Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This article is based on the fact that the Spanish population is aging, and is second only to Japan in its total number of senior citizens. Given this situation and the omnipresence of new technologies in everyday life, the use of Internet and ICT for older people is essential. The latest report by IMSERSO shows that only 15.6% of people aged be tween 65 and 74 connected to the Internet in the 3-month period measured. The data seem to show that there is a generational digital divide to be overcome. The studies that have addressed this issue have focused more on regional and specific aspects of the relationship between age and Internet use intensity, and these studies use age ranges as criteria. Other studies have introduced variables such as seniors’ economic situation or educational level. With this in mind, public policies have sought to reduce this generational digital divide through a number of media literacy and e-learning projects but without success due to their poor methodological approach. This paper proposes a number of new methodological approaches to tackle the design of digital literacy programs for older people based on criteria such as degree of autonomy and the possibilities for enjoying everyday life, proposing the development of programs based on contextualism, incrementalism, motivation and absorption processes.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction and state of the art

The demographic change that we have experienced in Spain has been rapid, progressive and profound. In the near future nearly a third of the population will be elderly. This increase is primarily due to increased life expectancy coupled with a decline in birth rates. After Japan, the projections for 2050 place our country among the highest in the world in terms of longevity.

Proof of this is that if we compare the numbers of older people in the early twentieth century with the general population figure for Spain in 2007, which reached 45,200,737, the population by this date had already risen 2.4 times (Barrio & al., 2009). Meanwhile, in 2008 the number of older people had increased 8 times with respect to 1900, going from 5.2% of the total population in the early twentieth century to triple that number for this date (16.7%).

The latest census of 2011 confirms this trend. The total number of people over 65 years of age amounted to 7,914,359, of whom 3,372,808 are men and 4,541,549 women (INE, 2012). Due to the ageing of the population pyramid, long-term projections of the INE for 2009-2049 indicate that the population over 64 will double in 40 years and will represent 31.9% of the total, with negative natural population growth from 2020. Thus, «in Spain for every 10 people of working age, in 2049 there will be nearly nine potentially inactive persons (under 16 or over 64). That is, the dependency ratio would rise to 89.6% from 47.8% at present» (INE, 2011: 3). The forecast is for a population in 2060 of 15,679,878 people aged 65 years and over, and for each child there will be 2.3 elderly people. From a continental perspective, the European Union in its «Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) Joint Programme» indicates that life expectancy in Europe has increased from 55 in 1920 to 80 today. In 2020 about a quarter of Europe’s population will be over 65 and the number of people aged between 65 and 80 will grow to nearly 40% of the European population between 2010 and 2030. An aging population means a change in the economic, social (IMSERSO, 2009) and technological structures for a country. Older people are compelled by circumstances to develop skills in the use of new Information and Communication Technologies (ITC) and thus lessen the digital divide between those who are connected (young people and adults) and those who are not connected (the elderly).

The purpose of this paper is to propose new perspectives to address the media literacy of older people underpinned by qualitative studies on this population group, based more on socio-cultural criteria than on age groups, which has been the majority approach so far. This would allow the design of training programs that are more efficient and suitable for bridging the generational digital divide and thus enabling the e- inclusion of elderly people, concentrating more on operating skills than on mere usability and access.

2. Older people and the use of new technologies

If we analyse the data that refer to the use of new technologies, and specifically the Internet, among older people, we can clearly distinguish between access and usage. We must orientate ourselves towards the need to promote the beneficial use of ICT, valuing not only quantitative aspects on usage linked to Internet access and use of office tools.

The «Elderly people in Spain» report published by IMSERSO in 2008, in which Chapter 6 referred to «Daily life, attitudes, values ??and emotions in old age» (Barrio & al., 2009), established a series of very illustrative parameters on the use of ICT by the elderly, highlighting with respect to Internet access that only 50.5% of people between 65 and 74 connected to a computer daily, 31.5% weekly, 8.3% monthly and 9.8% not every month. The Internet services used are principally «information searches» (79.9%), «receiving or sending e-mail» (78.7%) and «other» (62.7%). Very much below this are functions that could be considered useful for this social group such as «Finding information about health issues» (37.9%), «Obtaining information from websites on the authorities» (30.1%), «Purchasing goods and services» (20.2%) or «Downloading official forms» (16.8%). If we focus on the methods of acquiring computer skills, we found that 75.5% were self-taught, 60.6% had learned through people in their social environment and 30.9% in adult education learning centre courses. However, according to data published recently by IMSERSO and CSIC in the report entitled «A profile of elderly people in Spain, 2012. Basic statistical indicators» (Abellán & Ayala, 2012), the proportion of people aged 65 to 74 who had used the Internet in the last three months had fallen to 15.6%. This factor of exclusion of elderly people from Internet access is also evident in the «The Networked Society 2010» annual report of the National Observatory of Telecommunications and the Information Society referring to 2010 (Urueña & al, 2011), which states that if we focus the analysis on the age variable, we observe how the use of the Web is clearly differentiated, as the younger the person, the more use of the Internet, and conversely, the older the age, the lower percentage of Internet users.

At the European level, the data referred to the Indicators of the Digital Agenda 2011, in which Pillar 6 was dedicated to digital competence. This showed that while 90% of those between 16 and 24 are regular Internet users, only 46% of people between 55 and 64 are, this proportion decreasing to 25% among people between 65 and 74. This segment is as low as 20% when it comes to people between 55 and 74 with low levels of education.

Based on these data, we can see that there is a generational digital divide, defined as differences in access and use of ICT in different social environments. Linked to the Internet, Castells (2011: 311) defined it as «the disparity between the Internet haves and have-nots». For its part, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) conceptualized the digital divide as «the gap or divide between individuals, households economic and geographic areas with different socio-economic levels with regard both to their opportunities to access information and communication technology, and the use of the Internet for a wide variety of activities» (OECD, 2011: 5).

In the field of studies on Internet use a significant number of works have focused mainly on aspects related to regional variables and how economic and socio-demographic variables and different service prices by region influence the decision to install Internet in households (Chaudhuri & al., 2005); or in which in 14 European countries the determinants of individual Internet use and its intensity of use are analysed based on individual variables (Demoussis & Giannakopoulos, 2006) or similar work applied to 15 European countries (Vicente & Lopez, 2006). In the Spanish case the primary literature on the subject is linked to studies examining geographical differences in Internet use (Carmona & García, 2007; Jordana & al., 2005). A more complete study includes socio-demographic factors and concludes that as age increases, the probability of Internet use decreases by 1.47% (Lera-Lopez, Gil & Billón, 2009). Another significant piece of research in this area has been conducted by Agudo, Pascual and Fombona restricted to Asturias, which establishes that values ??such as age, gender, living arrangements or place of residence are not determinant variables of ICT use for leisure purposes, although the level of studies does influence Internet use for information purpose and marital status determines the use of ICT for communicative purposes, highlighting single older women (Agudo, Pascual & Fombona, 2012).

In the field of literature on the relationship between Internet use and age, there are noteworthy works that deal not only with quantitative data on the use of the Internet but also with aspects related to the scope and intensity of Internet use by older people (Loges & Jung, 2001); others which address the differences between metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas (Mills & Whitacre, 2003); where it is seen that the difference between Internet users and non-users is linked to age and income, but not to gender or race (Rice & Katz, 2003); there is an examination of the patterns and determinants of the use of information technology in five countries: the United States, Sweden, Japan, South Korea and Singapore, establishing differences in access to ICTs by gender, age, education and income (Ono & Zavodny, 2007); or that evaluate differences in Internet use among people with high incomes and high educational levels compared to people with low income and low educational levels (Goldfarb & Prince, 2008). One of the important aspects related to the use of the Internet by older people may reflect a combination of different factors such as Internet usage skills, lower in the elderly (Demunter, 2005; Hargittai, 2003); the perceived needs and benefits of use, also lower among older people (OECD, 2007); as well as attitudes and lifestyles associated with different age groups (Chaudhuri & al., 2005). Other studies link age with gender, concluding that belonging to a particular generation is neither the only nor the most important predictor of gender differences in Internet use. The life stage (measured as level of employment and marital status) influences the differences between men and women or had an independent effect for most of the activities studied, affecting aspects that we will deal with below (Helsper, 2010).

3. Analysis and results

3.1. Public initiatives for e-inclusion of older people

The concern about the need to include older people in ICT has been taken up by various public authorities and international organizations leading to a significant number of media literacy initiatives for this sector of the population. Among some of the interesting projects we should mention the European Commission-funded intergenerational project called «Grandparents and grandsons» that is aimed at people over 55. It provides for the involvement of young students from vocational colleges and secondary schools with the role of «digital facilitators» who individually assist older people, guiding them in the use of Internet and e-mail1.

Also noteworthy in the European Community framework is the creation of a specific work area within the Digital Agenda adopted by the European Commission in May 2010 in Pillar 6 (Enhancing digital literacy, skills and inclusion). The Commission proposes a series of measures to promote access to digital technologies by the potentially disadvantaged, including among these older people (European Commission, 2011). As part of the e- Inclusion policies and specifically the «European i2010 initiative on e-inclusion», the Commission has set up a group of measures to improve e-Accessibility for older people. This proposal complements the initiative taken in 2007 called the «Ageing Well in the Information Society Action Plan». Particularly significant is the AAL Program to stimulate and develop technologies to help people to continue living in their home (allocated 600 million euros) or the funding of projects on older people and ICT in the Seventh Framework Programme for Research of the European Commission related to the promotion of independent living and inclusion.

One of the most ambitious studies on the issue is that called the «Social Impact of ICT» conducted under the auspices of the Directorate General for the Information Society of the European Commission, which has involved several European universities (European Commission, 2010). One of the main recommendations arising from this study is precisely that the e- Inclusion should not focus on access to ICT, but especially on operational skills and more advanced forms of digital literacy, offering support to those groups at risk being marginalized in this process, especially the elderly.

In Spain, public policy measures in relation to e-inclusion have been based on the access to web infrastructure, one of the main programs in this regard being the installation of public telecentre networks which according to Red.es are aimed at «facilitating and streamlining citizens´ Internet access in rural and disadvantaged urban areas with difficult access to ICTs through telecentres and networked libraries». In Spain, the promotion of ICT has been pursued in three successive stages: infrastructure, promoting and boosting of the use of ICT and services.

The first phase would be to facilitate citizens’ access to the technological equipment and devices necessary for their inclusion with regard to internet under the best technical terms available by means of the state promoting the purchase of equipment and the hiring of Internet connection services with private operators.

Once this is completed, the second would be to seek to encourage the effective use of the same, through the training of potential users in the skills relevant to the handling of ICT and its possible uses. This would be a condition precedent to the third stage in this strategy, the development and promotion of products and services based on the Internet, from trade to electronic administration, via e -learning or other applications for social life (leisure, work, the economy, personal relationships, etc.).

Regarding the relationship of older people with ICT in these three phases, it is appropriate to emphasize the need to assess how far public policies have focused on the first of these, to some extent on the second without the expected results, which has prevented access to the third. However, there are initiatives such as the «i-Mayores» («i-Age») Program of the Government of La Rioja, the Digital Volunteer Program of the Xunta de Galicia or Seniors in the Web of the Zaragoza Town Council2, to name a few, which are a good example of public authorities’ real intention to work on digital literacy.

3.2. Methodological proposals for the design of e- inclusion programs for the elderly

All the studies cited above show the difficulty of integrating older people into active, advantageous and productive use of ICT. In this regard, the need to bridge the so-called digital divide for this population group without skills and abilities for the efficient use of ICT is essential, leading to the concept of e- inclusion, understood as the ability to access regularly and easily the various services and programs both ‘online’ and ‘off-line’ and to be able to use their skills linked to the specific needs of each user. The importance of digital inclusion has been put on record by the various documents of the World Summit on the Information Society held in Geneva in 2003 and Tunis in 2005 sponsored by the International Telecommunication Union, a UN agency, which defined inclusion as the «set of public policies related to the construction, administration, expansion, offering of content and local capacity building in the wired and wireless public digital networks in each country and in the entire region»3.

As a step towards digital inclusion, digital literacy, defined as «the ability to understand and use information in multiple formats from a wide range of sources when presented via computers, is essential. The concept of literacy goes beyond the simple ability to read; it has always meant the ability to read with meaning and understanding» (Gilster, 1997: 1). Critical thinking rather than technical competence is identified as the central element of digital literacy, and the critical evaluation of what is found on the web is emphasized, rather than the technical skills required to access it. Martin (2006: 19), meanwhile, defines digital literacy as «the awareness, attitude and ability of individuals to make an appropriate use of digital tools and the facilities to identify, access, manage, integrate, evaluate, analyse and synthesize digital resources, construct new knowledge, express it through various media and to communicate with others, in the context of specific life situations, in order to enable constructive social action; and reflect it through this process».

Theoretically there are three levels in the development of digital literacy: 1) digital competence, 2) digital use, and 3) digital transformation. Digital competence involves finding information on the Web, document preparation and processing, electronic communication, creation and manipulation of digital images, using spreadsheets, creating presentations, web publishing, creating and using databases, digital and interactive games, production of multimedia objects and the dominion of digital learning environments. Digital use involves the successful use of digital skills in life situations, the proper application of digital competence in the specific profession or in specific contexts, giving rise to a corpus of specific digital uses for an individual, group or organization. Digital transformation is to be able to make those digital applications that have been developed permit and enable innovation and creativity and encourage significant changes within the professional or knowledge areas, or in the personal or social context.

In this way one must understand the current interest in the usability of the technologies or in the Community initiative of «media literacy», which is not limited to the instrumental learning of the technologies, but rather would cover some of the powers ascribed to what is called «informational capital», which signifies the intellectual ability to filter and evaluate information, but also the motivation to actively search for it and the ability to apply it to social practices (Hamelink, 2000).

To address the media literacy of older people it is necessary to start from the basis of the complexity in dealing with aging as evidenced by several gerontologists (Binstock, Fishman & Johnson, 2006; Settersten, 2006) and the need to take into account the different aging characteristics. The traditional categories of age groups (50-64, 65-74 and 75 +) used for statistics and quantitative approaches are inadequate and according to these authors, it is necessary to employ the following groups when addressing an investigation of this matter: 1) an age more or less close to retirement age (early retirement period); 2) autonomous age as a pensioner (independent life period); 3) age with increasing handicaps (beginning of the period of dependent life); 4) age of dependent older people (dependent life period until the end of life).

Most of the projects on the digital divide, aging and e- inclusion have been linked to E -learning and few studies have focused on the needs of older people regarding new technologies and specifically on the usefulness of the Internet. One of the most comprehensive studies in this regard is that developed by a team led by Ala - Mutka regarding the potential of ICT in learning by older people to enable them to have an active life. Using this multipolar perspective, they advocate developing improved research tools to predict the future needs of those who are not yet elderly. These start from the need to redesign the content of training courses on the use of ICT to promote media literacy, and the need for financing R & D projects to develop new educational tools aimed at this group, involving the members of such group in their design (Ala-Mutka & al., 2008).

All this leads us to the proposal of a series of methodological approaches that should be considered when designing media literacy programs. The first of them involves moving away from the inconsistency of the existence of training programs for older people on Internet and ICT use without an analysis of the personal and social circumstances of each of them. As Ferrés and Piscitelli indicate, «the in-depth study of a product is of little use if it is not accompanied or preceded by an in-depth study of the reactions of the person who interacts with this product. There is little point in analysing the meaning of a message if it is not accompanied by the analysis of the effect it has on the person facing it. And the in-depth study of what the person thinks about a product is of little use if it is not accompanied by an in-depth study of what he/she feels facing it» (Ferres & Piscitelli, 2012: 79). Especially significant is the proposal for dimensions and indicators of these authors, where they include - as an essential element to evaluate in media competence - transformations derived from neuroscience. Applying this new variable to the process of media literacy in the elderly, we consider that there is a need for a new approach with specific indicators for this sector of the population in accordance with the views expressed in this article.

The second methodological proposal involves the desirability of both public and private policies of media literacy allowing for a smooth transit between competence and digital use, but developing in particular the second of these, which involves use of the technological tools associated with an increased quality of life for older people. This is ultimately to enhance the so-called critical knowledge, which includes the understanding of media content and function, knowledge of the media and their regulation and the use made of it by users (Celot & Pérez - Tornero, 2009), for which it is necessary to know the specifics of this population group. Given this, we believe it necessary to address them, based on the significant differences between older people regarding their economic situation, social ties, personal interests or living environment. It seems clear that «different groups need different forms and levels of support if they want to use the Internet to learn» (Eynon & Helsper, 2010: 548).

The third methodological proposal states that the design of training programs should start with the selection of members of this social group organized according to the criteria specified above and a qualitative approach should be performed in relation to them, which would allow for the establishing of degrees of consensus of the group with respect to what should be, critical to the analysis because these become discourse scenarios regarding which the social and political institutions will take future operational decisions (Callejo, 2002).

4. Discussion and conclusions

The study of the digital divide cannot be limited to the analysis of Internet access (first digital divide), but must go a step further and become involved in the analysis and determination of the uses and intensity of Internet use (second digital divide), where concepts such as digital literacy, digital skills and digital inclusion acquire a greater impact.

The so-called information society measures should be applied, meaning as systems of indicators that allow one to analyse development and obtain an adequate view of the situation, at a particular time and in a specific social environment. We must define new metrics directed not at studying the types of Internet use in older people, but the aspects that affect these uses.

In this connection, a prior qualitative approach is necessary for a better definition of ICT training programs for older people, because this approach «seeks to understand the meaning or nature of the experience of people when exploring substantive areas about which they know little or much, but seeking to obtain a new procedure. It explores the life of the people, the experiences lived, their behaviours, emotions and feelings, as well as organizational functioning, social movements, cultural phenomena» (Strauss & Corbin, 2002: 12). The focus group, understood as a discussion carefully designed to obtain perceptions on a specific area of ??interest allowing discursive reconstruction of the social group to which the participants belong which in turn distances them from other social groups. This is a group that is constructed and discursively remade in relation to its significant ideas. From these we obtain what must be, i.e. the norm of what is considered is the phenomenon of study to investigate (Callejo, 2002).

Therefore, a preliminary qualitative approach can influence what was established –for the design of digital literacy policies– by Cochrane and Atherton (1980), applied to the conditions for the putting into practice of actions to bridge the informational gap. Digital literacy programs must be designed by taking as their foundation (a) contextualism that allows one to adjust the materials to the cultural and social environment (with differentiation, in the case of older people, based not on age but on their dependency and economic situation, social relationships, personal interests and living environment), (b) incrementalism, which leads one to decide when to do each phase (linking training programs with the three aforementioned levels of digital literacy: competence, use and transformation), (c) motivation that allows evaluation of the receptiveness of the procedures and the process of absorption that provides criteria on what is the best way to access skills and abilities (for which one requires not just a quantitative analysis based on access rates, but rather the assessment of use as a successful employment of skills).

One of the objectives for digital literacy of older people and their inclusion in the information society should be to achieve a sufficient quality of life in old age, which may allow older persons to lead a fuller and more participatory life and can serve as essential instruments in promoting their civic participation (Culver & Jacobson, 2012). In this connection studies based on the above criteria would seek to develop training proposals that will link use, employment and enjoyment of the ICTs associated with quality of life including: health, functional abilities, economic conditions, social relationships, staying active, access to social services, quality in one’s own home and in the immediate environment, satisfaction with one’s own life and cultural and learning opportunities (Fernández Ballesteros, 1997). The key to bridging the digital divide for older people is not asking what is the best way to bring ICT to this population group, but rather what is the optimal way for older people to benefit from ICT to enhance their personal and social situation.

Notes

1 Grandparents & Grandchildren Program (www.geengee.eu/geengee) (13-12-2012).

2 «i-Mayores» Program developed by La Rioja Government (www.conocimientoytecnologia.org/cibertecas/formacion/i_mayores/index.htm), Voluntariado Dixital Program by Xunta de Galicia (http://voluntariadodixital.xunta.es/es/51/el-proyecto) or Mayores en la Red by Zaragoza City Council (www.zaragoza.es/ciudad/sectores/mayores/mayores_red09.htm) (13-12-2012).

3 Geneva Declaration of Principles, Geneva Plan of Action, Tunis Commitment and Tunis Agenda for the Information Society (https://www.itu.int/wsis/index-es.html) (16-12-2012).

References

Abellán, A. & Ayala, A. (2012). Un perfil de las personas mayores en España 2012. Indicadores estadísticos básicos. Informe Portal Mayores nº 131, Madrid. (ww-w.imsersomayores.csic.es/estadisticas/indicadores/indicadoresgenerales/indicadoresbasicos/2012/index.html) (12-12-2012).

Agudo, S., Pascual, M.A. & Fombona, J. (2012). Usos de las herramientas digitales entre las personas mayores. Comunicar, 39, XX, 193-201. (DOI: 10.3916/C39-2012-03-10).

Ala-Mutka, K., Malanowski, N., Punie, Y. & Cabrera, M. (2008). Active Ageing and the Potential of ICT for Learning. Institute for Prospective Technological Studies (IPTS) y European Commission. (http://ftp.jrc.es/EURdoc/JRC45209.pdf)(DOI: 10.2791/33182) (22-10-2012).

Barrio, E., Sancho, M.T., Pérez-Ortiz, L. & Abellán, A. (2009). Las personas mayores en España. Datos estadísticos estatales y por Comunidades Autónomas. Tomo I. (www.imserso.es/InterPresent1/groups/imserso/documents/binario/infppmm2008vol1.pdf) (21-01-2013).

Binstock, R.H., Fishman, J.R. & Johnson, T.E. (2006). Anti-aging Medicine and Science: Social Implications. In R.H. Binstock. & L.K. George (Eds.), Handbook of Aging and the Social Sciences (pp. 434-453). New York: Academic Press.

Callejo, J. (2002), Observación, entrevista y grupo de discusión: el silencio de tres prácticas de investigación. Revista Española de Salud Pública, 76 5, Oct. 2002. 409-422. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S1135-57272002000500004).

Carmona, M.M. & García, L. (2007). Difusión del uso de Internet en España: ¿Existe una brecha digital entre Comunidades Autónomas. Revista de Estudios Regionales, 80, 193-228.

Castells, M. (2011). La Galaxia Internet. Barcelona: Plaza y Janés.

Celot, P. & Pérez-Tornero, J.M. (2009). Study on Assessment Criteria for Media Literacy Levels - A Comprehensive View of the Concept of Media Literacy and an Understanding of How Media Literacy Level in Europe Should Be Assessed. Brussels: European Commission.

Chaudhuri, A. & al. (2005). An Analysis of the Determinants of Internet Access. Telecommunications Policy, 29, 731-755. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.telpol.2005.07.001).

Cochrane, G. & Atherton, P. (1980). The Cultural Appraisal of Efforts to Alleviate Information Inequity. Journal of the American Society for Information Science, 31, 283-292.

Culver, S. & Jacobson, T. (2012). Alfabetización mediática como método para fomentar la participación cívica. Comunicar, 39, 73-80. (DOI: 10.3916/C39-2012-02-07).

Demoussis, M. & Giannakopoulos, N. (2006). Facets of the Digital Divide in Europe: Determination and Extend of Internet Use. Economics of Innovation and New Technology, 15 (3), 235-246. (DOI: 10.1080/10438590500216016).

Demunter, C. (2005). The Digital Divide in Europe. Statistics in Focus 38. Luxemburg: Eurostat. (http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/cache/ITY_OFFPUB/KS-NP- 05-038/EN/KS-NP-05-038-EN.PDF) (09-09-2012).

European Commission (2010). Study on the Social Impact of ICT. (http://ec.europa.eu/information_society/eeurope/i2010/docs/eda/social_impact_of_ict.pdf) (23-12-2012)

European Commission (2011). Digital Agenda Scoreboard 2011. (http://ec.europa.eu/information_society/digital-agenda /scoreboard/docs/pillar/digitalliteracy.pdf) (13-12-2012).

Eynon, R. & Helsper, E. (2011). Adults Learning Online: Digital Choice and/or Digital Exclusion? New Media & Society, 13, 4, 534-551. (http://nms.sagepub.com/content/13/4/534). (DOI: 10.1177/1461444810374789).

Fernández-Ballesteros, R. (1997) Quality of Life: Concept and Assessment. In J. Adair, D. Belanger & K. Dion (Eds.), Advances in Psychological Science, vol. I: Social, Personal and Cultural Aspects. Montreal: Psychological Press.

Ferrés, J. & Piscitelli, A. (2012). La competencia mediática: propuesta articulada de dimensiones e indicadores. Comunicar, 38, 75-82. (DOI: 10.3916/C38-2012-02-08).

Gilster, P. (1997). Digital Literacy. New York: John Wiley.

Goldfarb, A. & Prince, J. (2008). Internet adoption and usage patterns are different: Implications for the digital divide. Information Economics and Policy, 20, 1, 2-15. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.infoecopol.2007.05.001).

Hamelink, C.J. (2000). The Ethics of Cyberspace. London: Sage.

Hargittai, E. (2003). The Digital Divide and What to do about it. In D.C. Jones (Ed.), New Economy Handbook (pp. 812-839). San Diego: Academia Press.

Helsper, E.J. (2010). Gendered Internet Use across Generations and Life Stages. Communication Research, 37, 3, 352-374 (DOI: 10.1177/0093650209356439).

IMSERSO (2009). Informe 2008. Las personas mayores en España. Datos estadísticos estatales y por Comunidades Autónomas. Tomo I. (www.imserso.es/Inter-Present1/groups/imserso/documents/binario/infppmm2008vol1.pdf) (21-01-2013)

Instituto Nacional de Estadística (2011), Informe Anual 2010. (www.ine.es/ss/Satellite?blobcol=urldata&blobheader=application%2Fpdf&blobheadername1=Content-Disposition&blobheadervalue1=attachment%3B+filename%3Dinforme_anual_2010.pdf&blobkey=urldata&blobtable=MungoBlobs&blobwhere=912%2F1009%2Finform-e_anual_2010.pdf&ssbinary=true) (21-01-2013)

Instituto Nacional de Estadística (2012), Informe Anual 2011. (www.ine.es/ss/Satellite?blobcol=urldata&blobheader=application%2Fpdf&blobheadername1=Content-Disposition&blobheadervalue1=attachment%) (21-01-2013)

Jordana, J., Fernández, X., Sancho, D. & Welp, Y. (2005). Which Internet Policy? Assess in Regional initiatives in Spain. The Information Society, 21, 341-351. (DOI: 10.1080/01972240500253509).

Lera-López, F., Gil, M. & Billón, M. (2009). El uso de Internet en España: Influencia de factores regionales y sociodemográficos. Estudios Regionales, 16, 93-115.

Loges, W. & Jung, J.Y. (2001). Exploring the digital divide. Internet connectedness and age. Communication Research, 28, 4, 536-562. (DOI: 10.1177/009365001028004007).

Martin, A. (2006). Literacies for the Digital Age. In A. Martin, & D. Madigan (Eds.), Digital Literacies for Learning, (pp. 2-15). London: Facet.

Mills, B. & Whitacre, B. (2003). Understanding the Non-Metropolitan-Metropolitan Digital Divide. Growth and Change, 34(2), 219-243.

OCDE (2007). Working Party on Indicators for the Information Society. (www.oecd.org/sti/sci-tech/38217340.pdf) (23-12-2012).

OCDE (2011). Understanding the Digital Divide. (www.oecd.org/dataoecd/38/57/1888451.pdf) (23-12-2012).

Ono, H. & Zavodny, M. (2007). Digital Inequality: A Five Country Comparison Using Microdata. Social Science Research, 36, 1135-1155. (DOI: 10.1006/j.ssresearch.2006.09.001).

Rice, R.E. & Katz, J.E. (2003). Comparing Internet and Mobile Phone Usage: Digital Divides of Usage, Adoption, and Dropouts. Telecommunications Policy, 27, 597-623. (DOI: 10.1016/S0308-5961(03)00068-5).

Settersten, R.A. (2006). Aging and the Life Course. In R.H. Binstock & L.K. George (Eds.), Handbook of Aging and the Social Sciences (pp. 3-19). New York: Academic Press.

Strauss, A. & Corbin, J. (2002). Bases de la investigación cualitativa. Técnicas y procedimientos para desarrollar la teoría fundamentada. Bogotá: Contus-Editorial Universidad de Antioquía.

Urueña, A. & al. (2011). La Sociedad en Red 2010. Informe Anual. (www.ontsi.red.es/ontsi/es/estudios-informes/informe-anual-2010-edicion-2011) (14-01-2013).

Vicente, M.R. & López, A.J. (2006). Patterns of ICT Diffusion across the European Union. Economics Letter, 93, 45-51.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Tras la japonesa, la población española es la segunda población que más envejece. Ante esta situación y la omnipresencia de las nuevas tecnologías, el uso de Internet y las TIC en la vida cotidiana se hace imprescindible para las personas mayores. El último informe del IMSERSO establecía que solo se habían conectado a Internet en los últimos tres meses un 15,6% de las personas entre 65 y 74 años. Estos datos muestran la existencia de una brecha digital de carácter generacional que debe ser superada. Los estudios que han abordado esta problemática se han centrado más en aspectos regionales, y los específicos sobre la relación entre edad e Internet han abordado solo la intensidad de uso vinculada a intervalos de edades. Otros estudios han introducido variables como el nivel económico o educativo. Frente a esta realidad, las políticas públicas han pretendido disminuir esta brecha digital generacional mediante diferentes proyectos de alfabetización mediática y e-learning, sin lograr su objetivo por el deficiente planteamiento metodológico de los cursos. Este artículo propone una serie de nuevas perspectivas metodológicas a la hora de abordar el diseño de programas de alfabetización digital de las personas mayores basadas en criterios tales como el grado de autonomía o falta de la misma para la vida cotidiana así como el desarrollo de programas basados en el contextualismo, incrementalismo, motivación y proceso de absorción.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

El cambio demográfico que hemos sufrido en España ha sido rápido, progresivo y profundo. En un futuro próximo casi una tercera parte de la población serán personas mayores. Este incremento obedece fundamentalmente al aumento de la esperanza de vida junto al descenso de los índices de natalidad. Después de Japón, las proyecciones para el 2050 sitúan a nuestro país entre los más longevos del mundo. Prueba de ello es que si se compara el número de personas mayores a principios del siglo XX con el padrón en España del año 2007, que ascendió a 45.200.737, la población para esa fecha ya se había duplicado en 2,4 veces (Barrio & al., 2009). Por su parte, en 2008 el número de personas mayores se había multiplicado por 8 con respecto a 1900. Su evolución había pasado del 5,2% de la población total de principios del siglo XX a triplicarse para esa fecha (16,7%).

El último censo del año 2011 confirma esa tendencia. El total de personas mayores de 65 años ascendía a 7.914.359, de los cuales 3.372.808 son varones y 4.541.549 mujeres (INE, 2012). Debido al envejecimiento de la pirámide poblacional, las proyecciones a largo plazo del INE para 2009-2049 señalan que la población mayor de 64 años se duplicará en 40 años y pasará a representar el 31,9% del total, siendo el crecimiento natural de la población negativo desde el 2020. Así, «por cada 10 personas en edad de trabajar, en 2049 residirían en España casi nueve personas potencialmente inactivas (menor de 16 años o mayor de 64). Es decir, la tasa de dependencia se elevaría hasta el 89,6%, desde el 47,8% actual» (INE, 2011: 3). Se proyecta una población para el 2060 de 15.679.878 personas mayores de 65 años y por cada niño habrá 2,3 personas mayores.

Desde una perspectiva continental, la Unión Europea en su «Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) Joint Programme» indica que la esperanza de vida en Europa se ha incrementado de 55 años en 1920 a 80 años hoy en día. En 2020 alrededor de un cuarto de la población de Europa tendrá más de 65 años y el número de personas con edades entre los 65 y los 80 años crecerá hasta cerca del 40% de la población europea entre 2010 y 2030. Una población que va envejeciendo supone un cambio en las estructuras económicas, sociales (IMSERSO, 2009) y tecnológicas para un país. Las personas mayores se ven compelidas por las circunstancias a desarrollar habilidades y destrezas en el uso de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación (TIC) y así disminuir la brecha digital entre conectados (jóvenes y adultos) y no conectados (personas mayores).

El propósito del artículo es proponer nuevas perspectivas para abordar la alfabetización mediática de las personas mayores sustentadas en estudios cualitativos sobre este grupo poblacional, basándonos más en criterios socio-culturales que en grupos de edad, enfoque mayoritario hasta ahora. Ello permitiría el diseño de programas formativos más eficientes y adecuados para la ruptura de la brecha digital generacional y así posibilitar la e-inclusión de las personas mayores incidiendo más en las competencias operacionales que en la mera usabilidad y acceso.

2. Personas mayores y uso de las nuevas tecnologías

Si analizamos los datos que hacen referencia al uso de las nuevas tecnologías y específicamente Internet entre las personas mayores, podemos distinguir claramente entre el acceso y su uso. Debemos orientarnos hacia la necesidad de fomentar el empleo provechoso de las TIC, no valorando únicamente aspectos cuantitativos sobre el uso vinculado al acceso a Internet y el empleo de herramientas ofimáticas.

El Informe «Las personas mayores en España» publicado por el IMSERSO sobre 2008 establecía en su Capítulo 6 dedicado a «Vida cotidiana, actitudes, valores y emociones en la vejez» (Barrio & al., 2009) una serie de parámetros muy ilustrativos sobre el uso de las TIC por las personas mayores, destacando respecto al acceso a Internet que sólo un 50,5% de las personas entre 65 y 74 años se conectaban al ordenador diariamente; un 31,5% semanalmente; 8,3% mensualmente y un 9,8% no todos los meses. Los servicios de Internet empleados principalmente son «Búsquedas de información» (79,9%), «Recibir o enviar correo» (78,7%) y «Otros» (62,7%). Muy por debajo quedan funciones que podemos considerar útiles para este grupo social tales como «Buscar información sobre temas de salud» (37,9%), «Obtener información de páginas web de la Administración» (30,1%), «Compra de bienes y servicios» (20,2%) o «Descargar formularios oficiales» (16,8%). Si nos atenemos a las formas de adquisición de conocimientos informáticos, encontramos que un 75,5% han sido autodidactas, un 60,6% han aprendido a través de personas de su entorno social y un 30,9% en cursos de aprendizaje en centros de educación para adultos. Sin embargo, según datos publicados recientemente por el IMSERSO y el CSIC en el Informe titulado «Un perfil de las personas mayores en España, 2012. Indicadores estadísticos básicos» (Abellán & Ayala, 2012), el porcentaje de personas de edades comprendidas entre 65 y 74 años que habían usado Internet en los últimos tres meses había descendido a un 15,6%. Este criterio de exclusión de las personas mayores en el acceso a Internet también queda de manifiesto en el Informe Anual «La Sociedad en Red 2010» del Observatorio Nacional de las Telecomunicaciones y de la Sociedad de la Información referido a 2010 (Urueña & al, 2011), donde se indica que si centramos el análisis en la variable edad, observamos cómo se diferencia claramente el uso de la Red, pues a menor edad mayor uso de Internet, e inversamente, a mayor edad, menor porcentaje de internautas.

Para el ámbito europeo, los datos contemplados en los Indicadores de la Agenda Digital 2011 en el Pilar 6 dedicado a competencia digital muestran que mientras el 90% de las personas entre 16 y 24 años son usuarios habituales de Internet, sólo lo son el 46% de las personas comprendidas entre los 55 y 64 años disminuyendo esta proporción al 25% entre las personas entre 65 y 74 años. Este segmento baja especialmente al 20% cuando se trata de personas de entre 55 y 74 años con niveles bajos de educación.

Basándonos en estos datos, observamos la existencia de una brecha digital de carácter generacional, entendida como las diferencias en cuanto al acceso y uso de las TIC en diferentes entornos sociales. Vinculada a Internet, Castells (2011: 311) la definió como «la disparidad entre los que tienen y los que no tienen Internet». Por su parte la Organización para la Cooperación y el Desarrollo Económico (OCDE) conceptualizó la brecha digital como «el desfase o división entre individuos, hogares, áreas económicas y geográficas con diferentes niveles socioeconómicos con relación tanto a sus oportunidades de acceso a las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación, como al uso de Internet para una amplia variedad de actividades» (OCDE, 2011: 5).

En el ámbito de los estudios sobre el uso de Internet un importante número de trabajos se han centrado principalmente en aspectos vinculados con variables regionales y en cómo influyen las variables económicas y sociodemográficas y los diferentes precios del servicio según regiones en la decisión de instalar Internet en los hogares (Chaudhuri & al., 2005); o donde se analizan para 14 países europeos los determinantes del uso individual de Internet y su intensidad de uso a partir de variables individuales (Demoussis & Giannakopoulos, 2006) o trabajos similares aplicados a 15 países europeos (Vicente & López, 2006). En el caso español la principal literatura al respecto está vinculada a estudios que analizan las diferencias de carácter territorial en el uso de Internet (Carmona & García, 2007; Jordana & al., 2005). Un estudio algo más completo incluye factores de carácter sociodemográficos llegando a la conclusión de que a medida que aumenta la edad, la probabilidad de utilizar Internet disminuye en un 1,47% (Lera-López, Gil & Billón, 2009). Otra investigación significativa en este sentido es llevada a cabo por Agudo, Pascual y Fombona circunscrita a Asturias, donde se establece que valores como la edad, el género, la forma de convivencia o el lugar de residencia no son variables determinantes del uso de las TIC con finalidades lúdicas, sí influye el nivel de estudios condicionando el uso de Internet con fines informativos y el estado civil determina el uso con finalidades comunicativas de las TIC, destacando las mujeres mayores solteras (Agudo, Pascual & Fombona, 2012).

En el ámbito de la literatura sobre la vinculación entre uso de Internet y edad destacan trabajos donde se incide no tanto en datos cuantitativos sobre el uso de Internet como en aspectos relacionados con el alcance e intensidad en el uso de Internet por parte de las personas mayores (Loges & Jung, 2001); otros donde se abordan las diferencias entre zonas metropolitanas y no metropolitanas (Mills & Whitacre, 2003); donde se observa que la diferencia entre usuarios y no usuarios de Internet está vinculado a la edad y los ingresos, pero no al sexo o la raza (Rice & Katz, 2003); se examinan patrones y determinantes del uso de la tecnología de la información en cinco países: Estados Unidos, Suecia, Japón, Corea del Sur y Singapur, estableciendo diferencias en el acceso a las TIC según sexo, edad, educación e ingresos (Ono & Zavodny, 2007); o se valoran las diferencias de uso de Internet entre personas de altos ingresos y nivel educativo elevado frente a personas con bajos ingresos y niveles educativos bajos (Goldfarb & Prince, 2008). Uno de los aspectos importantes relativos al uso de Internet por las personas de más edad puede reflejar una distinta combinación de factores como las habilidades de uso de Internet, menores en las personas mayores (Demunter, 2005; Hargittai, 2003); las necesidades y beneficios percibidos en su uso, menor también entre los mayores (OCDE, 2007); así como actitudes y estilos de vida asociados a distintos grupos de edad (Chaudhuri & al., 2005). Otros estudios vinculan la edad con el género llegando a la conclusión de que la pertenencia a una determinada generación no es ni el único ni el más importante predictor de las diferencias de género en el uso de Internet. La etapa vital (medida como nivel de empleo y estado civil) influencia las diferencias entre hombres y mujeres o tenía un efecto independiente para la mayoría de las actividades estudiadas, incidiendo en aspectos que desarrollaremos posteriormente (Helsper, 2010).

3. Análisis y resultados

3.1. Iniciativas públicas para la e-inclusión de personas mayores

La preocupación por la necesidad de incluir a las personas mayores en las TIC ha sido asumida por diversas administraciones públicas y organizaciones internacionales dando lugar a un importante número de iniciativas de alfabetización mediática para este sector de la población. Entre algunos de los proyectos interesantes debe mencionarse el financiado por la Comisión Europea de carácter intergeneracional denominado «Grandparents and grandsons» que se dirige a personas mayores de 55 años. Prevé la implicación de jóvenes estudiantes de formación profesional y de escuelas secundarias con el rol de «facilitadores digitales» que asisten de modo individual a personas mayores guiándolas en el uso de Internet y del correo electrónico1.

Destaca también en el marco comunitario la creación de un ámbito de trabajo específico dentro de la Agenda Digital adoptada por la Comisión Europea en mayo de 2010 en el Pilar 6 (Mejorando la alfabetización digital, habilidades e inclusión). La Comisión propone una serie de medidas para promover el acercamiento de las tecnologías digitales a los potencialmente desfavorecidos, incluyendo entre estos a las personas mayores (European Commision, 2011). Formando parte de las políticas de e-Inclusión y específicamente en la «European i2010 initiative on e-inclusion», la Comisión ha puesto en marcha un grupo de acciones para mejorar la e-Accesibilidad de las personas mayores. Esta propuesta complementa la iniciativa adoptada en 2007 denominada «Ageing Well in the Information Society Action Plan». Especialmente significativo es el Programa AAL para estimular y desarrollar tecnologías que ayuden a las personas a continuar su vida en su hogar (dotado con 600 millones de euros) o la financiación de proyectos sobre personas mayores y TIC en el VII Programa Marco de Investigación de la Comisión Europea vinculados a la promoción de la vida independiente y la inclusión.

Uno de los estudios más ambiciosos sobre la cuestión ha sido el titulado «Social Impact of ICT» realizado bajo los auspicios de la Dirección General de Sociedad de la Información de la Comisión Europea y donde han participado varias universidades europeas (European Commission, 2010). Una de las principales recomendaciones que se derivan de este estudio es precisamente que la e-inclusión no debe enfocarse al acceso a las TIC, sino especialmente a las competencias operacionales y a formas más avanzadas de alfabetización digital, proponiendo apoyar a aquellos grupos que corren el riesgo de quedar marginados de este proceso, especialmente las personas mayores.

En España, las políticas públicas han fundamentado su acción de cara a la e-inclusión en el acceso a las infraestructuras de red, siendo uno de los programas principales en este sentido la instalación de redes de telecentros de titularidad pública que según Red.es tienen como finalidad «facilitar y dinamizar el acceso a Internet de ciudadanos del medio rural y a núcleos urbanos desfavorecidos con difícil acceso a las TIC a través de los telecentros y bibliotecas conectados en red». En España, la promoción de las TIC se ha desarrollado en tres fases sucesivas: infraestructuras, fomento y dinamización del uso de las TIC y servicios.

La primera de las fases tendría por objeto facilitar el acceso de los ciudadanos a los equipamientos y dispositivos tecnológicos necesarios para su incorporación a Internet en las mejores condiciones técnicas disponibles mediante el fomento estatal de la compra de equipos y la contratación de servicios de conexión a la Red con operadores privados.

Una vez completada esta fase, la segunda buscaría alentar el uso efectivo de las mismas, mediante la formación de los potenciales usuarios en las competencias que requiere el manejo de las TIC así como en sus posibles utilidades. Esto sería condición antecedente a la tercera fase en esta estrategia, el desarrollo y promoción de productos y servicios con base en la Red, desde el comercio a la administración electrónica, pasando por el e-learning u otras utilidades para la vida social (ocio, trabajo, economía, relaciones personales, etc.).

Respecto a la relación de las personas mayores con las TIC en estas tres fases, parece oportuno hacer hincapié en la necesidad de valorar hasta dónde las políticas públicas se han centrado en la primera de ellas, algo en la segunda aunque sin los resultados esperados, lo que ha imposibilitado el acceso a la tercera. No obstante, existen iniciativas tales como el Programa «i-Mayores» del Gobierno de la Rioja, el Programa de Voluntariado Dixital de la Xunta de Galicia o Mayores en la Red del Ayuntamiento de Zaragoza2, por citar algunos de ellos que son una buena muestra de la voluntad real de trabajar en la alfabetización digital por parte de las Administraciones públicas.

3.2. Propuestas metodológicas para el diseño de programas de e-inclusión de personas mayores

Todos los estudios citados anteriormente muestran la dificultad para integrar a los personas mayores en una utilización activa, ventajosa y productiva de las TIC. En este sentido, la necesidad de evitar la denominada brecha digital entre este grupo poblacional sin capacidades y habilidades para el uso eficiente de las TIC se hace imprescindible, dando lugar al concepto de e-inclusión entendido como la capacidad para acceder de forma habitual y sencilla a los distintos servicios y programas existentes tanto «online» como «off-line» y realizar un aprovechamiento de sus utilidades vinculado a las necesidades específicas de cada usuario. La importancia de la inclusión digital ha sido puesta de manifiesto por los diversos documentos de la Cumbre Mundial sobre la Sociedad de la Información que tuvo lugar en Ginebra en 2003 y Túnez 2005 auspiciada por la Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones dependiente de la ONU, donde se definió la inclusión digital como el «conjunto de políticas públicas relacionadas con la construcción, administración, expansión, ofrecimiento de contenidos y desarrollo de capacidades locales en las redes digitales públicas, alámbricas e inalámbricas, en cada país y en la región entera»3.

Como paso previo a la inclusión digital se hace imprescindible la alfabetización digital, entendida como «la capacidad para entender y usar información en múltiples formatos de un amplio grupo de fuentes cuando se presente vía ordenadores. El concepto de alfabetización va más allá de la simple capacidad para leer, ha significado siempre la capacidad para leer con sentido y comprender» (Gilster, 1997: 1). Identifica el pensamiento crítico más que la competencia técnica como el elemento central de la alfabetización digital, y enfatiza la evaluación crítica de qué se encuentra en la web más que las destrezas técnicas requeridas para acceder a ella. Martin (2006: 19), por su parte, define la alfabetización digital como «la conciencia, actitud y capacidad de los individuos para un uso apropiado de las herramientas digitales y las facilidades para identificar, acceder, gestionar, integrar, evaluar, analizar y sintetizar los recursos digitales, construir nuevo conocimiento, expresarse a través de diversos medios y comunicarse con otros, en el contexto de situación vital específico, en orden a permitir una acción social constructiva; y reflejarla mediante este proceso».

Teóricamente existen tres niveles en el desarrollo de la alfabetización digital: 1) Competencia digital; 2) Uso digital; y 3) Transformación digital. La competencia digital implica buscar información en la web, preparación y procesamiento de documentos, comunicación electrónica, creación y manipulación de imágenes digitales, empleo de hojas de cálculo, creación de presentaciones, publicar en la web, creación y uso de bases de datos, juegos digitales e interactivos, producción de objetos multimedia y dominio de ambientes de aprendizaje digital. El uso digital supone el empleo exitoso de las competencias digitales en las situaciones vitales, la apropiada aplicación de la competencia digital en la profesión específica o en contextos propios, dando pie a un corpus de usos digitales específicos para un individuo, grupo u organización. La transformación digital es lograr que los usos digitales que se han desarrollado posibiliten y permitan la innovación y la creatividad y estimulen cambios significativos dentro del ámbito profesional o de conocimiento o en el contexto personal o social.

Así hay que entender el interés actual por la usabilidad de las tecnologías o por la iniciativa comunitaria de «alfabetización mediática» que no se limita al aprendizaje instrumental de las tecnologías, sino que comprendería algunas de las competencias que se adscriben a lo que denomina «capital informacional» entendido como la capacidad intelectual para filtrar y evaluar la información, pero también la motivación para buscarla activamente y la habilidad para aplicarla a las prácticas sociales (Hamelink, 2000).

Para abordar la alfabetización mediática de las personas mayores es necesario partir de la base de la complejidad al abordar el envejecimiento como ponen de manifiesto diversos gerontólogos (Binstock, Fishman & Johnson, 2006; Settersten, 2006) y la necesidad de tener en cuenta las diferentes características de la vejez. Las categorías tradicionales por grupos de edad (50-64, 65-74 y más de 75) empleadas por las estadísticas y las aproximaciones cuantitativas no son adecuadas y siguiendo a estos autores se hace necesario emplear los siguientes grupos cuando se aborda una investigación sobre esta materia: 1) Edad más o menos cercana a la jubilación (período de pre-jubilación); 2) Edad autónoma como pensionista (período de vida independiente); 3) Edad con incremento de los hándicaps (comienzo del período de vida dependiente); 4) Edad de personas mayores dependientes (período de vida dependiente hasta el final de la vida).

La mayoría de los proyectos sobre brecha digital, envejecimiento y e-inclusión han estado vinculados con el E-learning y pocos estudios se han centrado en las necesidades de las personas mayores respecto de las nuevas tecnologías y específicamente sobre la utilidad de Internet. Uno de los estudios más completos en este sentido es el desarrollado por un equipo dirigido por Ala-Mutka sobre el potencial de las TIC en el aprendizaje de los mayores para permitirles una vida activa. Usando esta perspectiva multipolar abogan por desarrollar mejores herramientas de investigación para predecir las necesidades futuras de aquellos que todavía no son mayores. Parten de la necesidad de rediseñar el contenido de los cursos de formación sobre uso de las TIC para favorecer la alfabetización mediática, así como la necesidad de financiación de proyectos de I+D que desarrollen nuevas herramientas formativas, orientadas a este colectivo involucrando a sus miembros en su diseño (Ala-Mutka & al., 2008).

Todo ello nos conduce a la propuesta de una serie de planteamientos metodológicos que deberían considerarse para el diseño de programas de alfabetización mediática. El primero de ellos supone partir de la incongruencia de la existencia de programas formativos para personas mayores sobre uso de Internet y TIC sin un análisis de las circunstancias personales y sociales de cada uno de ellos. Como indican Ferrés y Piscitelli, «de poco sirve la radiografía de un producto si no va acompañada o precedida por la radiografía de las reacciones de la persona que interacciona con este producto. De poco sirve el análisis de la significación de un mensaje si no va acompañado del análisis del efecto que produce en la persona que se enfrenta a él. Y de poco sirve la radiografía de lo que piensa la persona sobre un producto, si no va acompañada de la radiografía de lo que siente ante él» (Ferrés & Piscitelli, 2012: 79). Especialmente significativa es la propuesta de dimensiones e indicadores de estos autores donde incluyen como elemento esencial a valorar en la competencia mediática las transformaciones derivadas de la neurociencia. Aplicada esta nueva variable al proceso de alfabetización mediática de las personas mayores, consideramos necesario una nueva aproximación a indicadores específicos para este sector poblacional según los criterios expresados en este artículo.

La segunda propuesta metodológica, implica la conveniencia de que las políticas tanto públicas como privadas de alfabetización mediática permitan un tránsito fluido entre la competencia y el uso digital, pero desarrollando especialmente el segundo, que supone un empleo de las herramientas tecnológicas vinculado con un aumento de la calidad de vida en las personas mayores. Se trata en definitiva de potenciar el denominado conocimiento crítico, que incluye el entendimiento del contenido de los medios y su función, el conocimiento de los medios y su regulación y el aprovechamiento por los usuarios (Celot & Pérez-Tornero, 2009), para lo que se hace necesario conocer las especificidades de este grupo poblacional. Ante ello creemos necesario abordar éstas, basándonos en las diferencias significativas de las personas mayores según su situación económica, lazos sociales, intereses personales o entorno vital. Parece claro que «los diferentes grupos necesitan diferentes formas y niveles de apoyo si quieren usar Internet para aprender» (Eynon & Helsper, 2010: 548).

La tercera propuesta metodológica plantea que el diseño de los programas formativos debería partir de la selección de miembros de este grupo social organizados en función de los criterios anteriormente expresados y la realización de una aproximación de carácter cualitativo a éstos, que permitiera establecer grados de consenso del grupo con respecto al deber ser, fundamentales para el análisis porque se convierten en escenarios discursivos sobre los cuales las instituciones sociales y políticas tomarán decisiones operativas futuras (Callejo, 2002).

4. Discusión y conclusiones

El estudio de la brecha digital no puede limitarse al análisis del acceso a Internet (primera brecha digital), sino que debe dar un paso más e involucrarse en el análisis y la determinación de los usos y la intensidad del uso de Internet (segunda brecha digital), donde adquieren una mayor incidencia conceptos como alfabetización digital, competencias digitales o inclusión digital.

Deberían aplicarse las denominadas métricas de la sociedad de la información entendidas como sistemas de indicadores que permiten analizar el desarrollo y obtener una visión adecuada de la situación, en un momento determinado y en un entorno social concreto. Definir nuevas métricas dirigidas no a estudiar las tipologías de uso de Internet en las personas mayores, sino los aspectos que condicionan tales usos.

En este sentido, se considera necesario un enfoque cualitativo previo para una mejor definición de los programas formativos sobre TIC para las personas mayores, pues este enfoque «intenta comprender el significado o naturaleza de la experiencia de las personas al explorar áreas sustantivas sobre las cuales se conoce poco o mucho, pero se busca obtener un procedimiento nuevo. Indaga la vida de la gente, las experiencias vividas, los comportamientos, emociones y sentimientos, así como el funcionamiento organizacional, los movimientos sociales, los fenómenos culturales» (Strauss & Corbin, 2002: 12). El grupo focal entendido como una discusión cuidadosamente diseñada para obtener las percepciones sobre un particular área de interés permitiendo una reconstrucción discursiva del grupo social al cual pertenecen los participantes que a la vez les distancia de otros grupos sociales. Se trata de un grupo que se construye y rehace discursivamente sobre sus ideas de referencia. De ellos se obtienen el deber ser, es decir la norma de lo que se considera es el fenómeno de estudio a indagar (Callejo, 2002).

Por tanto, una primera aproximación de carácter cualitativo puede incidir en lo que para el diseño de políticas de alfabetización digital establecieron Cochrane y Atherton (1980) aplicado a las condiciones para la puesta en práctica de acciones para romper la brecha informacional. Los programas de alfabetización digital deben diseñarse teniendo como principios el contextualismo que permite ajustar los materiales al entorno cultural y social (diferenciando en el caso de las personas mayores en función no de la edad sino de su dependencia y situación económica, lazos sociales, intereses personales y entorno vital), el incrementalismo, que lleva a decidir cuándo debe hacerse cada fase (vinculando los programas formativos con los tres niveles antes mencionados de la alfabetización digital: competencia, uso y transformación), la motivación que posibilita evaluar la receptividad de los procedimientos y el proceso de absorción que proporciona criterios sobre cuál es la mejor forma de acceder a las habilidades y capacidades (para lo que no es suficiente el análisis cuantitativo basado en porcentajes de acceso sino la valoración del uso como empleo exitoso de las competencias).

Uno de los objetivos de la alfabetización digital de las personas mayores y su inclusión en la sociedad de la información debería ser lograr una calidad de vida suficiente en su vejez, que puedan permitir a las personas mayores una vida más plena y participativa y puedan servir de instrumentos esenciales en el fomento de su participación cívica (Culver & Jacobson, 2012). En este sentido los estudios basados en los criterios anteriores perseguirían desarrollar propuestas formativas que vincularan uso, empleo y aprovechamiento de las TIC asociados con la calidad de vida que incluye: salud, habilidades funcionales, condiciones económicas, relaciones sociales, mantenerse activo, acceso a los servicios sociales, calidad en el propio domicilio y en el contexto inmediato, satisfacción con la propia vida y oportunidades culturales y de aprendizaje (Fernández Ballesteros, 1997). La clave de la ruptura de la brecha digital en las personas mayores no es preguntarse la mejor forma de llevar las TIC a este grupo poblacional sino cuál es la forma óptima de que las personas mayores saquen ventajas de las TIC para mejorar su situación personal y social.

Notas

1 Programa Grandparents & Grandchildren. (www.geengee.eu/geengee) (13-12-2012).

2 Programa «i-Mayores» desarrollado por el Gobierno de la Rioja (www.conocimientoytecnologia.org/cibertecas/formacion/i_mayores/index.htm), el Programa de Voluntariado Dixital de la Xunta de Galicia (http://voluntariadodixital.xunta.es/es/51/el-proyecto) o Mayores en la Red del Ayuntamiento de Zaragoza (www.zaragoza.es/ciudad/sectores/mayores/mayores_red09.htm) (13-12-2012).

3 Declaración de Principios de Ginebra, el Plan de Acción de Ginebra, Compromiso de Túnez y la Agenda de Túnez para la Sociedad de la Información (https://www.itu.int/wsis/index-es.html) (16-12-2012).

Referencias

Abellán, A. & Ayala, A. (2012). Un perfil de las personas mayores en España 2012. Indicadores estadísticos básicos. Informe Portal Mayores nº 131, Madrid. (ww-w.imsersomayores.csic.es/estadisticas/indicadores/indicadoresgenerales/indicadoresbasicos/2012/index.html) (12-12-2012).

Agudo, S., Pascual, M.A. & Fombona, J. (2012). Usos de las herramientas digitales entre las personas mayores. Comunicar, 39, XX, 193-201. (DOI: 10.3916/C39-2012-03-10).

Ala-Mutka, K., Malanowski, N., Punie, Y. & Cabrera, M. (2008). Active Ageing and the Potential of ICT for Learning. Institute for Prospective Technological Studies (IPTS) y European Commission. (http://ftp.jrc.es/EURdoc/JRC45209.pdf)(DOI: 10.2791/33182) (22-10-2012).

Barrio, E., Sancho, M.T., Pérez-Ortiz, L. & Abellán, A. (2009). Las personas mayores en España. Datos estadísticos estatales y por Comunidades Autónomas. Tomo I. (www.imserso.es/InterPresent1/groups/imserso/documents/binario/infppmm2008vol1.pdf) (21-01-2013).

Binstock, R.H., Fishman, J.R. & Johnson, T.E. (2006). Anti-aging Medicine and Science: Social Implications. In R.H. Binstock. & L.K. George (Eds.), Handbook of Aging and the Social Sciences (pp. 434-453). New York: Academic Press.

Callejo, J. (2002), Observación, entrevista y grupo de discusión: el silencio de tres prácticas de investigación. Revista Española de Salud Pública, 76 5, Oct. 2002. 409-422. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S1135-57272002000500004).

Carmona, M.M. & García, L. (2007). Difusión del uso de Internet en España: ¿Existe una brecha digital entre Comunidades Autónomas. Revista de Estudios Regionales, 80, 193-228.

Castells, M. (2011). La Galaxia Internet. Barcelona: Plaza y Janés.

Celot, P. & Pérez-Tornero, J.M. (2009). Study on Assessment Criteria for Media Literacy Levels - A Comprehensive View of the Concept of Media Literacy and an Understanding of How Media Literacy Level in Europe Should Be Assessed. Brussels: European Commission.

Chaudhuri, A. & al. (2005). An Analysis of the Determinants of Internet Access. Telecommunications Policy, 29, 731-755. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.telpol.2005.07.001).

Cochrane, G. & Atherton, P. (1980). The Cultural Appraisal of Efforts to Alleviate Information Inequity. Journal of the American Society for Information Science, 31, 283-292.

Culver, S. & Jacobson, T. (2012). Alfabetización mediática como método para fomentar la participación cívica. Comunicar, 39, 73-80. (DOI: 10.3916/C39-2012-02-07).

Demoussis, M. & Giannakopoulos, N. (2006). Facets of the Digital Divide in Europe: Determination and Extend of Internet Use. Economics of Innovation and New Technology, 15 (3), 235-246. (DOI: 10.1080/10438590500216016).

Demunter, C. (2005). The Digital Divide in Europe. Statistics in Focus 38. Luxemburg: Eurostat. (http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/cache/ITY_OFFPUB/KS-NP- 05-038/EN/KS-NP-05-038-EN.PDF) (09-09-2012).

European Commission (2010). Study on the Social Impact of ICT. (http://ec.europa.eu/information_society/eeurope/i2010/docs/eda/social_impact_of_ict.pdf) (23-12-2012)

European Commission (2011). Digital Agenda Scoreboard 2011. (http://ec.europa.eu/information_society/digital-agenda /scoreboard/docs/pillar/digitalliteracy.pdf) (13-12-2012).

Eynon, R. & Helsper, E. (2011). Adults Learning Online: Digital Choice and/or Digital Exclusion? New Media & Society, 13, 4, 534-551. (http://nms.sagepub.com/content/13/4/534). (DOI: 10.1177/1461444810374789).

Fernández-Ballesteros, R. (1997) Quality of Life: Concept and Assessment. In J. Adair, D. Belanger & K. Dion (Eds.), Advances in Psychological Science, vol. I: Social, Personal and Cultural Aspects. Montreal: Psychological Press.

Ferrés, J. & Piscitelli, A. (2012). La competencia mediática: propuesta articulada de dimensiones e indicadores. Comunicar, 38, 75-82. (DOI: 10.3916/C38-2012-02-08).

Gilster, P. (1997). Digital Literacy. New York: John Wiley.

Goldfarb, A. & Prince, J. (2008). Internet adoption and usage patterns are different: Implications for the digital divide. Information Economics and Policy, 20, 1, 2-15. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.infoecopol.2007.05.001).

Hamelink, C.J. (2000). The Ethics of Cyberspace. London: Sage.

Hargittai, E. (2003). The Digital Divide and What to do about it. In D.C. Jones (Ed.), New Economy Handbook (pp. 812-839). San Diego: Academia Press.

Helsper, E.J. (2010). Gendered Internet Use across Generations and Life Stages. Communication Research, 37, 3, 352-374 (DOI: 10.1177/0093650209356439).

IMSERSO (2009). Informe 2008. Las personas mayores en España. Datos estadísticos estatales y por Comunidades Autónomas. Tomo I. (www.imserso.es/Inter-Present1/groups/imserso/documents/binario/infppmm2008vol1.pdf) (21-01-2013)

Instituto Nacional de Estadística (2011), Informe Anual 2010. (www.ine.es/ss/Satellite?blobcol=urldata&blobheader=application%2Fpdf&blobheadername1=Content-Disposition&blobheadervalue1=attachment%3B+filename%3Dinforme_anual_2010.pdf&blobkey=urldata&blobtable=MungoBlobs&blobwhere=912%2F1009%2Finform-e_anual_2010.pdf&ssbinary=true) (21-01-2013)

Instituto Nacional de Estadística (2012), Informe Anual 2011. (www.ine.es/ss/Satellite?blobcol=urldata&blobheader=application%2Fpdf&blobheadername1=Content-Disposition&blobheadervalue1=attachment%) (21-01-2013)

Jordana, J., Fernández, X., Sancho, D. & Welp, Y. (2005). Which Internet Policy? Assess in Regional initiatives in Spain. The Information Society, 21, 341-351. (DOI: 10.1080/01972240500253509).

Lera-López, F., Gil, M. & Billón, M. (2009). El uso de Internet en España: Influencia de factores regionales y sociodemográficos. Estudios Regionales, 16, 93-115.

Loges, W. & Jung, J.Y. (2001). Exploring the digital divide. Internet connectedness and age. Communication Research, 28, 4, 536-562. (DOI: 10.1177/009365001028004007).

Martin, A. (2006). Literacies for the Digital Age. In A. Martin, & D. Madigan (Eds.), Digital Literacies for Learning, (pp. 2-15). London: Facet.

Mills, B. & Whitacre, B. (2003). Understanding the Non-Metropolitan-Metropolitan Digital Divide. Growth and Change, 34(2), 219-243.

OCDE (2007). Working Party on Indicators for the Information Society. (www.oecd.org/sti/sci-tech/38217340.pdf) (23-12-2012).

OCDE (2011). Understanding the Digital Divide. (www.oecd.org/dataoecd/38/57/1888451.pdf) (23-12-2012).

Ono, H. & Zavodny, M. (2007). Digital Inequality: A Five Country Comparison Using Microdata. Social Science Research, 36, 1135-1155. (DOI: 10.1006/j.ssresearch.2006.09.001).

Rice, R.E. & Katz, J.E. (2003). Comparing Internet and Mobile Phone Usage: Digital Divides of Usage, Adoption, and Dropouts. Telecommunications Policy, 27, 597-623. (DOI: 10.1016/S0308-5961(03)00068-5).

Settersten, R.A. (2006). Aging and the Life Course. In R.H. Binstock & L.K. George (Eds.), Handbook of Aging and the Social Sciences (pp. 3-19). New York: Academic Press.

Strauss, A. & Corbin, J. (2002). Bases de la investigación cualitativa. Técnicas y procedimientos para desarrollar la teoría fundamentada. Bogotá: Contus-Editorial Universidad de Antioquía.

Urueña, A. & al. (2011). La Sociedad en Red 2010. Informe Anual. (www.ontsi.red.es/ontsi/es/estudios-informes/informe-anual-2010-edicion-2011) (14-01-2013).

Vicente, M.R. & López, A.J. (2006). Patterns of ICT Diffusion across the European Union. Economics Letter, 93, 45-51.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/13
Accepted on 31/12/13
Submitted on 31/12/13

Volume 22, Issue 1, 2014
DOI: 10.3916/C42-2014-17
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 28
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?