Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The current scenario of crisis and change has prompted the idea of entrepreneurship as a way to develop new media business models that can be promoted by university training. In this study, we aim to assess the effects of such training. A qualitative study was conducted using in-depth interviews of Spanish journalism and communication entrepreneurs who have undergone university training in business creation and management. Our results show the positive effects of this training on entrepreneurship both in general and on specific aspects of entrepreneurial projects such as organization, business plan/model, marketing, innovation, social aspects and quality of life. Different patterns between the effects of university training on new initiatives and advanced projects were also observed. In this respect, the training supported the creation of new businesses and the development of existing ones. Finally, the suggestions for improving training and the limitations to entrepreneurship have revealed the importance of providing this type of education with a more practical, up-to-date approach that is interconnected with the business and university world. Therefore, examples of this work can be of vital importance in opening up new opportunities for sector development to enable future generations of journalists to fulfill their important social function.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction and state of the art

The journalistic crisis and views of the media sector’s transformation from an economic perspective have generated a great number of studies (Siles & Boczkowski, 2012). However, few studies have examined the application of entrepreneurship to the field of communication and journalism (Weezel, 2010). Within this field, the influence of media entrepreneurship training and education has been scarcely studied (Hang & Weezel, 2007). However, the existing literature raises a number of interesting points. One of these points has to do with the reluctance of future journalists and communication professionals to embrace entrepreneurship. Some studies provide evidence of the small number of students who consider entrepreneurship and self-employment a career option both in Spain (Casero-Ripollés & Cullell-March, 2013) and in other countries –the United Kingdom, for example– (Delano, 2002). Furthermore, as students progress in their training, they develop a disenchanted and cynical view towards entrepreneurship (Barnes & de-Villiers, 2017; Casero-Ripollés, Izquierdo-Castillo, & Doménech-Fabregat, 2016). The motives that explain this low predisposition in students to media entrepreneurship are both ethical issues and the primacy of the journalist model, understood as an employee, distanced from ownership structures. Some studies show that journalists distance themselves from and turn their backs to business issues to protect their professional independence (Ferrier, 2013). Renouncing entrepreneurship may thus avoid conflicts of interest that arise from simultaneously having to serve the public and pursue economic benefit (Baines & Kennedy, 2010).

Despite journalists' disinclination to entrepreneurship, various research studies show that university training, in particular, creates positive stimuli and increases students' entrepreneurial intentions (Aceituno, Bousoño, Escudero, & Herrera, 2014; Aceituno, Bousoño, & Herrera, 2015; Barnes & de-Villiers, 2017; Paniagua, Gómez, & González, 2014). Even media sector entrepreneurs themselves attach great importance to university training to generate innovative and creative businesses (Beltrán & Miguel, 2014). However, this issue raises a broad debate in the literature. Other research studies conclude that the effects of this training are not well known or consistent (Von-Graevenitz, Harhoff, & Weber, 2010) because it is difficult to assess the effect of training programs on entrepreneurship (Rasmussen & Sørheim, 2006). Even some educational programs that adhere very closely to the business reality are minimally effective and may even fail to support the students’ entrepreneurial intentions. This is the case of the “Junior Achievement Young Enterprise Student Mini-Company” (SMC), which is the main entrepreneurial initiative in secondary schools and colleges in the United States and Europe (Oosterbeek, Van-Praag, & Ijsselstein, 2010). Other studies also report the ineffectiveness of such training (Souitaris, Zerbinati, & Al-Laham, 2007). However, media entrepreneurship programs are proliferating, especially in the USA, and becoming more legitimate in the academic realm, although their contents are similar to each other to the point of being isomorphic (Sindik & Graybeal, 2017). Entrepreneurs are made, not born and it is therefore necessary to train them to take advantage of market opportunities (Krueger & Brazeal, 1994). This positive perception of entrepreneurship training is confirmed by other research studies (Peterman & Kennedy, 2003; Wang & Wong, 2004). Even in the United States, this is one of the fundamental trends from the educational world to face the journalism crisis (Anderson, 2017).

However, the literature reveals that journalism curricula are rarely oriented towards entrepreneurship (Blom & Davenport, 2012; Elmore & Massey, 2012; Hunter & Nel, 2011). University education is dominated by a traditional view of what journalism is and should be, and it prepares its professionals to be media workers or employees (Deuze, 2006). Universities lack the speed and agility to respond to the technological and business changes affecting journalism as well as the innovation and creativity required by media entrepreneurship (López, Rodríguez, & Pereira, 2017). Various experiences and experts show the need to equip students with attributes and skills related to business innovation, the empowerment of startup culture, statistical reasoning and entrepreneurship so that they can adapt to the new reality and take advantage of it (Baines & Kennedy, 2010; Barnes & de-Villiers, 2017; Briggs, 2012; Claussen, 2011; Ferrier & Batts, 2016; Griffin & Dunwoody, 2015; Lassila-Merisalo & Uskali, 2011), being able to become, in this way, both entrepreneurs of their own companies and intrapreneurs of the companies in which they work for others. It is important to do it from the very beginning of the Journalism curriculum (Chimbel, 2016). In this sense, these experts say journalism training should not be restricted to meeting the employee requirements of mainstream media companies. Instead, self-employment skills must be incorporated into the curriculum, so that, in addition to acquiring skills in developing journalistic and communication content, future professionals acquire business and financial management skills relevant to their sector. This approach poses a challenge for educators in the field of journalism and communication (Ferrier, 2013).

Given this context, the objective of this study is to assess the effects of university entrepreneurship training on entrepreneurial projects in communication and journalism in order to add understanding on the creation and management of new opportunities in this sector from which future generations of journalists can benefit.

2. Materials and methods

This study is based on the use of semi-structured interviews to explore the effects of university entrepreneurship training on the creation and development of entrepreneurial projects in the journalism and communication fields. The semi-structured interviews are a qualitative method and can be considered the most suitable approach to achieve our research objectives. It allows us to obtain data on the participants' views, practices, and behavior, offering a complete approach to a complex study topic for which quantitative approaches have not produced conclusive results (Rasmussen & Sørheim, 2006). Qualitative interviews also provide access to information that is difficult to obtain through other research techniques. The answers to research questions about the how and why of a process require qualitative approaches such as semi-structured interviews because quantitative approaches are geared towards responding to the what, who, where and how much (Yin, 2014). This study specifically focuses on how training affects entrepreneurship in the field of media and communication; therefore, the use and appropriateness of the qualitative method is justified. The study was conducted using COREQ guidelines (Tong, Sainssbury, & Craig, 2007) and RATS qualitative research review guidelines (BioMed Central, 2017). In our study, the questionnaire for the interview has been split into four general blocks as shown in Table 1.

2.1. Participant selection and recruitment

Participants were included in the sample if they met the following two main criteria: (1) They have acquired, in their undergraduate university education, knowledge in the field of business creation and management, (2) they have started to develop a full business plan for new business initiatives or have launched product or process expansions or innovations in entrepreneurial projects in the journalism and communication fields. The interviewees are active participants in business creation; hence, they are defined as promoters who have undergone a learning process to develop new initiatives or to expand or conduct product or process innovations. The inclusion of such participants enables access to accurate knowledge regarding the effect of entrepreneurship directly through the protagonists’ experience and perceptions. Spain is the geographical scope of reference of this study. In selecting sample participants, people from various Spanish regions (Valencia, Asturias, Canarias, Andalucía, Castilla-La Mancha and Cantabria) were selected, with a significant number of people from regions with a larger business network and greater population size (Madrid and Cataluña).

Participants were volunteers recruited through convenience sampling (Martín-Crespo & Salamanca, 2007). The sampling strategy prioritized feasibility, as the study’s subjects were difficult to reach. Therefore, as a starting point for finding participants that met the two main criteria, we used a list of 25 university students who pursued academic study in business creation and management in the Madrid Open University (MOU) and Jaume I University of Castellón between 2012 and 2016. The MOU students come from all over Spain, whereas the Jaume I University of Castellón students mainly come from Valencia and nearby regions, such as Cataluña or Aragon. The selection mentioned above was the main criteria for these lists of students, and we add a geographic criterion: subjects from several Spanish regions were included to ensure diversity, and a large number of subjects from the two major regions in the Spanish economy (Madrid and Cataluña) were included to ensure higher representativeness. In interview 14, data saturation was reached; there was no new or relevant material, and it was highly probable that additional interviews would not influence the results. The reason for this data saturation is due to aspects such as the reduction of barriers to enter the journalism sector (Hang & Weezel, 2007) and, additionally in the Spanish case, entrepreneurial effervescence and job loss (Asociación de la Prensa de Madrid, APM, 2014; APM, 2015). When students have entrepreneurial intentions and get through the appropriate training, they may get very motivated and transcend the barriers to implement their plans. This allows us to obtain a reasonable number of in-depth interviews for our research objectives. Also, it is important to note that the availability of key informants, those with innovative proposals likely to be imitated, is of concern in a difficult moment for the journalism sector in need to find new business models (Casero-Ripollés, 2010). Finally, our research sample comprised 14 participants (9 men and 5 women).

2.2. Ethics statement and data collection

The Ethics Committee of the MOU has approved this research. The potential members for our sample were initially contacted by phone by the authors and invited to participate. They were informed that the data they shared would be used for this study. Those who showed interest in participating did provide verbal expression of consent. Then they were extensively briefed on the research objectives and on the contents of the four blocks of the questionnaire for the semi-structured interviews.

This first phone contact lasted 30-40 minutes. Subsequently, the complete questionnaire was emailed (Table 1) to their personal addresses as provided by the participants. Once the researchers received the complete document, a first analysis of the interview content was conducted. The participants were contacted again by phone, to recheck the interview, ask for clarification or additional data, complete the answers to some questions or ask new questions that arose from previous answers. This second contact lasted 45-60 minutes.

The researchers served in both facilitative and neutral roles. They had a facilitative role in helping participants understand exactly what was expected of them in the questionnaire to obtain the maximum amount and quality of data. They played a neutral role to avoid influencing the participants' answers. For that reason, it was determined that allowing the participants to respond to the interview questionnaire through email was the best strategy to avoid influencing the responses and affecting the results. On this basis, the researchers' subsequent involvement in the recheck and interview enlargement process prevented the loss of information and guaranteed a minimal influence on the respondents.

The answers for blocks (2) and (3) were coded by three of the researchers involved in this study, with one of them acting as the coding coordinator. The fourth researcher, who was not involved in coding, reviewed the data and interpretations generated by the other researchers. No computer software was used for coding. The coding was designed following the guidelines below:

• Answer with positive effect (P). The student entrepreneurial intentions are increased due to its application of the acquired knowledge to the business project at the present moment.

• Answer with neutral effect (N). The student entrepreneurial intentions do not change either because he has not acquired knowledge to apply or because its application to the business project has not occurred at the present moment.


Aceituno-Aceituno et al 2018a-69569-en026.jpg

• Answer with negative effect (NE). The student entrepreneurial intentions diminished because of the acquisition of knowledge provided by the training.

Thereafter, the results from the 14 participants in the study were individually compared. As the second step, the results obtained for each of the 6 characteristics of these two blocks (2) and (3), were analyzed. Finally, we proceeded with the suggestions to improve the training and the suggested obstacles to entrepreneurship.

The analytic approach was based on an inductive method; it established a chain of evidence to formulate common patterns (and draw conclusions that were representative of the group) and build the explanation of the studied phenomenon. Thus, external validity is guaranteed (Dubé & Paré, 2003). The methodological approach for the data analysis was ethnography combined with discourse analysis. This study is based on approaches developed in a study on the entrepreneurial culture of young people in rural areas in Argentina (Secretaria de Agricultura, Ganadería, Pesca y Alimentación de Argentina, 2007), but adapted to the needs of entrepreneurship in the journalism and communication fields, characterized by the search for business models and innovative benefits that make this new work sphere highly desirable for future entrepreneurs.

3. Analysis and results

A detailed description of the entrepreneurial projects can be found in Table 2. As this table shows, students have increased their entrepreneurial intentions because of the provided training; in some cases, such as those of Castilla-La Mancha and Cataluña 2, this increase is quite significant.

In order to assess how the acquired knowledge has been applied to business projects, the information is summarized and coded according to the six characteristics established for this study, namely organization, business plan/model, marketing, innovation, social aspects and quality of life (Table 1).

According to this information, the training had positive effects on the organization of all entrepreneurial ventures. The technical and professional criteria provided were used to allow the projects in their early stages to lay the foundation for entrepreneurship planning and organization and in some cases to turn their business idea into a business plan (Asturias, Andalucía 1 and Valencia 1) and to learn organizational skills (Andalucía 2) For more advanced projects, these contributions improved the established organizational structure and permitted the expansion to new departments. Only in the case of Cantabria, a neutral effect is observed for the current non-application of organizational concepts.

Regarding the business plan/model and for most of the projects in their early stages, the provided expertise has had positive effects on its application to create a business plan, except for the cases of Madrid 1, Cantabria (for which the business plan was finished and to which new knowledge may only be incorporated if the company grows) and Valencia (financial knowledge to be applied in the future). In contrast, in the most advanced projects, the training fundamentally supported changes to the business plans of older businesses, except for Canarias 2, whose business plan was created as a result of the training.

Moreover, in the projects on their early stages, some initial business model cost optimization was observed (as in the cases of the Cataluña 1, Canarias 1 and Valencia 3 projects); furthermore, the Valencia 3 project even found a solution to its financial difficulties. In this regard, in all of the advanced projects, revenue growth and cost reductions were observed as a result of university training.


Aceituno-Aceituno et al 2018a-69569-en027.jpg

Regarding marketing, the training had positive effects on most projects in their early stages except in the cases of: Cantabria, which had already formalized their plans, Madrid 1, Andalucía 2 and Valencia 3. These effects are reflected in the support for planning and organizing this activity. Similarly, advanced projects were able to improve, develop and create new business plans by learning the importance of improving their adaptation to customer needs (Canarias 2 and Castilla-La Mancha) and to new technological realities (Madrid 2 and Cataluña 2).

Regarding innovation in early stage projects, positive effects were lower than on previous characteristics. Some of these projects had no positive effects (Cataluña 1 and Madrid 1), and some others exhibited only the assimilation of the importance of continuous innovative efforts necessary to achieve business success (Andalucía 1, Valencia 1 and Cantabria). In contrast, among advanced projects, training had a higher effect both on organisation (all projects) and on the creation of new products and services (all projects except Canarias 2).

According to the information obtained, only one entrepreneur who underwent training (Valencia 2) considered that the creation of a company might give rise to problematic relationships. Since this appreciation is related to the student's training, it could be understood as a negative effect, as it reduces his entrepreneurial intentions. In the case of projects on their early stages, most of the effects related to the social aspects are neutral and come from the project itself and not from the training, except in the cases of Valencia 1 (stakeholder and society relationship planning) and, Canarias 1 and Valencia 2 (product and service improvement and innovation). In contrast, for projects in their advanced stages it has had a positive effect in all cases except Canarias 2, whose social benefit is the achievement of a more communicative society and it comes from the project itself and not from the training.

Most projects experienced an improvement in quality of life and happiness; the two that did not (Andalucía 1 and Cantabria) neither showed a decrease of these characteristics (neutral effect). However, other factors related to the projects (personal fulfillment for being able to work in journalism or being their own boss, for example) are more typical of the projects in their early stages (neutral effect). In projects in their advanced stages, other factors related to the satisfaction to provide more professional management (positive effect) are observed.

Even though positive effects appear in all the projects, there are 5 projects on their early stages in which the neutral effects are predominant: Madrid 1 (1 Positive and 9 Neutral), Cantabria (1 Positive and 7 Neutral), Andalucía 2 (3 Positive and 4 Neutral), Cataluña 1 (3 Positive and 5 Neutral) and Andalucía 1 (3 Positive and 4 Neutral). The other 5 projects on their early stages have mostly positive effects: Valencia 2 (7 Positive and 1 Negative), Canarias 1 (7 Positive and 3 Neutral), Valencia 3 (6 Positive and 3 Neutral), Valencia 1 (5 Positive and 4 Neutral) and Asturias (4 Positive and 3 Neutral). Within advanced stage projects, there is a predominance of positive effects: Madrid 2 (12 Positive), Canarias (13 Positive and 1 Neutral), Castilla-La Mancha (9 Positive) and Cataluña 2 (9 Positive and 1 Neutral). The only case of a negative effect is Valencia 2.

As for the characteristics, they all have positive effects too. These effects are predominant over neutral ones in 4 characteristics: business/plan model (21 Positive and 3 Neutral), organization (17 Positive and 1 Neutral), marketing (13 Positive and 4 Neutral) and innovation (12 Positive and 5 Neutral). Neutral effects take over in the quality of life and happiness (12 Neutral and 7 Positive) and relationships and benefits with local society and stakeholders (19 Neutral and 13 Positive). This last characteristic is the only one with a negative effect.

To summarize, positive effects (83) are predominant in all projects and all the characteristics, over the neutral effects (44) and only one negative effect.

Regarding suggestions for improving training, providing expertise is the most prominent recommendation in the information obtained, especially concerning the presentation of case studies (Andalucía 2, Canarias 1, Canarias 2, Valencia 2, Valencia 3, Madrid 2 and Cataluña 2). Other options in this regard include providing more practical training (Madrid 1, Valencia 3 and Cataluña 2) and integrating the development of a personal project into the training (Cataluña 1 and Valencia 1). No clear consensus was observed in this key recommendation among the proposals of projects in their early stages and those of advanced projects. Discussions and interaction among students were also suggested and was very important to students of five projects in their early stages (Cataluña 1, Andalucía 1, Valencia 1, Canarias 1 and Valencia 2), which establishes a pattern among these new projects. Other recommendations provided by the students included making business creation and management a required course (Madrid 1 and Canarias 1), receiving personalized advice and moral support from teachers (Asturias), establishing contacts with editorial teams to understand the processes and conducting entrepreneurship workshops (Madrid 2).

To end the presentation of results, the limitations highlighted most frequently by students are closely related to the difficulty of making the business model feasible (Cataluña 1, Madrid 1, Asturias, Valencia 1 and Andalucía 2) or improving it (Castilla-La Mancha), the lack of entrepreneurship advice and support (Canarias 1, Cantabria, Madrid 2 and Cataluña 2) and an excessive legal and administrative burden (Andalucía 1, Cantabria, Canarias 1 and Madrid 2). The remaining limitations are of a personal nature: the lack of entrepreneurial experience (Valencia 2 and Valencia 3), a more significant personal commitment to enhancing activities with the newly acquired knowledge (Canarias 2) and the need to attract entrepreneurial project partners (Valencia 3). It was observed that there are greater limitations on projects in their early stages, and these limitations are especially concentrated when setting up a viable business model. This aspect is essential for the survival of and further development of new businesses and it is less critical in advanced projects.

4. Discussion and conclusions

The results show how university training, when applied to entrepreneurial projects in the journalism and communication areas, is capable to increase the students’ entrepreneurial intentions (Aceituno & al., 2014; Aceituno & al., 2017; Paniagua & al., 2014). Therefore, these results support the positive perceptions towards entrepreneurship training (Krueger & Brazeal, 1994; Peterman & Kennedy, 2003; Wang & Wong, 2004).

In addition, it is worth noting that this training has had positive effects in all the characteristics. In particular, these positive effects have been predominant over neutral effects in the business plan/model, organization, marketing, and innovation. Students have been able to perceive how effective training on these issues can increase the feasibility of their projects even in a highly competitive context where new business is difficult to formulate. This fact can explain the positive predominance effects.

In contrast, neutral effects are more significant than positive effects in quality of life, happiness and relationships and benefits with local society and stakeholders. These neutral effects should be attributed to the projects rather than to the training. It can be even asserted that the training has allowed more professional management of the projects, more innovation and better relation with stakeholders and society, elements which contributed to increase the student's satisfaction and therefore to positive effects on these aspects.

Different patterns for projects in their early stages and those in advanced stages were observed. For the latter, their organizational structures, business plans/models, cost and revenue structures and marketing plans were fundamentally improved by training support. Furthermore, organizational innovations and the creation of new products and services were observed. On the other hand, for the projects in their early stages, the basis for company planning and organizing were primarily created, with special attention to their business plans/models and marketing plans. In most projects, positive effects are predominant over neutral and negative effects. Therefore, it can be said that the training has supported the creation of new businesses and the development of others.

The most important recommendations collected from students suggest, on the one hand, to increase the expertise and the practical focus of the training and, on the other hand, to increase the discussion and interaction among students, especially in the projects on their early stages. These suggestions may be related to the scarcity of examples and the need to create or reformulate new business models in the sector. Therefore, studies such as the one presented in this work may bring significant value to student entrepreneurs. It is important to point out that although financing is a common difficulty for entrepreneurs, it does not require specific training for students with entrepreneurial projects in the journalism and communication areas because, as discussed above, new digital technologies considerably lower the entry barriers.

The most common limitations are the difficulty to create feasible business models, the lack of advice and follow-up and excessive bureaucracy. These problems highlight the importance of training that offers up-to-date knowledge in such areas as administration, grants and funding, management and new market opportunities.

Although the results on which these conclusions are sound in terms of the effectiveness of entrepreneurship training in entrepreneurial journalism and communication projects, future studies should complement this approach with other techniques and quantitative methods, such as surveys.

For all the above issues, the study’s findings indicate that training is effective in the creation and development of entrepreneurial projects in journalism and communication. This important feature may open new alternatives and opportunities to develop the sector and to help future generations of reporters fulfill their important social function.

Funding agency

This research is part of the projects referred to USE 3433/17 and UJI-B2017-55, both funded by the Jaume I University of Castellón.

References

Aceituno-Aceituno, P., Bousoño-Calzón, C., & Herrera-Gálvez, F.J. (2014). Una propuesta para impulsar el espíritu emprendedor y la capacitación en el futuro de la profesión periodística. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico, 21(2), 929-942. https://doi.org/10.5209/rev_ESMP.2015.v21.n2.50893

Aceituno-Aceituno, P., Bousoño-Calzón, C., Escudero-Garzás, J.J., & Herrera-Gálvez, F.J. (2014). Formación en emprendimiento para periodistas. El Profesional de la Información, 23(4), 409-414. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2014.jul.09

Anderson, C.W. (2017). Venture labor, the news crisis, and journalism education. International Journal of Communication, 11, 2033-2036. https://bit.ly/2KUvX9v

Asociación de la Prensa de Madrid (APM) (2014). Informe anual sobre la profesión periodística 2014. [2014 Annual report on the Journalism Profession]. https://bit.ly/2G98ii2

Asociación de la Prensa de Madrid (APM) (2015). Informe anual sobre la profesión periodística 2015. [2015 Annual report on the Journalism Profession]. https://bit.ly/2G98ii2

Baines, D., & Kennedy C. (2010). An education for independence: Should entrepreneurial skills be an essential part of the journalist’s toolbox? Journalism Practice, 4(1), 97-113. https://doi.org/10.1080/17512780903391912

Barnes, R., & de-Villiers-Scheepers, M.J. (2017). Tackling uncertainty for journalism graduates: A model for teaching experiential entrepreneurship. Journalism Practice, 1-21. https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2016.1266277

Beltrán, G.J., & Miguel, P. (2014). Doing culture, doing business: A new entrepreneurial spirit in the Argentine creative industries. International Journal of Cultural Studies, 17(1), 39-54. https://doi.org/10.1177/1367877912461906

Biomed Central (2017). Qualitative research review guidelines - RATS. London: BioMed Central, https://bit.ly/1WteYxh.

Blom, R., & Davenport, L.D. (2012). Searching for the core of journalism education program directors disagree on curriculum priorities. Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, 67(1), 70-86. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077695811428885

Briggs, M. (2012). Entrepreneurial journalism: How to build what's next for news. Los Angeles: Sage /CQ Press.

Casero-Ripollés, A. (2010). Prensa en Internet: nuevos modelos de negocio en el escenario de la convergencia. El Profesional de la Información, 19(6), 595-601. https://bit.ly/2G6gIXL

Casero-Ripollés, A., & Cullell-March C. (2013). Periodismo emprendedor. Estrategias para incentivar el autoempleo periodístico como modelo de negocio. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico, 19, 681-690. https://doi.org/10.5209/rev_ESMP.2013.v19.42151

Casero-Ripollés, A., Izquierdo-Castillo, J., & Doménech-Fabregat, H. (2016). The journalists of the future meet entrepreneurial journalism: Perceptions in the classroom. Journalism Practice, 10(2), 286-303. https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2015.1123108

Chimbel, A. (2016). Introduce entrepreneurship concepts early in journalism curriculum. Newspaper Research Journal, 37(4), 339-343. https://doi.org/10.1177/0739532916677057

Claussen, D. (2011). CUNY’s entrepreneurial journalism: Partially old wine in a new bottle, and not quite thirst-Quenching, but Still a Good Drink. Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, 66(1), 3-6. https://doi.org/10.1177/107769581106600101

Delano, A. (2002).The formation of the British journalist 1900-2000 (Doctoral Thesis). London: University of Westminster. https://bit.ly/2wxBYGi

Deuze, M. (2006). Global journalism education: A conceptual approach. Journalism Studies, 7(1), 19-34. https://doi.org/10.1080/14616700500450293

Dubé, L., & Paré, G. (2003). Rigor in information systems positivist case research: Current practices, trends, and recommendations. MIS Quarterly, 27(4), 597-636. https://bit.ly/2KOVzEZ

Elmore, C., & Massey, B. (2012). Need for instruction in entrepreneurial journalism: Perspective of full-time freelancers. Journal of Media Practice, 13(2), 109-124. https://bit.ly/2jNiVye

Ferrier, M.B. (2013). Media entrepreneurship curriculum development and faculty perceptions of what students should know. Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, 68(3), 222-241. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077695813494833

Ferrier, M.B., & Batts, B. (2016). Educators and professionals agree on outcomes for entrepreneurship courses. Newspaper Research Journal, 37(4), 322-338. https://doi.org/10.1177/0739532916677054

Griffin, R.J., & Dunwoody, S. (2015). Chair support, faculty entrepreneurship, and the teaching of statistical reasoning to journalism undergraduates in the United States. Journalism, 17(1), 97-118. https://doi.org/10.1177/1464884915593247

Hang, M., & Weezel, A.V. (2007). Media and entrepreneurship: What do we know and where should we go? Journal of Media Business Studies, 4(1), 51-70. https://doi.org/10.1080/16522354.2007.11073446

Hunter, A., & Nel, F.P. (2011). Equipping the entrepreneurial journalist: An exercise in creative enterprise. Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, 66(1), 9-24. https://doi.org/10.1177/107769581106600102

Krueger, N.F., & Brazeal, D.V. (1994). Entrepreneurial potential and potential entrepreneurs, entrepreneurship theory and practice, 18(3), 91-104. https://bit.ly/2KfHXl4

Lassila-Merisalo, M., & Uskali, T. (2011). How to educate innovation journalists? Experiences of innovation journalism education in Finland 2004-2010. Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, 66(1), 25-38. https://doi.org/10.1177/107769581106600103

López-García, X., Rodríguez-Vázquez, A.I., & Pereira-Fariña, X. (2017). Technological skills and new professional profiles: Present challenges for journalism [Competencias tecnológicas y nuevos perfiles profesionales: desafíos del periodismo actual]. Comunicar, 53, 81-90. https://doi.org/10.3916/C53-2017-08

Martín-Crespo-Blanco, M.C., & Salamanca-Castro, A.B. (2007). El muestreo en la investigación cualitativa. Nure Investigación, 27. https://bit.ly/2G7ZDfJ

Oosterbeek, H., Van-Praag, M., & Ijsselstein, A. (2010). The impact of entrepreneurship education on entrepreneurship skills and motivation. European Economic Review, 54(3), 442-454. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.euroecorev.2009.08.002

Paniagua-Rojano, F.J., Gómez-Aguilar, M., & González-Cortés, M.E. (2014). Incentivar el emprendimiento periodístico desde la Universidad. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 69, 548-570. https://bit.ly/2jQndoR

Peterman, N.E., & Kennedy J. (2003). Enterprise education: Influencing students’ perceptions of entrepreneurship. Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, 28(2), 129-144. https://bit.ly/2s0Qlhv

Rasmussen, E.A., & Sørheim R. (2006). Action-based entrepreneurship education. Technovation, 26(2), 185-194. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.technovation.2005.06.012

Secretaria de Agricultura, Ganadería, Pesca y Alimentación (Ed.) (2007). Evaluación de impacto proyecto piloto jóvenes emprendedores rurales. Promoción de cultura emprendedora. [Evaluation of the young rural entrepreneurs pilot project. Promoting entrepreneurship culture]. https://bit.ly/2jOqdlt

Siles, I., & Boczkowski, P.J. (2012). Making sense of the newspaper crisis: A critical assessment of existing research and an agenda for future work. New Media and Society, 14(8), 1375-1394. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444812455148

Sindik, A., & Graybeal, G.M. (2017). Media entrepreneurship programs: Emerging isomorphic patterns. International Journal on Media Management, 19(1), 55-76. https://doi.org/10.1080/14241277.2017.1279617

Souitaris, V., Zerbinati, S., & Al-Laham A. (2007). Do entrepreneurship programmes raise entrepreneurial intention of science and engineering students? The effect of learning, inspiration and resources. Journal of Business Venturing, 22, 566-591. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusvent.2006.05.002

Tong, A., Sainsbury, P., & Craig, J. (2007). Consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research (COREQ): a 32-item checklist for interviews and focus groups. International Journal for Quality in Health Care, 19(6), 349-357. https://doi.org/10.1093/intqhc/mzm042

Von-Graevenitz, G., Harhoff, D., & Weber, R. (2010). The effects of entrepreneurship education. Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 76(1), 90-112. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jebo.2010.02.015

Wang, C.K., & Wong, P.K. (2004). Entrepreneurial interest of university students in Singapore. Technovation, 24, 163-172. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0166-4972(02)00016-0

Weezel, A.V. (2010). Creative Destruction: Why not researching entrepreneurial media? International Journal on Media Management, 12(1), 47-49. https://doi.org/10.1080/14241270903558442

Yin, R.K. (2014). Case study research: Design and methods. Thousand Oaks: Sage.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

El escenario actual de crisis y cambios ha llevado a pensar en el emprendimiento como una nueva vía para el desarrollo de nuevos modelos de negocio en los medios de comunicación, que puede ser fomentado por la formación universitaria. El objetivo de este estudio es valorar los efectos de dicha formación, para lo que se ha desarrollado una investigación cualitativa basada en entrevistas en profundidad entre emprendedores españoles de periodismo y comunicación que han recibido formación universitaria en creación y gestión de empresas. Los resultados muestran el efecto positivo de esta formación sobre el emprendimiento en general y también sobre aspectos concretos de los proyectos empresariales: organización, plan/modelo de negocio, marketing, innovación, aspectos sociales y calidad de vida. También, se han observado diferentes pautas entre los efectos obtenidos para las nuevas iniciativas y para los proyectos avanzados. En este sentido, la formación ha apoyado la creación de los nuevos negocios. Por último, las sugerencias para mejorar la formación y las limitaciones al emprendimiento aportadas han revelado la importancia de dotar a este tipo de educación de mayor carácter práctico, actualizado e interconectado con el mundo empresarial y universitario. Por ello, los ejemplos de este trabajo pueden resultar de vital importancia para abrir nuevas oportunidades al desarrollo del sector que permitan a las futuras generaciones de periodistas cumplir su importante función social.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

La crisis periodística y la transformación del sector desde una óptica económica ha generado un gran número de estudios (Siles & Boczkowski, 2012). Sin embargo, pocos han examinado la aplicación del emprendimiento al campo de la comunicación y el periodismo (Weezel, 2010). La influencia de la formación en emprendimiento en los medios de comunicación ha sido escasamente estudiada (Hang & Weezel, 2007). No obstante, la literatura existente plantea una serie de puntos interesantes, como el de la renuencia de los futuros periodistas y profesionales de la comunicación a sopesar el emprendimiento.

Algunos estudios evidencian el reducido número de estudiantes que lo consideran junto al autoempleo como una opción laboral tanto en España (Casero-Ripollés & Cullell-March, 2013) como en otros países, el Reino Unido, por ejemplo (Delano, 2002). Además, a medida que los estudiantes progresan en su formación, desarrollan una visión desencantada y escéptica hacia el emprendimiento (Barnes & de-Villiers, 2017; Casero-Ripollés, Izquierdo-Castillo, & Doménech-Fabregat, 2016). Uno de los motivos de esta baja predisposición, junto a la primacía del modelo del periodista entendido como empleado y alejado de las estructuras de propiedad, son los aspectos éticos. Algunos estudios indican que los periodistas dan la espalda y establecen distancia con las cuestiones empresariales para proteger su independencia profesional (Ferrier, 2013). Renunciar al emprendimiento evitaría los conflictos de intereses al servir simultáneamente al público y buscar el beneficio económico (Baines & Kennedy, 2010).

Pese a la escasa inclinación de los periodistas hacia el emprendimiento, diversas investigaciones demuestran que la formación, especialmente la universitaria, crea estímulos positivos e incrementa la intención emprendedora de los estudiantes (Aceituno, Bousoño, Escudero, & Herrera, 2014; Aceituno, Bousoño, & Herrera, 2015; Barnes & de-Villiers, 2017; Paniagua, Gómez, & González, 2014). Incluso los propios emprendedores de los sectores comunicativos dan una gran importancia a la formación universitaria para generar negocios innovadores y creativos (Beltrán & Miguel, 2014). Sin embargo, esta cuestión genera un amplio debate en la literatura. Otras investigaciones concluyen que los efectos de esta educación no son muy conocidos ni consistentes (Von-Graevenitz, Harhoff, & Weber, 2010), dado que es complicado evaluar el efecto de los programas de formación en emprendimiento (Rasmussen & Sørheim, 2006). Es más, algunos programas educativos muy cercanos a la realidad empresarial son escasamente efectivos y muestran una disminución en las intenciones emprendedoras de los estudiantes, como por ejemplo el «Junior Achievement Young Enterprise student mini-company» (SMC), que es la principal iniciativa emprendedora en institutos de educación secundaria y colleges de Estados Unidos y Europa (Oosterbeek, Van-Praag, & Ijsselstein, 2010).

Otros estudios también afirman esta inefectividad (Souitaris, Zerbinati, & Al-Laham, 2007). Sin embargo, los programas de emprendimiento en medios de comunicación están proliferando, especialmente en los Estados Unidos, y se están legitimando en el ámbito académico, aunque sus contenidos son similares entre sí, hasta el punto de ser isomórficos (Sindik & Graybeal, 2017). El emprendedor no nace, se hace, y por ello, es preciso capacitarle para que aproveche las oportunidades del mercado (Krueger & Brazeal, 1994). Esta percepción positiva hacia la formación en emprendimiento es confirmada por otras investigaciones (Peterman & Kennedy, 2003; Wang & Wong, 2004). Incluso en los Estados Unidos, esta es una de las tendencias fundamentales del mundo educativo para enfrentar la crisis del periodismo (Anderson, 2017).

No obstante, la literatura revela que el currículum de los periodistas está escasamente orientado hacia el emprendimiento (Blom & Davenport, 2012; Elmore & Massey, 2012; Hunter & Nel, 2011). En la formación universitaria predomina una visión tradicional de lo que es y debe ser el periodismo que prepara a sus profesionales para ser empleados (Deuze, 2006). Las universidades han respondido con poca rapidez y agilidad al contexto de cambios tecnológicos y empresariales en los que está inmerso el periodismo, así como a la innovación y creatividad requeridas por el emprendimiento en comunicación (López-García, Rodríguez-Vázquez, & Pereira-Fariña, 2017). Diversas experiencias y expertos muestran la necesidad de equipar a los estudiantes con atributos y capacidades vinculadas a la innovación empresarial, al empoderamiento de la cultura startup, al razonamiento estadístico y al emprendimiento para que puedan adaptarse al nuevo escenario y aprovecharlo (Baines & Kennedy, 2010; Barnes & de-Villiers, 2017; Briggs, 2012; Claussen, 2011; Ferrier & Batts, 2016; Griffin & Dunwoody, 2015; Lassila-Merisalo & Uskali, 2011). Pudiendo convertirse, de esta manera, en emprendedores de su propias empresas e intraemprendedores de las empresas en las que trabajan para otros y, además, es importante hacerlo desde el comienzo del curriculum de Periodismo (Chimbel, 2016).

En este sentido, estos expertos indican que se debe evitar reducir esta formación a los meros requerimientos de los empleadores de las principales empresas de medios. Se debe, en cambio, incorporar competencias de autoempleo en las que junto a las necesarias para elaborar contenidos, los futuros profesionales adquieran habilidades de gestión empresarial y financiera adaptadas a su sector, cuestión que plantea un reto para los educadores en el campo del periodismo y la comunicación (Ferrier, 2013).

Dado este contexto, el objetivo de esta investigación es valorar los efectos de la formación universitaria sobre el emprendimiento en proyectos empresariales de comunicación y periodismo para aportar conocimiento en la creación y gestión de nuevas oportunidades en este sector para el beneficio de las futuras generaciones de periodistas.

2. Materiales y métodos

Esta investigación se basa en la técnica de las entrevistas semiestructuradas para explorar los efectos de la formación universitaria en emprendimiento sobre la creación y desarrollo de proyectos empresariales en el campo del periodismo y la comunicación. Este método cualitativo puede considerarse el enfoque más adecuado para lograr los objetivos de la investigación, pues permite obtener datos sobre las concepciones, las prácticas y el comportamiento de los participantes, ofreciendo una aproximación completa para un tema de estudio complejo para el cual los enfoques cuantitativos no han producido resultados concluyentes (Rasmussen & Sørheim, 2006). Estas entrevistas también brindan acceso a información que es difícil de obtener mediante otras técnicas de investigación. Las respuestas a cuestiones de investigación sobre el cómo y el porqué de un proceso requieren enfoques cualitativos, como las entrevistas semiestructuradas, porque los cuantitativos están orientados a responder al qué, quién, dónde y cuánto (Yin, 2014). Esta investigación se centra específicamente en cómo incide la formación en emprendimiento en el sector del periodismo y la comunicación; por tanto, se justifica la elección y la adecuación de este método. En el estudio se siguieron las pautas de COREQ (Tong, Sainssbury, & Craig, 2007) y de revisión de investigación cualitativa de RATS (BioMed Central, 2017). Como se muestra en la Tabla 1, el cuestionario para la entrevista se ha dividido en cuatro bloques generales.

2.1. Selección y reclutamiento de participantes

Los dos criterios principales de inclusión de los participantes en la muestra fueron: 1) Han adquirido, en su formación universitaria de Grado, conocimientos del campo de la creación y la gestión empresarial; 2) Han comenzado a elaborar un plan de empresa completo para nuevas iniciativas empresariales o han efectuado ampliaciones o innovaciones de producto o proceso en proyectos emprendedores del campo del periodismo y la comunicación. Los entrevistados son participantes activos en la creación de negocios; por tanto, se definen como promotores que han atravesado un proceso de aprendizaje para desarrollar nuevas iniciativas o expandir o efectuar innovaciones de productos o procesos. Esta inclusión permite acceder a un conocimiento preciso sobre el efecto del emprendimiento directamente a través de la experiencia y las percepciones de los protagonistas. España es el ámbito geográfico de referencia del estudio. En la selección de participantes, se han combinado personas de diversas regiones españolas (Comunidad Valenciana, Asturias, Canarias, Andalucía, Castilla-La Mancha y Cantabria) con la presencia destacada de personas de regiones con un mayor tejido empresarial y volumen de población (Madrid y Cataluña).

Los participantes fueron voluntarios reclutados mediante muestreo de conveniencia (Martín-Crespo & Salamanca, 2007). La estrategia de muestreo priorizó la viabilidad, ya que los sujetos del estudio eran difíciles de alcanzar. Por tanto, como punto de partida para encontrar participantes que cumplieran los dos criterios principales, se utilizó una lista de 25 estudiantes universitarios que cursaron estudios académicos en creación y gestión de empresas en la Universidad a Distancia de Madrid (UDIMA) y la Universitat Jaume I de Castellón entre 2012 y 2016. Los estudiantes de UDIMA proceden de toda España, mientras que los de la Universidad Jaume I de Castellón provienen principalmente de Valencia y regiones cercanas, como Cataluña o Aragón.

A los criterios principales de selección antes mencionados, se agrega un criterio geográfico, incluyendo sujetos de varias regiones españolas para garantizar la diversidad, y un gran número de sujetos de las dos principales regiones de la economía española (Madrid y Cataluña) para garantizar una mayor representatividad. En la entrevista 14 se alcanzó la saturación de datos; no surgió material nuevo o relevante, y era altamente probable que entrevistas adicionales no influyeran en los resultados obtenidos. El motivo de esta saturación de datos se debe a aspectos como la reducción de las barreras de entrada al sector (Hang & Weezel, 2007) y, adicionalmente en el caso español, de efervescencia empresarial y pérdida de empleo (Asociación de la Prensa de Madrid, APM, 2014; APM, 2015). Cuando los estudiantes tienen intenciones emprendedoras y reciben formación adecuada, no encuentran excesivas barreras para aplicarlo y además están muy motivados a hacerlo, por lo que este número de casos para esta metodología de entrevista en profundidad se adapta fácilmente a los objetivos de la investigación. También hay que tener en cuenta las dificultades para conseguir mayores cifras de informantes claves, por tratarse en la mayoría de los casos de propuestas innovadoras fácilmente imitables, en un momento de dificultades del sector para formular nuevos modelos de negocio (Casero-Ripollés, 2010). Por tanto, la muestra quedó integrada por 14 participantes (9 hombres y 5 mujeres).

2.2. Declaración de ética y recopilación de datos

El Comité de Ética de la UDIMA ha aprobado esta investigación. Los miembros potenciales de la muestra fueron contactados inicialmente por teléfono por los autores e invitados a participar. Se les comunicó que los datos que compartirían se usarían para este estudio. Aquellos que mostraron interés en participar proporcionaron un consentimiento verbal. Posteriormente fueron ampliamente informados sobre los objetivos de la investigación y los contenidos de los cuatro bloques del cuestionario de las entrevistas.

Este primer contacto telefónico duró de 30 a 40 minutos. Posteriormente, el cuestionario completo les fue enviado por correo electrónico (Tabla 1). Una vez que los investigadores recibieron el documento completo, se realizó un primer análisis del contenido de la entrevista. Los participantes fueron contactados de nuevo por teléfono, para volver a verificar la entrevista, pedir aclaraciones o datos adicionales, completar las respuestas de algunas preguntas o hacer nuevas preguntas derivadas de respuestas anteriores. Este segundo contacto duró 45-60 minutos.


Aceituno-Aceituno et al 2018a-69569 ov-es026.jpg

Los investigadores sirvieron tanto en roles facilitadores como neutrales. Tuvieron un papel facilitador al ayudar a los participantes a comprender exactamente qué se esperaba de ellos en el cuestionario para obtener la cantidad y calidad máxima de los datos. Jugaron un papel neutral para evitar influir en las respuestas de los participantes. Por esa razón, se determinó que la respuesta al cuestionario por correo electrónico era la mejor estrategia para evitar influir en las respuestas y afectar los resultados. Sobre esta base, la participación posterior de los investigadores en el proceso de verificación y ampliación de la entrevista evitó la pérdida de información y garantizó una influencia mínima en los encuestados.

Las respuestas para los bloques 2 y 3 fueron codificadas por tres de los investigadores participantes en esta investigación, con uno de ellos actuando como coordinador de la codificación. El cuarto investigador, que no participó en la codificación, revisó los datos y las interpretaciones generadas por los otros investigadores. No se utilizó ningún software para la codificación, que se diseñó bajo las siguientes pautas:

• Respuesta con efecto positivo (P): Las intenciones emprendedoras del estudiante se incrementan debido a la aplicación de la adquisición de conocimientos al proyecto empresarial en el momento presente.

• Respuesta con efecto neutro (N): Las intenciones emprendedoras del estudiante no varían porque no ha adquirido conocimientos para aplicar o esta aplicación de conocimientos al proyecto empresarial se producirá en el futuro.

• Respuesta con efecto negativo (NE): Las intenciones emprendedoras disminuyen por la adquisición de conocimientos proporcionada por la formación.

Tras la codificación, se compararon individualmente los resultados de los 14 participantes, y posteriormente, se analizaron los resultados obtenidos para cada una de las 6 características de los bloques (ii) y (iii), y las sugerencias para mejorar la formación y las limitaciones al emprendimiento.

El enfoque analítico se basó en el método inductivo, estableciendo una cadena de evidencias para formular patrones comunes y extraer conclusiones representativas del conjunto capaces de construir la explicación del fenómeno estudiado. De esta forma, se garantiza la validez externa (Dubé & Paré, 2003). La orientación metodológica para el análisis de datos fue la etnografía combinada con el análisis del discurso. Esta investigación se basa en los planteamientos desarrollados en un estudio sobre la cultura emprendedora de los jóvenes de entornos rurales en Argentina (Secretaria de Agricultura, Ganadería, Pesca y Alimentación de Argentina, 2007), pero adaptado a las necesidades del emprendimiento en el periodismo y la comunicación, caracterizadas por la búsqueda de modelos de negocio y de beneficios innovadores que hagan realmente deseable esta nueva vía laboral para sus futuros emprendedores.

3. Análisis y resultados

Una descripción detallada de los proyectos emprendedores se puede encontrar en la Tabla 2. Como muestra esta tabla, los estudiantes han aumentado sus intenciones emprendedoras por la formación proporcionada; en algunos casos, como los de Castilla-La Mancha y Cataluña 2, este incremento es bastante significativo.


Aceituno-Aceituno et al 2018a-69569 ov-es027.jpg

Para valorar cómo se ha aplicado el conocimiento adquirido a los proyectos emprendedores, la información se resume y codifica de acuerdo con las seis características establecidas para este estudio: organización, plan/modelo de negocio, marketing, innovación, aspectos sociales y calidad de vida (Tabla 1).

Según esta información, la formación ha tenido efectos positivos sobre la organización de todos los emprendimientos. Los criterios técnicos y profesionales aportados han servido para que las nuevas iniciativas sienten las bases de la planificación y organización de su emprendimiento y en algunos casos para que conviertan su idea emprendedora en un plan de empresa (Asturias, Andalucía 1 y Valencia 1) y conozcan habilidades organizativas (Andalucía 2). En el caso de los proyectos más avanzados, estas aportaciones han mejorado la estructura organizativa establecida y la ampliación hacia nuevos departamentos. Únicamente en el caso de Cantabria, se observa un efecto neutro por la no aplicación por el momento de conceptos organizativos.

Por lo que respecta al plan/modelo de negocio, en la mayoría de las nuevas iniciativas los conocimientos aportados han tenido efectos positivos por su aplicación para crear el plan de negocio, excepto en los efectos neutros para los casos de Madrid 1, Cantabria (cuyo plan de negocios estaba terminado y al cual los nuevos conocimientos sólo pueden incorporarse si la empresa crece) y Valencia (conocimientos financieros a aplicar en el futuro). Por el contrario, en los proyectos más avanzados el efecto formativo ha apoyado fundamentalmente la modificación del plan de negocios antiguo, salvo para Canarias 2, cuyo plan de negocios ha sido creado a partir de la formación recibida.

Además, en las nuevas iniciativas se observan algunos casos de optimización de los costes iniciales del modelo de negocio como el de los proyectos Cataluña 1, Canarias 1 y Valencia 3, e incluso este último ha encontrado una solución para sus dificultades de financiación. En este aspecto, en todos los proyectos avanzados se observan incrementos de los ingresos y reducción de los costes como resultado de la formación universitaria.

En relación con el marketing, la formación ha tenido efectos positivos en la mayoría de las nuevas iniciativas emprendedoras, excepto en los casos de Cantabria, que ya tenía formalizado este plan, Madrid 1, Andalucía 2 y Valencia 3. Estos efectos se han reflejado en el apoyo para planificar y organizar esta actividad. Igualmente, los proyectos avanzados han podido mejorar, desarrollar y crear nuevos planes comerciales con el aprendizaje de la importancia de conseguir una mayor adaptación a las necesidades de los clientes (Canarias 2 y Castilla-La Mancha) y a las nuevas realidades tecnológicas (Madrid 2 y Cataluña 2).

Con respecto a la innovación, los efectos positivos son menores en las nuevas iniciativas que en las anteriores características, con proyectos que no han tenido ninguno (Cataluña 1 y Madrid 1), y algunos que sólo han supuesto una asimilación de la importancia del continuo esfuerzo innovador necesario para conseguir el éxito empresarial (Andalucía 1, Valencia 1 y Cantabria). Por el contrario, en los proyectos avanzados se observan más efectos de la formación tanto en el ámbito organizativo (todos los proyectos) como en el de la creación de nuevos productos y servicios (todos los proyectos, excepto Canarias 2).

De acuerdo con la información obtenida, únicamente un solo proyecto de emprendimiento apoyado desde la formación (Valencia 2), contempla la posibilidad de que se puedan producir relaciones problemáticas con la creación de la empresa, lo que podría ser entendido como un efecto negativo, al haber sido la formación la que ha proporcionado este conocimiento que puede reducir las intenciones emprendedoras del estudiante. En el caso de las nuevas iniciativas, la mayoría de los efectos en relación con los aspectos sociales son neutros y procedentes del propio proyecto y no de la formación, excepto en los casos de Valencia 1 (planificación de las relaciones con los stakeholders y la sociedad) y, Canarias 1 y Valencia 2 (mejora e innovación de productos y servicios). Todo lo contrario sucede en los proyectos avanzados, en los que la formación ha tenido un efecto positivo en todos los casos excepto en el proyecto de Canarias 2, cuyo beneficio social en forma de un logro de una sociedad más comunicativa procede del propio proyecto.

La mayoría de los proyectos ha experimentado una mejora en su calidad de vida y felicidad, excepto dos (Andalucía 1 y Cantabria), que tampoco han mostrado un decrecimiento en estos aspectos (efecto neutro). No obstante, factores relacionados con los propios proyectos (realización personal por poder dedicarse a la profesión periodística o sentirse su propio jefe, por ejemplo) son más propios de las nuevas iniciativas (efecto neutro), mientras que en los proyectos avanzados se observa la satisfacción por poder prestar una gestión más profesional debido a la formación recibida (efecto positivo).

Aunque en todos los proyectos aparecen efectos positivos, hay 5 proyectos de nueva iniciativa en los que predominan los efectos neutros: Madrid 1 (1 Positivo y 9 Neutros), Cantabria (1 Positivo y 7 Neutros), Andalucía 2 (3 Positivos y 4 Neutros), Cataluña 1 (3 Positivos y 5 Neutros) y Andalucía 1 (3 Positivos y 4 Neutros). En los otros 5 proyectos de nueva iniciativa tienen mayoría los efectos positivos: Valencia 2 (7 Positivos y 1 Negativo), Canarias 1 (7 Positivos y 3 Neutros), Valencia 3 (6 Positivos y 3 Neutros), Valencia 1 (5 Positivos y 4 Neutros) y Asturias (4 Positivos y 3 Neutros). También, en los proyectos avanzados existe un predominio de los efectos positivos: Madrid 2 (12 Positivos), Canarias 2 (13 Positivos y 1 Neutro), Castilla-La Mancha (9 Positivos) y Cataluña 2 (9 Positivos y 1 Neutro). Únicamente existe un efecto negativo en el proyecto de Valencia 2.

En relación con las características todas igualmente tienen efectos positivos. Estos efectos predominan sobre los neutros en 4 características: plan/modelo de negocio (21 Positivos y 3 Neutros), organización (17 Positivos y 1 Neutro), marketing (13 Positivos y 4 Neutros) e innovación (12 Positivos y 5 Neutros). Los efectos neutros son mayores en calidad de vida y felicidad (12 Neutros y 7 Positivos) y relaciones y beneficios con sociedad local y stakeholders (19 Neutros y 13 Positivos), siendo está última característica la única con un efecto negativo.

Como resumen de todos estos datos, se observa en el conjunto de todos los proyectos y características una mayoría de efectos positivos (83), sobre los efectos neutros (44) y el único efecto negativo.

Por lo que respecta a las sugerencias para mejorar la formación, la aportación de conocimientos prácticos es la recomendación más destacada sobre todo en lo que se refiere a la exposición de casos prácticos con 7 proyectos (Andalucía 2, Canarias 1, Canarias 2, Valencia 2, Valencia 3, Madrid 2 y Cataluña 2). Otras opciones en este sentido práctico son dotar a la formación de este mayor carácter práctico (Madrid 1, Valencia 3 y Cataluña 2) y la integración en la formación del desarrollo de un proyecto propio (Cataluña 1 y Valencia 1). No se observan pautas claras en esta recomendación principal entre las propuestas de las nuevas iniciativas y las de los proyectos avanzados. Los debates y la interactuación entre los propios alumnos es otro tipo de sugerencia muy destacada por los alumnos de cinco nuevas iniciativas (Cataluña 1, Andalucía 1, Valencia 1, Canarias 1 y Valencia 2), lo que puede establecer una pauta por parte de estos nuevos proyectos. Otras recomendaciones formuladas por los alumnos han sido la obligatoriedad de la asignatura de creación y gestión de empresas (Madrid 1 y Canarias 1), el mantenimiento del asesoramiento y apoyo moral por parte de los docentes (Asturias), contactos con equipos de redacción para conocer los procesos y celebración de talleres sobre emprendimiento (Madrid 2).

Para finalizar la exposición de resultados, las limitaciones más destacadas por los alumnos se encuentran muy relacionadas con la dificultad para hacer viable el modelo de negocio (Cataluña 1, Madrid 1, Asturias, Valencia 1 y Andalucía 2) o mejorarlo (Castilla-La Mancha), las carencias en el asesoramiento y acompañamiento al emprendimiento (Canarias 1, Cantabria, Madrid 2 y Cataluña 2) y una excesiva carga de aspectos legales y administrativos (Andalucía 1, Cantabria, Canarias 1 y Madrid 2). El resto de las limitaciones son de tipo personal: la falta de experiencia emprendedora (Valencia 2 y Valencia 3), una mayor dedicación personal por el incremento de las actividades iniciadas con el nuevo conocimiento adquirido (Canarias 2) y la necesidad de conseguir colaboradores para el proyecto emprendedor (Valencia 3). Se observa que las limitaciones son superiores en las nuevas iniciativas y, muy especialmente concentradas, en el establecimiento de un modelo de negocio viable. Esta aspecto es básico para la supervivencia de los nuevos negocios y su posterior desarrollo, una cuestión que está más lograda en los proyectos avanzados.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Los resultados muestran cómo la adquisición de conocimientos proporcionada por la formación universitaria aplicada sobre los proyectos empresariales de periodismo y comunicación ha incrementado las intenciones emprendedoras de los estudiantes (Aceituno, & al., 2014; Aceituno & al., 2015; Barnes & de-Villiers, 2017; Paniagua & al, 2014). Por tanto, estos resultados confirman las percepciones positivas hacia la formación para el emprendimiento (Krueger & Brazeal, 1994; Peterman & Kennedy, 2003; Wang & Wong, 2004).

Además, resulta necesario destacar que la formación ha tenido efectos positivos en todas las características, con un predominio sobre los efectos neutros en el plan/modelo de negocio, la organización, el marketing y la innovación. Los estudiantes han podido percibir cómo una formación efectiva sobre estas características puede aumentar la viabilidad de sus proyectos, incluso en un contexto altamente competitivo donde es difícil formular nuevos negocios. Este hecho puede explicar el predominio de los efectos positivos.

Por el contrario, los efectos neutros son mayores que los efectos positivos en la calidad de vida, la felicidad y las relaciones y los beneficios con la sociedad local y los «stakeholders». Estos efectos neutros se deben atribuir a los proyectos más que a la formación. Incluso se puede afirmar que la formación ha permitido una gestión más profesional de los proyectos, más innovación y una mejor relación con los «stakeholders» y la sociedad, elementos que contribuyeron a aumentar la satisfacción de los estudiantes y, por tanto, los efectos positivos en estos aspectos.

Igualmente, se han observado diferentes pautas entre los efectos positivos para las nuevas iniciativas y para los proyectos avanzados. Para estos últimos, con el apoyo de la formación se ha mejorado fundamentalmente la estructura organizativa, el plan/modelo de negocio, los ingresos y los costes, el plan comercial y se han facilitado innovaciones tanto organizativas como en la creación de nuevos productos y servicios, mientras que en las nuevas iniciativas con el apoyo de la formación se han creado principalmente las bases para la planificación y la organización de su emprendimiento, con una atención especial hacia el plan/modelo de negocio y el plan de marketing. Además, estos efectos positivos han predominado sobre los neutros y el único negativo en la mayoría de los proyectos. Por tanto, la formación ha apoyado la creación de los nuevos negocios y el desarrollo de los avanzados.

En relación con las sugerencias, las más destacadas recomiendan, por un lado, aumentar la experiencia y el enfoque práctico de la formación y, por otro lado, incrementar el debate y la interacción entre estudiantes, especialmente en los proyectos en sus etapas iniciales. Estas sugerencias pueden estar relacionadas con la escasez de ejemplos y la necesidad de crear o reformular nuevos modelos de negocios en el sector. Por tanto, estudios como el presentado en este trabajo pueden aportar un gran valor a los estudiantes emprendedores. Es importante señalar que aunque la financiación es una dificultad común para los emprendedores, no requiere una formación específica para estudiantes con proyectos en los campos del periodismo y comunicación porque, como se expuso anteriormente, las nuevas tecnologías digitales reducen considerablemente las barreras de entrada.

Las limitaciones más comunes son la dificultad para crear modelos de negocio viables, la falta de asesoramiento y seguimiento y una burocracia excesiva. Estos problemas destacan la importancia de una formación que ofrezca conocimientos actualizados en aspectos administrativos, subvenciones y financiación, gestión y nuevas oportunidades de mercado.

Aunque los resultados sobre los que se fundamentan estas conclusiones son sólidos en relación con la efectividad de la formación en emprendimiento sobre proyectos emprendedores de periodismo y comunicación, futuros estudios deberán complementar este enfoque con otras técnicas y metodologías cuantitativas como la encuesta.

Por todo lo expuesto anteriormente, las conclusiones del estudio apoyan que la formación es efectiva en la creación y desarrollo de proyectos emprendedores de periodismo y comunicación. Este importante aspecto puede abrir nuevas alternativas y oportunidades para desarrollar el sector y ayudar a las generaciones futuras de periodistas a cumplir su importante función social.

Apoyos

Esta investigación forma parte de los proyectos con referencia USE 3433/17 y UJI-B2017-55, ambos financiados por la Universitat Jaume I de Castellón.

Referencias

Aceituno-Aceituno, P., Bousoño-Calzón, C., & Herrera-Gálvez, F.J. (2014). Una propuesta para impulsar el espíritu emprendedor y la capacitación en el futuro de la profesión periodística. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico, 21(2), 929-942. https://doi.org/10.5209/rev_ESMP.2015.v21.n2.50893

Aceituno-Aceituno, P., Bousoño-Calzón, C., Escudero-Garzás, J.J., & Herrera-Gálvez, F.J. (2014). Formación en emprendimiento para periodistas. El Profesional de la Información, 23(4), 409-414. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2014.jul.09

Anderson, C.W. (2017). Venture labor, the news crisis, and journalism education. International Journal of Communication, 11, 2033-2036. https://bit.ly/2KUvX9v

Asociación de la Prensa de Madrid (APM) (2014). Informe anual sobre la profesión periodística 2014. [2014 Annual report on the Journalism Profession]. https://bit.ly/2G98ii2

Asociación de la Prensa de Madrid (APM) (2015). Informe anual sobre la profesión periodística 2015. [2015 Annual report on the Journalism Profession]. https://bit.ly/2G98ii2

Baines, D., & Kennedy C. (2010). An education for independence: Should entrepreneurial skills be an essential part of the journalist’s toolbox? Journalism Practice, 4(1), 97-113. https://doi.org/10.1080/17512780903391912

Barnes, R., & de-Villiers-Scheepers, M.J. (2017). Tackling uncertainty for journalism graduates: A model for teaching experiential entrepreneurship. Journalism Practice, 1-21. https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2016.1266277

Beltrán, G.J., & Miguel, P. (2014). Doing culture, doing business: A new entrepreneurial spirit in the Argentine creative industries. International Journal of Cultural Studies, 17(1), 39-54. https://doi.org/10.1177/1367877912461906

Biomed Central (2017). Qualitative research review guidelines - RATS. London: BioMed Central, https://bit.ly/1WteYxh.

Blom, R., & Davenport, L.D. (2012). Searching for the core of journalism education program directors disagree on curriculum priorities. Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, 67(1), 70-86. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077695811428885

Briggs, M. (2012). Entrepreneurial journalism: How to build what's next for news. Los Angeles: Sage /CQ Press.

Casero-Ripollés, A. (2010). Prensa en Internet: nuevos modelos de negocio en el escenario de la convergencia. El Profesional de la Información, 19(6), 595-601. https://bit.ly/2G6gIXL

Casero-Ripollés, A., & Cullell-March C. (2013). Periodismo emprendedor. Estrategias para incentivar el autoempleo periodístico como modelo de negocio. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico, 19, 681-690. https://doi.org/10.5209/rev_ESMP.2013.v19.42151

Casero-Ripollés, A., Izquierdo-Castillo, J., & Doménech-Fabregat, H. (2016). The journalists of the future meet entrepreneurial journalism: Perceptions in the classroom. Journalism Practice, 10(2), 286-303. https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2015.1123108

Chimbel, A. (2016). Introduce entrepreneurship concepts early in journalism curriculum. Newspaper Research Journal, 37(4), 339-343. https://doi.org/10.1177/0739532916677057

Claussen, D. (2011). CUNY’s entrepreneurial journalism: Partially old wine in a new bottle, and not quite thirst-Quenching, but Still a Good Drink. Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, 66(1), 3-6. https://doi.org/10.1177/107769581106600101

Delano, A. (2002).The formation of the British journalist 1900-2000 (Doctoral Thesis). London: University of Westminster. https://bit.ly/2wxBYGi

Deuze, M. (2006). Global journalism education: A conceptual approach. Journalism Studies, 7(1), 19-34. https://doi.org/10.1080/14616700500450293

Dubé, L., & Paré, G. (2003). Rigor in information systems positivist case research: Current practices, trends, and recommendations. MIS Quarterly, 27(4), 597-636. https://bit.ly/2KOVzEZ

Elmore, C., & Massey, B. (2012). Need for instruction in entrepreneurial journalism: Perspective of full-time freelancers. Journal of Media Practice, 13(2), 109-124. https://bit.ly/2jNiVye

Ferrier, M.B. (2013). Media entrepreneurship curriculum development and faculty perceptions of what students should know. Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, 68(3), 222-241. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077695813494833

Ferrier, M.B., & Batts, B. (2016). Educators and professionals agree on outcomes for entrepreneurship courses. Newspaper Research Journal, 37(4), 322-338. https://doi.org/10.1177/0739532916677054

Griffin, R.J., & Dunwoody, S. (2015). Chair support, faculty entrepreneurship, and the teaching of statistical reasoning to journalism undergraduates in the United States. Journalism, 17(1), 97-118. https://doi.org/10.1177/1464884915593247

Hang, M., & Weezel, A.V. (2007). Media and entrepreneurship: What do we know and where should we go? Journal of Media Business Studies, 4(1), 51-70. https://doi.org/10.1080/16522354.2007.11073446

Hunter, A., & Nel, F.P. (2011). Equipping the entrepreneurial journalist: An exercise in creative enterprise. Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, 66(1), 9-24. https://doi.org/10.1177/107769581106600102

Krueger, N.F., & Brazeal, D.V. (1994). Entrepreneurial potential and potential entrepreneurs, entrepreneurship theory and practice, 18(3), 91-104. https://bit.ly/2KfHXl4

Lassila-Merisalo, M., & Uskali, T. (2011). How to educate innovation journalists? Experiences of innovation journalism education in Finland 2004-2010. Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, 66(1), 25-38. https://doi.org/10.1177/107769581106600103

López-García, X., Rodríguez-Vázquez, A.I., & Pereira-Fariña, X. (2017). Technological skills and new professional profiles: Present challenges for journalism [Competencias tecnológicas y nuevos perfiles profesionales: desafíos del periodismo actual]. Comunicar, 53, 81-90. https://doi.org/10.3916/C53-2017-08

Martín-Crespo-Blanco, M.C., & Salamanca-Castro, A.B. (2007). El muestreo en la investigación cualitativa. Nure Investigación, 27. https://bit.ly/2G7ZDfJ

Oosterbeek, H., Van-Praag, M., & Ijsselstein, A. (2010). The impact of entrepreneurship education on entrepreneurship skills and motivation. European Economic Review, 54(3), 442-454. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.euroecorev.2009.08.002

Paniagua-Rojano, F.J., Gómez-Aguilar, M., & González-Cortés, M.E. (2014). Incentivar el emprendimiento periodístico desde la Universidad. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 69, 548-570. https://bit.ly/2jQndoR

Peterman, N.E., & Kennedy J. (2003). Enterprise education: Influencing students’ perceptions of entrepreneurship. Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, 28(2), 129-144. https://bit.ly/2s0Qlhv

Rasmussen, E.A., & Sørheim R. (2006). Action-based entrepreneurship education. Technovation, 26(2), 185-194. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.technovation.2005.06.012

Secretaria de Agricultura, Ganadería, Pesca y Alimentación (Ed.) (2007). Evaluación de impacto proyecto piloto jóvenes emprendedores rurales. Promoción de cultura emprendedora. [Evaluation of the young rural entrepreneurs pilot project. Promoting entrepreneurship culture]. https://bit.ly/2jOqdlt

Siles, I., & Boczkowski, P.J. (2012). Making sense of the newspaper crisis: A critical assessment of existing research and an agenda for future work. New Media and Society, 14(8), 1375-1394. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444812455148

Sindik, A., & Graybeal, G.M. (2017). Media entrepreneurship programs: Emerging isomorphic patterns. International Journal on Media Management, 19(1), 55-76. https://doi.org/10.1080/14241277.2017.1279617

Souitaris, V., Zerbinati, S., & Al-Laham A. (2007). Do entrepreneurship programmes raise entrepreneurial intention of science and engineering students? The effect of learning, inspiration and resources. Journal of Business Venturing, 22, 566-591. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusvent.2006.05.002

Tong, A., Sainsbury, P., & Craig, J. (2007). Consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research (COREQ): a 32-item checklist for interviews and focus groups. International Journal for Quality in Health Care, 19(6), 349-357. https://doi.org/10.1093/intqhc/mzm042

Von-Graevenitz, G., Harhoff, D., & Weber, R. (2010). The effects of entrepreneurship education. Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 76(1), 90-112. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jebo.2010.02.015

Wang, C.K., & Wong, P.K. (2004). Entrepreneurial interest of university students in Singapore. Technovation, 24, 163-172. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0166-4972(02)00016-0

Weezel, A.V. (2010). Creative Destruction: Why not researching entrepreneurial media? International Journal on Media Management, 12(1), 47-49. https://doi.org/10.1080/14241270903558442

Yin, R.K. (2014). Case study research: Design and methods. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/09/18
Accepted on 30/09/18
Submitted on 30/09/18

Volume 26, Issue 2, 2018
DOI: 10.3916/C57-2018-09
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Views 1
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?