11. Del-Fresno-GarcíaM, . 2019.informativos: Sobreexpuestos e infrainformados en la era de la posverdad&author=Del-Fresno-García&publication_year= Desórdenes informativos: Sobreexpuestos e infrainformados en la era de la posverdad.El Profesional de la Información (28)3
  12. De-Pablos-PonsJ, Ballesta-PagánJ, . 2018.La educación mediática en nuestro entorno: Realidades y posibles mejoras.Revista Interuniversitaria de Formación del Profesorado (32)91
  13. FecéJ L, . 2000.crítica de los medios audiovisuales&author=Fecé&publication_year= Lectura crítica de los medios audiovisuales.Comunicación y educación en la sociedad de la información: Nuevos lenguajes y conciencia crítica.
  14. FerrésJ, PiscitelliA, . 2012.competence. Articulated proposal of dimensions and indicators. [La competencia mediática: Propuesta articulada de dimensiones e indicadores&author=Ferrés&publication_year= Media competence. Articulated proposal of dimensions and indicators. [La competencia mediática: Propuesta articulada de dimensiones e indicadores]]Comunicar 38:75-82
  15. FerrésJ, MasanetM J, Marta-LazoC, . 2013.y educación mediática: Carencias en el caso español&author=Ferrés&publication_year= Neurociencia y educación mediática: Carencias en el caso español.Historia y Comunicación Social 18:129-144
  16. FerrésJ, MasanetM J, . 2015.educación mediática en la universidad española&author=&publication_year= La educación mediática en la universidad española. Barcelona: Gedisa.
  17. FloresJ, Frau-MeigsD, VélezI, . 2015.Educación a medias. Un problema mundial.Ciencia UANL. Tendencias Educativas 74:33-37
  18. Frau-MeigsD, . 2006. , ed. education. A kit forteachers, students, parents and professionals&author=&publication_year= Media education. A kit forteachers, students, parents and professionals.Paris: UNESCO.
  19. Frau-MeigsD, FloresJ, VélezI, . 2014.Políticas públicas de alfabetización mediática e informacional en Europa: Formación y fortalecimiento de competencias en la era digital. In: Ramírez-PradoF., RamaC., eds. recursos de aprendizaje en la educación a distancia. Nuevos escenarios, experiencias y tendencias&author=Ramírez-Prado&publication_year= Los recursos de aprendizaje en la educación a distancia. Nuevos escenarios, experiencias y tendencias.Perú: Universidad Alas Peruanas y Virtual Educa. 79-90
  20. García-SantamaríaJ V, . 2016.grupos multimedia españoles. Análisis y estrategias&author=&publication_year= Los grupos multimedia españoles. Análisis y estrategias. Barcelona: UOC.
  21. González-FernándezN, Gozálvez-PérezV, Ramírez-GarcíaA, . 2015.La competencia mediática en el profesorado no universitario. Diagnóstico y propuestas formativas.Revista de Educación 367:117-146
  22. González-YusteJ L, . 2000.de la educación en comunicación&author=González-Yuste&publication_year= Variables de la educación en comunicación.Comunicación y educación en la sociedad de la información: Nuevos lenguajes y conciencia crítica.
  23. GozálvezV, . 2013. , ed. mediática. Una mirada educativa&author=&publication_year= Ciudadanía mediática. Una mirada educativa.Madrid: Dykinson.
  24. KahneJ, BowyerB, . 2017.for democracy in a partisan age: Confronting the challenges of motivated reasoning and misinformation&author=Kahne&publication_year= Educating for democracy in a partisan age: Confronting the challenges of motivated reasoning and misinformation.American Educational Research Journal 54(1):3-34
  25. LópezL, AguadedM L, . 2015.media literacy in colleges of education and communication. [La docencia sobre alfabetización mediática en las Facultades de Educación y Comunicación&author=López&publication_year= Teaching media literacy in colleges of education and communication. [La docencia sobre alfabetización mediática en las Facultades de Educación y Comunicación]]Comunicar 44:187-195
  26. Mancinas-ChávezR, . 2016. , ed. teóricos de Estructura de la Información&author=&publication_year= Fundamentos teóricos de Estructura de la Información.La Laguna: Cuadernos Artesanos de Comunicación.
  27. Martínez-VallveyF, Núñez-FernándezV, . 2016.comunicación y su estructura en la era digital&author=&publication_year= La comunicación y su estructura en la era digital. Madrid: Ediciones CEF.
  28. MasanetM, FerrésJ, . 2013.enseñanza universitaria española en materia de educación mediática&author=Masanet&publication_year= La enseñanza universitaria española en materia de educación mediática.Communication Papers 2:83-90
  29. MastermanL, . 1993.enseñanza de los medios de comunicación&author=&publication_year= La enseñanza de los medios de comunicación.
  30. McdougallJ, ZezulkovaM, Van-DrielB, SternadelD, . 2018.media literacy in Europe: Evidence of effective school practices in primary and secondary education&author=Mcdougall&publication_year= Teaching media literacy in Europe: Evidence of effective school practices in primary and secondary education.NESET II Report
  31. MendelT, García-CastillejoA, GómezG, . 2017.Concentración de medios y libertad de expresión: Normas globales y consecuencias para las Américas. Cuadernos de Discusión de Comunicación e Información UNESCO 7.
  32. ONU (Ed.). 2017.Informe del Relator Especial sobre la promoción y protección del derecho a la libertad de opinión y de expresión.
  33. Osuna-AcedoS, Frau-MeigsD, Marta-LazoC, . 2018.Educación mediática y formación del profesorado. Educomunicación más allá de la alfabetización digital.Revista Interuniversitaria de Formación del Profesorado 91(32):29-42
  34. Pérez-EscodaA, García-RuizR, AguadedI, . 2018.competencia mediática en el profesorado universitario. Validación de un instrumento de evaluación&author=Pérez-Escoda&publication_year= La competencia mediática en el profesorado universitario. Validación de un instrumento de evaluación.@tic 21:1-9
  35. Pérez-TorneroJ M, . 2000.Introducción. In: Pérez-TorneroJ.M., ed. y educación en la sociedad de la información: Nuevos lenguajes y conciencia crítica&author=Pérez-Tornero&publication_year= Comunicación y educación en la sociedad de la información: Nuevos lenguajes y conciencia crítica.Barcelona: Paidós.
  36. Pérez-TorneroJ M, . 2000.desarrollo de la sociedad de la información: Del paradigma de la cultura de masas al de la cultura multimedia&author=Pérez-Tornero&publication_year= El desarrollo de la sociedad de la información: Del paradigma de la cultura de masas al de la cultura multimedia.Comunicación y educación en la sociedad de la información: Nuevos lenguajes y conciencia crítica.
  37. Pérez-TorneroJ M, ParedesO, BaenaG, GiraldoS, TejedorS, FernándezN, . 2010.and models of Media Literacy in Europe: Between digital competence and critical understanding&author=Pérez-Tornero&publication_year= Trends and models of Media Literacy in Europe: Between digital competence and critical understanding.Anàlisi 40:85-100
  38. Pérez-TorneroJ M, TayieS, . 2012.training in media education: Curriculum and international experiences. [La formación de profesores en educación en medios: Currículo y experiencias internacionales&author=Pérez-Tornero&publication_year= Teacher training in media education: Curriculum and international experiences. [La formación de profesores en educación en medios: Currículo y experiencias internacionales]]Comunicar 39:10-14
  39. Pfaff-RüdigerS, RiesmeyerC, . 2016.into action. Media literacy as social process&author=Pfaff-Rüdiger&publication_year= Moved into action. Media literacy as social process.Journal of Children and Media 10(2):164-172
  40. PuddephattA, . 2016.Internet y la libertad de expresión. Cuadernos de Discusión de Comunicación e Información UNESCO 6.
  41. QuirósF, Sierra-CaballeroF, . 2016.espíritu MacBride. Neocolonialismo, comunicación-mundo y alternativas democráticas&author=&publication_year= El espíritu MacBride. Neocolonialismo, comunicación-mundo y alternativas democráticas. Quito: Ciespal.
  42. Rangel-ContlaJ C, . 1975.Estructura y orden de la sociedad.Nueva Antropología 1(1):5-30
  43. Real Academia Española (Ed.). 2014.Diccionario de la lengua española (23ª ed.). Actualización 2018.
  44. RedeckerC, . 2017.framework for the digital competence of educators: DigCompEdu&author=Redecker&publication_year= European framework for the digital competence of educators: DigCompEdu.Luxenbourg: Publications Office of the European Union.
  45. ReigR, . 2011.mercado. Contra la simplicidad del pensamiento crítico&author=&publication_year= Todo mercado. Contra la simplicidad del pensamiento crítico. Barcelona: Anthropos.
  46. ReigR, . 2017.para el estudio de la estructura mundial de la información&author=Reig&publication_year= Metodología para el estudio de la estructura mundial de la información.Estructura mediática y poder.
  47. ReigR, LabioA, . 2017.laberinto mundial de la información. Estructura mediática y poder&author=&publication_year= El laberinto mundial de la información. Estructura mediática y poder. Barcelona: Anthropos.
  48. ReigR, Mancinas-ChávezR, BocioA I, . 2017.estructural complejo: Propuesta metodológica desde el periodismo&author=Reig&publication_year= Enfoque estructural complejo: Propuesta metodológica desde el periodismo.Estudio del Mensaje Periodístico 23(1):191-208
  49. Sánchez-BravoA, . 1992. , ed. de Estructura de la Información&author=&publication_year= Manual de Estructura de la Información.Madrid: Fundación Ramón Areces.
  50. TiedeJ, GrafeS, HobbsR, . 2015.media competencies of preservice teachers in Germany and the United States: A comparative analysis of theory and practice&author=Tiede&publication_year= Pedagogical media competencies of preservice teachers in Germany and the United States: A comparative analysis of theory and practice.Peabody Journal of Education 90(4):533-545
  51. TulodzieckiG, GrafeS, . 2012.Approaches to learning with media and media literacy education-trends and current situation in Germany.Journal of Media Literacy Education 4(1)
  52. WallisR, BuckinghamD, . 2016.literacy: The UK’s undead cultural policy&author=Wallis&publication_year= Media literacy: The UK’s undead cultural policy.International Journal of Cultural Policy 25:1-16
  53. WardleC, DerakhshanH, . 2017.Information disorder. Toward an interdisciplinary framework for research and policymaking. Council of Europe Report.
  54. WilsonC, GrizzleA, TuazonR, AkyempongK, CheungC K, . 2011. , ed. mediática e informacional: Curriculum para profesores&author=&publication_year= Alfabetización mediática e informacional: Curriculum para profesores.París: UNESCO.
  55. WilsonC, . 2012.and Information literacy: Pedagogy and possibilities. [Alfabetización mediática e informacional: Proyecciones didácticas&author=Wilson&publication_year= Media and Information literacy: Pedagogy and possibilities. [Alfabetización mediática e informacional: Proyecciones didácticas]]Comunicar 39:15-24
Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/19
Accepted on 31/12/19
Submitted on 31/12/19

Volume 28, Issue 1, 2020
DOI: 10.3916/C62-2020-09
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Views 201
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?