Abstract

Temporal variations in CO2 stream composition and mass flow rates may occur in a CO2 transport network, as well as further downstream when CO2 streams of different compositions and temporally variable mass flow rates are fed in. To assess the potential impacts of such variations on CO2 transport, injection, and storage, their characteristics must be known. We investigated variation characteristics in a scenario of a regional CO2 emitter cluster of seven fossil-fired power plants and four industrial plants that feed captured CO2 streams into a pipeline network. Variations of CO2 stream composition and mass flow rates in the pipelines were simulated using a network analysis tool. In addition, the potential effects of changes in the energy mix on resulting mass flow rates and CO2 stream compositions were investigated for two energy mix scenarios that consider higher shares of renewable energy sources or a replacement of lignite by hard coal and natural gas. While resulting maximum mass flow rates in the trunk line were similar in all considered scenarios, minimum flow rates and pipeline capacity utilisation differed substantially between them. Variations in CO2 stream composition followed the power plants’ operational load patterns resulting e.g., in stronger composition variations in case of higher renewable energy production.

Temporal variations in CO2 stream composition and mass flow rates may occur in a CO2 transport network, as well as further downstream when CO2 streams of different compositions and temporally variable mass flow rates are fed in. To assess the potential impacts of such variations on CO2 transport, injection, and storage, their characteristics must be known. We investigated variation characteristics in a scenario of a regional CO2 emitter cluster of seven fossil-fired power plants and four industrial plants that feed captured CO2 streams into a pipeline network. Variations of CO2 stream composition and mass flow rates in the pipelines were simulated using a network analysis tool. In addition, the potential effects of changes in the energy mix on resulting mass flow rates and CO2 stream compositions were investigated for two energy mix scenarios that consider higher shares of renewable energy sources or a replacement of lignite by hard coal and natural gas. While resulting maximum mass flow rates in the trunk line were similar in all considered scenarios, minimum flow rates and pipeline capacity utilisation differed substantially between them. Variations in CO2 stream composition followed the power plants’ operational load patterns resulting e.g., in stronger composition variations in case of higher renewable energy production.

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The different versions of the original document can be found in:

http://hdl.handle.net/11420/7412 under the license cc-by
https://doaj.org/toc/2227-9717
https://www.mdpi.com/2227-9717/8/9/1188/pdf,
https://tore.tuhh.de/handle/11420/7412,
https://www.scilit.net/article/fe5d4724c4d9cc44eac55dfaee830fc9,
https://academic.microsoft.com/#/detail/3087120948
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/pr8091188
under the license https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/


DOIS: 10.3390/pr8091188 10.15480/882.2936

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Published on 01/01/2020

Volume 2020, 2020
DOI: 10.3390/pr8091188
Licence: Other

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